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Full text of "Duluth Evening Herald"

• \ 




28 



^DULUTH EVENING HERAL 



TWENTY-SEVENTH YEAR. 



LAST EDITION 



SATURDAY, MAY 22, 1909. 



SENR TE COMBINE 
ENDED; DATE FOR 
VOTE NOT FIXED 



Democratic and Progres- 
sive Republican Coali- 
tion Is Broken. 

They Come to Parting 
of Ways Over In- 
come Tax. 

Upper House Is Deter- 
mined to Finisli Tariff 
Work First. 





"Waf 


hi I) ft Km. 


May 22. — Tht- w.-cd 




Sr! 




,, 1 . ; iiuult: re- 


* 






.rntn r. No vote 


•m- 


Wl 




'iulf. as sev- 




er;. . >' 


.:„„. !.•.,-. ... 


'-ved frum 




i'Ori'- ' ■> 


!f aitfrii 


sslons of 




th. 


■:r In < 


lU- r t<. atiend to their 




coi r>" 


'' , 






Air: 




(tor Ah'lrlch gnve no- 
dal ht' ■ a^K she 




aenatt 




fix a <Ja\ :.-r \"ting 




ohi tlT 




t and all .•iinftMlr<i>-ri!s 




hr - 




\\i.' tlial rt-ini' ■ 




M. 








TAKE GEMS 
FROM MAIL 

Jewelry Sent From Min- 
neapolis Mysteriously 
Missing. 

Package Emptied Before 
it Left the Post- 
office There. 



Minneap«ilis, Minn., May 22.— (Spe- 
cial to The Hf-rald .) — A j.ai kape, ton- 
talning- jewelry sent ly the Johnson 
Jtwelry lompany. Mlnnear-olis. to R. 
H Knu.lvig. litynoids. X D. was 
!i.\,.--li rlously rilled in th< ruailf^. 

The stamps on tin laekage were 
cancelled in tlie Minneapolis post- 
office, but bef<»re it l^ft the building 
it uas noticed tlu.t one end of the 
package had t'ttn torn out and that 
it was empty 

The casf has been given to detec- 
tives and a thorough investigation will 
be made. 



GO IN RAIN 
TO FUNERAL 

All Fairhaven Braves the 

Elements When Rogers 

Is Buried. 



Entire Town Draped in 

Black— Flags at 

Half Mast. 



T)' 



' - llie 

■■ubli- 

-t as 

rned. 

that 

.,......:.. '.v ould 

,vr.!s to llif 



I.I 



i» ". 



STEEL MERGER 
IS UNMOLESTED 

WIckersham Tells House 

He Has Instituted 

Ne Action. 



aentiit 



to 



DR. JAMES M. BARKLEY, 
Who Has Been Elected Moderator of 
the Presbyterian General Assembly. 

Iifiivtr Colo.. May 2;:.- -The rejiort 

i.f l'.< c i/;iirn : I I i-e nil ministfil.il I'llef, 

; . i t I ! . ■ 1 ■ ! • ' ' a II 

r .:, t'.'OK llif ateniK i llie 

f- .~*-iiibly uf the Preshyteiian 

church this moniiv.K. The former re- 
port, embracing th<- woik of relief for 
mlrli^■tt•l■K wlio- 

I'liff!i-'«Tlf f <t [.■ . 

t 
!■ 

tet- I' 

Brolhei : 

tnijch iuttrt.^;. 



not been 
ir old age. 
.\ long re- 
,f cominlt- 

!■■.'•.[ Ian 



••■*el coriMiraliun^ 



SririOE NKAH F(tSSTO\. 



Mrv. 4::iii|!:st(Ml Sends Husband f«r 
Slinistcf and Cnt^ Thioat. 



Crook St.'! 


V Minn 


.. M. 


.<-,,, 


I., T! 






ii 


11.. 






> 1 home. 



val- 

1 1 ,. r 



iilASKITIESMAV Sli: 

FOR LOWER [MSTKIBl TION. 



ti 



■ III' 
I i- 



i-'ran- 



t 



POSTOFFICE 
SAFEJLOWN 

Robbers Get About $200 

in Cash and Some 

Stamps. 

Two-Story Brick Build- 
ing in North St. Paul 
Damaged. 



St. Paul, Minn., May 2 2. — (Special 

to Tht Herald ) — Hutglars blew the 

~:,tv in the North St. Paul j.offtofflce 

:v this morning and serured aV'out 

5-uO in cash and stamp.'^ 

The safe was blown i" pi. . ■ ^ and 

the tuo-stoiy l'ri« k building was i..ol- 

y d.tiuiigVd liy the txplosion. It is 

the :-;ecou<l time the office ha.s been 

robb -d within .i year. 

G. \V. Hiadway and A. L. Hansen, 

who livt Hi the .'same block. were 

• iwakeiled I'y tlie .xiilo.^ii.n and ran 

t,, tio' so. !u- of tho r.d»boiy just as 

thret: ni'ii disiippeand a Iilo. k away- 

Bradvvay and Han-, n t^.ivo 'base 

and in the outskirts of th. town 

opened *ire upon the lb ring robb. rs. 

TJio ehot« were returned and tho i"b- 

, rod \*\ tlo >\ ••"i\'- 

r. H. lioodj', po.'stmaster. says he 

.- unable, without checking up his 

aoi'-vnits. to say Ik-w much the rc»b- 

■o.t. but it IS lioiievod liitre was 

.. I^tto taken. There i- lo- 

1 th. robbtrs. 



APPEAL IS MADE 
TO GOVERNOR 

Trains Are Stoned By 

Strikers or Their 

Sympathizers. 

Augusta. Ga.. May J2. — Following 
tlie receipt of a telegram from Assist- 
ant Grand (^hief Burge.«F of the Brotti- 
erhood of Liocomotive Engineers early 
today, advlshig him that the trains of 
tlie Georgia railroad were being stoned 
either i>y tin- striking firemen or ti.eir 
(sympathizers, and the lives of the en- 
gineers Jeopardized. General Manager 
Scott no[.(-Hb-.i tu Governor Smith to 
tuke ' . .rc.j iv protect tl.e 

eiigln. 

NEGRO BURGLAR 
STILL AT LARGE 

All Efforts to Find Him 

in Pen Confines 

Fail 

Columhuia. Ohio. May 22.— The hunt 
for Harvey .lohnson, iio* desperate ne- 
gro bvirglar, who (.--.Mi'.-d from his 
guard \Vednfc..-<ia> nifiht and Is at large 
in the Oldo i«eiitttiitary. continues. 

.lohnson was seen twice at midnight 
running llirough the yards and was shot 
at, but esiapeil in the dark. Warden 
.loneH said today that he will purchase 
hlt.odhound.s to he kept iti the prison 
for nuch ernei gencit-f. Search for the 
man continue.x in every nook and cor- 
ner, gii.irds hfing .s<-nt even tf> the top 
of the «t;Mi<l I'ii'e. 160 fet, in the hope 

■ if liM'i:i.i^ ImUI. 



Fairhaven, MaKS., May 22. — Fairha- 
ven. th«' birthplace ol Henry H. Rogers, 
today paid final tribute to the memory 
of the financier. All d^y business was 
suspended. Draping* pt black hung 
from the public buildings, most of 
which were presented to Fairhaven by 
Mr. Kogera, and throughout the town 
flag." were at half niast. 

The funeral party arrived on a spe- 
cial train from New York last night 
and the body of the capitalist was 
taken to hid tun.mer home at Fort 
Phoenix. This forenoon it was carried 
to the I'nitarian Memorial church, 
which was built by Mr. Rogers several 
years ago as a tribute of affection for 
iiis mother. In this Imposing Gothic 
editice the casket w'as placed before 
the altar ui.d was attended by a guard 
composed of m«nbert of two Masonic 
lodges — George H. T abor l odge of Fai r- 

(Continued on page B, fourth column.) 



FAR OVER 
PREDICTION 

May Wheat Exceeds Pat- 
ten's Prophecy By 
Seven Cents. 



Option Rises Again; Only 

Six More Days to 

Deliver. 




CORNELIUS J. SHEA. 

New York, May 22.— Alice Walsh, a 
young woman formerly of Ciilcago, 
Who was stabbed twenty-four times 
last night in a <ioarrel with Cornelius 
J. Shpa, former pre.vident of the Inter- 
national Brotherhood of Teamsters, 
will probably recover. Shea, who was 
found in the apartments in West Thir- 
teenth street where the quarrel took 
place, is under arrest, awaiting the re- 
sult of the young woman's injuries. 



Chicago, May 22.— With only fix 
more days In which to deliver wheat 
on May contracts that option early in 
the session on the board of trade to- 
day rose In pri<?e to Jl.32%. 

This marks an advance of l'^c since 
the close yesterday, and is more than 7 
cents over the most sanguine predic- 
tion made by James A. Patten, the bull 
leader, two months ago, when the bull 
campaign was In full swing. 

It took only a small purcliase today 
to send up the price. 

July also advanced a cent. 

BLEACHED FLOUR 
SEEMS A LOSER 

Government Likely to 

Win in Case Against 

Wilson. 

Washington. May 22.— By action of 
the court of appeals of the I'istrict of 
Columbia, in the case of the Alsop 
Process Company of St. Louis against 
Secretary of Agriculture Wilson, In 
which the flour company seeks to have 
the secretary recede from his deter- 
mination to prosecute manufacturers 
of blefiched flour, a decision favorable 
to the government is loreshadowed. 

The court apparently took the posi- 
tion that tlie Alsop Process company 
had not been injured by the secretary's 
action, which was not directed against 
the machinery. 

One of the justices intimated to the 
attorntv for the Alsop company that 
such a proceeding should have been 
Instituted by a miller against whom 
the order was directed and who might 
come under the ban of prosecution. 

INSANE W HEX HE SLEW. 

BUT FILLY SANE NOW. 

St. I.ouls, Mo., May 22. — William 
Strothman, who shot and killed his 
wife Sept. 2, was freea today by a 
jury. His defense was insanity, which 
was upheld by the jury, the members 
deciding also that Strothman Is again 
"fully sane." 

WOMEN FOR( E BRITISH 

PREMIER TO SIDE EXIT. 

Sheffield. Eng.. May 22. — A political 
meeting being addressed last night by 
Premier Asguith was stormed by 
suffragists. The women failed to ef- 
fect an entrance to the hall and sev- 
eral were injured In encounters with 
the police. Asguith was obliged to 
make his exit through a side door. 




CENTS. 



fA i^ jkiicii tJ fcX) 



CLEANING DAYS. 

Mrs. Klcanyard : "Ycu are doing fine, but don't stop because the offkial cleaning days are past, 

y) i (»»»»i i( ») i ci i (»»») ) (»» »*»»»»»»»»»»»»» » » t * ^*»»» *»«»»*** »*»»»*** 



b. 



■ fM til I lie I 
with the i 
.hut .lij;, reafei'!*. 



BIBLE S«KIETY SEEKS TO 

EIH AL MRS. SAiiE'S (ilFT. 



At the 

', n 



t. 
1 1. 

rn ■. 
the 





\t- 


1 M,l tlie I . \^ t^> - . - 


■P- 


nlily hiif reo* 


•n- 


from I't'-v. .I' 


of 


■ ' H i \', .1 - 


IV . Il,_' 


-.■iL ^f'' 


1 ' 1 H 1 , 


t* H gift 


;a! 


. , ..,.. Airs. Kupsel. .■-■...^; . 





« # *-* **. i.,i (i » :m » K » » »■» <•» » m « i K ■»•** 

* W I • . -■ I M I .\ >Tl*:it 1 1 ia E€TS 

* \S1IES or MEKElHTIi. 



41 
■Hi 

m 
♦ 



♦ 



I,...>mIihi. Miiy 22. — The W>st- 
■lllll^ll-r iiiitli«»rlties liitv<> cliH^iinetl 

!i4>t"iiiiK^I«>ii to pliK-e tile if^lie.H of 
■« "Merr<lith In tin' abbey. 

An , . il to the «Iean to tJiK 
«IHI Mas slroiiglj Mip|M»rt€tl by 
tlir S«rk'l.v «>r Author!*, repre- 
M'litiiig all Ihf iea<lln;t writers; 
bj rreniier .\s<pijth. Lord .^I«>rU-.v. 
iiiiil.tartl Kiphiig and .htnic*>s M. 
Iljirrie. The aitlon of the \V«'»t- 
mlii-li-r authorities has fau.s«Hl 
■until dlsuiUHdainieut. as it ts 
kiiouii Ihiit the raiidJy ut the lute 
iiovtiisf hfiil no ohjt*4*tioits to the 

tilaciiiK ol his HsheH hi the nh- 
»ej. niid lilt* question of sputt- 
%vns in»l linoUed lt> the tieptislt- 
Ifig t>r the urn tlierein. 



ADMITS GUILT 
AND IMPLICATES 

Suspended County Attor- 
ney Makes Confession 
of Grafting. 

' k!;i , Mil " ■ sing 

I n 1 1 1 1 i I . : n a 

I'harK' of gfiifling In tiie proteitO'ti "f 
Ikh.i1. ggers, and joint keepers. \i:f;il 
HiKgtis. recently suspended ..,-; i<'uiuy 
attorney of this county, now testlttes 
In a I rlliery case in wnich William 
Maheii, (Itsiiii I jud^*'. is- ilefendant. 

1';; ■ ■ ae*.l;ires that .liulge Maben 
hin 'id el hers met the bootleg- 



j3;ei-t> m !'■• 
and later 
tlieni by t 
Itagar 



' rina 
t to 

K.'Im I t 



MRS. STAN(J ()F DILI TH 
IS RE-ELECTED PRESIDENT. 



re.nia 111., May i;: 

..'; ti.. <\\:ic\. 

' Nil l!i AMieri'a, yet-tei 

I unaulniousl y re-eiected 

Slang ot iMilutli, Minn 



TI;. 



!. 



Mrs. Mur\ 

ele<'ti-(l iii'> 
I'ari/.ade \' 
Mrs. H 

Second 

■■- '■ ' ;iK./ 



St. 



wart o r 

~i<leiit I 
(jtai.i! 



V- _. .• T. 

»||l -»»-»-» » ♦ » »♦ • » ■ »■♦ »» » *») | t -»-»»-i>Hfr« j t. e«.-.u,i-er. 



.lackson, 



. ..f 

1,1 : .u u I tuxin 
Mr^ Barliara 

: e.videlit, 
lid waii 
••d Mrs. 
. Mich.; 

i\kt :>>■" >'■•■■ ^ 

.Mrs. l;. ; 

V I'-e jtr . - , : . 

s<-i i I. ui t y ami 




NEW DOCKS^WKL 
MAKE LAKE PORT 
OF KNIFE RIVER 



JAP GOVERNOR IN 

KOREA TO RESIGN 




PRINCE ITO. 

Toklo, May 22. — While the lesigna- 
tion of Prince Ito as Japanese resident 
general in Korea lias not been record- 
ed as yet. there is no doubt that it 
will be placed before the emperor with- 
in a short time. The appointment of 
Viscount Sone. present vice resident 
general, to succeed Prince Ito Is equally 
certain. 

It Is understood that while some 
changes in the method of administer- 
ing Korean affairs have been agreed 
upon, the general policy will be that 
followed by Prince Ito for the last 
two years. 

Viscount Sone will be given probably 
less of a free hand in Korea than was 
allowed his predecessor. Prince Yama- 
gata, president of the privy council, 
and the premier, Marquis Katsura, will 
dictate to Viscount Sone the course he 
shall pursue. 



ESCAPE IN 
BULLET RAIN 

Prisoners in Minneapolis 

Worktiouse Make a 

Daring Break. 

Scale Higti Banks Under 

Heavy Fire— Not 

Caught. 



Minneapolis. Minn., May 22. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — H. M. Joy, alias 
Henry Jay. and Roy Bower, prisoners 
at the Minneapolis workhouse, made 
a .sensational escape from their guards 
late yesterday. 

The two men broke away from a 
gang of twentv pri.'^oners and scaled 
the banks of a high clay pit under 
heavy fir.-. It is not known if they 
were hit. Fully forty shots were 
fired at the fleeing men. 

They have not yet been captured- 
Both men were in the workhouse on 
larceny charges. 

FRENCH STRIKE 
DIES BY DEGREES 

Sailors, Stokers and the 

Stewards Now Leave 

Their Jobs. 

Paris. May 22. — Notwithstanding the 
decision the general federation of 
labor reached yesterday to call off the 
strike, the sailors, stokers and stew- 
ards of the merchant marine have gone 
out at Marseilles. Toulon and Havre 
and the movement is likely to extend 
to other French ports. The grievance 
of these men are of long standing and 
have in the past resulted in a num- 
ber of partial strikes. They Include 
the non-application to them of the 
weeklv day of rest law; eijualization of 
salaries on passenger and freight boats 
and objection to being paid off when 
a ship has been out of commission 
less than a month.^ 

PROCLAMATION OPENS 

MANY ACRES OF LAND. 



Washington. May 22. — President Taft 
today issued a proclamation providing 
for the opening up to settlement and 
entry of about 400,000 acres of land 
In the Flatliead. Mont; 200.000 In tlie 
C'ouer dAlene, Idaho, and between 
60,000 and 100,000 In tlie Spokane, 
Wash., reservations. 

ROOSEVELT'S HUNTING 

LUCK CONTINUES GOOD. 



Nairobi, British East Africa. May 22. 
— The Roosevelt expedition is still 
hunting buffaloes on the Nairobi river 
and today Mr. Roosevelt and his son, 
Kermit, succeeded in bringing down 
their third animal of this kind. The 
bull buffalo, wounded by the hunters 
yesterday, fled Into the marshes, where 
he was found and finished off. 



Logging Road Extended 
Ten Miles Nearer Ca- 
nadian Northern. 



Concrete Coal Dock Be- 
ing Built at Southern 
Terminus. 



Many Improvements Are 

Made By Duluth & 

Northern Minnesota. 



The Duluth & Northern Minnesota 
Railway company, which operates a 
line of road from Knife River in a 
northerly and easterly direction Into 
the heart of the Minnesota pineries, 
has jilanned and is carrying on some 
exten.sive improvements in and about 
its southern terminus at Knife River. 

These improvements, which Includa 
the erection of a large concrete dock, 
the building of a trtstle stockpile with 

capacity for 3(t.000 tons of "coal, the 
laying of numerous spur tracks and 
the locating of a eedar and piilpwoog 
yard accessible both for steam ana 
water shipments, are estimated to cost 
about 175.000. but will probably exceed 
that sum before the work is tinished. 

The dock is to be built of concrete, 
I e- enforced with steel above the water, 
and supported on timber cribs below 
liie surface. Tlie contract for tb.e 
cribs is being filled as rapidly as pos- 
sil le by the Barnett & Record t om- 
pany of this city and this part of the 
f onstruition material will be towed to 
Knife River when ready. 

The lake bed at Knife River Is of 
solid stone and the supportin;? sub- 
stiuctuie is being built wltli refer- 
ence to the sjiecial location it will 
occupy beneath the water. The dock 
will extend ".00 feet into the lake, and 
i.« to be forty-six feet in width, with 
ccmcrete trestle approaches from the 

(Continued on page 5. fifth column.) 

DREW SENTENCED 
TO TWO YEARS 



Former Bank President 

Must Do Time in 

Stillwater. 

St. Paul. Minn.. May 22.— (.Special to 
The Herald.) — A. Z. Drew, former prea- 
ident of the defunct Bank of Hambllne, 
a state bank, was sentenced to a term 
of two years in Stillwater today. Stay 
of sentence was granted pending ah 
appeal to the supreme court. Drew was 
released on ftf.OirO bail. 

Mr. Drew was convicted of receivinlf 
deposits in an insolvent hank. 



HALF A CENTURY 
FIRE SPREADING 

Flames Fought for Fifty 

Years Get New 

Life. 

Tamaqua, Pa., May 22. — Notwith- 
standing that hundreds of thousanda 
of dollars have been spent to extin- 
gnish the fire burning for .fifty years 
In the Lehigh Coal & Navigation com- 
p.'iny".'= mine at Summit Hill, flames to- 
day spread toward the spring tunnel 
w cokings. Thirty carpenters and ma- 
ions are being sent to erect concrete 
walls to stop the i onllagVation. (Jreat 
<iuan;ities of sulpliur abound in the 
sunken .shafts, and it may be necessary 
to fill the sl;afts with water. 



PLAGIARISM ( HARGED IN 

ORATORICAL CONTEST. 



Milwaukee, Wis.. May 22. — An 
Evening Wi.vconsin special from Ap- 
r>leton. Wis., says: Ignatius McNumeo 
of Notre Dame univer.'-ity and J. 
Fergus Orr of Park college. Mo., were 
ruled out of the inter.vtate oratorical 
contest here c>n the grouiid of plagiar- 
ism, announcement of this being made 
today, after a stormy session of the 
officers and delegates of the Inter- 
state Oratorical association. It was 
through thi.s elimination that it be- 
came possible for the representative 
of Beloit college to enter the con- 
test. The association officers this 
morning decided to hold a pre-ellm- 
ination contest hereafter to reduce the 
number of speakers at the final con- 
test to three or four. Instead of seven. 



m COMMITS SriCIDK * 

Ut AT THE .\GE OF 99. * 

^ ^ 

* Dearb<»m. Mich.. May 22, — * 

* rnc!e Billy Gray, 99 years old * 

* ami patriarch of tliin section, cic- * 

* elded last night there \\a» noth- * 
^|t Ing left to live for. Mixing parls * 
Ha green in a tin dipper at hlw well * 

* and drinking the |><>rtl«n, the * 
^ iigeil man calmly laid flown to # 
ife die. His 80-year-old wife db»- ^ 

* covered 1«1>" and calletl a phy- * 

* sielan, who vainly entleavored to ^^ 

* save Uncle BlUy'f. life. Tlie * 
lie widow, who lias no living rela- * 

* tives. .says slie tloes nt»t know ^^s 
Mfc what will becHjme of her now, al- * 
^j^ though Jrh*' is in ♦•omforlable 1(fr 
^i^ financial circumstances. ♦ 



«■ 
1 







EVENING ^ HERALD : SATURDAY, MAY 22. 1909. 



W»:\TItKn rmhtWy showem tnnl4^t or 
1 chaiTfB la Ui» tom- 



KNOX 




World-R«nowtted 

HATS 



We Alone Sell Them. 




MARIN 



THE TWO SIDES OF THE 
TROUBLE ON THE LAKES 




Corner Fourth Avenue W. aad 
Superior Street. 



Livingstone Makes First 

Public Statement of 

Any Length. 

Outlines Position of Mem- 
bers of Lake Carriers' 
Association. 



WHY PAY CASH 

Wfaen Your Cndit Is Good flere ? 

W'i^ are -jut of the hi^h r^ji.t ila- 
irt.-f ,ir;'l 'AV'. s.i,v9 you money. Any- 
tht ■ • '" • !n Furnlt'irts. 

Oa Iditi^. Ht()v.)S. 

et. ••■..;.''■.. ;'■■■ '-' :>rlct'S. 

0> I- IS\ I'AVMK.N rs. 

BLOOM & CO. 

102-4 W«Mt Fir** "Street. 
Zenith t'bnne 9^5. 



' vm Living- 
<•, , V a.-iHoeiatiun 

i..i.-4 .oti^i:si.-tai.v j.-.-llntta to take any 
i>>jri 111 the JeltlHT lU 111.-* ot the liiler- 
itjiie btmrd of ai bittiithni. wliicli has 

II m .-iessioii lu DftiiiU jsitice last 

; " ■-• iay, he has taken occAdlan to 
a lettet III which ttu' a.-*.-*ocia- 
M.ii ^ide of the rtltike aituaiitm is set 
; nth 

Ti' • '-tter. which was addrwsseil to 
S. Duyl-. U the first public 

■i"' ' . .■r ^ ri V i.Ti^-fh tiiat Ml". IjIv- 

irt dtrlke be- 

, . . wii ai>poiiued 

ta caU upon Mr Llvkntf- 

'■..> rell*sr. which is in an- 

■st from that commit- 

; . aieiU. la a« foUuwa. 

;-riitig to uur Interview thla 

iiji With Mr. Woernor, Mr Kluiiip 

:j.u.i your.s«lt', as cumu ■' ■■' l'''' 

'■■>.>ar<i '^t arbitration. ';!ii>ll- 

reiiue«»t, i :ii"i>.'rly state 

iu«d by !iie during the 

:.';•, •.;:".■ lew 

■'First, tl'.i- 'S-'I" •■!;';;■.• 



The Engineers' President 

Issues a Reply to 

Livingstone. 

Discusses Six Points Made 

By the Vessel 

Owners. 



:ng a 



"1" 



,-i.'.sti.iu fit 
■ i*o tar a«s 
tion Is coii- 



fuu.JiU; 



1< ! ; f. 




PEOPLE ARE 

JUDGED BY THE 

STATIONERY 

THEY USE. 

Tlien Why .^ol I'se the Best. i, 

We tiivid it for ijale. 

Chamberlain-Taylor Co 



Ti 

=isk , 

I. r*)i 1 1 ■ 
h.i.'i ■! 

w 

a- 

»!: 

a 1 I : ,;; 

Repuljin.;au >r t ><■> 

tariff man -n' .i :'t 

V.> tit <>l^;itiiii; < uutruv1-« 

, . 1. ' .; • ■( ■. .-■ :oi! rais',' ; , 'tie 
.>f your members i.-s to liavms men 
^i(ti« a :onir 1. t nor (•) join a union lA 

'•'--• do I".')' ' -■'' 
t no' • 






n in.N- 

1.1 to wt. - 

« unhjji or not. 

■ '.vh^it hiij reply 
I man to 

■i. li.'-r he 

,'-. a *'all\ollc or 

lit! -il!'>uM by a 

.ve 



Ch-veltitid, Ohio, .May 22. — William 
v. Y'aiuE*. national pre.sident of the 
•Marine Engfineerrt' Benevolent as-^ocla- 
tion, i».sued .i l.GOO word reply here 
yeaterday In in.swer to a statement 
made recently hy William Livingstone. 
preaident of the Lake Carriers' associ- 
ation, rewarding the marine atrike on 
the Great Lakes. Mr. Yates makes 
reply to Mr. Livingstone in six points, 
his assertions being as follows: 

"I — The open shop policy of the 
Lake Carriers' a.ssociation is not only 
to give employment to men who do 
not belong to unions, but al.so to f <rco 
men to renounce all allegiance to their 
organizations. 

"1 — Tlie application blanks for em- 
ployment on Lake Carrier a.ssociation 
vessels for employes, except enfjinttrs, 
i: • dj worded, that no union man can 
Tii^ii one of them and consistently re- 
tain his union memberslilp. While no 
i-*.Cf»reiice is made to unions In l!ie 
engineers, neither is a 
permanent employment 
givtn. -Vlv-n have been t.iken off vessols 
and forced, at the risk of lo.-?s of em- 
plo : ' to sign affidavits renoun ting 
allf- to all labor uni.Tn?. 

. 11!.- welfare plan was not orig- 

■ed for tlie benefit of the men and 

. t» optional with the individual. 

I The statement that the strike Is 

n>it affef'tlng commerce Is untrue. 

Many ships are tied up. 

•'5. Tlie wages paid marine workers on 

the Great Lakes are lower tlian those 

paid to any marine men In the world 

with Ih-- exception of Cliinese and Jap. 

aneH« ."ieainen. The Individual con- 

tra» ' 1 last year reduced materlal- 

Iv I .lint of wages paid. 

■ • » ii.vf that the strike Is having 

an effect Is found In that foreigners 

.,.. K-ing employed on boats and en- 

- are being brought from the 

bv armed detectives." 

in closing Mr. Yates says he believes 

th^ 3trike will end In a victory for 

4ineers. i 



FREIGHTEliS 
IN COLLISION 

Steamer James J. Hill 

Strikes the Package 

Freighter Troy. 

Troy Slightly Damaged; 

the Hill Proceeds on 

Her Way. 



A Collision occurred In the channel 
near the Capital elevator about 6 
o'clock last evening between the Pitts- 
burg Steamship company's ore freight- 
er James J. Hit! and the steamer Troy 
of the Western Transit line, which re- 
sulted in damjLges to tlie latter vessel, 
the extent of which have not yet been 
ascertained. 

The Troy -was leaving the Capital 
elevator intending to swing around 
into the Elevator H slip. Tlie Hill was 
coming down clraninel heavily loaded, 
and tlie captain of the Troy noiice<l 
another vessel In tow coming up. in 
order to clear both, he steered the 
Troy straight acros.s and stopi)ed with 
the Troys stern clear of the channel 
to permit the Hill to pass. 

There was a Kljstiince of about 100 
feet brtweeij the two vessels when the 
wheelman of the Hill .suddenly made 
a port turning tliat svfUng the big ves- 
sel's stern in tlie direction of the Tro.v. 
The Hill siruj;!^ atnidsliips on the Troy's 
stern. . i > 

Another version of the accident is 
tliat the Trov after crossing the chan- 
nel and coming' tf> a stop, commenced 
ti» back before*the Hill had time to 
pass," a collision being tiie result. 

The heavy stee! plates of the Troy 



SCHREIBER 
ANJNIGMA 

Unmoved When Informed 

of Death of His 

Child. 





I . o I' a 



he 



IF TOV ARE WOT 

FEELrlNO WELrLr 



A- 



'I. f 

Herbaqueen Mfg. Co. 

^i-w LoeiiliiiUi 
:il J.LiHi «»w|»erl«ir Htreel — I pstnir-.. 



. ANOCRMEICR 

'/.ealth 17I.VY. 



In 



1 he Welfare iM.m. 



1 



An Electric 
Oeaner 



W!" 1 > your h 
much mor*" ' "" 



.': It 



Northern Electrical Co., 

210 Weal First Street 



I print- 
Mi. «'■''■■ 
. ' h I * 



CHARGES AGAINST 
I THE ENGINEER 

Claimed He Weis Respon- 
sible for Explosion 
on Hoyt. 

CharRc.i have be>ni pi i against 

JTgan, who vva.s euKineer on 

:ri steanu'i- .\i:\'.i'n H. Hoyt 
' I r'. . 1 r 1 ■\i)iiidij'l oft 

. i.-il saturdaj. 

will have nl.-* y 

■ James .Stono, supervidu g 

.steamboat.s at Clevelai-"!. 

. Willi negligence in allow- 

r to get too low In tiie 

vi-ilatiun of section 44 U of 

■>*>d .Stat'ites. 

.. who wa.s a uni<»n man umil 

I on a l.ak'- Cairleis" ve^j.-,!-!, 

I ..lit water ent;ln»»er until re- 

Of the three Italian seamen 

'.-'■<■•' killerl (jn tlie Hoyt. one was 

■ .)f the Lake Carriers' wel- 

It will take about two 

t . I- I'.iir the llM\t. 



tii> 



OLD SORES CURED 



AI.LBK'8 UI.CER1NE 8ALVK. 

Ct«r;s» Cbronlc Clc«r». Bou» Ulcers, Varlco** 
|71«erii, ScTofulou* I'loeri*, Merearlal ricer«, 

5«v«r Hore*. Oangreae. Blood PuUoalng. 
fbitf.Sw«>Uliig,BtrikLeg,roUonedWound», 

aU Sores of Ion* •tending. PonltlTely iicTer f»U» 



I I 



The Sault Passas^es. 

;i Ste. Marie, Mich.. May 22.— 

, il to The Herald.!— I'p; Friday 

-Matthews. Hamapo. Morrell, 

ri.»iie.-*ta, Wexford, 10. Saturday 

lam Uogers, 1 a. m. ; Winona, 

r. Mason. Marquette No. 5, 1:30; 

rnuiips Neepawali. i.M, James Don- 

abl-son Wrl<lit, Dayton, 4::5«>; .Sullivan. 

^' •;. •> f, Neff. 7;30, Leonard, H. Kul- 

- Kalkaska. Fryor and barg.-, 

wii: Friday night — Acadian, 

ok, Butler. Turret Cape, mld- 

4,1 -n-dav— .Schuylkill, l.tonna- 

I IP.; .Vndrew, I'psoii, 4;J0; 

Mirk M'K.e. »>:;{i»; Be8<«e- 

I „, .siipeiioi . Midland, 

I K' \V;ird. .\me.>*. Simla, 

\, , : I M..|-b_'v' !"::;'): 



steamship MoveiiuMits. 

ith, Mass.. May 11. — Arrived: 



after a sutvey. which will be made 
this afternoon. From the position of 
the vessels at the time of the accident 
rt Is considered remarkable tliat 
neither th*si*aiirller wheel nor the 
rudder of the Troy were injured. 

No opinicms'aTP ventured by the 
agents of either vessel as to the causes 
of the accident. The Hill proceeded 
on her down lak.e trip without stop- 
ping further than to learn that tlie 
Troy was la no need of assistance. 
The Troy wlU leave with her usual 
consignment of package freight for 
Buffalo tonight. The accident will not 
reatUt in delaying her sailing time un- 
less tlue damage is more serious than 
Is at present suppos ed. 

ARE EARNING 
POCKET MONEY 

Culuth Children Taking 
Advantage of the Pic- 
ture Contest 

The baseball sea.son being near at 
hand, there isn't a boy in Duluth but 
wants pocket money in order that 
he may see tl)e White Sox perform 

The boys are getting that money by 
winning the Borden cash prize.s. 

Yesterday prizes for letters and pic- 
tures of cows were well scattered oVer 
tlie city, and one boy over in Superior 
got into the game and won a .Prj?e. 

The best letter ab.tut Borden s Peer- 
less fc:vaporate«l Milk was won by Miss 
Peterson of a27 Kouth Fifty-ninth ave- 
nue west and the prize of %:l in cash 
will go to hei'. The secmd prize of 
%i was won by Urtbert Scharpe of 1j14 
Baxter avenue. 8«iperlor. 

The two ^r!«es tor the best pictures 
of cows were wOn by boys. The best 
row' was drriw'n^bv Clifford Leary of 
429 Sixtieth aven'ire west, who there- 
by won JL'.and'tlie second prize of %l 
went to William Hoskins of 305 Sixth 

avenue west. .. , .v,„ .,„„ 

Any boy or girl may be In the con- 
test everv .lay .if they like. F or the 
voung peodl^ |>etween the ages of 12 
knd 1:1 ve:^s ll)*^ is the letter con- 
test Write- a a*>tter al»out Borden s 
peerless Milk and mail It with a label 
from the caif Ǥf iUe milk and a coupon 
from The Hffl-al^to the Contest Editor 
of The Her;il<1.- *■ , , , 

For the children under 12 years, 
draw a picture nt a cow. and with a 
label from the can of milk and the 
coupon from TA<« .Herald mall It to the 
Contest Editof,* hwA maybe the next 
day vour name will be in the paper as 
.,i,e "of the T«-1nu,er- 



Erawa otit all i>ol«oo 



Savsi 9xpeni« nod sufTerlng. 

riita Hall SSf: Mid 

U. Paoi.. Hiu- 



Ur*Wtl out Kit l>01«Ua. 0»»B« Ii»J»TOi««= M— ^«i.»..— ■- 

Pur«» «j«in.»nent Fortale by dmmciitu M«U»cmm1 




■ ^ ■• 



BONDS OF ARMOl R & CO. 

PlRl HASEO IN NEW YORK 



C D TROTT. 

TH£i OPTICIA.NI. 

has removed to 



; ; ' 1 :"» '.' 



•\v 



20 East Superior Street. 



till.* y 

■•■;£;bt . 



ear, 
■ >ti - 



Hotel Superior 



time. 
.ird 



rU a wa,<e 

* t>aid all 



York, Mav 22 — A purchase by 
Loeb & Co., and the National 
hank of $:•'•, ">oO,itOO of bonds of 
•ir & Co.. of Chicago was an- 
ed todav. This Is part of an 
of $50,000.0i)tl. The bonds are to 
thirty years at 4J-is per cent In- 
• r, ist and are secured by a first mort- 
ise on the real estate and plant of 
,..r! Armour & Co. and subordinate 

plants ...... ,., . 

It Is understood the bonds will be 
u.sed In paying off the company's lloat- 
Ing debt 



run 



srPKKIOK. WIS 



PEAN PLAN— 75« to K.M nw <•«»• 
ap#«UI Wenkly Batui, 



ENGRAVING AND PRiNTiNG 

! ■ ■ .* l^ ha.'f 

•, , .' - "e hlgh- 

Kra'h- letter pre^n »%rlliuK, whii-h 
affni-ds scope for originality and 

newness. 

MILLAR PRINTING CO., 

Uiiluth 'I'bone I«H>I. 



headed 

' ■ i n t? to 

try 

; to 

!'om »>' 

■ fi lue f ' 

you In c..jmi>;iaiu;e 

•"h!*! morniri«. »nd 



!i.\ o: sC'Oir- 

. rising your 

■nrirely on 

it the prin- 

: it be arbl- 



Port of Diilnth. 



■i»d 



H 



4NTITRKATIN(i SALOON 

IS ADYKRTISINli SCHEME. 

I.e.si Moines. lowa. May 22.— The 
much li'-ralded anti-treatlng saloon of 
D..S M'jines. which was to open today 
is nothing more 01 less than an ad- 
vcrtNcd .-. lieme b.ised on a well known 
saloon keeper's attempt at publicity. 
an.l a number of willing newspaper 
• t- The .saloon opens tonight and 
' 1. intl-treatlng feature will not be 
strictly observed by tlie proprietor or 
\\\,' |..iTiteet^r.s. ^...t J 




pAftKtiR'd ' 

HAIR BALSAM 

ClaaaiM tad bMotUlM tt« Ma 
proAotM • temUnt VvwtfL 

<>-i^,L.fe\>^Si£^ 



M IKII «. 
. le-^. F 



B W.- 
I .1 




who want to enjoy Ufa sh.wld 
t>uy ft ttot of ITAV1( BEAirS. 
Their rflUave Derr^uscn^-llne »nd 
. — ^ ^^_ ^ _ w«akn«i>u«H; restore !itrr>ni;th «iia 
BUtkl lip Ui« »y»t»m : mo-»t w.>n«l»rlul TltftlUlim remwly 
fkir youuir «n'l <>l 1 Try « t)o« »ik1 note the »tf «;t. • I •« 
Bofca l>iug Co.. 8a6 3Ui»erlor St.. Duluth. Miiia. 



.-^ ri'.Ait.-'n ! I' 



.M 



l>r..»»ii \\ tllle 



.^^^. 11 ; 




Why Does It Cure 

Not because it is Sarsaparilla, 

but because it is a medicine of 

peculiar merit, composed of more 

than twenty different remedial 

agents effecting phenomenal 

cures of troubies of the bloody 

stomach, liver and bowels. 

I Thu3 Hood's Sarsaparilla cures 8crof- 

I ttla, eczema, anemia, catarrh, nervoua- 

i .Mav 22.— James nes3, tliat tired feeling, dyspepsia, lose 

i^hail/l^^ ^•i^eSr'^M^n^: 1 oi appetite, anti builds «P ^^ sys^m. 
^hileflshlng in Twin '^•J^.^tod^^^^^^ 



Hi, I. 
...^talli, .1 r 
miw^i.rl. w. 



KlMhlns. 



Ciire of CH«tMl Birds. 

Never let a bird cage hang in a 
room where gas is alight, unless It Is 
exceptionullv well ventilated. The air 
near Iho ceiling is always the most im- 
pure at night. .Make a rule of always 
setting Dickey's cage on the floor at 
night, and Ul« health will improve, 
and you will *?njoy the society of 
your feathered pet for many years. 
You should alTsays know that a per- 
.son can obtain good health by the 
use of a malt tonic, such as QoUlen 
Grain Belt beer'. Serve a glass with 
each meal. Order of your nearest 
dealer, or be supplied by Duluth 
brunch. Minneapolis Brewing com- 
pany. ^ 

CiAME WARDEN INJURED. 

(lit Deep Oash in Foot While Set- 
ting Wolf Trap. 

Negaunee. Mich.. May 22.— (.Spe- 
cial to Tha Herald.)— Game Warden 
E. C. Haywood, who is widely known 
throughout the upper peninsula and 
Northern Wisconsin, inet with a seri- 
ous accident while setting traps near 
Lathrop. on the line of the North- 
western road.. Thursday He was 
-letting a ^tt- trap, and in cutting 
down a sapling for a drag, the ax 
slipped, cuttiny^a deep gash In his 
foot The wouAd bled profusely and 
he lost a great *4eftl of blood, but he 
managed t.*,iirarf himself through the 
woods to rtfe- traVk. where a passing 
train picked- hlni, up. bringing him to 
this city. He was taken to the Ne- 
gaunee hospital, where he is being 
cared for. 

<i*y Settle* Suit. 

I.idgerwobdIlN. D.. .May 22.— /Special 
to The Herald. >— The suit which was 
recentlv filed against the city of Lid- 
eerwood b^/ Hentv Hurke for the sum 
of $2,500, ha;* he^n settled out of court, 
the city council agr'^elng to pay Hut;ke 
the sum of $500 With cost.s. The plain- 
tiff claimed damages on account of his 
land being overtiowed by the city a 
well. 



Did Not Seem Interested 
in tlie Funeral Ar- 
rangements. 

When informed last night that his 
little baby had died. William Schrelber. 
convicted during the March term of 
district court of the murder of Frank 
Massapust, showed no visible emotion. 

He shrugged his shoulders, nodded 
that he understood and continued his 
walk about the corridors of the county 
Jail, where he Is confined awaiting the 
action of the court on his appeal for a 

new trial, which will be made by his 
attorneys, Ross & McKnlght, early next 
week. 

This morning Schrelber was in- 
formed that the little one would be 
buried this afternoon from the under- 
taking rooniK of Durkan and Crawford. 
As before, he showed no emotion. He 
seemed not In the least Interested, and 
there was no quiver In his voice as he 
continued his walk about the hall ex- 
changing an occasional remark with 
the other prisoners. 

Schrelber is a most unusual man. 
His Jailers are unable to fathom him. 

Either he Is not able to understand 
or fully realize what all these mis- 
fortunes mean to him. or he has a 
most remarkable ability to conceal his 
feelings. 

His face always bears the same ex- 
pression. He greets everybody alike, 
whether it is his wife. child. or a 
stranger. He appears to be interested 
in nothing. 

He will answer any question that 
is put to him, but he does not Invito 
friends, nor does he turn them away. 
He seems to have no fear of anything 
that could befall him, and his keepers 
say that should he be sentenced to 
hang, he would undoubtedly walk to 
the gallows with a smile, arid his step 
and voice would be as firm as tliougli 
he were going to dinner. 

He Is either constantly on his guard 
or else he cares little about convers- 
ing. He asks no favors from the 
jailers, never asks for anything he 
knows he cannot have, and seems en- 
tirely satisfied with himself and his 
position. 

He Is. to say the least, the queerest 
prisoner ever confined within the walls 
of the county Jail. 

THE WOMEN'S 
DEPARTMENT 

StateLaborCommissioner 
Completes Organiza- 
tion of New Force. 

."^Lute Labor Commissioner MtlCwen 
has announced the personnel of the 
women's department of the state de- 
partment of labor, authorized by the 
legislature at the last session. Mrs. 
Perry Starkweather of Minneapolis 
heads the section and Mrs. L. A. Rosing 
will be special Inspector. The factory 
inspectors are Miss Nan Dunnigan of 
St Paul, Miss Louise Klapp of Minne- 
apolis and Mls.s .lean Polrler of Duluth. 
Miss Mildred Barnard will be In charge 
of the child lal>or br.inch. 

SDIT IS SETTLED 
OUT OF COURT 

Paulson Gets Nothing; 

His Attorney Wants 

His Fee. 

The suit of John Paulson against 
M. Cook of the Union Clothing house 
for $15,000 has been settled out of 
court. Cook says tliat Paulson got not 
one cent. 

It was arranged, however without 
the consent of Alexander Marshall, at- 
torney for Mr. Pauisoii, and he now 
threatens to sue Mr. Cook for an at- 
tornev's lien of $1,500. 

Paulson left a good business In some 
country town to work for Mr. Cook 
witli the understanding that In three 
years he should be given a $15,000 In- 
terest In the concern if he should have 
built up the business to a per cent 
agreed upon. in his complaint Paul- 
son savs that he filled his part of the 
contract, but that Cook backed out. 

He then brought suit. Alexander 
Marshall was retained as his attorney. 

He settled vesterday. Mr. Cook says 
he got nothing. He Is still working 
for Mr. Cook. 

Mr. Marshall wants his fee. 

NECiRO AND WHITE DO NOT 
H.AVE SAME HUMILIATION. 



Announce for Monday and the Week 

A Special 
Demonstratio n Sale 

-of- 




and 



^y THE m 

i-wnssani 






CORSET 



>al^^Kf^'>t 



Reg:ular $5.00 and $8.00 C 'J ^/l 

Corsets at ^^lO.Oiy 

Regfular $10,00 to $18,00 Ijf ^ /l/l 

Corsets at v^O.l/l/ 

Reg-ular $22.50 and hig-her priced itf^ Chfh 
Corsets at %iJ^l3.\J\J 




THIS COVPON 

LIutHleH one person, uader 20 yenri* of age, to enter 

BORDEN'S PRIZE CONTEST 

Full details of contest on another page. 
name: «. 

AGU 

AODRE.S.S 

Fill out coupon, attach a label cut from a can jf 

Borden's Peerless Brand Evaporated Milk 

Mall to Contest Editor, Duluth Evening Herald. 










THIS COVPON 

Entitles One Child to Entry lor a PrUe In the 

BORDEN'S BABY CONTEST. 

Piste t(w o-)iip.>ri in til- Ija.-k tt ,4 t AUINJiT SUK PilOfO in 1 
aUK'ha LAUKL rwX. fmni llie fron' )f i ••\\\ .>f 

BORDEN'S EAGLE BRAND CONDENSED MILK. 

NO KNTKV FKI:: Olt nTlllilli 'JuNI UTI'JN-S. 

Name of Child 

Age. Weight .Se.K 

Parents' 'Address 

City or Town 

Address "Baby Contest Editor," Oululh Bcrald. 



Thev are the first cases on record in 
New York where a prison sentence has 
been imposed for the oflense. l his 
drastic action was taken to break up 
the practice which repeated imi»osltlon 
of fines failed to eheck. 

CREDIT MAN UNDER ARREST. 

A. J. Noble of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, 
Said to Have Embezzled $2,0iM). 

redar P.apids. Iowa, May 22.— A. .J. 
Noble, confidential credit man of the 
T. M. Sinclair company for many years, 
was arrested yesterday on a charge 
of embezzlement. He Is said to be 

$2,000 short. 

Kdward J. Rogers, cashier at toe 
Milwaukee freight office for fifteen 
vears voluntarily .surrendere(4 his keys 
Vesterday and admitted that he was 
short the estimates of the shortage 
vary from $500 to $2,000. He has not 
yet been arrested. 

MISSOURI INSURANCE 

LAW IS SUSTAINED. 



.lefferson City. Mo., May 22.— The 
Missouri supreme court today sus- 
tained the state law. which denied 



licenses to Insurance companies, which 
pay anv of their otflcers satari-s In 
exoe.ss of $50,000 a year. The act •' i.^ 
passed two years ago and has hvMi the 
subject of extended litigation 
• 

COUNTV SEAT FKJHT 

AlUiUED BEFORE JUDGE. 

Grand Forks. N D.. May 22. — i.-=!pe- 
cial to The Herald.) — Attorney George 
A. Bangs arrived home Friday from 
Dickinson, N. D., where he appeared 
before Judge Crawford of the dis- 
trict court, arguing for a permanont 
injunction against the county commis- 
sioners of McKenzle county to re.strain 
them from carrying out a resolution 
ordering tlie county officials to remove 
from .Shafer to Alexander. Shafer 
cl.aims to he th; legaJly selected county 
.seat and the people of that place re- 
sent the action of the commissioners 
in ordering a removal. Judge Craw- 
ford announced he reserved his deci- 
sion. 



Piiddli-i-M' \%aKexi Itainetl. 

Pottstown, Pa.. May 22. — P'il<llers at 
the Glasgow Iron company's mills hera 
will on Monday get a wage Increase 
of 50 cents a ton. This off-sets part 
of a cut of $1.50 whh-h went into 
effect March 1. 




NEGLECT OF DISEASE 

Causes More Deaths Annually 

Than All Other Causes 

Combined. 



New York, Mav 22. — A negro and a 
white man do not suffer equal humil- 
iation In the eyes of the law for false 
arrest according to the appellate di- 
vision of the supreme court, which has 
•sustained an order of Justice Dugro of 
the supreme court reducing the amount 
of damages awarded George Griffin, a 
Pullman porter, from $2,a00 to $300 
The negro was arrested In Montreal 
cltarged with stealing a pooketbook 
but the charge was not .substantiated 
and he was released. He brought suit 
against Daniel H. Brady, a New York 
manufacturer, who caused his arrest. 
In his order Justice Dugro says: 

"While In some senses the negro 
under the law Is Just a.s good a man 
as the president of the Lnlted States, 
it would be a bad argument to say 
that he Is Ju.-<t as good in some re- 
spects The damages in a case of this 
kind depend upon a man's standing 
and circumstances. If he l.s colored, 
that fact should h e consider ed. 

BAD EGGS PUT MEN IN 

JAIL FOR TWO MONTHS. 

New York. May 22.— Two men have 
be'en sentenced to sixty days' Imprison- 
ment, one for selling bad eggs, the 
other for using them In making pastry. 



JDIPffl** ^ 




• II 



CELERIED 
WHEAT FLAKE 

Is plain, pure and wholesome, easilj 
digested, prevents constipatioa. 



Recent statistics show that mope 
deaths are caused every year by sheer 
ignorance than by the failure of medi- 
cal science to find a cure. There are 
very few diseases nowadays that some 
cure ha? not been found to overcome 
If applied intelligently and In time, but 
the trouble is that most people do not 
consult a docto'r about their "little ail- 
ments" until they have passed far be- 
yond the stage of being Inconsequential 
and liave become. If not hopeless, at 
least sufficient to Impair the health of 
the patient permanently. Men who are 
suffering from any form of disease 
should not delay an Instant In laying 
the case before the PROGRE.S3IVE 
MEDICAL EXPERTS. Thousands of 
such cases are laid before them every 
year and none leave their offices with- 
out experiencing relief. 

They specialize In this line and have 
devoted their whole lives to obtaining 
every possible scrap of knowledge on 
the subject which might in any way 
further their cures. A cure la guaran- 
teed if they assume the case. It will 
be worth vour while to come up to 
their offices at No. 1 West Superior 
street, Duluth. and lay your case be- 
fore them, even though other doctors 
liave pronounced It hopeless. A large 
number of the cases they treated dur- 
ing the past year were pronounced 
hopeless by others before coming to 
them and were completely cured. If 
vou wish to see the way in which the 
fame of these scieatxsta has spread o«- 



'yond the confines not only of the city 
In which their offices are, but of the 
state, you should call at the in.stituta 
and see the addresses of .some of the 
patients who have come, in some casea. 
hundreds of miles to leave the PRO- 
GRE.SSIVK M E D I C A L INSTITUTE 
CURED. You would find cases of men 
from Bergland, Mich., Cloquet; Calu- 
met, Mich.; Ballard. Wash.; Chicago, 
Bemidji and Aurelia, Iowa, with tu- 
mors and festering cancers, gallstones 
and ulcered legs, or crippled from rheu- 
matism. These are people who bear 
the mark of iiaiti and suffering of long 
standing — people who have sought a 
cure for years without success, to find 
it at last in the office on West .Supe- 
rior .■street, which has lak*>n in no 
many hopeless wrecks of humanity, to 
turn them out virile and str.mg once 
more able to play their i)art In the 
grim game of life and to fulfill their 
duties as citizens of this great Re- 
public. 

Nothing has a more depressing effeot 
on the system than the slow Insiduou* 
progress of some deadly disease. It 
saps the vitality from a man and roUa 
life of all Its brightness. Such are the 
men who are continually finding ne^r 
health and brightened pr.>spects at the 
hands of the Specialists W^e cannot 
sufficiently impress upon you the need 
of haste in dealing with these disease^: 
delay even for a few weeks may in- 
crease the time required for a cure, to 
say nothing of the additional expense, 
pain and suffering. 
' If you detect the slightest signs of 
I anv form of di.^ease in yourself, do 
not delay an Instant, but come at onoe 
to the PROGRE.SSIVE MEDICAL A3- 
SOCIATIOxN. NO. 1 WE.ST SUPERIOR 
STREET. DULITTH. and have your case 
examined. The cure will be guaraa- 
i teed. 



.... I -11.111.— ■. 

■ P II ■ " »—'■ -" 



Services for Sunday 
Tn Dulti|b€burcbe$ 

Rev. Jllexander milne (Uill Preach on "Cbe 
6ood Soldier of 3e$ii$ €bri$t." 

Service of Song Olill follow Sermon on Cbnrcb 

music at Lakeside. 






tirch. 
will 

■ • 1 - 



^ \" ;"1 LT ! 1 1 




THE DULUttt EVENING HERALD: SATURDAY, MAY 22, 1909 



Crr.okston. Tlie Sunday m 1 ''1 will 

1 ■ KV The Enili;iV(ii inf. tins will 

I 7 (I'rlork auii Mif i«-.i'l<Tf< will 
br Ml!- low Yfigan and Bessh- | 

McBrid. 

>• • • 

'11,,. !si»TVie«s ju Ciii.i- Mci iiotlis't 



Saens 



11.4: r\ ' 



. . .Grieg- 



.■1* 
,■. 1 iia.rt. 



I 



It at 7 p. m 

i.M.rUitiP >;.-v>r..,r: 

God," nil' 

"-ill Ik- ■■ . 



•I'hird sC'-.i and 

,.• ives't, K- \ . M (' 

"' '' !(>lhi\vf<: 

^ p. m.; 



(HK the 
lom on 



At 



„I..h' 



ijifflish T.iilhfran 
" ■ ■ ■ ■ je 

\\ J t li 
day. 



. \ ' f . 1 1 'It.' 



u'l/U't, 



t.,| the Evangelical 

• :ist and 

■ . t li 6 

II be 

f tlie 

- Re- 

iiivi-tinK 
.(.(.1 at 16 



; I n 

at 



is 



rf* 



ay 
li- 
st ' r m < ! 
Of tl.. 

1 fi. in. , I .- 1 t . 

{.. m The 

n !!\rnnf." 

F!nk 



■!"■,..•■ 
KViiltfl- ' ■ ■• ' ' 
Fatliei ■ i 

'--■•■; F: 

■ ' on 

... . . IJovmod 
Made the 

Smart 



.At 



* * • 

St. Swe^^i^ll i:r'iHcf.i'nl 

r-ch, T\- ■ :. • ijJThth aviiUf vviM 

ami First f=ir»et. bcvvIi r- will he lit-ld 
at 11 a. m. The siibj. rt <-i Hie sermon 
will b«> "The ProvideiK •■ < i <;<id." Ai 
the service in the evening .>t s (.■-•link. 
' '(••■t i.f thi' .<;«- 1 tiieii wii! bf "The 
,.\ . ,.u Lord," Sun<]a\- s' Ik'oI will 
mtt-t at 10 a. 111. William i:. Harniann. 

reelor. 

• « • 

At Hie First Swedisli nr-t't'^t ehnjch. 
\ nth avenue west and First 

-erviees will be held at 11 a. m.. 
wiu. .-ermon by Gustof Krelsgard of 
Northwestern nntversity. (.'hliaKo. 
Kveninp jsi-rvief will be iield at 7:30. 
when ){r\ , I .It'iiMfn will pnaeh. Sun- 
day Peht.t.i w.l! nutt at 1'' it-cU.ek in 
the raorninp. There will be no younj; 
l.eople's meetiif >•- tbf soelety will 
CfinthKt a mee • I'O'" 'arm in 

I lie lifternooii. 

* • • 

At Mt I'iiiitS I.illii-iaii cliunli. 'rwcii- 
tieth aven ; and Tliird street. 

I!, (re will .rnlDK serviee«. eom- 

■ :,, n iriK at n a. rn. Th' will 

■ . , .-r. ducted in the Ni : ■ • 'an- 
; t \- ihv pastor. Hev. K. Wulfs- 

,fif! the sermon the celebration 

ill take place. 

9:45 a. m. 

-n..ii>Ua> .-\.-Mng me Liither, KuiUt 

will eiv* ilieii atmiial May testivai at 

tlie tliurili. 

• « • 

At St M;nk - A M K church, Fifth 

avenue lo-t .imiI Sixth street, the pas- 

Jonaiiian Biewtr, will preach in 

inomingr at 11 o'clock on "Tlie In- 

r nf a t'iirisllan Life." Sunday 

nil! meet at noon, Mrs. ('harles 

k,,,..v .supeiiiiienrtent. Song services 

will brRin at 7 t>. m., Mrs. A. S. Mat-oa 

! .,,1 M,->; i;iiii(s Dlnck. leaders. At ^ 

!!. P. Bin will deliver a lec- 

(M., ( TiKrefration on "The Lay- 

Imai '1 !.. > holr will fur- 

] ,,iti , -i, .ii both services. 

^ I ,;/. anison, organiist ; Har- 

I v.: director. Wednesday 

at l> p. m.. prayer an<l praise sirvites 

will be lield, 

.'-t rani's Episcopal 

\ \V K\an, rector, Rev, 

-tani. win be as fol- 

.»ly communion; 1« a. 

I: 11 a. in . mornint? 

i\ v> riiion "Ml "Tlie 

,.; of tt,' ^ r,v,,.r." 

.■ninfr iira\ ■ ! 



Mi -ll'S ! 



.V 1 t 



1: 







.1 

I'lbel 



< < Am-!-.,,.!-:.' :■ 
I In t 'miiiiiu I "l 



EASY 



MONEY 



Young people and children getting Easy Money Every Day 
from all sections. Hundreds of letters on Peerless Evaporated Milk 
and pictures of cows being received. Contest Editor kept busy. 



Conditions of Contest 

Get a label from a can of 

Borden's Peerless Evaporated Milk 

— Fill out coupon, found elsewhere in this paper 
— Write a letter or draw a picture of a cow, and 
send to Contest Editor, Herald. 



List of Prizes 

Young People under 2 i years of age — Best 
letter about Borden's Peerless Evaporated Milk 

—A Daily Prize of $3.00. 
2nd Best a Daily Prize of $2.00. 

Children 1 2 years or under — Best picture of a cow. 

1 St Daily Prize $2. 2nd Daily Prize $ 1 . 



Names of Winners published following day. 

Contestants must send in label of Peerless Evaporated Milk 
and coupon from Herald to enter. 

Send All Mail To Contest Editor, Herald. 




GRAPHOPHONE HITCHED TO 
TELEPHONE BY GRAFTERS 
TO FOIL FRISCO PROBERS 



'\':,,\ lor i 



< ' I 't ; I .it 1 I ■ » 

. t.-udent, 



'*T'' 



t ■ 



a "Ser- 

1 ' 1 e i nf- 






, 1- J e. «■;!.« Hath (Ifne 



iHis*." in U Hat I'a.^i.L.ctt 

•own Hitn Wiih Many 



\\ 



,1 
t.. 



first 

Kev. 



( M- ~ 

■V I 



m« wtfii-N' 



1 (I 

I '('tia Id A le.v;i iiiji 
■ ti.il "The Kternal < 

M ('u.^tiiiiee. OT'f- 



Alllrn 

Hrackett 

i,a .koviki 

'"r-'ilVlod 



■l 



« 11 

t i 



It 



.(1 Lijuk.'' m^if w I ii 1 

in, and at h p. m. Tl. , , ^ 

7rtltt'''\vi'l1 i 't®v. J. S. Kilt ley will pi each at the 

Vv..,i, V vv ' I'irst Baptist church, Nint'i avmue east 

the'^Siadow' T ' '""•^' street, at 1' -n 

the Shaatm ^^ SeemhiR keekle- 1 at 

R V 1' i'" •-•'- P- '" «'" "I'aul Heiere AKiil'pa. 
f!.,..« Vririra" FcilowlnK IF the musical pregfain; 

uiiK'' inuiM- Mi p 1 ■ *' ' ^' 1 

t Or ^tlude. Tours 

Auf!,.;', 'Sins: .\: -•■.li;" Heck 

It.'SfM.ii.'^e ■■'' I.'Til. in Tli\ Menv",, 

Ha iiycoin 

I ' I^ove lUvine ■ N< \ In 
.. - Wrivrlit. 
i-i.-iade I'atiison 

K\ i:\iN<:. 

• n K;iii pi'i'liKic- ■■' 'I hi < ;■' , . 

... Batiste 
•n — "Jesti.'< l.u.ii .■.' .Mv Soul".. 

Schubert 

0.nt;rt«.irv — "O, Morni'iK Laud" ..Phelps 
Mrs. Baldwin. Mt Ji-rl;i.-, 

IV'tKtlude- •■!■'( stal .M.->if h in *'" 

Batiste-t 'aulkin 

• • • 
Bt V .' A M' (lauj^hey will conduct 
ttie re^ulai m rvices in the First I'res- 
byterian chun !» totnerrow. Fidlowins 
isi the munical program; 

MOKXINiJ 
OfRan prelude — "l^riro' Ihmdel 

Anthem — "Let A]\ That Seek 'I'. ■ 



. .1 !;; 

..1 t.' 
In 
.it 



<i\E L\ THREE. 

Every Third IVrsiin INiisoned By 
('of fee. 



I eople believe 

,...i^,.n to at 

thn e. 

•~.li>\\,\ i n , > 1 1 I . K it ' • U t . 

.iiui."^ I If tiiftri suffer ter- 

■■ver the fact. At >tT. rfry 

sa\-s: ' Si.'li. 

-ffee I I 
xeited. l"P"!=tlnd. 

. iiiinir ■ 
« Iho'd 



' 1 1 1 1 1 1 i u 1 1 < 
.Mr B 



< i : 1 1 ; ' 1 , . ; n t 



viiiuU ami suffer*"il M 

wh,'ich S-"t u'i^rs' .-tTi': 



\S !l. 

Guilmant 

►•VEMN'i: 

.Mlef;i-i^tto" i 

,Mf". : W". 

^t fVii. 'i- ... r.i ; K' 



but. 

1-,: .■ 

1 

t 



!■> . ..II, .• ui.s 

:iiiii siiK- 

! Iau>:hed 

- ' ;; '. hurt it"- 

.irtl that I 111! 

, ^. t I , 1 . 1 . 

I 1 1 i 1 1 -11! ■ n \ 11 ' 1 m • I i 1 > - . - 

irritation disai.peare:l 1 

' fi ( ilv. and th. " ' 

: ir h.-tte;- th. 

.ISf <•! 

- ruin- 



Mr. liilbeit 

I'l St liidf' '■•M;>rrh" 

The ehcdr cois 
Hev nobis, Mrs. b 



C.idsli.v 

Mi.xs <;ia(.l.\-s 

Sthell. I'aul 

I .Mis^ Isabel 



At 11. 



F:i.>-t t'liil.' 



o « lock 

'■rf dn^-v- 



!. u ; ' h Pi r> 

» a.st. Uci 

t iiere will 

:m;,1 church 

will 

..ity," 



th. 



B<tstuin 



b, 



of 
of 



At tlie FIts; < - .iii <'hurc-:i. Bev. 

H \' Black Will iMi\. but one llieme 

ffi l...th servlr.-s !i will t.e, ••Bijarlil 

-• • - '-^ "It," 111 the morn- 

, ; 'I dssatisf action" 

. ^1 U.'.^."f<: ■'" ■ ■ - ■ ■■ will 

In tl tlu 

liiie, "I 'ontent riifii 1 .■^utmu.v fii-hool 

will meet at noon; Cliristian Endeavor 

at ; p m. 

• • • 



Pan Francisco, •""ah. May 22.— Patrick 
Calhoun's trial en a brlt'erv charR© 
ended the most impoi lant wt • k of lla 
five months' S1^^^.'tl Ian niKht. Ru- 
dolph Spreckcl.'-. -w lio tlnanced the 
pronecution. and r>etecine I'iin Helms 
alternated a." witnesses yeeterday, and 
it was evident that a crisis In tlie case 
had be«n rea« lo d. Intereft was sus- 
tained until a hitt liour in the after- 
noon, wlon AHsistatit l);strlct Attorney 
jl<:.,if rwiK t^^'"' reetrainlnft or« 

flers by a curt ef similar juris- 

diction ;..,iiounced that he would ask 
Jiid{.'e hawlor's pernilseU'n to open 
'.(-ah'd packapes .seized In the raid upon 
II. e offices of WiTllam M. Abbott, gen- 
eral counsel for the Fnited railroads, 
an.l allcKed to contain documents stolen 
fr<'m the offices of William J. Burns, 
htad of tiie prosecution's corps of spe- 
cial detectives. 

Arifunients on this ,s.«^ue -were de- 
ferred until Monday, ihie of the lines 
of pr<dialde intiutry waj" indicated when 
Helms, after testlfyiuK that lie knew 
I.uther Brown, former jiariner of Earl 
UuRi rs. said: 

'Altbott and Brown met me at the 
steamer landing on tlie day 1 left the 
city after tiuittlnK the services of the 
Fniled railroads. Abttott asked me 
what 1 knew about the dynamiting." 

"What dynamiting?" ^ „ , , 

"The dvnamitlng of Gallaghers 
home,' said Helms, referring to tht, 
biowmK up in Oakland last spring of 



belt Tt Parker, rector: A. F^ M. Cus- 
tji,,, 1 h.dr ilirector: Miss Ida Bogan. 
leadrr. and Mis'f MarBarot Pearson, or- 
ganist. 

• • • 

At the l,«-i.! l.iK .M K fhur<h. 
Flfty-fourtli aveiuit »ast and Superior 
stree the pastor will conduct the serv- 
ices tomorrow. Tlie topic of the morn- 
ing service will be "The Worlds 
Helpers," and in the evening. "Ad- 
versity and Character:" Funday school 
and Bible class will meet at noon: Ep- 
worth leaKne at 7 u . Un k In the even- 
ing. 

• • • 

St. Luke's i;iM.>-< opal chur<h. Nine- 
teenth avenue w^sl and First street, 
Sundav scho<d will meet at 10 a. m.; 
evening prayer and sermon at 7:4.^i p. 
m The*Mibie(t of tiie sermon will be 
•Mail ._. i;.,i'!i. k .1 Mooney, rector. 

• • • 

At tlie First Norwegian Lutheran 

Icliiitch, First av»tiiie east and Third 

sir..-t. the p^i'-'or. J. H. Htenberg. will 

i] Ml 111., morning on, "l>efeat." 

) .; vi!. and in the evening on. 

luies Kvervthlng Happen Foi the 

|Be.«!t? rtomans vil . 'Jh. The Sunday 

' will meet at noon, th*- topic for 

. (lass be'ng the eighth com- 

.;... at. An afternoon service will 

.id at the home of C. O. Carlson. 

[K.dge street, at 3 p. Tti. 

I • . . 

\t ih Bitii.sila .N.'i wf^'ian Lutheran 
(hunh. Sixth avenue east and F'iftli 
street, tliere will be no services Sun- 
day foreno(m. as the pastor. Rev 
Theodore J. Gustad will (onduct serv- 
' at Floodwood. Minn. Services will 

'Id In the evening at 7:46 in the 
.M.rvcegian language; Norwegian Sun- 
i day school will m«et at H a. m.: Eng- 
lish Sunda.\- school will meet at noon. 
I The '\'oung Ladies' Aid society will 
I meet with Mrs. O Larson. 918 East 
Seventh street. Wednesday evening. 
Ma', m; at S oeUtk . The Little <;irls' 
society will meet with Mrs. L. M. 
Honsan. 618 Ninth avenue t-ast Sat- 
urthiv aftornoim. May 29, at 2 o'clock. 



.•Vt Ibe Snoiid I'huM'h 



f Christ 



mo 

ii.re fc- if 
liilfr<'»l. 



i...(i u i>-M' I''-'" oil 
<i i;.i to (lUit C'»f- 

. :..' , - •■'( rv 



iUK off 
stum" 

!viU*-," in 

ul the jilMnc lelt««r'* \ ii'-w 

- Iniin iliiie let time. TlM'y 

.,« . I rut. 1111(1 futl ff hiiiimii 



S* lentist. Burgess" hiill. ;uo and :U2 
West I""' '-' 

at K' ■ 
anil 1 

e\ ' 



111 



rr-<-(-t sti i-ii-<.s xi'ill Tn- hclii 

Will be 

vv!!l f'''".'! 



t I. 

SI ■ ' 

a 1 .1 
pr 



.fohn Walk.T f 

.■ . ' ; : .1 ! ; 
1 1 1 ' k . 



I ;i ; 1 1 1 1 1 f II i. ; 

10 (.(lock 



il 

:ll 



Episcojial 

a,*; follows: 

- .. B.blf 

mot -ayer 

. " k . . . .■'I intj 
«', l:tv. Al- 



mm 







Get a box of 

Sioams' Eledrlo 
RAT and ROACH Paste 

Guarantee*! to exterminate cocUronches. rats. 

mice, waterbutfs. etc. — or nioney refunded. 
So«.boxS6r; 18ot. Imx II.OO. S^ld ^Tcry where 
or M-nt «xprcsa prtpmit ou receipt of price. 

STEARNS' ELECTRIC PASTE CO., • CHICAGO, ILL 



the home of Former Supervisor James 
L. (Jallagher. 

Helnij? declared severtfcl offers had 
been made to prevent hie appearance 
as a wllne.s» In the Calhoun trial. Since 
his arrival In this city, he declared, a 
plot had been laid In the office of W. 
H. Metzon. a prominent attorney to 
trap him In a conversation over the 
telephone. The testlmopy followed an 
inquiry by Mr. Rogers, who asked the 
witness if he knew that a grapho- 
phone had been attached to the tele- 
phone while he was speaking from the 
other end of the line. 

A dramatic outburst occurred when 
Helms charged that y\bhott had once 
expressed to him a wish tliat "Some 
one would shoot Heney." and that 
Stanley Moore had congratulated him 
on liis performance In following Burns. 

Stanley Moore arose In his place at 
the louhscl table and, in a voice 
trembling with anger, told Helms he 
was "Lying like a dog" and perjuring 
liimself. Helms leaped to his feet ana 
defied the attorney to make good his 
charge. 

Charles W. Cobb, law partner of 
Henev, credited wltli receiving $10,000 
from Rud<dph Spreekels for services in 
the prosecution, was the third witness. 
He said he knew Heney had thrown up 
his representation t>f th© government 
In the Hyde-Benson land fraud cases 
and the IJlnger Hermann case, and that 
he had refused President Roosevelt's 
offfr to direct the prosecution of Sen- 
ator Borah of Idaho. Mr. Cobb affirmed 
that Heney bad lost his law practice 
since entering upon his duties as muni- 
cipal prosecutor. 



MIKE BUTORAC 
BIT ONWJ) GAME 

tie Is Now Mourning the 

Loss of His Pocket- 

boole 

Mike Butorac of f32 "West First 
street complained to the police last 
night that he had been robbed by the 
old trick of dropping the pocketbook. 
This is the second theft of the kind 
within a few weeks, 

Butorac made the acquaintance of a 
man at the Union depot, and walked 
up the street with him. A man walk- 
ing in front dropped a pocketbook. 
and Butorac picked It up, and then 
slipped It In his pocket when urged 
to do so by the new-found friend. 

At this front the man In front 
turned aroand. accused him of stealing 
the money, and insisted on searching 
his pockets, almost before the sur- 
j.rlsed Butorac had a chance to offer 
any objections. When the latter real- 
ized what had oc( urred, the two men 
were gone, and with thenr went hia 
own pocket botik. 

THE WEEK AT 
THE NORMAL 

^■^>— l^^^M ^Hl^^ 

Students Are Busy With 

Examinations — Prof. 

Quigley Speaks. 

The students listened to one of the 
best chapel talks of th^. year at the 
Duluth normal school, last Monday, 
when Prof. Quigley, head of the 
psychological department at the 
Moorhead normal, addressed them 
(luring the chapel exercises. Prof. 
Quigley took for the subject of his 
talk "The Cycle of Teaching." and 
all of the student", bnt esp.Hially the 
seniors, rec»^lvt d valuable information 
which will be of great benefit to them 



SLEEPING SICKNESS 
WIPING OUT ENTIRE 
CONGO COMMUNITIES 



Boston, May 22. — As the result of the 
report nuide by two English mission - 
arles. who made a tour of Inspection 
through the Congo region, the Congo 
Reform association will make repre- 
sentation to Secrt^tary Knox that re- 
forms demanded by the United States 
and Great Britain have not been put 
Into operation In the Congo. The mis- 
sionaries are .S?tephen Oilchrist and 
Charles P. Field of the Congo Balolo 
mission, an English station. Tiie 
region through which they triiveled 
is not farmed out to concessionary com- 



and their pupils when they are teai h- 

Ing. 

• • « 

The Grey.<«olon Literary society held 
the last meeting of the year yest<r- 
day afternoon in the a.^semhly hall. 
This society, which, with the Thalian 
society, was organized at Christmas 
time, has made favorable progress. 
Although the membership has been 
limited. It has in a way served as a 
benefit, thus Including only the stu- 
dents who felt a real Interest in this 
work. Besides the debating, which 
was one of the Important feature.* of 
the work, much was accomplished in 
readings. blograpViical sketches of 
noted authors and poet*, book re- 
views, drama and music. 

This applies, too, to the Thalian 
society which was organized at the 
same time, and each society acted as 
a stimulus rather than a rival of the 
other. The work of the members of 
the Thalian society has been excel- 
lent in every way. The last meet- 
ing will be held next Friday after- 
noon. 

The program of the Greysolon Lit- 
erary society yesterday was as follows: 

Piano solo 

Eva Le Morgnan. 

Recitation — "Imijh-in" 

Glady.s Goldsmith. 
Book review — "The Servant in the 

House" 

Pearl Elevitch. 
Recitation — "I Want to Go Tomor-.. 

row" 

Anne McLaughlin. 
Debate — "Resolved That Winter In 

Duluth Affords More Pleasure 

Than Summer in Duluth" 



panies. but le controlled by the states. 
In their report they said: 

"The nightmare "wlilch haunted tliese 
people was statc-anpointed cliiefs. They 
were like little kings, and to their 
greed and extortion there seemed no 
limits. 

"The Riverine populations are prac- 
tically extinct from the sleeping 
scourge and many interior peoples are 
becoming Infected by being brought 
into contact with the rivers In fishing 
and collecting rubber. Both the flsh 
and the rubber tax should be stopped 
and the natives should be encouraged 
to move away from the banks." 



Affirmative — Lois Quinn. Astud 
l>ahle. Negative — Fannie Steph- 
enson. .Alyrna Todd. 

Piano solo 

Jessie Ttald. 

• • • 

The week has been one of exam- 
inations in what may be called spe- 
cial studies. Dr. Kline gave his classes 
in writing an examination, and a large 
number were gra.luated from the 
class. The classes in domestic sci- 
ence had their final examinations this 
week, too. 

The examination which cau.<:ed the 
most excitement, however, was that 
in spelling. Every student in the 
school was examined on Thursday on 
a list of 500 words, which was pub- 
lished in the November bulletin of 
the schocd. The requirements were 
that each of the 500 words dictated 
from the list should be spelled cor- 
rectly. Another opportunity will be 
given before the end of the year to 
all those who failed to meet the test 
this time. 

• • • 

The cotillion at which the faculty 
will entertain the students of the 
school will be given this evening. 
The students have been looking 
forward to the affair all week with 
pleasurable anticipation and there is 
no doubt but that their expectations 
will be fulfilled from the preparations 
which have been going on for the last 
few weeks. The party will be a 
rose party and the faculty members 
have been bu<-y making hundreds of 
roses and garlands with which to dec- 
orate. Miss Quilliard and Miss Van 
Stone have been drilling some of the 



girls for special numbers for the even- 
ing, it 

* • • 'i 
Miss Ethel Eckert of Washburn 

hall was called to her home in Iowa, 
durln- the week, by le serious ill- 
ness of her father. 

* * • 

Mls.s Fay Cock of Washburn hall 
went to her home in Cloquet last 
evening. 

* • * 

The senior class met "en masse" 
Tuesday evening of this week at the 
school for the purpose of arranging 
their program for class day. This 
meeting resulted in the best turn out 
the class has ever had. so many plana 
were discus'^ed and the business was 
satisfactorily transacted. 

* • 

An invitation was Issued by the 
members of the Alumnae a.ssoclati<>n 
of the Duluth normal school to the 
seniors of the school for a banquet 
to be given at Washburn hall, June 
B. This alumnae banquet has be- 
come one of the features of graduat- 
ing week at the school, as has also 
the receiitlon for the seniors at Mr. 
Washburn's home. 



GARY IN LEAGUE, 
ANTMAMMANY 

Joins Move to Name In- 
dependent Good Gov- 
ernment Ticket. 

New York, May i2. — The first ap- 
pearance of Elbert H. Gary, chairman 
of the board of directors of the United 
States Steel corporation, in a local po- 
litical movement will be in connection 
with the campaign for the nomination 
of a non-partisan good government 
ticket to oppose Tanunany at the ap- 
proaching municipal election. The pre- 
liminaries of the movement, which 
was launched at a conference held in 
Cooper Union recently, will be in 
charge of a committee of nineteen, the 
membership of which, it is announced. 
Includes Messrs. (Jary, Timothy Healy, 
national president of the Electric Fire- 
men's union: Hamilton Holt, editor of 
the Independent: Marcus M. .Marks, 
president of the Natioi-.al Association 
of Clothiers, and Oustave H. Schwab, 
manager of the North German Lloyd 
Steamship company. 

Ten of the nineteen are Republicans, 
five are Democrats and four are inde- 
pendents. 






I 



THE DULUTH EVENINO' HKRALD: SATURDAY, MAY 22, 1909. 




AUTOMOBILE 
OWNERS 

Having tHc.>vrrc<l from the effects of t!ie Ron-Fernandez 
fire, winch li;:: i our s^aragc to a lar«e extent about two or 

three weeks a^ wi>h to announce that we arc now m bolter 

shane than ever t ". overhaul and take charge of y-'ur car^^ 

We have just rec; >ur new stock of automobile supplies and 

sundries, which is the most complete ni the Northwest What 
y " c:ui*t find elsewhere you w.ll find here Uur prices are 
moderate. 



N 



Mutual Auto Co. 1 

AGENTS FOR CHALMERS-DETROIT. THOMAS FLYERS, | 
REAR BOARD OF TRADE BLDG. 







The City National Bank 

OF DVI^VTH 

ClPim IND SURPLUS, S650.000.00 



UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT DEPOSITARY 



3 Per CenU Interest Paid Upon Savings Depoalts 



rjfc 3^ '^' t^ w^ m. 9^ ^ •^» •!* ^s * 



^ »j»»)K»»»»)K)H»»* 



WELL KNOWN 

I N CARICATl^ 



^im^m^- 



it 

it 
it 

it 

H 

o 
a 
i( 
a 
a 




Loose 

Leal 

Devices 

PROVIDENCE BLDC. 



P/f/J^ TB/tS-BltfOeRS^ 



4th Ave. W. and Superior St. 



Mail 

Orders 

Solicited 

Both 'Phones. 







n ' 
u 

it ! 

if i 

n| 

o 

it 
n 

i 
* 
It 
it 
it 
u 

u 
n 
n 
u 
u 
n 
u 

u 

n 
n 
i\ 
it 
it 
o 
n 



"PADDY" McDonnell.. 

»»»] i i»»«»<t«»«»») i t«»«»«*«**«*******»*»***«***«***«****** 






-* 
-* 
-# 

n 
it 
it 



112 



West First Street 

is the New Location of 

IMERRITT & HECTOR, 

Printers and Binders. 
Bulh Phones. 



"Rush Ordern a Weature." . 



PERISHED ALONE IN HIS 
LITTLE TAR PAPER SHACK 



COAL DOCKS 
AREJiASED 

Carnegie Company Will 
Become Active Com- 
petitor Here. 

Deal Is Closed for Valu- 
able Superior DecK 
Properly. 



Body of Man Found in 

Brush Near Golf 

Grounds. 

Probably Froze to Death 

in His Improvised 

Shelter. 

The ho4y nf a man who eviil>^ntly 
Y t for tivo or six monlhii 

■na.i ,, ;.,; . .n mornlns at Thlrty-firsit 

srenuo ea^t. afjuut ;:'»ii ftMn .s.juih of 
¥ V alreet, by a laborer on .Htreot 

c.: k work In the vicinity 

Thare Wlia iiothInK on tho \ 1 

dicat® the Identity ot the tn:i!i ;:■ ..,-- 

p««r©d to li«»v«» hetsn about ".r, v-'nifh ol" 
»«»• at tht> ' ' ■ 

I 

moreIobT 

THAN MEN 

Employment Agents Say 

There Is WorK 

for AIL 



br'irth w'o 

man 



lie carnu acraa.-* Iho <lcad 



hospital. There la much apprehen- 
sion that he will not recover. The 
former municipal executive has the 
distinction of being the oldest loco- 
i!i'>tive enicirie^ l« the service of the 
Duluth. SouMi fJhore & Atlantic rail- 
road. He • n continuously In 
the employ i.<}mpany and it-s 
predecessors since July, 18S7. or near- 
ly forty-t wo y-ars 

.\RTIST WHO BOBBED 

liWMK IS SENTENCED. 

f ,U, (jliiu. May 22. — H'^nry 

\v, . .•■h, 9tf artmt who robbed a 

number of homes where he wa.s em- 
ployed. ple«deri&uilfy trtday to an In- 
dieiment charging lum with the larceny 
Of $'.^0 worth of gohd.-» from the home 
'f Hirry Levy, The sirtist was sen- 
'■iv. .-d" to four 'years In the petiiten- 

tiary. .. • 

' '— ■—*' 

I.atbam In Keoord Fllicbt. 

nouy. Franf•^ May 2'<J.— Herbert 
Lathiim. the French aeronaut, made a 
record flight in an aeroplane here to- 
day He stayed In tt.e air for 37 mln- 
tite.i and 37 .^^*rond^ at «.' height vary- 
•nif from thin* to nthety feet. 
-■i. ' J » • 



fo 

(1 



l»ut no name-^ 

ping from t ^- .„'■' 

taliiinK a for riu'iiumusm. i iie 

unkno* i> '-nlly. ma.le the spot 

Ilia iv \^v», for he had made a 

Htti,. ;..-r shack against a log 

It V f^et long and no more than 

t,,i , hlHh. con.structed so a man 

could barely He under It and thus be 
in part pr-^tected from the element.'*. 
Th." sholt. open at the front. 

TiicT" V ower extension of tar 

nut, .1.1 which some old clothes 

w. .>aled. There were two pipes, 

a .,...»v,.ig outfit, some tobacco, a 
liroken bit of mirror, a fish reel and 
two iiixket knives under the tar pa- 
per It looked as if the man might 
liav»- slept there several nights, and it 
Is thought likely that he frosse to 
dt*ath. The remains were partly de- 
lompo.it'd vvluMi dis 1. 

The fft't wHi-.' ft. ::i puMe.i or 

ijiinny sack. stufft<i .si.u i<traw. No 
shoes, aside from this, were l'\ evi- 
dence. Appearances would Indicate 
tliat th« individual was entirely witli- 
.mt funds, and was too oroud to ap- 
I)eal to the county aut: - for am. 

Thert» \vaH no money i of the 

t^ocketfl. 

Thr man had liglit h.iii. .md ,i two- 

<'ks growth of beard on his face. 

• was at>out 5 ftnn 10 Inches In 

t There were several tin cans 

the sp>>t. 



A - <l ticit will bring mlo ac- 

tive comptJtiti Ml til.' Carnegie Coal 
com jn 1.1/ .f t>(t..ii, 1 ^ wi!li the Head 
of f. ' • - '■ "-^ ■■■ '■'■'■I 

today ti.fuui^U Uic leaoUtg by the PilL.s- 
Liirg company oi: tiie Great Non!i.jrn 
dock, upon the Superior ni.le >f the buy, 
and al.ia all other dock.^ !..tw-en the 
Northwestern Fuel ..<nip un nd the 
i'liUadeiphia & Heading d.>ck.s. 

The deal was ciosed by R. P. Burgan, 
president of tiie company, md J. i". .M. 
.Stoneroad. secretary and trensurer of 
the company. These m-n wero m Du- 
lulli the present week looking over 
the property, and after returning to 
Pittsburg, closed the deal th.it will ».lve 
the Carnegie company one -(f the beat 
waterfronts at the Hea<l of the Lakes. 

The contract giving the lease to 
the Carnegie company was signed ^ es- 
terday in at. Paul, tho last details of 
the business being completed .n '.his 
city today througli a repreaentaiivj t.f 
the company here. The securing of the 
Great Northern dock and the water 
front and docks, between th.e North- 
western Fuel company's docks ."ind the 
doekiit of the Philadelphia .>i Kea-ding 
r.ial" company, means that the Inlfu- 
tion of the officials of the Carnegm 
company la to enter Into a.rtlve ccmpt?- 
titj.Mi with the fuel companies at tlie 
H-ii.l of the Lakes ai. the present 
time. 



ti«i^ter i'ai'k. 



The work of'r'^rrtMde'Uhg the pavilion 
Is now con;plet.»d. Icve cream and 
iunchea wftj' be served tomorrow. There 
will bo a dan^e next Tue.sday night, 
the first one of the season. Monday. 
May 31st. wtU be grartd opening, ram 
or shine. ' " 

MuNkftcon W ioM. 

Ann .\rbor. >li ii.. May 22.— Miuske- 
gori high school won the twelfth an- 
nual Michigan interscholastic athletic 
meet hore today with a total score of 
4r>^ points. Detroit Central high was 
second with 35 1-6 and Lansing higii 
third. 19 points. 



I'ntil r«c«^ntl> ' 
..-,''. <»lher 
id of ■ 



impany 
, :.;. docks 
Now the 
.1 direct 



Duluth. a.< loaits f 



work 
in th- 

to th. 

is i n ' 

■i.-nt 

to till 



.\i:in 






■. ii.ue 
ivl for 



g"Ue 



and 

.11 th.' 
th" dtoiiand. 
'=■■, ■'igns of 

;it; 1 1 resent a 

view if >in that pri-.>*emco 
ago rhen the bulletin 

tht^ L'uluth 
few J. lbs t<t 



op- 

dls- 
annual 

'>>» tons 
of the 

L.sed. It 
in the 



in- 

dtH; 



--'-■ ■•■•Mit 
nt 

IWi. '.v.-.-kS 

boaril.s of 

otflrcs prc.*^cnted but a 

the guz*' of the .se.'ker 



Tiit-r ■ 
r>i!!'tt}) 



:i ■. "w th 

i. i,,,, .,1.. • itii'l">- 
df*rs. Uf'Hi til-" : 
not fill 

The 
tin* \V 

Improx'- 

tip-on tt>':- 1-1.1 iir-'ii' 



more jol>.s in tlo^ \'\\.x of 
tiiaii tlo-f.' .>'• ni»-n t.i 



■ill, 1.- >> tliiia 

...;,i,,tV ^■.■M-k- 



; ,1 they ran- 
! \v"i-k in 



after eniployni.'nt. Today x\\- hnar<ls 
are filied with sign.s .>n"eriiig all kinds 
of enaploymeiii at fairly good wages. 
Knifi'-^oo.nt mt-n stJit.- that any 
man le in tho . ily of Du- 

luth i...i.. \. .- idlf through hi.s "Wn 
di.sincllnation to w.vrk. Ih. y sUite 

that thero is plenty of w.ok for all 
LilMOfi-.s who care to go t > work, and 
.lurai tors in th*- Wr-st are b»'hin.l in 
'!!■ work l>i*( 111-, tht-y hav*^ not 
sulhcient m»-n to do tli.- work with, 
Tht» openinii' ui* 'f farm \vi>rk 
country ha<! also in- 
oand f'lr m.-n. It is 
b. r tlie demanii f.^r labor wllj 

sh . .. : ady iner.as+' all through 
the .summer months The advent of 

. ? 1 'T-.o. ftM- fill will further in- 

; for labor and will 
. ~ . , 1,1. i .- I >. • ; . L . . :\ a:r,-» sea!** 



i.aK 



, ^;h company owns m 
mine.s In tlie soft coal 
■ -T r.sylvania. Th' 
•limpany 1- 
.:•. Tl.« c. 
;ug rapid; 
if tiii.s i: 
oiiput oi' Ll..' company. tn.r 
.,h.Pt.in« f.Tilltles at the H 

.:ig*lif and secu: j . 

•s pr>Midt:it of the Car- 

., t. bank of Pltt.^burg, and 

,ad is a director of the same 

Mr Stoneroad wa.s a resi- 

.'bMit of' Duluth from I-ISG to IS^X and 

is well known to many of the bu-^iness 

men of this .dty 

Some f)li. -rations and .i!. nis 

WtU !:e mude in the proper' ired 

liv ihc Carnegie company. >n»; 

pany will begin shipping ii.-s o.vo 
to il!i new docks early In the pr- 

^''whil.' ;n Duluth Mr, Bureau and 
Mr .Ston.-roHd were entertained at the 
iTmne of Mr. and Mrs -lames V. . Nor- 
t„ii, n::4 Ka^t Fir^t street 



WHERE WILL YOU BUY? 




That trunk an<l travt>iiiie h.i*; wliich 

■nplaiing ev.T 
ir trip" 

L;,.>iiig i.> ii'jv t'r.)ni 
::i,ii\.' ill fir f.wTi trunks 
.■ t.T mak.-' them. If y<m 

-. ' . ii . i>i • 'ii t. 

I , . • >iir line. 

DULUTH 
TRUNK CO. 



SHOOTS WOMAN 
AND KILLS SELF 

Chicago Man Seeks Re- 
venge, Being Barred 
From Wife. 

Chicago. May i::.— Wiiile Mrs. Charles 
A. Mace was walking with her three 
children near her home today. Gus An- 
.lerson, whosH wife Is hou.^ekeeper for 
Mr.s Mace, camo up beliind and fired a 
bullet Into Mrs. Mace's shoulder H." 
hen shot liimself in the head and 
stomach and will die. Mrs. Mace will 

■""^Andlrson and hH wife ^^Paratod 
.s..me time ago. Anrt^rson >''?''t^'^:*'^,f^ 
, .il.'d at the Maet, home and ;ifked to 
-., „ his wife, but Mrs. Mace told him 
Mrs. Anderson -lid i.ot care to see lilm. 
and sliut the door ^^^^^ 

EX-M.\YOR({KEENEOF 

MAIUU ETTE VERY ILL. 

Mar.iu.>tte. Mich.. May 22. --(Spe- 
cial to The H.-rald.)— Critically III. 
Former Mayor William H. Greene of 
this city has been taken to St. Mary's 



MUNICIPAL CIVIL .SERVICE E.XAM- 
INATiON 

PUBLIC NOTICE I.S HEREBY GIVEN 
That a competitive examination under 
the rules of the Civil Service Commis- 
sion of appUcant<i,for the following po- 
sitions, promotion to sergeant of po- 
lice and inspectors and assistants to 
the engineering Jtepartment. will be 
hel'l in the council chamber. City Hall. 
Duluth. Minn. '^'ednesday morning, 
June t. 19')i*. frotu 5 a., m to 1:4 m. 

Application..forind for these examina- 
tions may be o«wSA?d from tlia secr-?!- 
tary of the Commission, Room 6, City 
Hall. Duluth, .Vflnn., 

All appUcatioiw must be filed by 5 p. 
m May Slst, >.V)a|,, at which hour the 
lists will be cU>i#tJ»i., 

The scope ''of the examination for 
sergeant of p»di«« will include tl) 
Writing. Spcmng dnd C.)mpositlon, i'l\ 
Arithmatio. < ^i • Experience and Gen- 
eral Knowledg.? of Duties i4i Time of 
iiervice. to) >t»!Krord :n Department. (6) 
.•Ability to Cottlmattd. 

The sc'jpe of th'e* examination for in- 
spectors and a.<»sl.*t^nts to th« «?ngineer- 
ing departmefat w'Jll include (I) Writ- 
ing. .Spelling and Composition. (2) 
Ari'hmetic. (3) Experience and General 
Kn.jwIedgH jf Duties. 

Ail examination^ are public, competi- 
tive and free. 

RUBE.V .lOH.V.^ON, 

St^cretary Civil "Service (Commission. 
Duluth Evening Herald. May, 20, t'i, and 

24, 1909. 

tNo. 02117. > 
CONTE.ST NOTICE — 

Departm»^nt of the Interior, United 
States Land Offi-:;e. 

Duluth, Minnesota. May 4, 1909. 
.\ surtleient contest affidavit having 
.»n filed in this office by Rachel E. 
KjOJttad, contestant, against homestead 
► n'rv No. 2332S, made November 13. 
1907," for Lot 1. E4 NW^ and 
NK-.SW>«i. Se.^tion 19. Township 65 N.. 
Range 17 W.. 4th P. M.. l)y Stanislaw 
Dziadusz. contestee. In which it is al- 
leged that said .>»tanislaw Dziadusz 
shot and killed himself some time 
during the lattet- part of May, 19')8. | 
That prior to hfs death he. the said 
claimant. ne%'er buflt a house upon or 
cl^arf»d or cultivated any portion of \ 
said land. That he n-'ver e3t,ablished 
residence tiiereon, but wliolly al>an- 
don.-d all claim th.ereto forward from 
the time of makihg said entry. That 
sinck» his -leatl. tT'='ith »r hi.s wi low nor 
his h'>irs or legal representatives, or 
any of them, have appeared and laid 
claim to said ian.l. or in any way or 
manner built upon, cleare.l. improved 
or cultivated said land or any portion 
thereof. That the name* and re.-'l- 
ilencea of the heirs of said deceased , 
entryman are unknown to this de- 
ponent. That none of them are resi- ' 
dents of thp United States. That said* 
deceased claimant . came from Russia] 
alon.^ to thia coBtfrry, leaving all his ; 
r^'Iatives in said Empire of Russia; 
and that said alleged absence from said 
land was not dOo to his employment,, 
in the Armv, Navy or Marine Corps of 
the United Stales dliring any war, said : 
partl»»s are hereby notified to appear,, 
r.'spond ahd offer evidence touching 
.said alicgatlSc. at 9 o clock a. m.. on , 
T'tne 30 1903. b^^fore the R<>gister and 
Receiver at the United .States Land j 
Office In Duluth. W»nnea.->ta. 

The satil conte-^tant having. In a 
proper afflda\dt. JtL-d February S, 1909 
set forth facta whi.-h show that after 
vlue diligence persrtnal service of this 
notice can not H^ ma.le,. It is hereby 
ordered and dlreiTted that such notice 
be given by dutt'And proper publica- 

^"^"' J. C HERMAN KNGEL. 

Register. 

N. B. THAYER. 

Plaintiff's At^'rney, 

■iOl Willadio Buihling, 

1 . . , ,f Duluth. Minn, 




■#•'' 




Don't Fool Yourself In to Thinking 

That You Can Buy a Really High-Grade 
Automobile at a Low-Gradc Price! 

It cannot be done. 

No automobile manufacturer is putting more into his car than he is get- 
ting out of it. 

Regardless of what enthusiasm may be displayed by manufacturer or 
dealer — 

Regardless of manufacturing facilities — ' 

The whole thing sifts itself down to a hard-headed, calculating business 
proposition — 

You get exactly what you pay for. 

Possibly some manufacturers (because of inadequate manufacturing 
facilities or other reasons) offer you less than they should at a given price; 
but we know, and you know, and they know, that no manufacturer will give 
you more than he can afford to. ; 

You cannot buy chrome nickel steel at the price of pig iron. 

There are plenty of low-priced cars on the market, but the bed-rock 
argument in favor of buying them— and practically the only argument 
that influences sales — is the argument of cheapness. 




MODEL X— TOURING CAR. 

And we submit, as a reasonable l)usiness proposition, that cheapness 
is a mighty poor guide in the purchase of as complicated a piece of mcchan- 
i.sm as is an automobile. 

The Haynes appeals to the buyer from an en tirely different standpoint. 

It is emphatically a car for the man who is ready to buy an automobile 
on its merits— wlio either knows car values himself or recognizes the protec- 
tion afforded by established and unquestioned reputation— who has gotten 
past the "makeshift" period and wants a mechanically perfect car for both 
pleasure and economy's sake. 

The Haynes is not only the oldest car on the market, but it has from the first, and 
without deviation for a siiigle year, been a car of superb mechanical construction. .^^ 

No concession whatever is made to cheapness. 
No concession is made to mere beauty. 

No concession is made to the man who cannot afford a thoroughly high-grade car. 
The Haynes is built for the man who is through experimenting. 
Elwood Haynes, widely known as builder of the first successful motor car in Am- 
erica, has an international reputation as a mechanical expert. 




RUNABOUT. 

And every Haynes car <.ti the market has hcen built under I\Ir. Haynes' personal 
supervision. 

He was the first manufacturer in the United Stales or Euroi)C to use nickel steel. 

He was the first to employ aluminum in motor car^. 

He was the first to introduce Roller Bearings in ajfeomohiie construction. 

Roller bearings are still an exclusive Haynes featup. 

The frictionless, noiseless roller pinion drive is alL> an exclusive Haynes feature. 

And the .same is true of the Haynes Jerk-Proof Cliftch. 

The Car throughout is made to last — not merely to sell. 

The Haynes principle — that every jjart of the car shall be as perfect as it is ])ossI- 
ble to have it, both in material and workmanship — is responsible for the famous 
Haynes record of 41 perfect scores, first prizes or medals in 41 contest.s. 

.\nd it is this principle, religiously applied to every car, that is the safest, most 
binding guarantee that any automobile buyer can have. 

The price. .$8,(X)0. represents a degree of car excellence that is not, and cannot be, 
excelled in any make of automobile, American or foreign, at any price. 

\{ you are ready for a real car 
You are ready for a Haynes. 







INTERSTATE AUTO tO., Agents, 

306 Lake Avenue South. 



\ 




THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: SATURDAY, MAY 22, 1909. 



oiTy 




mu MM 




CLASS OF TWELVE 
IS TO GRADUATE 



Program of Exercises for 

Grand Rapids Higli 

Scliool. 



.1 


rand 




: —On 
; inn fxcr- 








iid Rapids 
;ice. A class 


tit 






,:iiii three k"'1s — 


Ti^ 


- 




i.jIUrvviiiK being 


the 


ii*-!. 


I K'tm. ill 


l-'iazer, Kmrna Jo\- 


Fr. 


I, - '■.i-U 


M'»- h.^rf 


ft H- hard Grove. L«?s- 


1 
1 






iDi James McAlpine, 

1 .-^T>e McGee, 

. \' Meyers, 

■i..nil Tuel 



room8. The bcIiooI teachers and schol- 
ars wert' praised highly for their good 
work 

(ilEE ( LI BS POPULAR. 



'uiie 6, 



l.ai'or 
J>en Tuei, 






1 , ,. . 
I, , ; 



fli-ert Grove. 



( i a V rn end 



Omtlon"' 

OTcheutf, 
Cliss EiUs 

<■''.■•: ' 

\"...,,„.i 

Valt: 

C'la*- - 
( 



M. ■• .'i >. 



p. 
>iiu rage' 
Franer. 



'liere". . 



:i will 

i.y Dr. ».. 
arvh. On 



Boys' and H'Ms Organizations of 
Virjcinia High Made Reeords. 

N'irgiuia. Minn.. May :^2. — (Si>. i ial 
to The Herald. I— A pleasing feature 
of th»> Hocial life at the hig-h sch«>ol 
thi> ^'..'v \^«T.' 111.- i:\*'v ^■l\;ll^. l><'y.« and 
girls. The studtnt.s took a lively in- 
terest in the clubs and worked faith- 
fully to make therji .'-^m < t s<ful. 

Their work vva» rewarded, as both 
clubs uttniiied a hiifh degree of efliei- 
ency. The boys' elub sang at the 
meetinr attended by the state sena- 
tors on their \ isit to Virginia in April, 
and also at the meeting of the St. 
Loula County elub. April 20. An 

original football song, sung by the 
hoys, wa.^' . spe cially pleasing 

EUaiTH (iRADE PUPILS. 

Those Who W ill (iradnate in Eve- 
leth If They Pass Examinations. 

Eveleth, Minn., May 22. — t Special 
to The Herald.*— The eighth grade 
pupils who will graduate this spring, 
If thev successfully pas-s their final ex- 
aminations, are as follows: Paul 
Archambault, Rylois Butler. Katie 
Burke. Irene Campbell. Charles Crot- 
tier Ruth Damberg, H«>se Damberg, 
Olyn.pla Ellisen. Lucy Furlong. Paul 
JohJon, Otto Johnson, oga Kurti 
Mab^Ue Kiley. Jennie ^\^^^X^'l^Jt 
Maxwell Margaret Murphy. Beatrice 
Murnik Daniel MaJ^uce. .\ aud F age 
Roy Patterson. Ev.lyn P["«-f- J^^^*^ 
Ramlom. Clara Kohr.-r.Ha.el Stock- 
stead. Loul*. Stein. Joe seigel. in* J 

will br givf'i tl>«"'J" diplomas "" •'""*; 
,rnc time the high school 
,, , . their commencement. 



CAST IS CHOSEN 
FOR CLASS PLAY 

"The Shakespeare Water 

Cure" to Be Given at 

Eveleth. 



The Hti 

class p'ay to b<. 

JUTl' 

C! r. I. 

1 



'•■ 22.— ' '- : to 

-t fur ' 'I lor 

night. 

en decided 

pTiin. The 



Kaiuowjtz 

rU-d 

'. ridrews 
rrfl- 
.. . .1 Floyd 

.i.v iTvor 

'ger 

i.ger 

K' I i 1 K * ' ' 



ELY IS ( LEAMMJ UP. 

(diver Iron Mining Company .loins 
in Campaign .4gdinst Dirt. 

i^!\;, ■Minn, "■'■ ' iSpeeial to The 

Heii.;*'. '. — Ti., - clratiing the 

Streets and alleys and making a very 
r,f., . ^<;^. rv improvement to the appear- 
a,,, : !.f city'.'; thoroughfares. 

. : . n Mining '■' "V ^a» 

a,- -I-8 that al. '» "1 

ecii.p.iuv iniMi r.ust clean i.^t , . . mises 
at once" or have the l.as<s terminated 
„r the rent Increased. The company 
i.« ,e<iulring that the refuse be brought 
I., I he roadwavH in the locations and 
has placed team.- at the disposal Of 
the people. The .esnlt is »l'al '».^"« 
is an astonlBhtiJg amount of rubbish 
being removed from these par s of 
the city and the appearanct- ot those 
Bectlons grea tly improved. 

TO PLAY B(>VEY TEAM. 

(irand Rapids City Baseball Team 
Ready for the Season. 

2. — The 

Haplds 

.-Sunday 



ingiiig 



Grand Rat ■ 

baseball sen' 
city I 
with . 
ti'ani I 

luis 1 ■ 
put a 

iJrati'; 

S-il'lr! .1, 

niati ' 'U 

Grand Iv.i; 

games on I: 

;i I • ' - ' ' 

t ! 

section pome tinx 



\? . . 






SETTLEMENT MAI>E. 

Coleraine Voiing Man (Jot !f5,0(K) for 
Loss of Foot. 



juniiiia I DAXCES AT EVELETH. 

SiKcessfiil .\ffair at VVahlon Lahde 
H;,ll-Military Hall Planned. 

.,.;,, M:i.:i.„ .%'... : - .-■. • '-i" '''al to 

Heraiii. I — Til..' n.xt lo the last 

,(...,;.vi ol the <lut> h«-aj-<.n was given 

last n,-^::i ;it Wal.leii Lahde hall by the 

F- . Ming < Hi!. Many people 



c 



r-t 
if 



Nelson 


of 


iaiiship of 


his 


nor. 




■ cat off 
i I W 1 y of 
ii\'. anil 
pet t Ifo 


on 
the 

lie 
ent 
ijity 



mm\l VVIIRK EXHIBIT. 

Large ( navds Attend the Ftisplay of 
Nashuauk Schools. 



!/ M 1 



AT: 



and notifying the game warden, who 
gave him permisKlon lo keep the ani- 
mal. 

WILL WORK BY 
ELECTRIC LIGHT 

Rushing Work on Cuts 

on Nashwaiik-Grand 

Rapids Extension. 

Grand Rapids, Minn., May 22 — Tlie 
work on the big cut just nortlic-.st of 
Grand Rapids, on the Grand Rapid: - 
Nashwauk extension, will be pushed 
frcnj now until it it completed. 

Tuesday a big new dynamo was re- 
ceived at the scene of the work, and it 
will be used to light up the work while 
a night crew Is on the job. The elec- 
tric lights will extend to the cut and 
from there all along the track and 
along to the dumj'. The electric light 
line will be over a nille and a half 
kng. 

On the .same dav a steam shovel and 
outnt from the work at Calumet, which 
had just been coiupleted. v/ere shunted 
In and put In readiness to start work. 
The cut which is to be made iS some 
1,600 feet long and i:2 feet deep at the 
deepest point, and one of the fills alone 
1« to be over 3,500 feet. Tiie territory 
through which the right-of-way 
passes, where the fills will be. is very 
swampv, and is considered an unusu- 
ally hard proposition to get over. 

MEMORIAL DAY SERVICE. 

To Be Held at the M. E. Chnnh in 
Eveleth. 

Evilcth. .\Iinn. -May 22. — (Special to 
The li.iald 1- Kev H C Johnson Will 
priacli tomorrow evening :M tlie Metli- 
odi.-t ICpiscopal cliurch . n "t'ontrary 
Winds" In the morning he will speak 
on 'The Next Step Forward." The 
t V. tii!:g services, especially of late, are 
hi in,i well attended, due to the excel- 
lence of the sermons. A week from 
tomorrow the pastor will conduct Me- 
morial dav services, and. being an ex- 
soldler hiinself. will arrange for some- 
thing It fitting the occasiim. Tlie lo- 
cal militia and most of the old sol- 
diers will attend the services. 

At St John'.s ehiirch tomorrow morn- 
ing P.ev. Carswell will speak on 
"Ilea VI. u Our llonu^" 

BUILI)I\(i IS ACTIVE. 

Jones Street at Eveleth Becoming 
Quite a Business Street. 

Eveleth. Minn., May 22— (Special to 
The Herald. t — Tlie Campbell block is 
now being sided up with brick and 
the store fronts on the <ioner of 
Jones street and Grant avenue are 
being remodeled. The upstair.s will be 
clinnged and may be used in the fut'ire 
as a hall. it Is likely that the Elks 
will use the hall until the Howling 
theater is built. Work en the latter 
structure will soon be startfd. 

A store building is giiiig up next 

...Hii .-un.uiy to Frlske & Mewherters tailor shop on 

" . I-., i. „Ji Fierce street, so that Jones street from 

. ml-prolessional ^,»^,^^^j .avenue to the GUd. hotel, has 

heconie iiulti- a lusimss .•'treet. 

PAROLE UNSATISFACTORY. 

Young Miikovitch Boy of Ely to Be 
Sent to State School. 

Kly. Minn , May 22 — (Special to The 
Herald.) — Humane Officer Grae came 
u]> fir. in iHiliith on Mondav evening and 
)i,v.-tiK-:«ted several <:.->- of distress 
here. He will also t.iKe Meps to have 
the Mukovltch boy taken to the state 
.scho.il. Since his parole last Saturday 
In iiivenlle court at Duluth. the boy 
has h'Hn active in i.etty thievery and 
will o> sent awav at i.n< e. 

(U ST PETERSON BURIED. 

Man ^Vho W as Killed at Bovey By 
a Blast. 

Drayton N 

The Herul<" 



>t 



K'cr M. E. \\ insor 

IS men. anil will 

■ n ill thr Meid. The 

, t S;!s year n i'H be 
with nut one paid 

had many hard 
.■, among vvldch 

I- roloi-f.! c:..i.h- 
tast t- ill 

;i will I MS 

J line. 



D, May 22.— fSpeilal to 
Oust Peterson, a former 



w I from <'.it of town, .'^ev- 

er.u vMii noticed from Virginia, jiil- 
t.irt. Hiwabik and McKlnley. The final 
dance of the season will be given 

June 11. 1 J ' 

The militia ci.mpany has «PPt'i"'^a i resident of this place, was burled here 

^.'l?Sinran^'l^'SJ"al^r^TK ^ y-terday. He was killed a few days 
make plans and arrange f.o a military Ingo at Hovey. Mlnr.. where be was run- 
ball June 4 at Vail hall. This will be . ^ ,]j j„ ^^^ ^^e mine. H seems 
the final social b.foie the coinf.anv ! I'.i"*' »' " 
goes to camp June 14 at I-ake C»i 



the 

:iKi,iie at 



from ?:;'*"' '.intil 



,\ bv tlie 



wus lIir'jlig'L IM- ' las- 



In addition to their lianquet ti.[n..i- 
row night at M«mltc r liall. the local 
order of Hrith Aiualiam has decided 
to have a dance, lo help celebrate the 
first anniversary uf the urganizatlon of 
Oie local lodge. 

NEW LOD(^^ REDMEN. 

Judge Prince Returns From Insti- 
tuting the Koochiching Tribe. 

n\ ' It lii. Minn., .Ma\ -. i.'^prcial to 
T'.r Herald.! — Judtje ITmhc returned 
>-et.l -rda)' ficiri a ilav''>H trip to Inter- 
national Falls, will he he insiiint.-d a 

• of Hediiien. ttie K -ii icliirg trit»e. 

!v_,seven inemlx js were put 

t Willi tilteen applicants i>n the 

V . li.-it. who will be taken in 

[.[k^. who will have a big 

' vhen the local lodge 

; not received any set 

*-i!t ibey are f---M?- 
:ie j;Ta!!d 

.; ,.,...,.- . ,:ia<le for a ,...-. 

i relehratlon. 



Wake Up 



That indifferent appetite 
with 



Post 
Toasties 



T'iie rrisj), dfliglufiil f'-'-l 
' ' he palate and 
] ac bioiiiach. 

"The Taste Lingers." 

roiiiilar pUft- t*»cj 

l^ii»»« Family fclar 15e. 

Sold by Grocers. 



SUIT OVER WAiiES. 

Eveleth Clerk and Employer l»is- 
agree (Iver Their Contract. 

Eveleth, Minn., :ia\ ..: (Sp.-. ial t" j 

The Herald 1 llvnry 1.. Hiil furmerly | 
a clerk for M- Fehhuan. the clothier. 
has started suit against his f-^rin-.T 
employer f< r three months' wni- 
150 per irici.th. The case was 
fore Judge Iiinc.- \fKlerday aftet nonn. 
Feldman tla.is.s t!...T he hired Hill at 
f3(J Tier moniii, wl.ile Hill ciamis he 
was to get f50 per rm>nth, Feldman 
al!=o has a claim against his < lerk for 
$:'c, which the cK-rk guaranteed for 
a man who (■uupbt surne clotlie.f from 




K^^/^^ 









'«b,| ° •l<llt,on*l p,ottCtionH«'"'* 



;.r.«»rf^^''' 






'"'>e*rthe»<gn»tuf»-. ///»*' 





(The OrlginaL) 



For Baby's Sake 

Exercise care. Those who buy unknown 
brands of Condensed Milk for the baby, be- 
cause of the saving of a few cents, may find the 
experiment a costly one. The only brand 
especially prepared for infant feeding is 

Borden^s Eagle Brand 

Condensed Milk 

Never Accept a Substitute, It Cannot Be As Good. 

For Baby's Sake — Enter Borden Baby Contest. See photos of 
a few contestants and entry coupons elsewhere in this paper. 

Borden's Condensed Milk Co. 

Leaders oi Quality. 

JESSE NORTON, Selling Representative, Dulutli. 






tlon with the Gulbranson Bros, at 
SmllhvJlle. 

Edward M. Olson was duly Initiated 
Into the my^terles of woodcraft at a 
special meeting of the local Woodmen 
ludge held Thursday evening. 

Mr. and Mrs. L. F. Thorberg and 
Charles Gromjulst visited with Mr. and 
Mrs. Lindau at Arnold, Minn., last 
Sunday. 

The men of the Swedish Lutheran 
church are preparing for a festival to 
be held next Satujday evening. 

The supervisors of the town met in 
regular session on Wednesday after- 
noon. Only routine business was trans- 
not ^d 

N. C. Bllaey of West Puluth attended 
the supervisors' meeting here on 
Wednesday. 

Fritz Farm of Duluth visited with 
his parents here ovtr Sunday. 

• 

AVillM Mine (>P«-nH »>liaft. 

.McKinKy .Minn.. May 22. — A gang of 
nun have been put to work by the 
Hepnbllc people at the Wills mine. 
This marks the real reopenini? of this 
property which has laid idle for yeart 
It Is expected that the numher of men 
emploved will be constantly increasod. 
The Wills Is In a po.sition to become a 
shipper this year. 

• 

I'rlneliml Hrnlgnn. 
Biwabik. Minn., May 22.— Miss Marie 
Lasch, principal of the grade school in 
the high school building, has resigned 
lier position because of 111 health, and 
expects to go to her home early next 
week. Miss ?'erron has also been 
111. with the result that Mrs. Canode. 
the regular substitute teacher, and 
Ceal Tierney. a visitor, have both 
teach Imsr. 



.Miss 
been 



1' < i( 

t: 

and 

)f 

I . 



hiiari hilt \v 



.1 



W.ls lii't 1' 
\<. • ' t k i r . t: 



-! I !.•!■ 



that a large rock had been thrown 
high into the air by a blast nearby 
and tliJit in attempting to get out of 
its wav iie, Idinded by the sun, ran 
dirt-ctly in its path ami \^a^ instantly 
killed. 

NASHWAFK HAPPENINGS. 

Na^Viwauk, Minn., May 22. — (Special 
t" ri-r Herald. 1 — Edward Logan and 
familv of Grand Raj. ids spent Sunday 
wltli friends hue. retuiiung !• iheir 
home Mondax'. 

E J. Cram has .sed a farm at 

Meadowland, ten - northwest of 

here, and is erecting a cottage on it, 
where he e.xpictK to remain this sum- 

HuKh Hlley has been 111 the past 
w« t k, 

I'oni ^oc.-in arrived Saturday from 
(;rand Marias. Mich., and is spending a 
few davs here with friend;-. 

Miss Maud Adams of HUddng and 
a 1. liner graduate of the Hlbbing 
hinU .school has taken cliarge of Miss 
Cliase's pupils at the si liool, the 

later being ill. 

Key, Henrv Htilme left Monday even- 
ing for IiuUith to attend tlie district 
1 ci'nference. 

Mrs. Luke o.'iborn was here fiom 
iKeewatin the first of the week. 

The Ladies .Md society met with 
Mrs Carl Lippincott Thursday after- 
noon. 

A pleasant surprise party was ten- 
dered Ml.ss Ruth Iiodson by the Sicilian 
clionis at her home Monday evening. 
(■anus were played and a good time 
was !iad by all. 

Fi.uik McCuUa Is spending a few 
da>s at Grand Rapids this week. 

midway'events. 

Midway. Minn.. .May 22.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — Mrs. Krlikson of Alborn, 
Minn., was the guest of Mr. and Mrs. 
Gust Johnson this week. 

Ml«s Gerda F:klund of Froctor is vis- 
iting with Miss Alma Strom. 

.\ilolph Johnson has acceided a posi- 



WIII BrLnK Pareuli* Wrni. 

Grand Rapids, >Iinn.. -May 22.— Milton 
Belts, who has been blacksmitlung for 
the t'rookston Lumber company at 
Fowlds. was in the city this week and 
left for New Brunswick, to return in 
a month with his parents, who will 
move here to make their home. Mr. 
Belts recentlv purchased the Art Mitch- 
ell place and his parents will live there 
for a time at least. 

. • — 

Flrr \^ arden Nnmed. 

(Jrand Rapids, Minn.. May 22. — 
Thomas Ward, for several years gen- 
eral agent of fit. Benedict's hospital, 
has been appointed fire warden for 
Itasca county by Gen. C. C. Andrews, 
chief warden of the state 

GO IN RAI VrO FUNERAL 

(Continued ftom page 1.) 



YOUNG DOE aPTURED. 

Had Been Chased By >V olves Into 
Trout Lake. 

Coleraine. Minn., V. 

In gal Is of the ! 
pany m'as tak 

launch on Tro 
surprised to 



pi"' 
from the shore. 

iiad been frig' • 

from the wood 

succ =■■'■■ ■'•■■■' '" 

plac 

the .,**"a,.'', *' • •'■ 



rilay 

•■:g 



Ed 

I com- 

s new 

he was 

rapidly 

which 

water : 

Mr. Ingall.s I 

„ ; ... do© and I 

iied animal on board ' 
iiiiif her lo the city I 



ue. 

;he 



GOLDEN ( 
LINK I 

V whiskey:..^! 



" Worth 
Asking Fori 

DANIEL ADERLE & 5CNS 
Saint pauu 



haven, to which Mr. Rogers had pre- 
sented a Masonic hall, and East lodge 
of New Bedford, of which the finan- 
cier had been an active member for 
more than tliirty years. 

I>uring the forenoon a drenching rah. 

fell 

At 10 o'clock the doors of the church 
were thrown open, and for an hour 
there was a procession of school chil- 
dren passing by the casket. From 11 
a m. until 1 p. m. the residents of the 
town were admitted to the church and 
permitted to gaze upon the features of 
the dead. 

The church was closed later and no 
(me was admit t<d except upon presen- 
tation of a ticket, the distribution of 
which had been limited to members of 
the Rogers family and personal friends 
of the decedent. 

The funeral services were private 
and were conducted by Rev. Dr. 
Ri)bert Collver, pastor emeritus of the 
Church of the Messiah, New York. 
Rev. Frank L. Fhalen, pastor of the 
Memorial church, assisted. 

The lnt»-rment was in the Rogers 
family tomb at Riverside cemetery, 
where rest the bodies of Mr. Rogers' 
father, his first wife and his daughter 
Mlllicent. The tomb is a replica of a 
classic Greek temple, and is situated 
on a knoll overlooking the Acushnet 
river. 

SENATE COMBINE ENDED 

(Continued from page 1.) 



Hale of the committee on finance, and 
when, after a time, there seemed a 
possibility of Mr. Hale's yielding. Sen- 
ator Clapp came to the front and said 
11 at if Mr. Hale did not stand by his ob- 
jection he (Mr. Clapp) would insist 
upon making one of his own. Even in 
the face of the opposition of these 
two stalwarts, Mr. Burton still pleaded, 
although without avail. 

Messrs. Hale and Clapp took the 
position that If the bars were once let 
down, there would be no end of re- 
quests for special action. As a result, 
the senate would be Hooded with legis- 
lation. Mr. Burton was told that there 
would be plenty of time for the sen- 
ate to act upon his resolution after the 
passage of the tariff bill. 

Nenntor Squalls. 

There were some scjualls yesterday 
on the senatorial sea, but notwith- 
standing the tariff bill made progress. 
A number of paragraphs were passed 
upon and while in most instances they 
were disposed of with the understand- 
ing that the senate might still return 
to them, it is the general opinion that 
little, if any. change will be made in 
most of them. 

The hou.se rates were retained in 
the polished plate glass paragraph, 
but with the understanding that when 
the bill Is taken up in the senate 
proper it now being considered as In 
the committee of the whole, there 
probably will be some alterations. The 
Republican progressive criticised the 
house rate as too high, while Senator 
Oliver, who represents the glass pro- 
ducing state of Pennsylvania. cQn- 
tended that the rate was entirely In- 
adequate to the proper protection of 
the plate glas.s industry. 

The inlerestB considered during the 
day ranged all the way from mica 
and feldspar to automobiles. Begin- 
ning with the earthenware schedule^ 
a number of committee recommenda- 
tions were adopted. 

FIRE HALL WILL 
NOT BE CLOSED 



Action on Lakeside Mat- 
ter Is P«stponed Until 
October. 

The Lakeside fire liall will not be 
closed June 1, according to a decision 
reached last night at a meeting of the 
board of fire commissioners. Mayor 
Haven, the council committee on the 
fire department and several Lakeside 
residents were present. 

Action on the closing proposition has 
been postponed until next October, and 
it Is believed that by that time there 
will be some way of providing the 
funds necessary to maintain the hall 
during the remainder of the year. 

The Lakeside delegation was headed 
by Theodore Holllsler and L. B. Man- 
lev, who entered a strong purotest 
against the proposed closing of the 
hall. The fire department fund is said 
to be Insufficient to pay running ex- 
penses for the year unless the Lake- 
side liall Is closed^ 

NEW DOCKS WILL 

MAKE LAKE PORT 

OF KNIFE RIVER 



no business in the way of legislation 
while the tariff bill is pending. 

Tlie refusal came in response to a 
request from Senator Burton to adopt 
a resolution authorizing the expendi- 
ture of unexpended balances of appro- 
priations for river and harbor work. 
He brought in a report of the commit- 
tee on commerce In support of his 
lesolutlon and made an earnest plea 
ti.r action' at this time, saying that If 
there was greater postponement, im- 
portant public works would suffer, as 
contracts must necessarily be made at 
this season of the year. The last river 
he said, had been 
upon the availability 
and he pleaded that 
the government was 



and harbor bill, 
passed In reliance 
uf thees balances, 
the good faith of 
involved in the matter. 
u\et A siera objection 



He, howover, 
from Senator 



the number will be Increased as the 
work progresses. 

The cedar and pulp wood yard is to 
be located south of the main track. 
It will be commodious and provide am- 
ple storage room for the vast quan- 
tity of timber products which accumu- 
late at Knife River during the winter 
months. The land Is being cleared as 
rapidlv a.s possible. The trackage 
through the ceaar yards will be ample 
for present and future needs. 

Another improvement that is under 
way is the building of an interlocking 
system at the Iron Range crossing, 
w-hich will minimize the danger to both 
road.s in the operation of their trains. 
The work is all under the supervision 
of H Schupp, chief engineer of the 
Duluth & Northern Minnesota road. 
OffioinlH Here. 
Russell A. -^Iger, F. W. Alger and 
Mr. Pike of Detroit, Mich., and R 
W. Arnold of Albany. N. Y.. all promi- 
nent stockholders In the Duluth & 
Northern Minnehola railroad, arrived 
in the city this morning from the East. 
They spent the mojning In a business 
conference at the company's office in 
the Lonsdale building. 

A special train will convey the party 
accompanied bv the local officials to 
Knife River this afternoon. They will 
spend the balance of today and tomor- 
row m.orning in looking over and in- 
specting the work being done, and ac- 
quire a better knowledge of the con- 
ditions there, on which to base the 
plans for the furtherance of the work 
and future Improvements. If time 
permits they may make a hurried trip 
of general inspection over the line 
north, returning to Dulutli over the 
Iron Range road tomorrow. 
Iti Keaobing Out. 
The Duluth ^ Northern Minnesota 
Is gradually creeping closer to the 
present terminus of the Canadian 
Northern at Gunfllnt. The extension 
of the road between mile post 50. or 
ihe small station of Finland, and mile 
post BO, a distance of ten miles, has 
been laid out for the construction 
work to be done this summer. Fin- 
land is the present end of the line and 
the last outpost of civilization in the 
course the Duluth & Northern Minne- 
sota road will take. 

The survey has been made Into the 
heart of an unbroken wilderness and 
about a mile and a half of the right 
of way has been graded. The country 
through which the extension will run 
Is so rough and wild that the work 
is necessarily slow and it is not ex- 
l-ected that the work will be ct»mplct<il 
and the track leveled lor traffic, much 
before the coming of cold weather. The 
road will cross the Manitou rivei. 

Tlip officials of tlie Duluth Ai North- 
ern strenuously deny that the build- 
ing of the ten-mile extension has any 
bearing on a possible future consolida- 
tion with the Canadian Northern. It 
Is a well-known fact that the latiei 
icad Is anxious to get into Duluth 
along the nortli shore, either by its- 
own line, or bv traftic agreement with 
the Iron Range or Duluth & North* rn 
.Minnesota. 

If the Duluth & Northern Is working 
north with the ultimate object of 
joining the Canadian Northern, the fact 
is being kept a profound secret offi- 
cially. The new construction work on 
the Duluth k Northern Minnesota is 
of a permanent nature. The roadbed 
and bridges are substantial and per- 
manent and not the kind usually asso- 
ciated with t.ie building of a logging 
road This lends some color to the 
many rumors In circulation regarding 
a consolidation. 

FORMER PROCTOR 
GIRL IS DEAD 



Tuesday by the illness of 
She will make an extend- 



(Continued f i om page 1.) 



trackage to the water's 



company's 
edge. 

Although the road taps a country 
prospectively rich in Iron deposits, 
the new dock has been planned w 'th no 
reference to ore shipments from Knife 
River The company uses annually 
about 20,000 tons of coal. Tl-ie dock 
will provltle accommodations for ves- 
sels of the coal trade, and also for 
boats carrying timber product3 to down 
lake ports. 

Capaotty «if 30,000 Tona. 

The new trestle stockpile will have 
a capacltv of about 30.000 tons of coal. 
It Is to "be built close to the main 
track, running to the water front and 
but a few hundred feet from the new 
dock A spur running parallel to the 
main line will give the needed trackage 
for coal cars. The Barnett & Record 
company have a force of about forty 
men now employed at Knife River, and 



Miss Katheryn C. Goed- 
nough Succumbs to At- 
tack of Typhoid. 

Proctor, Minn.. May 22.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — Word was received this 
week of the death of Katheryn C, only 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Good- 
nough. at their home in Minneapolis, 
on Mav IS. Katheryn had been sick 
for several weeks with typhoid fever. 
The funeral took place at the Metho- 
dist Episcopal church at Cumberland. 
Wl=! Mav 19, and interment was in 
Lakeside 'cemetery. Katheryn was 13 
vears 8 months and 2 days of age at 
the time of her death. Mr. and Mrs. 
Goodnough and children made Proctor 
their home for a number of years, mov- 
ing to Minneapolis about a year ago. 

Mrs, Philip Casey was called to btill- 



son of Mr. 
seriously ill 



Whal is Home Without 
an Up-:o-Date Iron Fence 




Makes H«inc Altrsrllvel WOl Last a Lifetime 
OUB PRICES WUl. SURPRISE YOU. 

J. S* RAY & CO., Superior St. 



water. Minn 
her mother, 
fed visit. 

A number of friends and neighbors 
surprised John tmith at hie home Tues- 
day evening, tlie occasion being his 
seventy-eighth birthday anniversary. 
A purse of money wa.s presented to Mr. 
Smith to show t'le esteem in which his 
friends hold liim. Lunch was served at 
tlie close of a pleasant evening. 

Louis Leese, driver for the Duluth 
Brewing & Malting company, was ar- 
rested Tuesday for selling liquor with- 
out a license. His bond was fixed at 
|100. which he furnished. His trial 
was set for May 26 and will be held 
before Justice M. S. Datkstader. 

Rev. C. W. Ramshaw held services 
at Oneota cemeteiy Thursday. The 
remaJTis of Neil Cameron and the in- 
fant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. R. Gei - 
ia< li were remived trom the vault and 
r>la< ed in the lemeteiy. 

.lohn Humrich was taken to St. 
Marys hospital at Dulutli Thursday 
afternoon of this week in a very seri- 
ous condition. 

The Ladies of the Mf>dern Maccabees 
initiated a class of eandidatcs at their 
regular meeting at the hall Wednesday 
evening, at which a large crowd was 
present. 

The Ladits" Aid Society of the M. B. 
church wili meet at the home of Mrs. 
William McWelty on next Thursday 
afternoon. May 27. 

Mrs. C. A Green was surprised by a 
party of ladies last Monday afternoon, 
the day being Mr. and Mrs. Green's 
fourth wedding anniversary. Cards 
were played at three tables. Miss Kate 
Beutner capturing tlie head prize and 
Mrs. Nelson the consolation prize. A 
dainty luncheon was served, which was 
en.1o.v"ed by all. A beautiful cut glass 
l^owi was presented to Mrs. Green. 

Mrs. F. S. Bird, who underwent an 
operation at .-^t. Mary's hospital. Du- 
luth, last Friday, returned home on 
Thursday. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. U But trick returned 
to Proctor last week from Peoria, III., 
where thev have been for the past year. 

Miss Irene Findlan left Wednesday 
for a short visit with friends at Spoon- 
er, M'ls 

Miss Tessie Dolan spent Sunday at 
Cloquet with her brother. 

Mrs. Jamis I'tppin spent a few days 
in Eveleth this week. 

Mr. Van Leer, president of the North- 
western consolidated district and busi- 
ness agent for District No. 32. was in 
the village Tuesday and gave an in- 
teresting talk to the I. A. of M. lodge. 

Gordon Wood si'cnt a few days this 
week In Alborn with friends. 

H. H. Gilderman was taken wMth a 
serious attack of appendicitis W^ednes- 
dav, and tn Thursday morning was 
taken to St. .Marys hospital, where he 
was operated on, and latest reports 
show him doing nicely. 

Tlie basket social given Monday even- 
ir.g by the Brothtrhood of Railway 
Carmen was a decided success, both 
financiallv and socially A large crowd 
attended and dancing was enjoyed un- 
til a late hour. 

Clarence Swanson only 
and \rrs. Al Swanson, Is 
with bronchitis. 

Joe Shovein a machinist apprentice, 
had the misfortune to have one of his 
hands badly cut last week while at 
his work. 

Mrs. Charles Peterson has been quite 
ill with la grippe the past week. 

The Dartmouth Sewing club was en- 
tertained bv Misses Eunice Speck and 
Ethel Lillk last Saturday afternoon. A 
pleasant afternoon was spent and a 
dainty luncheon was served. 

Miss Mary Keating has taken a po- 
sition in Proctor market as bookkeeper 
during Miss Bird's absence. 

Mis.e Irene Findlan and Miss Luclle 
Sullivan left Wednesday for a visit at 
Spooner Wis. 

Last Wednesday afternoon Mrs. Ash- 
peek was pleasantly surprised by a 
number of her friends. Cards were 
played and a dainty luncheon served. 

Mre. George Govett had as her guests 
last Frldav Miss Laura Govett of Iron 
Junction and Miss Ethel Ericson, one 
of the local teachers. 



/ 




H 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: SATURDAY, MAY 22. 1909. 



HERALD'S WEST DULUTH DEPABTIHiEWT 



BRANCH 



J J. Morna. 405 Central Arr. 



OIKirKSi 
A. Jen«eH> 



S30 North 57th Are. Wmmt. 



BIG DAY FOR 
BOATOWNERS 

Two Races Will Be Held 
in West Duluth To- 
morrow. 






\\:i.s toll chert 
was taken. 



upon, but H'j dettnite 



Little (iirl Dies. 



Dixie and Bullet Will Race 

to New Duluth and 

Back. 



BMnday will 

forward with 

morntiiB ra*--* 
Motire will 

. 1 \i 

t. 



the 



b« a bin day for 

a i*t Wrst Diilulli. 

liiiflastts are looking 

much fntcreat to the 

,,!"«rr,>w when Casalua 

< nuUel against 

A il'lo ht't of $50 1> 

. -.suU ana many wasfers art? 

l,©l„i; t.-dav as to the outcome. 

As >>t cMitaln raiser, a pre- 

lirniT. tit will he pulled off In 

%vi...li !..- uwnersi have already eii- 
t>i-.l 1' *4. Phillips. Jean Bouchard 
anil xV 11. Armatrong 
an entry. There 
up on thlm affair. ,,. ^ . 

Tlif B-illet-IMxie event will start at 
!•> .»\-ltK-k tomorrow mornluK Irom 
Ctiro'3 hoathouse at \Ve.-?t DuhiU. 
the h.iHt» IV ill speed to New l>i. ut 
and hai-k 



Tlie H-year-old dauxhter of Mr. and 
Mrs. CharU-!* Dion, ill North Flfty- 
llrat avenue west, died at 1 o'clock tntd 
morning at the home of her parents 
of diphtlieria, A private funeral will 
be held lomorr'>w 

West Duluth Churches. 

Kfv K VVuiri!or« will conduct serv- 
ices In the Kntflish lanKuage tomorrow 
evening at Immanuel Evangtillcal 
Lutheran rtiurch of tlie Synod. Fifty- 
seventh avt-nut- west and Rormevelt 
street. Sun Jay sciijol will be held at 
the usual hour in the morning. 

Revr. J. O. Leitch will preach his 
farewell aerni.in s,'i'>r.- leaving on hl.s 
totir of Scutiaua an.l Europe, tomor- 
row morning at 10.30 o'clock at the 
Westminster Presbyterian church. The 
Christian Endeavor will meet at 7:4a 

In the evening 

• • • 

•■Li'.-<f§on.-' Kroru tin- A-ncenslon of Our 
'■ : 1 Lurd" will he the subject "f 
■ nlrsg sermon tomorrow, at 10:45 
,,.,M„, by Dr. Roderick J. Mooney. 
pastor, at the Holy Apostle Episcopal 
church, F'lfty-seventh avenue west and 
Elinor street. Sunday school will fol- 
low immediately after the sermon 

• • • 

At the Asbury M. E. church. Rev. 
Thomas Grice will conduct morning 
and evening service tomorrow. The 
morning topic, at 10:30 o'clock, la 
"Truth Speaking," and that of the 
evening service, at S o'clock, la "The 
Frizes of Life." Miss Eva McLyman 
will 8lng a solo at the morning meet- 
ing, and the choir will render a spe- 
cial musical i.rogram at the evening 

I services. Sunday school will he lield 
at 11:1', a. m.. and Epwurtli league will 

I meet at 7 o'clock, with W E. Bur- 

I tun as leader 



ALWAYS SOMETHING DOING ON 
THE GOOD OLD STEiSMER TROY 



The survey of the steamer Troy this 
afternoon to ascertain the damage done 
In the colllHion last evening with the 
J. .1. Hill, disclosed the fact that she 
Is but slightly damaged and will prob- 
ably be able to run througii the season 
without dry docking. The worst dam- 
age was to stern plates, which were 
badly bent, forcing the deck up sev- 
eral inches. The vessel will go out 
tonight as scheduled. 

Marine men are gettint? 



a.'i'ustomed 



to tlie Troy as a sensation maker. 



It 



c 



ODTY iKDEFS 



D 



today eacli made 
are also side bets 



and 



West Duluth Briefs. 



0,t 



SLAG USED FOR 
PAVEMENT 



Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Mu>;gl 
returned to Hlbblng after a 
In West [)uhuh. 

Over iOO couple attended the 
given la.*)t evening at the Great 
ern hall by Old Hickory 
W. A , , 

For Rent — NiccU r'lrni.Mlied 



r« 

irt 



hav»' 
.^lay 



ilance 

East- 
Camp, M. 

room. 



l*rlutluK nntl Ilookbiniling. 

Thwlng-Stewart Co. Phones 114. 

• 

MuMic At the SipaidlnK- 

Sunday. Wednes.lay and Saturday 
evenings. Cafe.^ of highe.st standard. 

♦ 

Go tu U««. H. Laybourn 
For surety bonds. 14 I'hoenlx block, 
— > ■ 
To Play at Moone Lake. 
The Spalding ba.se ball team will 
leave tonight tor Moose Lake, where 
Sunday they will play with tlie team 
representing that pk-.ce 
■ 
Label L.euKUe MeetliiR. 
The Women s Label league will mee . 
Monday evening at 7:;)0 in Kalamazoo 
hall There will he a business meetmg 
lifter which, a social session will be 
lield. 



was the -Troy -tMat three years ago 
made the interstate bridge look 
like a Duluth backyard before the 
spring clean-up. 3he got away with a 

few 3Ct*£Lt-Cll63 

It was the Troy that had the distinc- 
tion of opening navigation this year 
between Chicago and Buffalo A few 
days later she added to her laurels by 
breaking through the ice at Whlteftsh 
and being the f^rst package frelgliter 
to reach Duluth this season. 

The Troy is owned by the Western 
Transit company, and, in spite jJ' her 
oddities, is one of the best and moat 
reliable vessels In the freight business. 



people from Duluth and nearby towns 
left today for the Bitter Root valley. 
Montana Mr. Kn'idsen will show niem- 
bers of the party farming lands whnjh 
he Is advlsiug them to settle on. 
■ 

l.eavm fur Butte. 

N. F. Hugo, president of the Alex 
Scott Copper company, left today for 
Butte. Mont, where ho will .superin- 
tend the installing of new machinery 
at the property 

■ . » 

Annual Meeting. 

A. D. Goodman of the Duluth Lni- 
veraal Milling company will leave early 
next week for i^'hfcago, where he will 
attend tlie me..'Ung of the National 
Federation«of Mill<jr% 
■ 
C'liarleM .>la<*vengli Here. 

Charles Macveagh .)f New York, gen- 
eral solicitor "for the Steel corporation, 
was in L»u!uth yesterday to confer 
with Frank B. Kellogg, ^jeneral counsel 
for the Ollvah Iron Mining company. 



LAST DAY OF 
THE CLEANUP 

Campaign Against Dirty 

Yards Has Been Very 

Successful. 

School Children Putting 

Finishing Touches 

on the Job. 



DOWNWARD 
ON UJMBER 

Indications Point to Con- 
cessions to the Mid- 
dle West. 



Ive lane in Settled. 

Claiming that he delivered to 
Duluth. Rainy Lake & Winnipeg rai.- 
load li-e valued at |190.»0. Theodore 
Barker was about to sue the company 
for this amount, when the attorneys 
for l)oth slde.s got together yesterday 
aitcini.ou and settled tli<* matter for 

51fi& 

• 
C«!W Settled Out of Court. 

Th" ca.se of Markt-.s M-lvlu agaiiust 
I lie Zenith Cedar company for 1-^8. 
which Melvln claimed was due him 
work done for the cedar Oi>mpanv. 
settled yesterday afternoon out 
court for 1175. 



the 



for 
was 

of 



Slag from the Z»n 
pany Is being used 
imbllc 



works for 



ilh Furnace com- 
by the hoard of 
paving Ralclg 



at re 
1, 

W 1 1 1 ' 1 1 V ■ 

Y ester 

p.,. .., , 

b 
].< 

) I 

iiin ove 
Will ' 
It I 

wUI 



; !■' m 



ntral avenue west. Tho 

H its di.=>po.sal f3;>0 with 

j, itrclia.se the slag, 
lay a crew of laborers was 
( -k removing the old cedar 
oeparing the street for the 
is to be several 
After .he s: ■ 
st"#un roller v. 
anil l!u' surface 



...ag. which 
ii tliickness. 

li put in. a 
A- li..- strr.-t. 

'■■ ttiat 



a, t ' 



■It 1 



>ur blocks 



WANT A (JAMK. 

West Duhith ( hanipiou Boy Team Is 
Out tor Blood. 



with board. 4^2 Not tli Fifty-ninth 
avenue we.sl. 

The Oak Ht i.l ly tlic ruppers 

tomorrow on v..- ,,ittcis urounds in 
the i:a3t end, Superior 

Watch repairing. Hurst, W. t>uluth. 

The L.iidles Auxiliarv. Independent 

Order of Foresters will entertain 

after the r-<iii,ii- !i:>.-tiiii; Tioirs.lay 

night with .1 -•.■■: . ; .11. a dancr. 

Mrs. Chris j..hi.s..i! of ZO South 
-Sixtv -ninth av.uii.' w.st, entertained 
the Kpworlh League Sewing Circle of 
the Second Norwegian -Danish M. K. 
church at her home this aftern.>on 

For sale— A carload of new mil li 
row.H. also a number of liorses. Ai«ply 
to .Fohn Winness. Ramsey street and 
Central avenue, West Duluth. 

Tlu- Li'Mf <:itl's Society of Our Sav- 

i.,rs! V,,'vvogi:ni Liitlo-raii chun-h, was 

\ thi.s af'.-rn.).oi at the home 

:!iam.un, .Sixiii.-th avenue west. 

Lseii of 45'K> State .■itreet, is 

■ MO and around aRTain after a 

rheumatism. 

of the Merrltt Mem- 

IL. ciiurch has r>.--en redecor- 



.1. 



ahl.' 

ne-. 
'I 

orSal 



M. 



lurch is being 



year 
leu I 

the .>,i ;..'-. 

war path. 

A 
12-v 
I 

H 

at'. line: 

The T 
\ 

r. 
I 

h 

li'sd. 'i 

Luuh-!' 

T.' 
at \'- 



l>niiiti. Tisers. who hi-- 
itiiT.j.or-ih Ip iion.ii'H in a:: 

..t all teams ;:, 
,;. _. : ; ...It again 'o- th- 

; , berui iH.sueo to any 

a the Heaj of the 

» :fc;ers would like to get 

to trim up the Eagles. 

amateur out til 

me up as 



ated. and the entire 
overhauled and reiiov it.-. I 

The funeral of Mrs L\lia Rlchard- 

■•• f.'ok place tliis> .iiicrn.jon at i 

'■< from the Merritl Memorial M. 

;. ,;.urch„ Rev H. F Slhh! officiating. 

Burial was at « mei.t^i . • 

Ti.-kels f . .>!■ from ! , '••-* 

tixren, Lovve..*r j)rh .*.s. 

. ,!ik.s- We de.^tre to eKt.oid 

.>nr ii.arii thanks to Tent No. ;:. K. 
O T M, for the t»rompt payment of 
tiielr *1 OOO c:.!; , for the sudden 

deatft ..f our i i lirother. Arthur 

W Snifth wl«i rl. .le.ssle L. Smith. 
Mrs. W. F \\ rmht. sisters 



Uefendnut AnkM Judgment. 

.ludgment n.jtwlthstaii ding the ver- 
aict !s asked by the attorneys for the 
street railway company In the case 
that was on trial the earlv part of last 
wi-ek. m which M. C. Miller was given 
$461 for a broken cab. If tlie Judgment 
is denied, they 



'fhert of Coat. 

Carl Hanson, alias McKeon, believed 
to be a prize tighter, was arrested last 
night, charged with the theft of an 
overcoat from tlie office of the Duluth 
Posten. 



This is 
named "by 
municipal 
suits have 



the last of the three days 

Mayor Haven for a general 

cleanup. Satisfactory re- 

heen accomplished, and the 



InapeetH luelnerator. 

A. Caplan of .Minneapolis, represent- 
ing tlie Decarie Patent Incinerator 
company, which built the Duluth Incin- 
erator, in livtU«rfity today looking over 
the plant. He says better results are 
h.'ing obtained hero, under existing 
eondltlons, tlian at any other point 
where a slTntlar incinerator Is estab- 
lished. He finds the expen^i of burn- 
ing garbage in Duluth amounts to 
about 50 cents a ton. and says fhis can 
he further reduced with tli3 p an: run- 
ning to full capacity, whi-h is not the 
case at th* -present time. 



will ask a new trial. 



Lodce (;eti» ^ew Trial. 

lohn H Norton, counsel tor the 
.^lod.-rn Wo.>dfnen of America, yester- 
.iav afternoon tiled an appeal in dis- 
trict court In the case of OlUe M. 
Bam hard against the order to r^^^over 
her husban.l's insurance policy ot 
11 000. The case was tried recently, 
anil the iurv at that time br.)uglit in a 
fot- the plaintiff. The motion 
•vv iHal was granted. 



\'ei- 

fot 



diet 

J n- 



Delegatei* lieturn. 

The local .lelegates from the Duluth 
lodge of Pytiiian Sisters have returned 
from tlie grand lodge, which was held 
at St Paul The lo.-al delegates were 
Past Grand t^hlefs Enuna .J. Wicks am* 
Lu<-v Purdy: Grand Lodge Officer Ma.y 
Culilffe and Representatives Be.ssie 
• )wens Altha Dillon. Oliver Wigginton 
and Emma J organ. Emily Pease ol 
Redwood Falls was ele--ted grand chlet 
and May Cutliffe of this city was 
ed grand manager of the grand 



Horwe In Killed. 

One of Panton & White's delivery 
horses was struck by a railroad loco- 
motive at Twer.t.y-fifth avenue west 
this morning, and its leg was broken. 
The animal had to be shot. The boy 
driver did not see the approaching 
•niglne. and started to drive across the 
tracks in front of it. 



three days' campaign for doing away 
with garbage, refuse and dirt Is de- 
clared to have been a big success. 

People generally entered enthusias- 
tically into the spirit of the occasion, 
and everybody situated in a position 
to do so. pitched in and did what they 
could to lielp the movement along. The 
result is a much better looking city 
than existed earlier in the week. 

This being Saturday, tlie school chil- 
dren are being pressed Into service, 
and are tinisliing up work started by 
their elders. The younger generation 
is putting a good deal of energy into 
the work, and by tonight there will be 
very tew untidy yards in the city. 
The street cleaning department lias 
also been displaying unusual ardor in 
Its work, and the streets are most of 
them clean and neat in consequence. 

This is the first year that three 
days have been named for the cam- 
paign. Last season only one day was 
set aside for municipal cleaning work, 
and as the weather was bad not very 
much was accomplished. It had been 
rather cool ever since Thursday morn- 
ing, but there has been no rain, and, 
the main, conditions were right for 



Aldrich Yields to Its De- 
mand Regarding Tariff 
Revision. 



NOTICE 

Our Shop Will Be Open 
I'ntll 10 p. ni., Satur- 
day lOveniug, May ::2nd. 

For the purpose of demonslrat- 
ing and tilting slioes with our 
much talked about 

Detachable 

Twin Rubber 

Heels 

The Helmbach Rubber Heel Co. 

Located in the I niou t'lotbinK & 
Shoe Store, 405-407 \\ e.tt Supe- 
rior Street. 



FROM TIIE 
WASHINGTON 



HERALD 
BUREAU 



in 

the cleanup 



^ampaign. 

• 



EPIDEMIC OF 
RESIGNATIONS 



may be re- 
of rates of 
the interests 



A 

lead 

try 

cine 



elect- 
lodge. 



to-sr h 



ire. rigui 
• r or leit 

ilO hiise. <■> 

v:u-.s..:i ) 



illows. Her- 
;: Earl Ed- 
I. Frank 

ild. i»ltch- 
1. Charll« 
hi: Peter 

! laker. 

.-.ouer 

.;uioi. Cius 

i.L 




he I 



l.OST ( HILI). 



Taken to 



Little Harold Realaud Is 
the Police Station. 

Li,ti., K. v.:<i -..hi Harold Realand 



binis 
%t W 
lolm 
lutli 

1 

t 



L-jil Duluth. 

Cram and 

Slilti 



ost 

..; I '.-n 1 rai avenue, 

ana wa.s picked up by 

taken to the West Du- 



TABLE d'HOTE DINNER. 

50c 

Sanday. May 23. 5 lo8p. m 



Combine price and quality 
dine with us Sunday evening, 
spare nothing to pro. luce the 
iii.Ml<, in the .-ity. 

"The < afe of Uunllty." 
11 F. HOW Kits, Mjsr. 



and 
We 

1 1 e .H t 



Park Point tiuild. 

The annual meeting of the 
Point guihl will be held Tuesday 
noon of next week at the home 
Chamberlain of Thirty-fifth 
Park- Point. The election of 
will take place and will tie 
l)v an informal social. Tho lettrlng 
..ffi.era are: President. Mrs. Walter 
1.1 . vice president. Mrs Chatnber- 

.■retary, Mrs. Hultqulst <- 

..lis Harrington 



Park 

after- 

of Mrs. 

street. 

ofticers 

followed 



1 outagiouM Honpital. 

prints for the new municipal 

o,s h.j.spital are '»'iw complete. 

>r the contract for building 

!:e will be opened early in 



Free DeafneHH Cure. 

remarkable offer by one of the 
ng ear specialists in this coun- 
wTio will send two months' medi- 
free to prove his ability to cure 
Deafness. Head Noises and Catarrh. 
Address Dr. G. M. Branaman. 37 East 
Twelfth street. Kansas City. Mo. 



May Festival! 



Minneapolis Symphony 
Orchestra 

Three Graod Concerts. 

Lyceum Theater. School Matinee at 



J oat 



Kli 



(barged With AaiUiult. 

Hal.;y was arr sted this morning, 
charged witli a.s.saulting Patrick J^ 
.McDonald. The arrest was made at the 
corner of Third avenue west and t^u- 
uerlor .street, where the tw.) men were 
ttifh'lfg Hjley claims McDonald called 
iiim' vlh» names, v.hlcii started the 
ul»le McDonald's hearing was set 



troi 

for 



next 



Monday, and sentence on 
i withheld until this after- 
pleaded gull' V " 1 ' he as- 
.;e. 



Ol. 



'■.■', low luni ;i " 
ri ills hew 
■ • ■■•o. ma. - 
- lime 
. ,,.;,. ,;;. 1 in S..I1I 
1 1 lie wa.-* at ih 
home by liei 
M Raleigli -strtel. 



forgot - 
lit, but 

' iiki. it 



LINEN SHOVVKR. 

Paitv Is tilven in Honor of Miss 
Amanda Olson. 

A linen shower wa.s niv-oi hist even- 
home ot Mrs. C. G. Peterson 
:t!i Fifty-ninth avenue west. 
.Miss An. an. la Olson, who 



In ii.H...r 



mat 



to Edward 



111 en t 



SAYS MORSE 
IS VICTIMIZED 

Wife of the Former 

Banker Also Charges 

Blackmail 



New Y.>ik. May J J.- Mis. 
Morse, wife of Chaii s W 
former banker, asserted li 
view today that hm;; .i^" i* 
in iKiwer vowed that tliey 
her husband and tliat titey 
vuw agalns' 



nlS we: .1. 

;.ie:^eiit w ■ -^1 1'- 

Aioierson Mr. .mi 
Mr. and Mr.s. t . G. !'■ 
1". Peterson, Mrs 
.\niia l.ai-S(jn. 3- 

\ nnie Oi-s"i., \.~ 
-on. Selma P' 

I .-.ri -on. ' '''■' ' ' 

-n. Selma 






.:!, lol 
Ml-S. 

•tei - 



O'Se 
Ulls 



■fh 



.h 



.\i 



i 1 .1 



o:i.! h 



h os,ja!id'.s 
-. ',- !«■ I'sons 

.,-y 
the 



\- I 

N:. 



kiu::-l. 



( Uonentlne 

Morse, the 

.1; inter- 

-■■■sons high 

W-Olhi i ■liii 

tin'.- ke;*! 

■ -uth. Mrs. 

■■• -f- 

■ :i<i 

iiiil Mrs. 

.f h.-M-'V.* the 

lo the 

eiietm-,'s. 

know my lius- 

doUar owed to 

Bank of North 

iltng. "Of an 

■> more than 

■d it Mr. 

! not owe 

r,. ' * ' me 



i.ii: 



;l I 



VVeddinir Kept Set ret. 



The annonii' 



■ ,i ih 



1 .January wed- 
o West l»ulutiv 
much to the .siii 

.»ii!ig peopi'- 



iii be 
and 



used 
his 



.1 

duet, 

tlot 
hi.' 

reguhl 
lies at 



Sale ot «io»«!«ard t or«et«, 

M Gidding & Co. v/lll con- 

,,,.xr we.jk, a special demonstra- 

f tlie Gossard and L'lrreslstl- 

$'. and |H value.^. at $3.50. 

'- and $25 val- 



^l-s values at ♦■" 



i li. m. 

FKIUAY. MAV 3«i 
Grand Symphony, Night at 
SATl ltI>AY, .MAY 2«« 

(>raud Popular Matinee nt 
Orand Opemtic Night at 
.SoloiMtn — Louise Ormsby. 
May Plumb. Garnett 
thur Mlddleton. 



8:15. 



U:30. 
S!l5. 

Esther 
Hedge. Ar- 
Rtchard t^zerwon- 
ky (Violin). i:arlo Fischer .Cello.) 
Conductor — Emll Oberhoffer 

Seats, $1.50, $1.00, 75c and 51)0. 
School matinee seats. H^c. ISc and 25c. 
.Sale opens at Lyceum Theater. Mon- 
day morning. ^ 





miki 



V H. San del 
in the city for 

Mr and Mrs: 
children sailed 
New York OB 



steamer Cleveland. 



s <}( Syiacurfc. N. Y , is 
■a short business trip. 
John Sebenius and two 
for Europe to<iay from 
t,he Hamburg-American 



IS. 



.) i 



Northland Prlntery. 

printir.K '"all Z.-r.ith 



I M. 



board of 
yesterday. The award 
go to Dunning & Dunning, 
clie Frankfort lnsuran.:e 



Rork fruxher luwuranee. 

Hid for furnishing liaidlily Insur- 
an.e for th.e city rock crusher were 
..f.ened at the meeting of the 
piil.'.l,. works 
will probably 
representing 
company 

■ 
r««ie Im UianilM'ted. 

.Jacob Stubler. charged with letting 
women frequent his saloon, located on 
Superior street, just west of Third ave- 
nue west was given a hearing In po- 
ll, e court yesterday. and the case 
iKilPst hnn -VIS ilsrulsaed upon 
|,a.n.'-!it ■>•: t i 'costs of t- ' 

11. >a. 



For 




the 



a 

.iade 



Lumber Buninenn Iletter. 

I G Ketcham. general sales manager 
..r the Rainy Lake A Virginia Lumber 
company, returned yesterday from an 
Eastern trip Mr. Ketcham stated that 
the g»-neral lumber business Is improv- 
ing and that the present month should 
witness a big improvement in th.- sales 
uf lumber througliout the country. 
> 
On the Continent. 

Capt. Alex M.Dougali, who Is so- 
journing for a time in the capitals ot 
the Old World, has written Capt. 
Thomas H. Pressnell from Paris that 
he la having a fine time. He men- 
tions Paris especially as a city that 



with three 

late Mr E 

was killed 

best loca- 

Mrs. E. C 

ViO' tjiiestnut ' street. Virginia. 



Saloon Stock and Fixtures, 
years' lease. .)wned by the 
C. Rudd of Virginia, who 
by a train April :J6th, last 
tlon in the city. Apply to 
rtudd, 
Minn. 



An epidemic of resignations has 
broken out in the Y. M. C. A. and sev- 
eral of the best men have severed 
their active connection with the local 
organization. 

W H. Llppold, the educational secre- 
tary, has tendered his resignation to 
take effect Aug. 1. following the lead 
of the physical directors. A. J. Frey 
and Al Olson, who are to leave the 1st 
of September. _ , , ^, 

J H. Ballou and H. G. Sydow of the 
Y M. C. A. staff resigned recently and 
both have left the city. Ge.uge Mur- 
ray one of the assistant secretaries, 
has also handed in his resignation, 
although he is still attending to hi.s 
duties at the association building. 

PRISONER WITH 
MANY ALIASES 

E R. Nelson, alias Carl Hanson, 
alias Charles McKeon, was sentenced 
to thirty days in jail or a $r>0 fine, m 
municipal court tliis morning, for petit 
1 fi. t* c t* n V 

He was arrested for the theft of an 
overcoat from the office of the Duluth 
Posten The lo.ss of the coat was re- 
ported to the police, and Detective 
Terry found It in one of the .superior 
street pawn shops. The proprietor of 
the place told him that the .same man 
had pawned a pair of field glasses at 
a store across the street. The detec- 
tive succeeded in arresting Nelson, and 
after he got him to the police station 
a telephone call came from Superior 
that a pair of field glas.ses had been 
stolen from the tug Bayfield. 

In court this morning Nelson adnilt- 
ted stealing the field glasses, but de- 
nied all knowledge o f the co at. 

ROGERS' CHILDREN 
$4,000,000 APIECE 



New York. May 22 —H. H. Rogers, a 
short time before his death, distributed 
a portion of his fortune among his 
four children. It is understood that 
he gave $4 000.000 each to H. H. Rogers. 
Ir and to his three daughters. Mrs. 
W' E Benjamin. Mrs. Urba H. Brough- 
ton and Mrs. W R. Coe. 

The remainder of his estate, mainly 
in the form of stocks and bonds of 
railr.iad and industrial companies, will 
be disposed of by his will, which has 
not yet been made public. Fixceptlng 
any public bequests In which Mr. 
Roger.s' early home of Fairhaven. 
Mass may share, the main part of 
the estate is said te be divided among 
Mr Rogers' wld.iw and his children. 



Washington, May 22. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Indications today point 
to a downward revision of the lumber 
schedules, embodying concessions to 
the sentiment of tlie Middle West by 
the ultra-protectionists, who are in 
control of the senate. 

That concessions will be nflade to the 
Northwestern senators now seems as- 
sured. These senators have been for 
weeks hard at work in an effort to 
secure substantial concessions on lum- 
ber, and now it Is confidently asserted 
that they have convinced Chairman 
Aldrich of the finance committee, that 
the lumber schedule as reported is un- 
fair to the consumer, and 
vised, with a reduction 
duty, without prejudice to 
of tlie lumber Industry. 

An informal announcement is made 
todav that Chairman Aldrich will rec- 
ommend to the finance committee that 
the lumber schedule be redrafted. The 
compromise on lumber that Is now 
under way. it Is said, contemplates re- 
duction In tho duties in finished lum- 
ber. The rates on the pending bill on 
such products range from $1.50 to $3.50 
per 1.000 feet. 

Senator Aldrich has reached no 
elusion as to what would be a 
differential, but he is said 
vinced that the present 
cessive. 

There is prospect that the final 
agreement between those who advocate 
free lumber and those who Insist upon 
protected lumber will affect both rough 
and finished products. The free lum- 
ber advocates would be satisfied with 
a Hat rate of $1.50 on all grades of 
lumber. This involves an Increase of 
.'(0 cents per 1,000 feet on rough lum- 
ber, which was taxed at the rate of 
$1 by the Payne bill as it passed the 
house. 

There is no doubt that the rates on 
finished lumber will be reduced. All 
the missionary work now being done 
by the Northwestern senators is 
ward securing a flat rate of $1.50 
all grades of forest i)roducts. 



ARE YOU SAVING ANHHING 

Over a hundred p^^l*.,' at the 
Head of the Lakes ar* puJWng their 
savings into the Isle of Pines lands. 
They are procuring Cor themselves 
an income for life, and in' five years 
will be able to tell the iioss to give 
th'em their time, they have a better 
thing. , ^ 

We can tell you how it is done. 
Come and talk it over. 

We will return from the Island 
about June 10th. where we now aro 
looking up the choicest lands. 

SHEPHERD Sl CHANDLER, 

'ZiM Manhattan nidg- 



to 
rates 



con- 
fair 
be con- 
are ex- 



MUCH PAVING 
FOR WEST END 



The West end Is In the throes of a 
paving epidemic. All the property 
owners, apparently, are posses.sed with 
the improvement "bug," and tliere are 
likely to be big results 



the line of 



to- 
on 



.^ihl sh 



ghi.iiy to pay I; 



^^\ 



i 



.>*ol.i 
claim.-. 

.■laiiii 



h" 



Hi 



re 
I 

.lict 
iuarrle.i a 
an. I kept 



Miss 
ift>- 

V!r 



Pra 



•ticaiiy al 

!;ai;'lsome 



,jf tiie 
VioiTie at 



\ lien 1 leil\ e I .shall 

n't know vvh.-re 1 
I. 



ievvelry 

st her 

a her 

but 

•riety. 

furnishings of 

7r)H Fifth ave- 

■dd 

.nd 

':r lier 

1: home; 



llclll 



\T' 



Auto Tiijj. 



HILL PIIOVIDKS INIFORM 
WISCONSIN FiSHINii SK 



to 

IJI 



'v'b'i liua. I" 



'I': 



( 'o III ill I' n- ill I ( lub Meet in if. 

,. ( •.. 1 1 'club tiehl I 



in. 



Mii;-Mi, Wi.s.. May 2'2 — The 

1. . ■ . ■ .t.. . Kill, which came 

;iTM\i<l' t'-'i \ 

.11. opciu.'ii.: I'M 
remains m 
-n.'T S..J limited to ■•liv 
, i of tuo The bill 
sy.>tern under 




giv- 



the cli 

r. to h. 

requiring 

■ intee. 



Deputy 

iiJ. 



new 
into 
11 ni- 
.' 1. 
•d. 

puts 

civil 

for the appoitit- 

e warden by the 

rned by the sen- 

$3,000 bond by the 

wardens must 



I r 



up to Its 
w.)rd t" 
Britain. 



reputation. 

>,iy of ', 



and he 



also 

f 



Firm 1m UiHNOlved. 

The contracting firm in which J.jhn 
Bergman. Fred Engle and Simon John- 
son have been partners, was l"c;a;'y 
dissolved yesterday In the district 
court. The partners got Into per.sonal 
dlfricultles that eventually reached the 
court The case was dismissed and 
th»» receiver ordered to turn over the 
firms assets to the defendant's attor- 
ney. 



Gen. 
.army, 
Davis, 
nephew. 



«;cu. Oavlm Here. 

J. M K. Davis, United States 

retired accompanied by Mrs, 

is In the city visiting their 

J H Hoarding, of the Oliver 



Mining company 
from the Pacific 
to Wasl.ington. 



They have just 
coast and are en 



come 
route 



SCHREIBER SEES 
HIS DEAD BABY 



William Schreiber. the condemned 
murderer, who has been a prisoner at 
the county jail since his conviction, 
awaiting the sentence that may send 
him to the gallow.s. was this after- 
noon given a chance to look for the 
last time on the face of his dead child. 

A stop wa.s made at the jail as the 
body was being taken to the cemetery 
for "interment. The little casket was 
taken into the jail offl.je and Schreiber 
was permitted to leave his cell, and, 
under the watchful eye of tlie Jailor, 
to spend a few brief momenta with his 
wife and child. 

Schreiber didl not show much emotion 
when the casket wa-s opened. He stood 
t>y silently for a few minutes and 
then taken back to his cell, 
no feeling over his baby's 
made no comment when the 
closed and he was taken 
jailer. 



COPPER STOCKS 
ARE STRONGER 

North Butte Recovers 

Much of Losses of 

Previous Day. 

The copper stocTc market advanced 
during all of the short session today. 
North Butte regaining much of the loss 
incurred during yesterday's bear raid 
on the stock. 

North Butte opened at $56, advanced 
to $59.2.j and closed at $59.50 bid and 
$60 asked. Amalgamated opened 



In 
street work this summer. . 

Much enthusiasm in the projected 
Improvement of Twenty-ninth avenu.# 
west was shown at the meeting of 
property owners In the West end laat 
night, and plans for other street work 
were discussed. 

It is now proposed to pave Superior 
street from Twenty-fifth avenue west, 
tlie end of the present pavement, to 
Thirtieth avenue west. There is ahso 
a plan on foot to pave First street for 
several blocks in the West end. and 
anotlier plan to pave Second street. 

Several of the West end streets are 
in bad condition, and the property 
owners have evidently awakened to 
the necessity of improving them. 
• 

Twice in the Same Place. 

William Reamer was fine<i $30 and 
costs, or sixty days In jail, in municiiial 
court this morning, on a disorderly 
conduct charge, and the same amount 
Ol fine for contempt of court. 

With his brother he became en- 
gaged in an altercation with t.>ur \uh- 
trians in the Incline saloon, .seventli 
avenue west and Superior street, yes- 
terday afternoon. He was arrestcl 
some "time ago on a similar charge, ami 
was released on his own recognizance. 
Fal'ing to show up in court at the ap- 
pointed time, lie was charge.! with con- 
tempt of court, width explains the sec- 
ond fine this morning. 




.87 '/s, advanced to $84 and 



at 
closed 



at 
at 
at 




UPE^iOB ilW 




was 

He evinced 

death and 

casket was 

back by the 



*«paldinK. 

accepted, for the 

as clerk at the 

formerly connect- 

the hotel, but last fall went 

Springs. Ark., where he has 



Return* to 

E W. Con ley has 
summer, a position 
Spalding. He was 
ed with 
to Hot 



been clerk at the Arlington. Ha says 
many Duluth people visited l^lot 
Springs during the winter. 



H B 



Leave for Went. 

Knudsen and a party of twenty 



Banker Cainii Dies. 

Milwaukee. Wis., May 2'2 — Hoel H. 
Camp aged 87 years, a well known re- 
tired banker of this city, died today. 
the result of A stroke of paralysis, 
which he .«!uffered several days ago. 
» 

North Butte Mining Company. 
Dividend No. 14. 

A quartfrlv dividend of $400,000, b^- 
Ing $1 per shafe, on the outstanding 
stock of the company has been de- 
clared out of the surplus earnlng.s, 
payable on June 2 6th, 1909, to the 
Ptockholders of record at the clo.se of 
business on June 12th 

The transfer books 
from June l4th, 1909, 
1909, both inclusive. 

C. A. 



road 
west 



1909 

will be closed 

to June 26th, 



Duhith. Minn.. 
Duluth Evening 
29: June 5. 



May 



DUNCAN, 

Treasurer. 
17th. 1909. 



Herald, May 22 and 



NEW COAL DOCK. 

Clarkson Company Will Erect New 
Structure in Superior. 

The Clarkson Coai & l>ock comjiany 
of St Paul will build a new dock In 
Superior in the near future, on a site 
owned by the Northern Pacific 
on the St. Louis bay front, just 
of the Great Northern elevator.s. 

Although the report lacks olilci.ii 
confirmation. it Is understood that 
Worrell CUrkson at the head of the 
company. Is authority for it. He has 
n-ade several visits to Superior dur- 
ing the past year, and plans on build- 
Ins f>n^ 'i' the most up-to-date docks 
at the Head of the Lakes. 

The Clarkson company Is operating 
a small dock In .'\shland now. 

Odd Fellows liather. 

This evening the Odd Fellows of Su- 
perior are having a joint initiation at 
Maryland hall, at which guests of 
honor from all over the state are at- 
tending. It is expected that there will 
be about 700 present. 

The gran.i master, P A. Badour of 
Oconto. Wis., arrived In the city yes- 
terday. There will be a big banquet 
tomorrow afternoon at the Hotel Ros- 
slter at which the members of the fa- 
mous Norili Star degree team of Min- 
neapolis will be special guests of 
lionor. 

Saloon Man Arrested. 

r-harged with selling liquor without 
a license. Charles Lehman of 1104 
Tower avenue was yesterday arrested 
upon a warrant. The case will come up 
for trial Monday, May 31. 

Arrested Wrong Man. 

A man held at Trego. Wis., near 
Spooner supposed to have been impli- 
cated In the murder of young Rudolph 
Nelson at Itasca a we.^k ago, was yes- 
terday released. Sheriff Carlson and 
some of the other autiiorities having 
satisfied themselves that he was not 
the right man. 



4IS 

at $S4.12V2 bid. 

Greene-Cananea opened at $10.. "SO, ad- 
vanced to $10.02^, declined to $10.25 
and closed at $10.37Vs asked. Butte Co- 
alition opened at $2.'>.37v..: and advanced 
to $26, and closed at $26 bid and 
$26.25 asked. Cluuiet & Arizon opened 
t $103.50 and closed at $103 bid and 
$]ii;i.:>o asked 

Gir.iux oiiened at $7.75 bid and $7.87 M: 
asked and closed at $7.75 bid and $8 
asked. Anaconda opened at $49.62 \s. 
advanced to $51 and closed at $51.12^ 
bi'l and $51.25 asked. .Superior & Pitts- 
burg sold at $14.25 and closed at 
$14.25 bid and $41.50 asked. 

Denn-Arizona sold at $3.75 and 
closed at $3.75 bid and $4 asked; Ciitte 
& Superior at $2.87 >r^ and $2.75 and 
closed at $2.75 bid and $3 asked; Na- 
tional at 52 cents and clo.sed at 52 
cents bid. 

Globe was inactive and closed at $a 
bid and $5.50 asked. Lake Superior & 
Sonopa at $2 bid and $2.50 asked, Calu- 
met & Sonora at $11.50 bid and $12 
asked. Red Warrior at $2 bid and $2.2i> 
asked. Mowitza at »2 cents hid and •»;> 
cents asked. Savanna at $1.75 bid and $2 
aske<i, Butte-Ballaklava $10.25 bid and 
$10 50 asked. Carman at $1.75 bid and 
$•' asked. Copper Queen of Idaho 
$162V2 bhl and $1.87^: asked. Cliff 
$2 12 1* bid and $2.25 a.skcd. Cactus 
$3 bid and $3.12',* asked. Chief Con- 
solidated at $1.50 bid and $1.62 Vz asked 
and Butte-Alex Scott (part paid) ai 
$5 75 bid and $6 asked and full paid 
$S.75 bid and $9.25 asked. 

Black Mountain was inactive and 
closed at 89 cents asked. 
» • • 
Walker's copper letter in Saturday's 
Boston Commercial says: 

"Copper is decidedly stronger. Lake 
is I3'*« to 13>,^ cents, and electrolytic 
is r3»/8 to 13 U cents per pound. 1 
learn of sales of 150,000 pound.s of lake 
copper at 13 Vs cents, and otlier con- 
siderable sales at 131» cents. Electro- 
lytic has sold as high as 13 Vi cents. 
Topper is moving much more freely, 
and the surplus supplies are rapidly 
being exhausted. The outlook for the 
metal market is very much brighter 
than it has been at any previous time 
in the' past two years. 

"The monthly reports of the Pio- 
ducers' association are in a measure 
misleading, notwithstanding the care 
and efforts of the originators to make 
them perfectly accurate and reliable. 
This is due to the fact that the reports 
are based upon stocks of copper on 
hand and amounts delivered. A large 
percentage of the copper which was 
reported a.s surplus last month had 
been sold; but delay in making de- 
liveries forced the as.soclatlon to re- 
port thhs copper surplus. There was 
over 8.000,000 pounds of copper on the 
docks at Lake Superior which had been 
.sold, and a delav of two or three days 
In the opening of navigation prevented 
Its movement. It was therefore re- 
ported as a part of the surplus sup- 
plies. This undoubtedly was true of 
copper at other points. 

•'A leading copper man, who Is as 
good a judge of the market as I know, 
says: The .surplus supplies of copper 
are practically things of the past. As 
soon as th"re Is ai.v further improve- 
inent In the volume rf E^eneral business 
liir- little surplus remaining will van- 
'=h like snow before a June sun. 1 
feel confident that c«!>per will sell at 
15 cents per pound in September. 

"I know of but owo important pro- 
ducers who have sufficient surplu.s cop- 
per on hand to deserve special consid- 
eration. These two are holding their 
copper for a higher price, having be- 
lieved it unwise to sell at 13 cents or 
lower. There is still considerable cop- 
per held bv speculators, and the spec- 
ulative intere.1t in the metal Is Increas- 
ing 1 understand that some of the 
leading American copper consumers 
have been buying copper warrants in 
London recently, anticipating a con- 
siderable advance in the prices Im- 
mediately." 



TOeL^ 



One Cent a Word Kach Insertion — No 
Advertlsemeul Lei»it Than 15 Ceutnt. 

FACS^ ^A^ D SCALP^^-TRE ATM EN'f'. 
shampooing, manicuring: large stock 
of first quality hair goods made to 
order at Miss M. KeUy's, o ver Suffel a . 

^m SALE~^^ $5.'>0 INNER PIANO 

Player; used but a «''^J'"K V""'i.,rn 
perfect condition; will sell for $.1)0 
cash, or will arrangt easy payments 
for reliable jierson; bench 
rolls of music included. 
619. Herald. 



and twelve 
Address V 



WANTED 

Spaldiivg 



— HEAD 
hotel. 



LAL'NDRESS. 



"VVANTED— WOMAN TO DO FAMILY 
washing at home. Call Sunday. 1 East 
Superior street, roo m 207. 

FOR i>ENT — BEAUT 1 1-' C L LA RG E 
furni.shed room; all convimiences. 
also large front room. reasonable. 
320 East Second street. 



W \NTED— EXPERIENCED STENOO- 
lapher for city position. Apply 
Brocklehurst Business college. 
West Superior street. 



102 



FOR RENT— TWO 
steam heated. 
Eighth avenue 
street. $35 and 
& Co. 



SIX-ROOM FLATS: 

In Park terrace, 

west and Flr«t 

$40. R. B. Knox 



MARRIAGE LICENSES. 

\ndr<-w Miller and Helen M. Anderson. 
Carl Olson and Anne Pederaon. 



BIRTHS. 



born to Mr. 
of 631 East 



FOLZ — A daughter was 
and Mrs. Henry Folz 
Fourth street. May 21. 

PETERSON — A son was born to Mr. 
and Mrs. Axel Peterson of 350 Sixty- 
first avenue west. May 19. 

CHILDS— A daughter was born to Mr. 
a'ld Mrs. R. .S. Childs of 18 Chestnut 
street. May 21. ,^ 



DEATHS. 




Monuments — Direct from fac- 
tory. 25 per cent saved by or- 
dering from Charles Benson. 
2301 W. 2nd St. Zenith 1334. 



Marv Pllon. 
West Michigan 



6 years old .if 
street, died May 



i r.o.Nj- 

1415 

"0 
CFtd.SSE— G. F. Cros.se of 117 Park 

avenue. 1 vear old. died May 19. 
RICHARDSON — Lydia Richardson of 

410:i \\ est .Severth street, 87 years 

old. died May 21. 
OMACK- Raphael Omack, 37 years old. 

died at St. Marys hospital. May 20. 

at tlwe age of 37 years. 



BUILDING PERMITS. 

To Oscar Llngvall, frame 
dwelling on West Second 
street. betv.-een Twenty-ninth 
and Thirtieth avenues 

To S G. Knox, frame addition 
to garage, East First street, 
between Fifteenth and Six- 
teenth avenues 

To M. H. Potts, concrete block 
foundation on West Second 
street, between Twenty- 
eighth and Twenty-ninth 
avenues 

To Fred Husby. frame dwell- 
ing on East First street, be- 
tween Twenty-Hrst and 
Twenty-second avenues 



$3,000 



000 



200 



J 00 



NEW BOARDING 
AND SALES STABLE 

Seventh Avenue Rant and Superior St. 

F-.rmerly known as "Hill's Livery." 
Flr.st class attention and care giveo 
all horses. 

ED. ARMSTRONG, Prop. 




THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: SATURDAY, MAY 22, 1009. 



RHEUMATISM 



Don't Take Medicine 

Out iet u£ send you the new 

michijjin $1 External Cure 

ON FREE TRIAL 



/AUTOMOBILE POLICE PATROL WAOOH 

PUTS HORSES OUT OF THE RUHfLING 



Please Send Your Address 



Return mail will bring ycu a regular 
dollar pair cf Magic Foot Drafts, the 

great Jtlichigan External Cure for 
Rheumatism (no matter where locat- 
ed, how severe or whether it ie chron- 
ic, acute, muscular, sciatic, lumbago or 

f out, etc '": ■ : V FREE. 




rn 



I'Vf.K Corwsp, Sw'j. 



) conifort. If jou 

ttiiiifl We lakt 
■uiy ft sure and 





Words of Praise 
From Trained Nurse 



BuKrti'; t. jntnion 



■r .vcafs tuffcnng 
Hex <«« cfiit iU yi'.i 
root Draft KB 2t 

Wich. SeiiiJ ni' mi-m'S — 



writs teds'y— now 




THE m:v/ way. 



You can make your 

home the most 

attractive spot 

on earth 

with an Edison Ph^-no- 
i , ,, , A. Hear , .. . », 'ncc. A 
ve r ^ kittle n i * ■ n e v will in 



St a, a 11 in 



vciir iiuDie. 



Frc-h Records are made 

e \ t; r \ mo n t h , a n d t v e r y 
fresli Record renews your 
'PhonO'gT.-iph.. 





MISS BEbfciE MILL; 



Miss Bessie Mills of Atlanta^ 
Ga., who has had ten 
years' experience as a 
trained nurse, writes of the 
splendid results obtained 
when she has given her 
patients Duffy's Pure Malt 
Whiskey as a tonic and 
body builder, on the Doc- 
tors' orders. 

"I am a trained nurse with ten 
years' experience nnd have given 
Duffy's Pure Malt Whiskey on the 
doctors' orders to patients in many 
hospitals and private homes where I 
have been. I have found it very- 
beneficial when used as a tonic, to 
restore strength and vigor. I wish to 
vouch for the splendid results 1 have 
had with it in the sick room during 
the whole of this time."' — Bessie E. 
Mills, 381 Whitehall St., Atlanta, Ga. 

Duffy's Pure Malt Hhiskey is in- 
dorsed by leading men in all profes- 
sions, includmg clergymen, doctors, 
educators, nurses, lawyers as well as 
business men and the intelligent gen- 
erally. It is invaluable in the treat- 
ment of indigestion, nervous prostra- 
tion, malaiia. chills, low fevers and 
all diseases of the • throat, the bron- 
chial tubes and lungs. It is a heart 
tonic, and in old age when the vital 



forces are yielding to the weight of years, it will bring strength and vigor to the muscular and nervous centers. 
Every testimonial is guaranteed genuine and is published in gcud faith and with full consent. 

Duffy's Pure Malt Whiskey 

If you wish to keep voung, strong and vigorous and have on your cheeks the glow c f perfect health, takeDuffy's 
Pure Malt Whiskey regularly, according to directions. It tones and strengthens the heart action and purifies the 
entire svstem. It is recognized as a family medicine everywhere. 

CAUTION.— When you ask your druggist, grocer or dealer for Duffy 6 Pure Malt Whiskey, be sure you 8" 
the genuine It's the only absolutely pure medicinal malt whiskey and is scld in sealed bottle only; never in bulk. 
Price $1 00. Look for the trade-mark, the "Old Chemist," on the label, and make sure the seal over the cork is un- 
broken. Write Medical Department, Duffy Malt Whiskey Co., Rochester, N. Y., for a free illustrated m.edica! book- 
let and free advice. 



-I'iiotofc by McKtnzie. 




From the <Usj;u.«te<l lo<.k on the 
-.f the hi.rst^ in Mi.- .». < Mtni.any- 
, ,ot<>gr;i|rD. til' i s< 1 m li> havt- 
rt'alisi'd. ai the time tht- piiture was 
taken, that thtir 11 r«' of usffulnt^s <»n 
the Duluth polic* iN i-;irtin' nt had 
( omr Xi\ an cnil. 

Th«- tn<i iilM>t<<Kra|'hs ."^h<i\v a ^!i:irp 

lontiasi bctw*-»-n tht- t<l«l jukI tht- iit\\ 

niethtids of t'on\eying prK«i«.Turs t«t th. 

1 police ptalion. T" to patrol 

has Ix-in in :, m two 

' ■! lias proven Ust-ll m' vu.sily 

. \! r ttif ol«l horses a ti(i \vaK"n 

it uii! t.. permanently ins^talltd 

an«L at the <nd of another two 

weckf*. lh«: h«irst-s will l»f difposfcl of 

The muntifai. lurers? agreed when 



THE OLD WAY. 

given an order that th< > would run the 
aulo thf first thirty da>s li^ « ■ f tost 
to the city, supplyinK a ihaiintiir for 
that h ngrth of time. The old wagon Is 
heinp kept In < onunisslon while the 
drlvors are learning to operate the new. 
Th« aulo patrol Is in eommlssion half 
th. day and half the night imtil the 
(ltiv>rs learn how to optTate it. wlien 
it will be put In commission da> and 
night. 

The operation of the machine has 

, [roM n very .succes-sful up to tht- pres- 
ent time. Much better time is* made 
than with the <dd rlK. and the drivers, 
a.'^ they learn the tricks, say It is easier 

|(o cBc"ai>e eollLsiuns while going at a 



NEWS OF THE WEEK AT THE 
CENTRAL HIGH SCHOOL 



Corner Fourth Ave. West 
and Superior St. 



•Half a BU'ck from HeraW Sq." 
HOTEL 

COI^UNOWOOD 

West 
35tli 

St. 

tifttn • 



(irt tl e block l.f-tween 

FIFTH AVE. k B'WAY 



New 
York 
City 



|t«C'Pl.€ 

I IREI'IlOOr tPd »lTor<tt vtn 

^, ,,.,,.. f ti«c rlty, III a 

■i-.:\ rJruirea r.:H w,i| i)it«>. Ulitl In 

tile •IwDPlnc "tt*! ttirnt*! <lbtrlci. 

Room* WHh B.lh. •« ainl Up 

p,.,^r.i::., ■ .-,,,(....,4 '(ir Hurniufr rnonlha. 
! a la Carte. 
viY>3ELB.Y. 
Forrii. Haven Ho us*. 

.New iiu '. en. CO-Uri. 



Graduation Exercises Oc- 
cupy tt)e Attention of 
the School 



DIAMONDS 



1" 



Senior Girls in Curls Make 

Huge Hit With the 

Boys. 



T' - ■ ".e ex'f'Mt to 

\\ ,.H„.k!nK ter- 
waiu ic tor fcotiH.- time iiHfrt, was held 
it) flu- v. iicK.l Friday evening 

Tl.. ■ ■! in the h.ills 

,,t tl . ' -. partak. 

i,f II., ln!«teaa 

oj tb- u- !• I'y "»« 

thing 1 duH.^ ■ ■ ! 

both !be bo,\^ ami Kii'U- g"T i..Keti..-r 
aiid ^'ave a real '•aiHiiict prei-ared by 

■ ■hmI, Tin ta lilej, 
« , ,,■ ■ . i \ 1 't a'.<i Ml "H 

f.t'Ii M ;i f, t ^ .'. Ii<) < ' I "! - 



( ■, a W iiHam Eck- 

luaii, *. laricc Ht-iulf i s.ai. tllizabeth •>!- 
lott aial Maiv .Mai via tood, Dorotliv 
nicott, chairman. I'onald Paddock, 
Harvard Hockwell. Helen Hawkei- and 
I'uttis I'illsbury. Those In chark.'e de- 
serve a tfieat deal of credit Iit tlieir 



1- 



Tlie 

Willi I i 

bf'I.il f 

Mi.iida 
were 



• m tlic = '•■^- and for ibe s'lic- 

l lit- llOl I'll .ui. 

• • • 

track i.aia wii^ ibe talk of the 

l;i«-t w e»-k. The liiter-cla.''s meet 

>\as iMi.-tponed from the t^aturday 

on a. < 1 

ly atlei 1 

held on i 



meet aft- 
hop lion I 

serotiil 



Hit It-ad 



T 



:i:trfJP' ^!oek ' f '..f. re- 
■ ■■ will 



'bing: 
.M in 



KKYSTOi^E; I^OAN CO, j 

W \% flit Superior Siri-el. | ' ' 

To HHn.it ami Retii fit f 12.00 

J'h «be:.' ■•' .^ei. 



tl. 

f. 

v< 

W' 

e ! . 



a ail ii.i'.' 
danctiij.: 
I lillb 

iliptd ' 



rn till I 'CIS I't lb< 



Af I.I w ai-.i' 






■ »;o, 
M4. 



i« 



A ~ 



were Bi\'en l>> llie 

. - of tlie faci,i;i\' an.l 
vtr. Henl'.-iil. '' 
il*'. Kot'.-rt l" 

.l.bri Quinn. Curtis. 
;..-... .<:ird MeHoirh. Af 



anu a - '" 

ir Tl.. in 

I If eora i ; i.j. W\^i^.' >> lo- 
> iiace Fanner, tjeei'g. 



f rain was held 
riie field events 
-, i.ool grounds and 
the track evenl.«« on lA>ndon road. The 
meet was very .«vjccessful from every 
point of view The Jimiors won the 
r a liard slrugRle with the 
vlio were a very close 
' aiors and fre.shmen were 
lose behind. The freshmen 
ry strong showing, being In 
for a long while. A large 
crowd was out and displayed a great 
deal of Interest in all the events. A 
iiiaittr vvliich showe<l the advance ma<le 
In track work Is the fact that four rec- 
ords of the school were liroken. The 
discus. 2«0-yard. 440. and the half-mile 
records were all shattered. Allen John- 
Kin. one of the most promising fresh- 
men ever seen In the sclu»cd. made the 
most individual points. Mr. Hlestand 
ind all tlie enthusiasts were very much 
pleased at ttie showing made, which 
was fully ae good as could be expected 
umler tlie existing conditions. 

Yesterday afternon the first team to 

repr»sent Imluth at the Interscholastic 

flcM lacet in Minneapolis left for that 

|.i.p > t'» make their Initial appearance 

aH.oi,j4 tbe big schools of the Nortbwest 

In tills sport. No matlfi- what kind of 

;. vi,.,ning they make the school will 

-tied, for they are not expecting 

>r. but will l.e plea.sed with the 

suiaitest fnutlon of a s<ore. Some of 

llo- iiH 11. Imwever. ought to take places. 

Tie team that left I>uluth yesterday 

was: Allen ,Jolinson. Kill Stevens, Ar- 

.! Kerg. Charles Moonev. Clifford 

rburn, fierbert McMeekin. t»len 

toldsmith, Asher Taylor, -\rtbur Hel- 

mer. Stanley Mc<'rae and John yulnn. 

• • • 

' I'l Monday afternoon the Public 

."iloaklng club held a short session. The 

< iuo presented a very fine shaving set 

to Mr. Baker to show Its appreciation 

for all that he has done for them. The 



high rate of speed than was the case 
with the team and wagon. The speed 
limit of the auto patrol is twenty miles 
an hour. It is driven by a powerful 
motor and can easily climb the steep- 
est of Duluths avenues, making bet- 
ter time up hill than can any team. 
The new wagon makes a neat ap- 
pearance and has been attracting a 
good deal of attention Mnce it arrived 
in town. The loud, clear-sounding 
gong heralds its aproach, and every 
one turns to look. It Is equipped 
with stretchers for the care of the 
injured, and can rush a wounded man 
to the hospital before a patrol wagon 
drawn by a team could scarcely more 
than get started. 



presentation speecii was made by Har- 
low Watkins who. In his characteri.stic 
manner, expressed the thanks of the 
members of the club for what Mr. 
Haker had done for them. Mr. Baker 
accepted the gift and expressed his 
thanks in a very neat little speech. 

• * • 

The freshman class held its regular 
meeting last V>ednesday afternoon. In 
tbe absence of their president. Adelaide 
Miller, the vice president, presided. The 
atten<lance was not as large as it us- 
uallv Is The onlv business was a se- 
lection of a motto for tbe class. Tiie 
one finally selected was ".Mways i.,oyftl." 
Thev all agreed that they would live 
up to their motto. If that's what it is 
meant for. at least, as long as tliey 
were able to stay with It. 

• • • 

Wanted — Some one to straighten out 
the tangle of the senior play. 

The name of the play suggests tliat 
It might be complicated enough, but 
after a person has read it, he Is worse 
off than before. "All Tangled Up," the 
name of the farce, certainly Is "some 
tangle." and defies all the efforts to un- 
ravel it. The actors have been work- 
ing on the play two weeks, hut as yet 
have not been able to solve the riddle 
and trace the characters all through 
the meshes of the compllfated plot. It 
is expected that, in desperation, Mr 
Custance will have to offer a reward 
for anv one who can tell him "who's 
who?" 'and also "who owns the over- 
coat?" 

• • • 

The celebrated Pled Piper of Harae- 
lln. of whom so much has been heard, 
must have passed through 'the school 
last Tuesday. On that day the girls 
of the senior class appeared in school 
with their hair hanging in cute little 
curls down their backs. They pro- 
fessed that It was .iust to have a little 
fun and act young, like freshmen, 
again, but the admiring boys claimed 
that If tliey knew^ how they looked 
they would wear it that way ail the 
time. However, some of the boys 
doubted the assertions of the glrle. 
and after a few Sherlocks liad pulled 
off some professional detective work, 
thev reported that the clue reached 
was that the Pied Piper had made a 
few calls, and. as is his custom, took 
all the rodents along with him. There 
must have been lots more where they 
came from, for conditions were normal 
the next day. 

• • • 

Mr. Custance lias been instructing 
the seniors during the last week in the 
music that they are goiner to sing in 
the gr«d\iation exercises. The songs 
tliat Mr. Custance lias made up are 
very catchy, and will make a gre.at 
hit. There will be a vocal contest be- 
tween the Juniors and seniors. In which 
noise will count more than music. The 
beautiful Alma Mater, which has 



thriUtd the graduates of the D. C. H. S. 
for fifteen years, will lie sung as usual 
on commencement night, together witli 
the valtdictory song to the tune of 
"Loch Lomond " 

VENNER AGAIN 
IN LIMELIGHT 

Trouble - Making Stock- 
holder of Great North- 
ern Wins Law Point. 

et. Paul, Minn.. May 2 2. — The Ram- 
sey county district court was over- 
ruled yesterday wlien the supreme 
court ordered a reversal of the order 
in the case of Clarence P- Venner 
again.st the Great Northern Railway 
company. Venner was the appellant 
and the case came up on the action 
of the local court in sustaining mo- 
tions made by J. N Hill and E. T. 



Nichols for the dismissal, after an 
order of service made on them. They, 
with the L.ake Superior company, lim- 
ited were included as defendants. 

The case Is of more than ordinary 
interest as it involves an action 
brought by A'enncr. in which' he seeks 
to have the Lake Superior company, 
a holding concern f^r some $3 4.- 
000,000 worth of property, declared 
illegal and the property returned to 
the Great Northern stockholders, of 
whom he claims to be one. The whole 
matter is now sent back for trial and 
it is expected that a big leg«l battle 
will be the result. Venner has teen 
nersLstent in his attempts to dissolve 
the holding company, which activity 
at a hearing before the ID 07 legisla- 
ture brought fuom J. J. Hill, chairman 
of the directors of the Great Northf rn 
road, the remark that he was a pro- 
fessional l itigant. 

TRAFFIC ON RED LAKE 

RIVER IS QUITE HEAVY. 

Thief River Falls, Minn.. May 22 — 
(Special to The Herald.) — The traffic 
on the Red Lake river is assuming 
heavy proportions this spring. The 
farmers' steamboat as well as the 
boats owned by parties in this city all 



have cargr OS of fnig^ht and passengers 
as fast as they can make the trips 
between this city and the points up 
river. Including the Red Lake settle- 
ments. The shallow^ place on the 
liver are to be eared for this season 
by the United States engineers and 
river navigation will be a real thing 
from this time < n 

PETRIFIED SKELETON FOl ND 
PEEP IN GRAVEL PIT. 



Menominee, Mich.. May 27. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — The petrified 
skeleton of a man nearly seven feet 
tall was found at the depth of seventy- 
five feet in a grave! pit in Holmes 
township. The skeleton is in a fairly 
good state of preservation, and It will 
in all probability be {shipped to some 
state or national mu.seum. 

According to early residents, the 
gravel pit and land in the vicinity was 
an ancient Indian burying ground, 
and is said to have been used for 
many years before the first white man 
set foot on Menominee county soil. 
The white invasion, according to the 
best authentic history, came in 1792. 



f 

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BENEFICIAL 



ALWAXS BUY THE 






IT CLEANSES THE SYSTEM GEKTLY YET PROMPTLY: 
ACTS HATURALLY AKD BENEFICIALIY' ON THE 
KIDNEYS. LIVER AND BOWELS'. 
ASSISTS IH OVERCOMING 

coNSTiPATioK permanently: 

DISPELS COLDS AND HEADACHES! 

A REMEDY APPROVED BY PHYSICIANS BECAUSE 
OF KNOWN COMPONENT PARIS AND KNOWN BENEFICIAL 

EFFECTS. 

FOR<SALE BY ALL LEADING DRUGGISTS 

ONE SIZE ONLY,REGULAR PRICE FIFTY CENTS PER BOTTLE, 



II 

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THE DULUTH EVENING HERA^Df SATURDAY. MAY 22, 1909 





... y 



WHITE SOX 
WIIUGAIN 

Gowinittlngin the Eighth 

Gives Duluth the 

Game. 



La Crosse Could Not 

Score After First Two 

Innings. 



Standing 


of the Clults. 




Winun I. 
Ea>i Cl itfo ... 
La ('ro.>«.ie ..... 
IHilutli 


W'.n 
H 

7 

') 
« 


L.ost 

I 

Li 

4 

A 


Pet. 
.8S» 
.778 
556 
.S33 


.Su;<»'rtvjr 


I 


H 


111 



La (.•rnss,. 'A'ls.. M'-iy 22 — i,3p'::-i-!al ta 
The HerAid.*— Ld »ot four runa 

in the rir-it tw» : ;h of the «ame 

witli tht* Dul'Jth Wiiit.j .Sox yesterday 
and wa- -^ back, contented 

with til "'-i waa Just about 

In Its xvrien along mu- the 

eighth ii uw.^ r' » '"il'Uh bat"! >ut a 
victory. th«3 li- "■■■ '^'jiag *> to *. 

Mari.Hi allowed thd homo teim four 

hiM tri.i a t» i3s ^n<^ hit a. iiiay-r Virlng: 

I 4t two ^^i which tact, 

wMh r rt>r.>* by O'Brien, 

,., , . ■•- -■ '■••■■■ s- four 



W 'J I . ■ 




dlQ CATCHeS 
ANAN(A5 ctus. 



aiiii 



, llu.jl.i;i". -N'joi 



CLOSE (iAMh AT W INONA. 

Superittr Drops Exritinjc l oiue-it in 
th*' Ninth iniiiJii;. 





MANY BOYS 
COMPETING 

Grade Schools' field Meet 

at Ball ParKa 

Success. 



SEASo/v/ OPENiS 

weLcoMr 



tfOW ]>ULUrH FAMS 

SOY." W(M 



A, Cr^MAae— 



r bxo 



JACK cro^i^sot^ j>u> i^oT 

CLASS {^fYH 0*6ftlEJhi. 



TV /.EAQ^ei. 



-v 







Jackson Building Enters 

tlie Events at the Last 

Moment. 



Today is the big: day In grammar 
school circles, for the tnterscliola.stic 
fleld meet for the boys of the graded 
schools id being held this afternoon ai 
the ball park, under the auspices of the 
boys' department of the Y. M. O. A. 

The youthful athletes are patting 
the shot, running and jumping in a 
lively, healthful competition lor Thj 
Herald trophy and various other mucti- 
sought prizes. 

A large crowd was on hand to watch 
the youngsters do their stunts, many 
of their school fellows of the opposite 
8e.v standing on the sidelines and 
cheering the representatives of tlieir 
respective schools. 

There was plenty of enthusiasm and 
some good work on the part of the 
participants, many of wliom made ex- 
cellenl records for persons of then 
age. 

In all the events It was a contest 
all the way through for the honors, a-» 
every scliool repr>?sentel had competit- 
ors in nearly everything on tht; pro- 
gram. 

Since vesterday the Jackson 3chi>ol 
has entered the lists, making a total 
of seven schools competing They are 
Wasliington, tiie Adams, the '■:t- 



J - 



]»{!•'. > liuljs an.l Tli')mas. 
— Ilurst ■in-l p'-vin.s 



»i><«t<>a. «ii I liieuKo. 3 



Um- 



de- 



asily 

II. UK. 
♦J h 
<4 2 

tis; 



TIMELY HITS_^1N *iAME. 

Eaii ChiiT VidorioH-i hi Swotid o: 

WIf 



I BMir 



\.x^ Vork. t. 

.; , , : J,— ht. Louis 

1, by hitting 

ivity, for the 

_. i ■!>• l-ii-orf: 
i; II K 

' ' ■ ' \ Z '.* z 

' 1 :. 2 

..:. - --: . .-■ ns; W'ar- 
l ■ 1 1 1 p I r ( ■ .* — E g a u and 



y. - 

I'ltri. 

"i 



AMERICAN ASSOCIATION 



Standing of the Hubs. 



■II 
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A » 

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1 » 

M 



l.o-^l. 

n 

14 
17 
l*i 
I'i 

in 
IS 

no 



Pet. 

.r.u 

.4St 
.167 

.4 H 
. 1 :i ^ 
.iX2 




M. rtml «»]iiH Uul. 



Standiiiir of the Clubs 



is II 

It 1 ; 

. ■' I '. - 



St 



4 

t ;-■ 

1 ! i 



in i 



f'lili*n»S«». ": Hi»?it»»ii, »>. 



y :::> - Curt is 

!.iy h..ld- 
t'T.-'l iiil.^ 

> I'll tu 

.umI gfl xlllv' 

■iniiiR Davis. 

■|> ! in H row, 

'Ph.- liome 

! !■.'.' I un.H 

ig and 



I I) II tJ - l) 
KohliiHon, 
;k .Sa.'i-lUco hit- 
P'-rrlne. rftolen 

■ rty. Doublf I'l.t* .s 

Flvnn Left on 

St. I'aul. 8 First 

irtis. ->. Hit by 

Si fiuk out lU 

I- • ; TniK'. 1 1.), 



three pitchers tomorrow, besides other 
prospective tandidiite.s for the team. 

CORBETT TO SPAR 
WITH JEFFRIES 

Old Time Fighters Will 
Have Some Stiff Work- 
outs Together. 

Chicago. .M - — James J. Jtffri.'s 
has recelvt'd a It-itn from James J. 
Corbett. In which Janu-s J. .stated that 
he would bf in rhlcjigo next week and 
would 1)!' Klad I'I h. 1|> ih-^ undefeated 
champion in hi.s training. Jeff said 
he would accept thf^ offer and box 
with Corbitt e\ery afternoon next 
we.'k. 

"1 consider t'orbett the most clever 
boxer in the hi-story ot the ring, and 
by boxing with liiin I can ea.slly tell 
whether 1 am going to be as I used 

to be. 

•'1 think considerable of Johnson's 
style of fighting, and I am sure I will 
learn a lot from t'orbett. 

"Corbett also wants me to do some 



sword work with him, which fits into I Thames and the Hudson every June 
my planriilcely." ■ As for permanent physical disability 

For the benefit ©f tho.se who do not 
believe that h« Is taking off weight 
gradu^ly. a^v?- champion will have a 
phot<>gTa^h■ takCn on tlie scales. He 
predicts Ihat/lj* will be considerably 
under the 246-pound mark. 

Recently Jeff wtHghed himself in 
street clothing and tipped the beam 
at 241 p,ounds. He asserts he could 
have rtnluced more, but is afraid to 
take Mff weight ton fast. He is relying 
on 'the baths at Carlsbad to take off 
most of it. 

OPPOSED TO 
SHORTER COURSE 

Columbia Coach Says 

Pour Miles Is Not 

Too Much. 

New York, May 2 2. — Jim Twice, coach 
of the Columbia university crews, has 
some declined, views regarding the agi- 
tation to reduce the length of the var- 
stiy eiglii-oared shell races that take 
place between the colleges on the 



following rowing four miles in a var 
sity shell. Rice says It is absurd. 

"Rowing certainly is a tough game," 
said Rice, "and everybody who knows 
aiythlng about the sport will admit 
that; but it Is not as hard on the men 
who take part in it as a good many 
other athletic games. But If a man 
is properly trained there is no reason 
whv he should not go through the 
hardest and most gruelling race with- 
out feeling any more than ordinary 
physically tired. It would be as absurd 
to "say that they should collapse 
thri>ugh physical exhaustion, as it 
would be to expect a locomotive to 
break down if it has been properly 
constructed. 

"Oarsmen, and especially the oars- 
men who are in the colleges, go 
through the hardest kind of training. 
For six months they practice regularly, 
observing all the laws of health that 
are known. At the end of that time 
they are in far better physical condi- 
tion than professional fighters or men 
who go in for any other kind of sport. 
If they are trained properly they are 
able to stand almost anything in the 
line of rowing. 

"As for their not being able to 
stand up under a four-mile race bet- 
ter than a shorter race is all fooli.sh- 
ness. Instead of rowing a .shorter dis- 
tance, they could very well row two 
miles further, and I think that the re- 
sults would be even much better than 
In a four-mile race. A two or three- 



mile race Is nothing mora than a 
.sprint. From the starting gUn to the 
finish it Is nothing but row for all you 
are worth. A four-mile has a begit;- 
nlng, a middle and an end. The two 
or three-mile race Is all end. It is 
one desperate sprint that fairly t^kes 
the heart out of any man. There Is 
no chatice for the men to .slow down 
their pace after the nrst sprinting at 
the pistol. They don't get the chance 
to rest up by taking long, swlhgiiig 
strokes as they do In the middle of a 
four-mile race. They plug right at It 
all the way through. The men In the 
four-mile raoes, on the other hand, 
have their first sprint and then lako 
it comparatively ea,sy until the last 
half mile or so. 

"As a rule I think men oan row 
long dLstances better than sprints. 
Of course, the training h.is a lot to do 
with, it, but the average man can 
iTialntaln a long, swinging pull better 
than a short, rapid, sprinting str)ke. 
The fact that the Poughke<M>siP and 
Xew London races are aiway.s rowed 
with a favoring tide is another thing 
that should be taken Into considera- 
tion, for the tide sometimes seeina to 
cut almost a mile off the rape." 



the 



Lh- 



NORTHOME HAS FAST BALL TEAM 

COAAPOSED dlF ALL HOME PLAYERS 



feison, tiie Endion, the Nettleton 
Brvant and tlie Jack.-on. 

Following are the entries in all the 
events; 

Ooe-Mile Relay. HeavywelghtJi. 

Ernest Ullberg. Trauk dierndl, Algdr 
Streval. Fred Sullivan. James Small- 
wood, Dwiglit McOonaughy. Jay Uath- 
bun, Riciiard CuUum. Lewis Larson, 
Cliarles Ferovid, Alton irt Clair. Earl 
Ver.deryacht, Frank Frankowsky, Matt 
Brown, WilJlam LunJberg. Kjger 
Whiteside, Fred Noll, Earl Smith, Joan 
Kerns and Daniel Frink. 

Half-.'HIIe Kun. Hen» rwelRht*. 

Alget- dti-ovfl. Jay Betliun'-, lli-;;ii- i 
Culium. Lewis Larson, Charles Povor-o 
Matt Hrown. William Lundberg. I-'red 
; Noll and Jo'.m Keri.s. 
One-Quarter Mile Kuu. Mlddlewel^bti*. 

Ellwood Johnson, AU'ert. NorJ . -n. 
Roy Olson, Walter Lars)i>. Uoy CK»arv. 
Bvron Clifford Ted Flurry, Leonat l 
McCarthy, Charles Wiiiteside, iJeoi.;' 
Kal-stad. Waller Lawrence. ElU?...r':i 
Dennis and Fred 'Jordon. 

10n-%ard Huu, HeavywelRlitii. 

Ernest UUIierg, Alg.-i- .Strev-i. ILm- 
bert Bradbury, Jay Nallibun. L.-"vl.s 
Larson, Earl Vanderyacht, Maitl:ew 
Brown and Roger WhUeside. 

SHO-*ard Iteiay, HeavywelKltt"- 

Ellwood Joliiison, Jaral Hansen, Al- 
bert Nordeen. Ir.gvald Ingbrlghts on. 
Koy Cleary, .Sam Goniberg, Byron Clif- 
i ford, T^-d Flurry Horace Hargraves. 
Leonard McCarthy, Rudolph Litt-1\ 
Frank Wriglit, William Park. il>.):.i 
Bromin and (Jeorge K-'Is! 1 1. 

((I>0-Ynrd Ilelay, UgtitweigUtd. 

Joseph Demo*i. Kail Mitcliell, .Al'ieit 
Lundguist. Olaf Myrhmann, Aibin John- 
son Emil Gouldedel, Arthur Dengvald, 
Simon Peterson, Joe rileets. Kenneth 



BASE BALL! 

6UNDAY, a P. M. 
DULUTH ATHLETIC PARK. 

FITWELLS VS. SUPERIOR. 



=Tr ' Barrows. Kaipli Kugler. Web.-ter Hak . 
! Albert Ewald, Henry Jensen, Cllffi>f.l 



It. 



Iv niisnx tit 




^Utinenpoll*. li. 

Ii! t well 

K iiisjs I'ity 

:: Swan, 

: ..ne hit In 

n.H. K. 

?, 10 I 

- -'.i 5 1 

van ; Young. 

. :.:;ii res— King 



Staiiiiina; of tin* < lubs. 



t'olnniliiiA. tit 



1 ri. .•1(it;ir. I; \^ :i'«hliist<»n. I. 



Toledo, 1. 

.' :.' -* 'oliinil'iis (Ic- 

eless game 1>> 

■ (II the seventh 

im maiui'rie to 

;.do made «iiily 

■ duinbus 

R. H. E. 

I 4 ".: 

6 11 2 

and W. 

k I rnpire — 






i >., ii..i. V- :i I ..-I ^ Hi 



1 .•ij1'«< nh". :!: laillHtinjioll* t. 



; ; ^ v\'«'li/iiil»e 

!!■ 1 - li might 

took tlie 

tots galiud 

• i..-7, pitching. 

sade on}y two 

.t firul .'llOUgh 

de- 

riin. 

l:. H. K. 

'■■•15:: 
; •) 

:-.■:'. y 




4 ' t I 



Will Fhiv Iron River. 



iture 






r 



I ; , :■) . . 1 



■lils. Xiioy 



• all team leave 

iron Hlver, 

I their first 

,^.i.'.i-i the strong 

Manager ijwan- 

I g<>t a team this 

I almost anyiliing 

busy looking for 

will work out 



GOPHERS WIN 
SECOND GAME 

Defeat Hibbing Nine in 
an Extra inning Con- 
test. 

Hibbing, Minn., May 22. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Catcher Ratsy Johnson 
put a speedy end to a closy and excit- 
ing contest yesterday afternoon by 
putting the pellold over the- fence In 
the extra frame of the game. 

The colored players obtained a lead 
in the early stage of the game. In 
tl>e fifth frame Hibbing tied the score. 
From that time until Johnsoi> knocked 
the ball out of the lot. the game be- 
longed to eitlier team. 

Yesterday's contest was the second 
in a series of five games. The third 
contest will be played tiiis afternoon. 

The score: 

GOPHKItS 

.VB R 

Wallace. 2b 4 

Johtiiun c 5 1 

McMurray. If 4 

Barum. cf '' 

.Meliicr. i^ 5 

ning*. 3b 4 

.Mnr^hall. lb 3 

) McDouiall. w 4 

CatrUou, p 3 



n. po 

1) 3 



5 

I 
4 
1 
4 

12 






H. PO. 

a 6 



Tt)t»l« 37 5 8 3« 12 

UIBIUNO. 

AB. R. 

Oeiselman. ef 3 1 

Brojklns. 8b 4 2 

Hoolh. lb 3 1 

WliUanis. l> 3 3 

Slrni'tis. rf ' ' 

Ujrrowi. u '* '' 

CalUgui, 2b 5 J 

ClialTee. o 5 

C. Booth. U 3 J> 

36 4 



2 

12 
I) 

2 
2 
5 
2 



8 80 13 4 



THE NORTHOljE BASEBALL TEAM OF 1909. , * i, ,^ u 

J- T-f* ♦« v>;.rhf C Ralmer ss" Tohn Oaan. c: Matt Jones. Manager: G. Engelking. cf; A. Fcldman, If, 
E. S^ThooT h'%TnStl7^\ftT^^t^F/^^^^ lb; JohnVogan. 2b; "Jimtny" Beach. Mascot; Percy Scnb- 

ner, p; M. Engelking. 3b. 

vorthome Minn May 2 2.— The' ing the p^st two years Nort home has 
Northomc, Minn, auiy ^^^^ ^^^^^ «r the fastest amateur clubs 

in the North country. During the 

sea.son of 1907. the locals never lost a 

game, and aj^ain made an enviable 

record last yetir. by winning many vie 



crack Northom<- baseball teanJ of 
190 7-19U8 has been reorganized, with 
E. S. Shock as manager; J. B. Wilm. 
-secretary and treasurer, and J. F. 



■^urgun as captain of the team, bur-ltorles. As' was the case during those 



two years, the local club will again be 
composed of strictly all home players 
this year, and promises to be .stronger 
than ever before. The locals will 
play their fir.st game of the season 
next .Sunday when they go to Big 



Falls to meet the team of tliat ylace. [ druggii.t8. 



Totals 

Soora by tnoliiBs: 

r„.Dher» 2 2 a I) n 1— 5 

UlSblii? ■.'.■■■. 10 10 2 0-4 

Summary: K:irncd runa— O^jtiptrs, 3 Two-ba.se lUU 
—Barton. 2; Willlanw. i. Hoina run— J.>hn*m. Hit 
by pilchpd ball— Br ;jkltu. Ba.i»^ on balls— Off tJar- 
riaon, 3; off WllU.imji, 2 Strir.k jut— By Uairuoa. 
5; by WllUaim. 5 limn -1 r. 

• 

If you want to feel well, look well 
and be well, take Foieys Kidney Rem- 
edy It tones up the kidneys and blad- 
der purifies the blood and restores 
health and strength. Pleasant to take 
and contains no harmful drugs. Why 
not commence today. Sold by all 



Baker, Clarence Duffy. Harold Arm- 
strong, Henrv Azlnzky. T'jny Gotkln. 
Jolm Bussleman, Victor Cago. Fred 
Skflti>n. Fred ODonne!. 

440-Yard Relay, Midget*. 
Marsliali Pet.^rsoti. Frank McK''n:';i->. 
llfnry Ii'='dberg. Ralph .-^Irevel. MeivlUa 
Lar.son. Clarence Tliomas, George An- 
•lerson, Floyd Owens, Harold Ber'nust. 
Ed Biomin, Ted Meguaig, Arbor Huber. 
<MilYord .-Steele. Lincoln Brown, Arv ird 
Borg Jani'^s Noll. Clifford Hay. Norman 
Walter. Ralph. Bogen. Ellis Butchart. 
Raymond Lars.>r.. Herman Jei>s«n. 
Waller Couin. Hattwlck Nelson, C'.if- 
lord Marvin. .Sidney McTaggert Mick 
Watt, Leo Feiro. 

7S-Vard Oasth. Ll«htwelghtj». 
Albert Liindquist. 'Jl.u Meiniann. Ai- 
bin Johnson, Simon Peterson. J>)seph 
Sleets, Ralph Couin. Webster Hake^, 
Clifford Baker. Martin Bladdin, Harold 
Armstrong Henry Azinzky. Jot:i\ Bus- 
sleman, Fr-d .Skelton. 

IUO-%'ard l>anh. Mlddleweiielita. 
Ellwool Joiinson, Jaral Hansen. Roy 
Olson, Walter Larson, .Sam Gomber§r 
Byron Clltford, Ted Flurry, Leonard 
McCarthy. Walter Hoover, George Kol- 
stad Walter Lawrence, Fred (Jordan, 
Glen Abrahamsjn. Fred Noll. John 
Kerns. . ^^ 

Shot Put, Heavyvrclghts. 
Ernest Clliierg. Frank Sterum, R. 
Cullum Dwight McConaughy. Charles 
Fer«vld Elton St Clair, Frank Fran- 
kowsky", Matt Brown, John Kerns. L>an 
Fink. 

Staadingr Brood Jump, MlddlewelBUts. 
Ben Bloom. Koy <.)l.son. Waller l.ir- 
son, Roy Cleary. Sam Gomberg. Ted 
Flurry, Horace Hargreave.o George Kol- 
stad, "Walter Lawrence, Fred Gordon, 
Glen A'oraliamson. 

Standing Broad Jump, Mldfifeta. 
Mars!. all Pei*>rs..n. Henry Headberg 
Melville Larson, Floyd Oren. Harold 
Beniuist, Arbor Huber. Norman WaJ- 
t.-r Arthur Olson. Arthur Newman. 
Raymond Lar-sm. Mik- Nit'. L- . F.-iro. 
Kunnlns HI»5h Jump, Llghtweliebtt*. 
\lbln Johnson, .Simon Peterson, 
liaiph Kugier. Joseph Sleets, Webster 
Ihike Hf-nry Jensen, Harold Arm- 
strong. Justin Olln. John Bussleman. 
Victor Civo. .Jo'.in Kerns. 
Three Standing Broad Jump, I.iicbt- 
weiiehtM. 
Joe Demoe, I'^arl Mitchell, Albln 
Johnson Simon Peier.son. Kenneth 
Barrows. Joe Sleets, W.-bster Hake, 
Clifford Baker, Erling Shursen. Henry 
Azinsky, Lincoln Brown, I'lifford 
_m^>..le, Victor t'ayo and Fr-.-d Skelton. 
RunninK Hiieh Jump. MiddleweiKhtn. 
B*^n Sloan, Roy Olson. P.oy Cleary. 
Byron Clifford, Horace Hargreaves. 
Rudolph Little. Charles Whiteside. 
George Kolstad, Waiter Lawrence, 
Fr*»d Gordon atid Glen Abrahamson. 
RunninK Hlifh Jump. HeavywelRhta. 
Erne-it T'llberj? Frank Sternal, .lames 
Smallwo.d. Ri'-i:ard Cuilum, L'swia 
Lar'^on Charles Ferovid, William Lund- 
b^rg, Roger Wiiiteside, Fred Gordon 
and Glen Abrahamson. 

RunntDK Broad Jump, Heavywetshta. 
Frank Sterna!, Herbert Brid^'irv. Joe 
Ralhbun. Lewis Larson. fl\arles li'ero- 
vid. Matt Brown and William Lund- 
berg. 

SO-Yard Dai«h, Midgets. 
Marsliali ivterson, Frank McKen- 
zie, Geoige Andersen. Floyd Owens. 
Harold Berqulst, A. McQuaid, Clifford 
Hay. Norman Walter, Arthur Newman, 
Raymond Larson. Clifford Marvin. Miclc 
Watt. Clifford ^Steele aa<l A4 vld iiorg. 




DEFECTIVE PAGE 




- \ 




THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: SATURDAY, MAY 22, 1909 



9 



KELLY, BROKEN IN SPIRIT, 
LIKELY TO QUIT THE RING 



K.'li 
1'.. •• 
t '■ 
I 

«' 

Tlfi 

ft "I 
pi' -i ( 

C 

I. 
tl 



t 
J 

blow. 

t 
t 
t 



fal . May 22 — Huro 

iDHTkKl tK.ni the 

luUed by Billy Papke In 

:i fight but thf Chlcag:!! 

- ; ;t and thrrat- 
vtT Kelly is 



1 l»l,it.' 
# \r I- 



but J I IM 

of thK III 



was sifi 
He was 






ill" i I i t fl . 

I TV \\ >}(, '■ 
' t - 

■■.' ', ;,» 
it I Ati- 



,1.1 t vvirX 1,1 ut Hit vfTc'Cta 

ml (lamp frmn tht- morn- 

Mpped In a 

'' Fapke 
iruaiU 

...fc .;.i ,1 .... . . ..L, ring a 



bit but was not hurting me. But he 
rauKiit H'f off guard, and when he hit 
mt' cji iht jaw tht Jolt 1 got when my 
head Int tht canvas knocked me out. 
It wat^ t^xactly the same when 1 met 
Ketthel. i'ttpke'e could not put me out 
\n Milwaukee when I broke my arm 
hi tht- second. It wasn't Ills punches 
th:it dill thf trick" 

va.s the proudest man in San 
. Without a mark to show 
that lit had 1h • n in tthe prize ring, 
he made a (ircuM t>r the various sport- 
ing lieadMuarters, meet : frit mis 
and outliiip his future ; 
"Of course. I Inlenu 
mlddlew* j^tit title/ he 
one k- ' -: • y- ^ •■ '•, 



to mi. 

the Bcale. lie s • 
and that's alt t 
llpht huTi again ll 
.'irnrny <,"4ifrrwt li. 
V I u b , v\- ; ; 1 



iLi (,iairn tne 

.«aid, •'lovtry 

• ■ ' I 1 IS t<i(.i li«-av' y 

He must scale 

f » ' ' fuii makt 

!he tlile, 

But 111 

he waniB It." 

tJie owner of th'- 

now try tc gi^t ar. 




[6P0CTmG 



iBy Br«fe.) 

This f-"*" "■•• '•"•«' Orst 
clash V ■ 



n will 



O'f imi'fT !r; 
of t I 
|lrt\. 

< 

TtJii iiii ■■ 

I. ope t« 

with •»■• 
havt 

$trt' n 
year 



;; I. - 



,;l lacit 
imters 

,it wai< 

a rag- 

. OVf"'- 



^ 



i>r» can hope 

T 1 t h •■- '1 1 1 11 



to the 

li'ie this 



-eu 

' ity I 



y t(. g« 
match i>t\v(en Ketchtl at,.. 
FiipKe H* s.-typ he is willing to ofler 
a tilg f'um III the lout or let the men 
box on a percentage basis, as he may 
arrange the go for July 5 It la prac- 
tlcalty certain Papke will have to 
make a big weight concession to 
1 Ketcnel. 



gotten to Jennings' crew. It louks as 

if tli*- Jenning*- inacliine is the M long- 
est all-around urganizailon ;n tiie 
y«juntit t UiiKue. yet it doesn't louk as 
If the i..t;..:.iit race was going to bt. a 
walkaway tor the Tigers. 

Next to ibe '1 iger«, the Boston Red 
Box art r'laying the most consttjlent 
ball, Tni.- i.s ;, sciappy, fant aggrega- 
tion of bai: ijlayerw. They may net 
play the present fast article of ball all 
through the long pennant chasse. yet 
they are bound to make any team tiiat 
beats Hum play real ball. 

Cleveland has proved a disappoint- 
ment in the race so far this season, as 
that truly great collectl<in <■{ hn.\\ 
players has proved In tht pa.^i If 
Nan I.,a Jole fails to deliver Uiis year, 
it would not surprise a great inany 
fi:! :^ : * ganif to hear that he 

Un \ from his managerial 

Clilcag-' White S< X ui:i>; :.- 

.. ,,,,,.. .... ., . , ■ . .:.-.. t-y 

■ <'t tlie 

-> I ....c. .:.-,-- .;..tr league 

n.akt the aggregation of the 

fii;. II a very l-ard team to oeat. 

ll ilsh Smith. White. Burn." 

ai . ipon one team. If the Sox 

' iKfi close up in the rato, it will be 

.e to this great tuncii o( bi .0 art- 

An ci.rly .season revii-w wouKl lead 



tilt w 

t'.at I 



In V.u 



' to bilieve 

.al, and IX: ■ 

le, would be 

the chantO'9 

is to repeat 



111 for I 





that 






^ n r ^ . 






« 






1 " 






* 

a 
J; 
n 

V. 

I" 


- ii,i,;,s 
If 



• C lU t' I 11 1^ 



ud lor lht--i twi 1 

fir feats ot -.-■'. ■- . . 

• * » 

Battling Nelso: 'li" Si.n 

Fr,v : - • 

,re< 

\lv II i.-^' i. rati., t 11 to 

nuikt, efcpfvidliy .,,.,...-..■ ..-1' the 

liit and durk p; n. This Nelson 

t,.,-.. r v,,r'. ^^■).:it ■, ,,; ; It tie f.ghter, lf= 

itiucJi throat.;}. th», 

■-. . „. . >. ut out some <.'f hm 

evemtnts and accept the 

f .'ome of the men that 

s, , ■ ■ :a.--ii With the Bat- 

;:. ::..ir.! more of the 

1 iii,t- I ' pay for Hit 

ixi,iri<<i.- t'. 

• • • 

Croijoet will s-i • i. !■ ••. ith us, girls 

• • « 

In-^iiranr* writtts coruaifb-r Syilladel- 
' [-irien a - - '■*. So did 



.>en I 
luv L- .T-i o........ .ant ' 

.k lisis witrnssed a 
lit, 

, tliC 



A h 



• « • 

..inied "V.'!iii Knows" wi'.r. 
in the Kast yt .«t.'Ml..:, . Ttie 
ent question befor-; W hu Knows 
>i.»i Ird Was, V. Im dill. 

• • • 

"''.<■'■ .tTiaiii K'litlemen are unused 

.lay a^fair^• they are some- 

■ 1,, v\'i,^i.ir.j-f rn. When base- 

me ui^eless they 

.... ■ . : € national cap- 



t . .1.1, .;■• iStOb. 
• • • 

In bofi 



1 

f 

t. 

Ut t 
In 1' 

»' 

! 

1 

b 
t' 

I. 

1,1 

t 

I 

I 



ir mani; 



;i,.t 
or 



.n. t U.;.t 



: • I 1 1 . f I ' 



a re 
of 



■ r stafe't 

f the hard 

.rti.iKJi the 
• let 

■ rthe 
tat 



DULUTH HIGH SCHOOL TRACK TEAM 
COMPETING IN MEET 



UNIVERSITY 




Top Row— Coach Hiestand. Second Row — John Qtiinn, William Stevens 
Rcw— Herbert McMeakin. Arnold Berg, Allan Johnston, Clifford Thorburn. 
Helmer, Charles Mccney, Asher Taylor. 



The Duluth fVutral high school 

track t< am is cnnipt ting this afternoon 

at Northrop field, Miniieaia liB. against 

the larKfst high and prfparat<'ry 

Bchocb of the st.ito in a track and 

field meet, held under the auspj' • "f 
i>it Cniversity of Mitifiesota 



Tl 



,•- I'lactic; 



I .-: 



> ar that 



the local school has paid much atten- 
tion to track and field sports. antJ the 
members of the team and the coach 
arc not very hopeful of carrying off 
many points in the meet. ^Vhen they 
arc against Mich teams as Shatluck. 
the local boy>! are under a decided 
handicap. In spite of this fact, how- 
i \. r it la hoped that the local team 



— Photo by Eclipse View Company. 

. Glen Goldsmith, Ernest Mcrritt. Third 
Bottom Row — Stanley McCrea, Arthur 

will score at least a few points •which 
would greatly encourage the members 
of the team to make even greater ef- 
forts next yoar. Most of the mem- 
bers of this year'h; team will be in 
school again next year, and v.ith an 
extra year of tiaining. they .-hould be 
in f^hape to make a good showing for 
Duluth. • 



AUTO NEWS 
OF THEWEEK 

Big Event of the Season 

Will Be Endurance 

Contest. 



Efforts Being Made to 
Reorganize the Auto- 
mobile Club. 



lull ., 



SOCIETY PET 
BOXES JOHNSON 

He of the White Front 
Set Makes an Im- 
pression. 

I'h.ladelphia May ::— A J In. xf : 

Buidle. sot If! ,U..'r, p.. ct, .ili 

'' ■tt* iinu iiiiiitteur btixti ■' 
t hapter to his experi- 
Willi pi oJesnionals In the ring recniiiy 
by boxing Jaik Johnsi n, the heavy- 
weight cbaTiii'U n [..iK.isi^t cf the 

-••' -V» ••T... ,■ !.-,..■.!. vvl! ii t!.]8 fn- 

..--l.t lion I't hav- 

• "*■ nctf ll. the 

■ -- J. Jeffries 

►.'e Cole's 
g-v : ,. , in the 

presence of a iaige iiuniifi if spt^c ta- 
tors the majority of wl.im weic i.e- 

: as he arrive. 1 in F'hlladel- 

phia 1, • ' , , ;.- 

ence v t 

; . . 1 1 . •. 



a i i i V .- " . 

at M' <■ 

glad t> I' 

1 by an.. f 

...to the aui ;.. .c 

llie negro » trali. .i.g 

: '-■ hi found that a t r..- 

• d 

' ' - ". I . ' , , , ; o 

wait t..^ toil. 1. efittr the rlnp George 

Co'e Ik I K»rr 9 F'rankie Madole and 

(.1 . . ' • • 

:_ bout was tl.t Mm 

n uiii 1-cr. 

The bout only lasted tw( i .• > 
"'■.". -■ nifd to u,«ufu'.^- !■! 

Btddle prt ft rs 

1 idUTi. ' 'WO. As a result 

the t a f'*'" Itefore 

the bv..i "..c w,.-., ..^.-an. The negroes 

I at tht ringside yelled when It was 

.'J I t'Ver: 

"Biddle you are the best ever." 
.T< l^l,fi> tl himself declared that Bld- 
d;, • ng kid and a fine gentle- 

rr i ,. . 

i;\( .pt among the negroes there was 
n<' t-nthusiasm, 

PAPKE MAY MEET 
KETCHEL AGAIN 



a match with Papke on one end and 
Ytung Ketcht.1 <.n t>ie other. 

I'apke, who has had many proporals 
submitted to him. would rathor sign up 
with Ketchel than any of the others 
who are seeking his scalp. Ketchel, 
in a way, seems willing enough to 
,-u r rrnrr:f:ilate the thundt rbolt. but is 
takir;^ i.^ins to let Papke and the 
promoters know that Young Ketchel 
Is an exceedingly high priced ring ar- 
tist. 

■•.Vcne of your $r..('00 offers for me," 
Kt tl ht ! is reportt (1 -.a- .«aying. "I will 
want from tlO.OOO to $15,000 for my 
share." 

There were telegrams flying between 
Ketchel and interested parties in San 
Francisco the other day. and It was 
said that Ketchel's latest demand was 
for a side bet of $10,000. When Papke 
heard this he said; "I may he able to 
accommodate Ketchel in that little 
matter If other matters as to pur;-.e 
and weight are satisfactory. I hardly 
think, though, that if we get down to 
talking business he will insist upon 
a wa.ger on that magnitude." 

It may be that Papko-Ketchel out- 
look will look brighter a few days from 
ni \y It the match is made it will un- 
.: !ly be handled by CofTrolh, who 

\ it for his Mission street arena 

on July 5. 

Of course much will depen<l upon Ih^ 
outcome cf the negotiations begun by 
rnrle Tom McC'arey of Los Angeles 
for a July contest between Ketchel and 
Langford. If this latter affair is ar- 
ranged Mci'arey. wh" i- ;.n old-time 
matchmaktr, wiii have Int agreement 
worded s" that Ketchel will not be at 
liberty to meet I'apkt tr any one 
e;s( early in July. 

I'nitl:ng Nelson, who is to b<ix Dick 
'Ilyj;,i.d at CoffrotiVs arena on May 29, 
'ook possessitm of the camp at Millett'e 
, the tether day and engaged in light 
exerf i^.. Nelson's principal henchman 
durii.g his training spell will be Jack 
Henchell, Abdul th^ Turk, and Jeff 



Perry. The battler will work from 
now on on a full sthedule right up 
to the fight. 

The battler professes to be amused 
at the comment made in respect tc the 
shortness of the time at his disposal. 

"I'm not going to fool myself or the 
public either," said Bat. "Two -weeks 
Is ample for me at any lime." 

SCOTTISH EVENT 
IS OF INTEREST 

Champion Travers Will 

Take Part In Big Golf 

Tournament. 

Chicago, May 22. — For several reasons 
the American golfer finds his attention 
more closely riveted on the tomlng 
British amaieur chaujpionship at Muir- 
field, Scotland than even when Walter 
J. Travis, the American expert, was the 
successful contestant in that event. 
Champion J. D. Travis of tlie U. S. G. 
A. lb over there practicing, and will be 
a contestant. 

Mulrfield suggests In a way the 
Myopia. Deal. Garden City or Chicago 
Golf club courses. It is not such a 
hard test links for a skillful player 
like Travers as some of the other Brit- 
ish courses. A score of 79 for the 
fi2l2-yard links Is about what a good 
player should come near averaging. 
But Robert Maxwell, who is responsible 
for the new bunkers on tins Scotch 
course, 18 one ot the stumbling-blocks 
that Travers will have t<> overcome. 

It is the conditions governing the 
championsiilp that American golfers 
.should be mucii interested, as it is the 
first since its Institution abroad, in IfcM). 
that limits the players to those who 
arc plus or scratch in their clubs. If 



the -dead timber" in the U. S. G. A. 
event each year were to be similarly 
eliminated the national championship 
v.t'uld be a much better event. 

The twenty-lour clubs having a vote 
in the British championship are tc 
vote unanimoufcly- in favor of giving 
future control of the event to the 
Roval and Ancient Golf club of St 
Andrews. This raises the Koyal and 
Ancient to the dignity of a national 
governing he dy like the U. S. G. A. 
Inasmuch as the great Scotch club has 
been regarded as such In other coun- 
tries on account of its action in rule 
matters, the Briton.s thotight it wise 
formally to establish the fact at home. 

Travels has endeared himself to tlie 
Pritish golfing fraternity. Especially 
has be been happy in his selection of 
favorite crlticienis In Golf Illustrated 
In his "first impressions" of the for- 
eign courses, he has praised those 
grounds to the skies. 

Of the American courses with which 
he is acquainted, Myopia, near Boston, 
alone bears resemblance 
Ayrshire links. Travers 
orates the testimony of 
Scotch professionals 



best 
try. 

Pages 
devoted 



to the best 
thus corroh- 
many of the 
in this coun- 



in the foreign periodicals are 
to the "big $1,000 foursome" 
played by James Braid and J H. Tay- 
lor against George Duncan and C. H. 
Mavo. The first lialf of the match, 
plaVed at Burhill last mimth, gave 
Braid and Taylor such a commanding 
lead (five holes) o ntheir young rivals, 
th.at no one was surprised by the con- 
tinued great work of those champions. 
Braid and Taylor. 

l>unrnn !s a lad of slight bu.ld 
taller than Freddie McDeod, the United 
States champion he will meet at the 
Chicago Golf club in June, and looks 
not unlike Willie Anderson as the 
North Berwick man looked when he 
came here to win the national and 
Western titles so many times. 
m 

A < nrd. 

This Is to certify that all druggists 
are authorized to refund your money 
If Foley's Hone yand Tar fails too cure 
vour cough or cold. It stops the cough 
heals the lungs and prevents pneu- 
monia and consumption. Contains no 
opiates. The genuine is In a yellow 
package. Soold by all druggists. 



the 

his 
>l.:.v 



-till 

'ifg 



b«..,i!-; Ai 



out Iha: i^r 



;ou. other icuiufe 1 



Friends of Both Fighters 

Are Egging Their 

Favorite on. 

Ban Francisco, Cal.. May 22.— Billy 
Papke, by his workmanlike handling 
of Hugo Kelly, has placed himself full 
in the glare of the limelight once more. 
and sporting men who want the best 
the pugilistic market affords and are 
lavc i willing to pay for it are clamoring for 




The big event of the summer season 
In automobile circles will be the en- 
durance contest to be run the first 
part of August between the- Twin 
Cities and Liuluth. 

The plan of having an endurance test 
had its inception In the recent visit to 
this city of J. J. Barclay and a party 
of Minneapolis friends. Mr. Barclay is 
an automoblllst of the old school, a 
lover cf the sport since it first came 
In vogue and the head, Incidentally, of 
one of the large garages of Minne- 
apolis. 

He came up in a scout nadster and 
he liked Duluth. He also liked the 
roads that led into Duluth and before 
he liati left, everyone he had met 
liked Mr. Barclay. When he sprung 
his ideas about an endurance con- 
test he met with a hearty response 
f J om automobile rrien. 

There are to be no fixed rules 
governing entries. Maciiine owners in 
ali parts of the state are eligible to 
enter. There is no telling at liiis early 
date how many machines will start out 
from the Twin Cities when the signal 
is given, liut there will not l)e less 
than a hundred and probably more. 

A bid lor i^ood roads is tc be put in 
early. The county commissioncis o" 
every county tlirough wiiich the auto- 
mobilists will run, wlil be asked to 
get the roads in as good condition as 
possible before the first ot August. 
Some of the roads In St. Louis county 
are not as well-kept as they should be. 
A notable example is the extension of 
the boulevard to West Duluth which 
at the present lime is almost im- 
passable. The excuse may be offered 
for this road, however, that it has 
not yet been tamed down by travel 
and It will no doubt be in shape for 
fast travel by the middle of the sum- 
mer. 

Informal suggestions are being made 
by automobile rntn for the enteitain- 
raent In this city of tliose who lake 
pait in the contest. A suggestion that 
!s likely to be can led out Is to liave a 
big downtown parade, with hundreds 
of decorated machines in line. This is 
a common thing in cjties w licre flowers 
are ever plentiful, such as Portland 
and Los Angeles, but will be a new 
thing for Duluth. It is believed that 
a night parade on the downtown streets 
of tiower-bedecked automobiles spark- 
ling with hundreds of gii.mmering 
lights, will be a novelty much appre- 
ciated. 

Tlic Mutual Auto company announces 
that it will offer a prize ot ?[>0 for the 
best-decorated machine, and several 
proniinejit business men have said they 
will stand for a prlae for the most 
ludicrous car. This is :just a starter, 
ai.^J t.thcr prizes will be toithcoming as 
the time approaches. 

The city authorities are to be asked 
permission to use London road for 
several races that will be pulled off m 
August. Lontlon road offers practically 
the only good course In tlie city lor a 
race, and it is hoped 
its way clear to give 
the automobliists for 

• * • 

Efforts to organize an automobile 
club in Duluth will take concrete form 
next week, when a general invitation 
will be sent out to owners of ma- 
chines in the city to attend a meeting 
to be held some time during the week. 

There is a feeling that this city 
should have a club, as other cities of 
its class have. There has been no nu- 
tomcbile organization In Duluth lor 
two years. There are at present near- 
ly 300 licensed cars in the city, and 
no apparent reason, except a general 
apathy on the part ol the owners, why 
I^ulutli should not have a first grade 
auto club. 

The club that thrived briefly in Du- 
luth two seasons ago was a compara- 
tive t.ame organization, vet in the brief 
time It lived and had its being there 
was more local auto enthusiasm than 
at any time before or since, 
club was responsible for securing 
ney Oldfield to come here and 
part in the races, and the event is 
remembered as the only one of its 
Duiuth ever had. 

At that time the number of 
chines in the city was small, but there 
file so many now that tiwners feel the 
time has come for a good, live club. 
So far there has been no concerted ac- 
tion and it is to work up individual 
interest and get the lovers of the sport 
tt)gether that the meeting will be held 
next week. 

There is another reason why a club 
should be organized at this time. Dur- 
ing August the big endurance contest 
between the Twin Cities and Duluth 
will be run and more than a hundred 
automobiles from all parts of the state 
will be here. Duluth men feel it their 
duty to be In a position to entertain 
the visitors during their stay and the 
best means to do so is to have a good, 
strong club in running order when 
they come. 

• • • 

W. W. Crawford of the Chicago Au- 
tomobile club, is corresponding with 
the auto men of Duluth In regard to 
the Western ,'^tock Chassis race for the 
Cobe cup and the Small Car race fc)r 
the Indiana tiophy, which will be held 
n the Windy City June 18 and 19. Mr 
Crawford offers his assistance to all 
who go from this city, in the matter 
of obtaining accommodations and seats 
at the races. 

Clubs from all parts of the country 
will send delegations to the event. Tlie 
advance sale of seats has been heavy 
but a large block of choice locations 
has been reserved for the out-of-town 
visitors. 

The races will be over the Crov;n 
Point-Lowell course, one of the finest 
In the United States and from present 
Indications the contest will be one of 
the hottest ever pulled off in America. 

• * • 
F, H. Sanders, representing the H. 

H. Franklin Manufacturing company 
has been in Duluth during the past 



the city will see 
the road over to 
a day. 



The 
Bar- 
take 

stir. 

kind 
ma- 



week talking over the coming endur- 
ance contest with local men. It is hia 
intention to enter the Franklin in the 
run. 

• • • 

The Russell Motor company has 
plannec^ to make several changes in 
the electric chaiging outfit at its 
East Superior street g'arage. The 
company has purchased a large four- 
cylinder gasoline motor, which will be 
directly connected to an electric gen- 
erator and which will charge about 
twelve electric vehicles at a time. 
Electric cars are coming m use mora 
and more each month, and the Russell 
people will open a department for the 
exclusive care of electric vehicles. It 
will be located in tlie building ad- 
joining their present cjuarters on the 
east. 

• * « 

N. H. Srnitli ol ihe Minnesota Loan 
company has purchased of the Mutual 
Auto company a new Model A Maxwell 
runabout for clti' use 

• • • 

W. H. Congdon. a Hibbing druggist, 
is in the citv tcday to receive his ue\r 
6-cylinder Thomas Flyer. Mr. Congdon 
will liave the distinction of taking th« 
first car of the class and model to his 
home city. 

« * • 

T. H. Nelsun has returned to Du- 
luth, after a visit of several months In 
the West. Before he left he ordered 
a fine new Thomas Flyer. The car ar- 
rived during his absence and was given 
a tryout by Mi-. Nelson yesterday. 

• • • 

J. D. Lamont has purchased a 30- 
horse power, five passenger Chalmers- 
Detroit touring car. 

• • • 

The new Columbia electric recently 
purchased by W G La Rue, met with 
an accident Friday night that caused 
some excitement but very little dam- 
age. At Twenty-tliird avenue east and 
Second street the car took fire from 
crossed wires. The smoke and smell 
made quite a sensation for a time. 

• * • 

Mr. Mollenhauer of the Virginia 
Brewing company, shipped his 6-cylin- 
der Ford down from the range this 
week. The Russell company will in- 
stall a new selective type of trans- 
misslcn and otherwise overhaul tba 
machine. 

• * • 

Among those who have purchased 
Maxwell machines during the past 
week are the following; Dell Case, 
16-horse power, standard roadsterj 
Jolin B. Hoar roadster with rumble 
seat; Bert N. Wheeler of West end, 
single seat, Model A. runabout. This 
is one of the cheapest and most s«j<*V- 
Iccable cars in lite market. Tlie price, 
$500, appeals to the man who wants a 
machine for light service. 

• * * 

Messrs. F. B. Mveis and Lutz*of Bt- 
v.abik and A. M. Russell of Culuth 
will drive Mr. Myers' Model 17 Buick 
from this city to Virginia tomorrow. 
The trip is made to test tlie staying 
qualities of the car. The machine ar- 
lived In Duiuth last week. Several 
severe hill-ciimbing contests have been 
made with good results, and the effect 
of bad roads on the car will now be 
learned. The course from here to Vir- 
ginia Is said to be unusually bad this 
vea r. 

Dr. McClaren and F. P. Nestor are 
having their Thomas fiyers overhauled 
and refitted vv-ith new parts. 

The demand for new automobiles 
continues to Increase weekly, and all 
factories are reported beiiind in their 
orders. An example may be seen in the 
case of the Franklin company. Local 
agents have received several orders for 
Model •G" Franklins which it will not 
be possible to fill until 1910. Many 
manufacturers are compelled to cancel 
orders for this sc.TSuns delivery. 

INSISTS ON DATE 
ALREADY SET 



Coffroth Wants Nelson- 

McFarland Fight for 

July 5. 

Chicago, May 22. — Jimmy CofTroth Is 
determined in his stand on the Nclson- 
McFarland fight, and unless the Dana 
accepts Packey as his opponent he will 
not fight for Coffroth on July 6. This 
information has reached here,, and It 
came from both Nelson and Coffroth. 
Nelson sent a wire to Lai ney Llchten- 
stein. manager for Cyclone Johnny 
Thompson, in which he informed him 
that Coffroth would not listen to a 
Thompson match for July 5. Bat says 
he cannot move the coast promoter. 

Coffroth says he will have Nelson 
and McFarlan'd on the July date, or he 
will pass up Nelson for all time, and 
put on Billy Papke and either Lang- 
ford or Ketchel. 

Despite the stand taken by Coffroth, 
Nelson seems to be determined to hold 
off. He tells Thompson that there are 
other cities in the West that will take 
the match, and he asks for the lowest 
guarantee Thompson will take to meet 
him. Bat wlil seek for a promoter 
who will stage the battle. It Is certain 
now that Coffroth will not give in. 
Little more will be known of Bat's 
stand until after his Hyland fight. If 
he is the. winner and he learns Coffroth 
is still firm, he will likely accept Mc- 
Farland, for Bat knows that thty will 
draw big. and .he feels certain that he 
can trim the little Irishman with ease. 

OUTLOOK BRIGHT 
FOR BOXING BILL 



Madison. TATls,, May 22. — After an 
attempt to kill the Brew bill legalizing 
bcjxing failed, the measure was or- 
dered engrossed in the assembly by a 
vote of 40 to 34. When the bill 
came up Assemblyman Ingram moved 
for indefinite postponement. Assem- 
blyman Bray said It was carefully 
drawn to meet the objections to the 
original bill. He claimed that box- 
ing la better than baseball and less 
brutal than football. 

"Tne tendency of the age Is to culti- 
vate our young men to be sis.-iies and 
to make them society boys and girl 
chasers instead of manly fellows," said 
Mr. Bray, in asking the assembly to 
foster the maniy sport. 

Assemblyman Ingram said that the 
precaution thrown about thf bill waa 
indicative that boxing was dangerous 
and wrong. Assemblyman Euslett 
thought it was as bad as cockfighting, 
but the assembly thought otherwise 
and the bill wag ordered engrossed- 



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READY FOR SQCVIC^ 



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tain; Gertrude Owens, forward; Isia Knight, center; Supt. Greening in Front. This Is One of the Three Girls' 
Teams on the Range. 



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MOORE BOAT WORKS, 74 Lake Avc^ WAYZATA, MINN 







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m 

4 










ATTHE LYCEUM^ 



LILLIAN RUSSELL COMING FOR TWO NIGHTS 
IN "WILDFIRE" AND JAY QUIGLEY PLAYERS 
WILL OPEN SUMMER SEASON JUNE 7. : : : 




n 



1-ltU.ui 

n«w r . 

Br- ■ 
Br ■ 

waa 
view. 
had ^ 
that 

ne\' 
coil.. 
f erred 
nea a 

Bft:'^ 

■wli . 
tt'i 
tlf 
8t r 
th.t 

ou« '■■ 
the r. 
The 
new c 
a har 
ter 
q i: 



-^.MTViin 3!Tc1 



to be aeen 



pr.'vent his making a 

■ire tlu: d<Jl>!at <it 

U done i-^ the 

1 u« play. an<l one 

t.> be appreciated. 

I'ic, and ill it Miss 



.^,^.^ to 



the 



and It 
-ttdiMI? 



for t 



-k 






til" 
tlu 
Miss > 

to 6V. 

In 

I) a rid "h 

tliat 1: 

Bhe h;j 
le f ' 

di. 

de 

iH ■ 
W • 
ITl : 
It' 

tlr- 

To .. ■ 
Inter- 

Belt t 

Widr. V. 

til-- :> 

}!,:■ 



and 
piet 

Ir 

a(>r 
of 



iier 
n '"> - 



i n f I"! e 



1 1 am 11 : 
v'tntr tu 

■' wlu. 
I [1 as 

i..j !?tve 



lat IS 



■.ifture. Th 
• ■ It and I 



ex- 

u the 

>rce >it 

itt«:uiu.^tancea. 

■r .rklh.'inselves 

rorward [■> a 

-I vitally i-i'H- 



', ly of a.s- 
1 to make 
• xteriiir to 
1 10 me set- 

.1,,,..) act 



.-d arti.sts introduce illustrated recita- 
tions. singinK and solos on F rencli 
horns, <ornet» and viollnB. Tlie act 
lia.s plaved all th.- first-class theaters 
ot the lountry. and lias received much 
praise from press and public where- 
over It has appeared. 

other i)romlnent acts on tlie bill will 
h|. .lark McDevltt and Earl Kelley in 
one of tlie best dancInK a-ts ever seen 
at the Bijou. They present all styles 
of dancf«. and finish wtth their ec- 
centric dances which are extraordi- 
nary 

One of the flunnlest sketclies In 
vaudeville is presented by Rae and 
Hroi?ci-.o, who give the roarins one- 
act comedy entitled "Just L.ike A 
Wnnian." This act is one long laugh 
fr.fm start to finish, and one tliut is 
built for laughing purposes only. 

A comedy act that deserves much 
credit is given by Jere Sanford the 



whistling and y..dellng comedian 
.sanford has the reputation as being 
the champion whistler of America. i\>; 
Ims an excellent singing voice ami 
his yodeling »o«gs are always a big 

^ As an extra feature of the six 
C'ornallaa, American acrobats, will pre- 
sent their sensational and daring f>'f"- 
nastic feats. The act is given by tliree 

women and three "i^'" a"«\ '"* ■''?''J..,;"i 
he one of the,,*>e8t of its kind before 

^Ha^rrv Webb wiU sing his latest song 
succe.ss entitled -The Sweetest Thing 
on Earth." The moving pictures will 
all lie new and exclusive subjects. 
Matine«'s are given daily at 2.4;. and 
night performances at 8 anu .3-J" 
Seats may i.e reserved by e'^'^^r 
•phone. A .school children r matinee 
will be given Saturday at a. 30 
performances on Sunday afternoon 
night. 



Oenia, the 
dancer, whose 
ments in the 
Hiadu datices 
London. Paris 



celebrated American 
terpsichorean achieve- 
way of Oriental and 
have been the furore of 
and Berlin. Mis.s St. 



and 
and 




■■ . ; , Hi, 

».'aut;ful 



' trainer n 

. . : -■■. ■■•r.s are T: 
,' Booth, Joseph Ti: .i 

!,i,,. Ernest Trn.'s. 



::as- 

who 

!r r.'- 



.1 Will 
iifsliin 

.l.ihn 

M'.i-ti- 
Aimio 




GOSSIP OF THE RIALTO 



WILLIAM COLLIER SCORES HIT IN 'THE MAN 
FROM MEXICO"--REMARKABLE PERFORMANCE 
BY FUJI-KO, JAPANESE ACTRESS, DANCER AND 
SINGER. 



Buckl y 



SIMMER STiXlv t OMPANY. 

Jay Qui^Iey Players Will Oiien 
Duluth June 7. 

'juiFfley [May 



lU 




I The Jav 



Ts who will I'f 

i( .■!■ this summer, 

II ,!» .Iiine 7 with 

romantic drama, "Wlieii 

"• ■'•'. !n Klowar "' 
l.il 1 In thr 



VIII 



sixteenth 
■•IlluT King 
' by 

'I'lve 



^ li 

we 



w!:l.;:. 
flrinrii'l 



'i :i £4 

to'" 



th. 



tbia 



AriKTl! 



S a II : 

in fi- 



an .siaste. 
!iu1)n. a 
' with 



" the 

■d a 

,.'..•> \s 

front. Miss 

difficult role 

who was 

,.»" of Rng- 

vvSii l-» eonslcl- 

' I.. ok 111*; men >>n 

will h.> ■ '-; 

captain 

wliom l'fiti'----.i.* 



KW VOIIK. May 22.— It Is 
ii.it ..;i.-n that the re- 
vival ol a once popular 
farce gives one an im- 
pression of vital Interest, 
for a rechauff of good 
i,,k 'H is like a mess of 
stale eggs. But William 
^•olll.T gives you the impression that 
you art. seeing a brand-new farce when 
you sue him in "The Man from Mexico.'* 
which has been brought out at the 
Carrlck after lying quiescent for near- 
iecade. He has supplied the piece 
a baK' ly ol 1. vv quips and pep- 
dlaloguc, the uld- fashioned 
has been wteded out. the 
has been spiced with fresh snap 



busl- 
whole 



went over 



til 



Tlie Oil 

'!!*ed by 



Kir.al 
ftilH 



I. 



a 

cli-i; 

• 'tto W T 

Ithe V. 
n u( 



tt.te iiuy ai!i ' ■ 
• ^ th« plo' .1 
the loft in tun 
The-e is but a ii: 
ml her war.: 
Jvvlnk the 



crooked 



production whi' h wa.s 

Marlowe, has I' i' ' ■'- 

in:i the artist s are 

Ig-ht gettisig it in 

• ',. t . .n»ii n<'rt will 

•1 ^ .seen 
. -w York 



with eve 
l)rejudkes. but 
there are few 




AT THE BIJOU 



GYMNASTS, COMEDIANS AND MUSICAL ART- 
ISTS WILL ALL BE FEATURED ON NEXT 
WEEK'S VAUDEVILLE BILL : : : : 



ly a 
with 
pery 
nesa 

thing 

and ginger, and the farce 
the boards wltli as merry ^^'l, ^^•^;,'^, "" 
panimenl ot laughter from U e aud- 
ience as on il.s initial tour. His Beii- 
laiuin Fitzhugh la the best example 
:.t pure farce on the stage, and Col ler 
IS at.le to do ab.-iurd tilings ,«" s"^''; * 
v/ay as to make a l'».''l"=*"'",'f ^''tv ,^ 
a.s easily as the giggling " '^ ,^,*^n ^>^ * V' 
ilio hair-trigger .sen.se of ris bl lt>. Ot 
course, the phce is yul on «Uh eM.i> 
regard for up-to-daie 
even In mudern farces „,,.,.u.w-iia 

^nch scenes a.n the one on Blackwell s 
rsland where Fitzhugh Is serving a 
term of thirty days while ho makes his 
wife believe that he is gone to Mexico 
and sends home glowing accounts of 
ttie bull fight he wlt.ie.s3ed. 

"My bull ran .second. Is one of the 
briglit phrases in tlie letter. The older 
luealiHrns have been cut out and com- 
plei.dy new material lias been aubstl- 
tuted. It Uie reception given the 
farce by the large audience is any cri- 
terion "The Man from Mexico Is 
«^>od for a -summer run. and the coni- 
edian may postpone his announced 
vifiU to London. Ills principal support 
eomeij fioin his sister. Helena Collier 
IjaTiTck. who plays Mrs. Fllzhugh as 
lieartilv as Collier does 
She dances a bolero In 
that had to l>e rei>-nted. 
• • • 

The Twelilli Myl-t <•'"»» f^'V''t.,\!!' 
first of a series of dramatic eiiteitaln- 
ments at the Berkeley theater, which 
was remarkable for a performance 
Fuji-Ko, the Japanese actress 
and singer. After singing 
lullaby to music of her 
tion — and very ideaaing 
- -she gave 
Anna Held, Harry 



the 
the 



husband, 
last act 



Tlie 
Will 

COHK" 

mar '< 



mm will l'<-^ the 

1 1 ronipany in a 

- '■■ -the reg- 

e talenl- 



by 

dancer 

a Japanese 

own compo.-fi- 

music at tliat 

a number of Imitati.m.s 

Harry Lauder, \ esta V 




of 
ic- 

lorla and other well-ktiown P^'>1'»? ^' 
tile vaudeville world. She speaks Eng- 
lish with a sliglil foreign accent, 
this .li.sappears In the amazing 
ilialc- t and Scotch l)urr with 
lards licr .speech. Her Imitations 
I !, v.r throughout from 



mandy." "Martlfa" and similar operas 
for twelve mcwnths over a route of 
one-night stands, in which Little Hock 
was the lartfesf town. Last season 
.she was prima -donna of the \Mute 
City Park Oi>«ia company in New Or- 
ban.s for aevenleen week.s. Hubert 
Wllke was in 41m- company. He a-nd 
Edward Locke, the auliior of "I lie t.li- 
niax " are fiiends, and he recommended 
.Miss' Watson for the leading part, as- 
.suring liim that she could play the 
heroine, lauglu^ -pathos and all. Ana 
so it came about that slie appeared on 
Broadway In the first of a series of 
tentative pot^onimnces in the afternoon 
at Weber's. whM* the scandalous olrl 
from Hector's" is the regular night at- 
traction. She c*me. she saw and con- 
quered. Tile prcce was removed to 
Daly's, where it is expected to last out 
the season aitd ^''^^^ l"^" ^•'*' summer 
dav.s Miss WatBon i.s an exceedingly 
modest girl and tears gather in lier 
eyes when slie- tells of the struggles 
she had to get a foothold in the pro- 
fession after leaving Cincinnati. She 
was born in F'rankfort. Ky.. and is a 
fair example of Kentucky grit. 
• • • 
Tho once trem<^ndously popular Pau- 
line Hall, who has not been seen In 
New York for years, made her reap- 
pearance on Broadway last week in a 
character In "Nellie the Beautitul Cloak 
Modal." a scene from which tlie Friat;s 
put on with a star cast for their benent 
at the .New York tlieater. Next 
the still handsome comedy queen 
he starred in Lillian Russell's part In 
"WTKUftre." which Is to resume the 
road. _ . 

"The Thiof" is to go out another sea- 
son but Kyrle Bellew will not play 
Ihe husband next year. Mr. t rohman 
has decide'd fi pyl the play out with 
Herbert Kelcey ,^nd Eff ie Shannon in 
the principal r51es. They have 
playing with feellew the present 
son. Mis*' Shannon as the wife 
Kelcey as the father. But next 
Ivelcey will liave Bellews part 
Bellew will go out In a new play. 
• • • 

Jamew Forbes, the author of 
Chorus I^dy" an I "The Traveling bales- 
man", lias written a new satirical coin- 
edv of New York life, entitled "iue 
Commuter.s." which Henry B. Harris 
will put out next season. (^ ommuters 
are pebple who live in the suburbs and 
depend on railways, street cars and 
ferry boats to go to and from their 
liomes mornings and evenings, and who 
have grievances and experiences, sad 
and humorous, that have not yet been 
exploited in comedv or farce. 



Denis will be seen at the Hudson thea- 
ter in <:)ctob<sr in a series of matinees 
in her repertoire of dances, which have 
l)een greatly enlarged since her last ap- 
pearance in America. 

• • • 

Next .season Henry E. Dixey in 
-*«arv Jane's Pa" will be sent by Henry 
W Savage on a complete tour of ttie 
country. Dixey s Chicago engagement 
Is proving so prosperous that it may 
continue until July. 

• * • 

Maclyn Arbuckle will go to his farm 
on tlie St L.iwrence river, near Ogdens- 
burg to rest up before he begins his 
rehearsals of "The Circus Man' in 

August. 

• • • 

KUw & Erlanger will put out Mc- 
Intvre and Heath next season in Ihe 
.Steeplechasers," by H. A. Du Souchet. 
The tour will open in New \ork. 

• • * 
Roberts will 

Bayonne when 
his boat 

• ♦ • 

Lillian Russell will spend her vaca- 
tion In Europe. 

• • • 

Maclyn Arbrickle, whose tour in "The 
Round Up." Klaw & Erlanger and Jo- 
seph Brooks' big play of the Arizona 
desert ends shortly, is delighted 
his new play, "The Circus 
Eugene Presbrey The playwright 
read the play to him in Cleveland 
feels tiiat Mr. Presbrey. in 
ing Holman Day's book. "Squire Piiln 
has given him the be.st opportunity 
his life for the cree-tion 
character of importance. 

" "Fighting Hime Look 
Englander," says Mr 
a boy lie was the 
and was finally 
world in 
later he 



Theodore 
summer at 
cruising on 



spend 
be is 



his 
not 



with 
Man," by 
fht 
He 
Iramatlx- 



THE BREAKDOWN 
OF MRS. TAFT 

Has Aroused Much Spec- 
ulation in Washington 
Society Circles. 

Washington. May 22. — The Illness of 
Mrs. Taft has aroused much specula- 
tion in the society circles of Washing- 
ton. This is not neces.sarily because 
the indisposition of the mistress of 
the Wlilte House is at all serious On 
the contrary, she is expected to resume 
her duties as hostess in a few days. 
Society's main concern is whither Mrs 
Taft is physically able to go thr)ugh 
the rigorous season of .social entertain- 
ing 

Strictly speaking, there has been no 
extensive entertaining at thi» \^'■hite 
House since President Taft tOf>k office. 
The really heavy and tiresome duties 
of the first lady 
begin until 



•Charlie" 
tonsil.s. 

It is not improbable that the n ;- 
merous dinner parties which have 
been given recently will not be a part 
)f the program of. entertainments dur- 
ing the remainder of the .summer, and 
Mrs Taft may find It advisable to go 
to the .ummer capital at Beverly in 
advance of the pre.sident if the .ses.sion 
)f congress drags along until the lat- 
t r part of July or the fir.st part of 
Aui?ust 



of 



of 
stage 



not 



of the land will 
the winter season. 
It is true there have been numerous 
dinner partie.s. and two or three de- 
lightful garden parties The enter- 
tainments, such as they have been, are 



If 
his 
con- 
a war- 
issued 



ius 

By 

con- 

well. 



year 
will 



been 

sea- 

and 

year 

and 



•The 



Mr. Day 
an opportunity 
American type 



closed ft con- 

Needham for 

political life 

This Is the 



of the pro- 
Tiie Raven," 



p.anl'meMt. "wb'en'the curtain 
Bispliam Is discovered seat* 
harren room at a 
liquor and a glass 
guise, and 



but 

cockney 

whlcii slie 

were 

any point of 

view both In reproducing and dialect 

and the mannerism of the originals. 

Another striking feature 

eram was a recitation or 

-David Bispham.to musical accotn- 

discovered seated In a 

table with a bottle of 

He wears no dls- 

Interprets the poem in the 

spirit of half delirious Imagination. 

which he works up into a fervid and 

rffectlns piece of realism. As a mel.>- 

dramatic performance It takes tauK 

with anytl.ing we »>*^ve had on the 

staKe in recent years, and It he were 

not the paying ProP-^'li"" ^,« f 'l;!^/^ 
that he is he could make $1,000 a weeK 
reHtlrig "The Raven" to Arthur Bergs 
music. Though the composition Is not 
much in Itself, it furnishes the atm"-^; 
Dheric touch that is essential to the 
artist in sustaining the interest above 
the level of an ordinary 

'^Another feature of the program 
sketch. "The Siege of Berlin, 



evei\t in 



was 
dram- 
atized from the story of Alphon.se 
Daudet by William J. Hurlbut author 
of "The Fighting Hope ano i ne 
WrilT.ig on tiie Wall." It tells the last 
day of one of Napoleon's old guard, 
roi louve who has l>een nursed back 
to life b> 'his granddaughter with the 
delusion that the Frencli 
triumphant in the war and 
tng Berlin, whereas the 
In the streets under 
the 
1 he 



and at- 
to Mont- 



John 
and was 



back 
on. 



to 



have been 

are bealeg- 

musie lie hears 

bis window is not 

Marsellalse." but "The Watch On 

Ilhine." played by the invading 



piece 



( , .■! Ill 1 IIS. 

'Follies of the *Day" is a musical 
comedy, which avowedly has no plot, 
but a great deal of action, and its ex- 
ul'ri^nce here has been %-arIed and in- 
teresting. It first blossomed out on 
Bowery. It was so good that the 
berls agreed to transfer it to the Ma- 
jestic Before the dale became 
some one changed his mind, 
remained on the Bowery 

and then went on tour for a 
.Now It is back 1n New York. 
,. . ,i,g to Inaugurate the new policy 
at the Lincoln Square, which c-^as'';! »!> 
l,.. a vaudeville house when \N ilUam 
.Morris renewed his attract 
n,.w Plaza music hall, 
ihrough the ^^rdeal with 

iji;g""'i:^hr^h hii J'sV.^ilar experience 
iiiore" thin a year »K" »' t^'^^' 
the-ater. It is a breezy, up-t. 
slcal piece, with a number 

dancing g"»8. «;>"'« ?^tXT,i 
iivd several good burlesque 
IndicltToris are that It will hold on 
for some time to come 



The dignified Henry E. Dixie, now 
plavlng In his big success. Mary 
.lanes'l'a. " at th© Chicago opera hou.se, 
is known as an Inveterate Joker to 
his actor friends, but a Chicago paper 
tells Ibis story about how the tables 
were turned on him the other day. Ihe 
story goes that he bought a bouquet 
of flowers for Dave Montgomery, who 
had a birthday, and to make the Joke 
good he dres-sed in his tramp clothes 
that he wears in the play, 
tempted to deliver the tlowers 
gomery at the Grand oP«[* ^'I'^y,^'': 
where a matinee was on. But he failed 
to reckon with the doorkeeper 
Marlin refused to let him in 
about to handle him roughly when 
Montgomery heard the commotion and 
stopped the argument. Then Dixie 
made a hurried exit and got 
his theater Just in time to go 
- • • • 
•'The I..ove Cure" is another comic 
opera of "The Merry Widow" type by 
Kdmund Kyslcr, a Viennese composer 
The foreign book by Leo Stein, part 
author of "Tlie Merry Widow." has 
been adapted to the Fnglish speaking 
stage by Oliver Herfor.l, whose (luaint 
humor lias made blm known through 
his books as well as through his dra- 
matic work. 

• • • 
Work on the scenic production of 
Bisson's thrilling French drama. 
"Midime &" is now under way at 
Heni-y W savages New York studios 
and all four acts are expected 
complete by the time 
turns from abroad in 
Is now the only new 
tlon for next year 
Savage, who expects 
new operas in 
the success of 



is a New 
Presbrey. ".\s 
village scapegoat, 
kicked out into the 
disgrace. Twenty year.s 
returns after having been 
the proprietor of a circus in Texa.s. He 
comes back with $40,000. the remnants 
of his menagerie and a determination 
to conquer the village. 

"The town is stUl antagonistic^ 
resents his return. The wartiith of 
w.-lcome is shown by the village 
stable, still In office, who holds 
rant for the arrest ot Look, 
twenty yars before. Thus warrant is 
nromntly served, as a means of show- 
ing how the coinmunity feels toward 

the black sheep. .r^: ,,,Mt.£r Hime' 

"During the year 'Fighting H'n^f 
spends in the town he bends every et- 
foi-t toward subduing the comniuiuty. 
It has been his cvistom to ruie 
bei.«t8 by forcing tlium to submit 
the end of the year he not only 
quers the village, but lumsdf a.s 
His character undergoes psjycho ogir^l 
transformation, and from tlie bull> he 

is changed into a big l«-t'^l"^,„'l':*PjgV 
whom it is a pleasure to .surrender. 
The character, as drawn by 
will give Mr. Arbuckle 

for a creation of a big - . , -j, 

of human instincts that will be loved 
by everybody." 

• • • 
Klaw & Erlanger have 
tract with Henry Beach 
his play on American 
entitled "Senator West. -^^ 
Play with which President Roosevelt s 
name was identified last winter, so 
much so that some of l\l^^^'\^^ ^fi«" 

admirers were Si'"'^^^^^'}^ . Khlfllv 
that he was writing a play The play 
deals with political complications la 
Washii^on and the Mildle West, but 
has a rial love story running through 
it The announcement Is ot 
nterest, national figure.s. Including 
President Roosevelt, Postmastei 
eral Frank H. Hitchcock 
Follette and Bevexidge 

r"c^iel;ior Tlirion or^. York 

?e^ar?lfiE- M^■^Needham has Vl^<i^^ 
nlav so auspiciously, an'i I know inai 
President Roosevelt will be gl^d to 
hllr t as he was Intensely interested 
In the theme and the sincere message 
which Mr. Needham is sending 
country in this drama. .. _ . ^ 
ereat many Washington plays, but I 
know that Mr. Roosevdl believed this 
i»iit> to be real politics. 

Senator Beveridge, who read the 

months ago, wrote to Mt. 

"The best tiling of the kind 

President Roosevelt told 

thinks so too. I believe it 

great 'go' and will make 

money and reputation for you." 

Senator La Follette wrote as follows: 
"You have in the political theme of 
your play made a graphic, dramat c 

Cosmos of many of ^'|f «''*1\'"« ^^^^^ I 
cal conditions and tl^«„ PJ,Y .J^'J •,i^ 
think, make a strong appeal to audi- 
ences in various parts of the <'*>unV, ' 
It com ines so many elements with n 
the personal experience of people in 
tne P^.'"*^"* ^ine.^ and the smaller 

It Is a play with a message 
who choose to hear it, but 
dramatic story would 



not to be compared with a busy sea- 
son, and society is wond<Ming whether 
this nervous breakdown of Mrs. Taft 
will result in curtailing the .schedule 
)f White House entertainments which 
have been in vogue for nearly eight 
years. ' 

The fact that the wife of the pre.sl- 
dent has clerical assistance does not 
m.aterially lighten the burdens. Mrs- 
Taft has a .social secretary, in addition 
to which a number of the '^leiks in the 
executive othce are at her disposal 
Unlike the other woiumi in the ortlctil 
.set, she is relieved from the necessity 
of making calls, although she fre- 
quently does call on her intimate 
friends. _ , , 

Notwithstanding this Mrs. Taft has 
had a slight breakdown. A stat.?- 
nient from the \\n\ite House says thai 
it was primarily iue to the tax on her 
system incident to an .ip-r-ation on 



To Detroit and Return :«; 12.00. 

Via the South Shore, in connection 
with steamers of the Detroit & Cleve- 
land Navigation company. Leaving 
Duluth June S. 11. I'"- and 1*?. Toledo. 
$12.50; Cleveland, $1',.5'), ButT alo. $14. 

PITTSBURG MEN 
ARE EASY MARKS 

For Beautiful V/oman 

Sharper, Who Operated 

on Trains. 

Pittsburg, Pa.. May 22— Pitt.sburg 
clubs and stag parties are at present 
discussing a mysterious "woman with 
the white carnation," who for some 
weeks recently traveled on trains In 
and out of Pittsburg and v.ho reaped 
a rich harvest from men of means. 

Eight Pullman porters have been 
discharged for either having assisted 
tlie woman In her worlc of liaecing 
gullible male travelers or for not hav- 
ing gained enough knowledge >f wliat 
was going on to put a st ip to it 

Wliile the railroads ea-st and west of 
Pittsburg are each busily 'denying that 
their particular lines \v.?re vi^itei by 
the lady, members of the big clubs are 
busily iscu.ssing it. as several of 
prominent men of Pittsbuig were 
ported caught. 

The woman, who was very 
ful is r.»ported by victims to have u-sed 
th^ p irters to have her thrown Into 
the company of piosperous loikmg 
jiassengcrs on the night trains, 
she would rob and trust to their 
afraid to tell of the occurrence. 



I 



y" 



the 

ro- 



beautl- 



>• 



y 



wh»m 
being 



AMUSEMENTS 



AMUSEMENTS. 




unusual 

Gen- 
Senators La 
and Congress- 
William Loeb 



play some 
Needham: 
I ever read, 
me that lie 
will be a 



to the 
liave had a 



LYCEUM THEATER 



C. A. MARSHALL 

Manager 



MA.Y 31st ».ndi 

JVNC 1st 



both the 
districts, 
for those 
the strongly 



who had no interest 



in 



MONDAY AND TUESDAY 

JOSEPH BROOKS Presents 

LILLIAN 
RUSSELL 

In the Racins Comedy Sueoes.s 

WILDFIR 






By G«orge Broadhurst and George V. Hobart. 
SEAT SALE. MONDAY. MAY 24. PRICES, 50o to $2.00. 



to be 
Mr. Savage re- 
.lune. This play 
dramatic produc- 
promised by Mr. 
to launch several 
the hojie of duplicating 
"The Merry Widow. " 



hold those 
politics. 

• • • 
•Bill Truetell," George H. Brennan'a 
^tori- of theatrical life, has become so 
widely popular that arrangement.s 
Tirpailv in progress for its 
flon The production will be made in 
NVw York early n.>xt 
known star, who has 
comely successes, wi 

title role, that ot a ^- n-i.o, 

in the hardest kind «f f^^'"** '""^^-hv^ ''f 
iramatization is to be made by a 
rromfnent playwright in collaboration 
wiU Mr Brennan. .Simultaneously 
u the American production a per- 

formance will be given in London to 
secure the English rights. 



are 

dramatiza- 

.de it 

fall. A well- 

acl-.leved several 

11 impersonate the 

manager constantly 



Week of Jnne 7th— Tlie Jay Qulgley Players 
In "\Mien ItnJs?!ithood Was in Mower. ' 



BIJOU 



Commencing Monday Matlnse and Week. 
Polite Vaudeville for Ladies, Gentlemen 
and Cliildren. Tlie Week's Attractions- 



tlie 
Shu- 



vacant 
and the 
a while 



ions to the 
It passed 
something of 
Woman and 
I 

Circle 

)-date mu- 

of pretty 

comedians 

acts. The 



• • • 
Henry B. Harris, returning 
(-aronia from London, where 
been superintending the 
Rose Stahl's engageme^nt 
James Forbes' comedy 



in 



not 
a 

slang 
have 
are 



next 



player 



of 
of 



one afternoon 
"The Climax." 
so far as New 



this 
were 
ng 



LILLIAN RUSSELL, 
Coming to the Lyceum in "Wildfire.' 



T , > -n- t)iaver which the eveiits 
tlu's-a.s..n nave added to the roster 
'-Hl-known people is Leona Watson, 
who until she appeared 
at Weber's theater in 
was unknown to fame. 
York was concerned. Little Kocit rec- 
..KnUed her talent four years ago *-hen 
she first went on the slaRC, for she told 
' «cribe that Ihe Little Rock critics 
"the first to give her an encourag- 
notice "The Climax" requires 
that the leading actress shall be a good 
vocalist. The combination is riot al- 
wavs available, and so It was that 
unknown personage was selected 
the role. Until she appeared n 
homelv. sympathetic characterization 
Adeiina von Hagen she was prima 
of various light opera com- 
and after graduating from a 
miisIc.Tl academy sh(>^ sang 
TUa Chimes of Nor- 



on the 
he has 
launching of 
in that city 
"The Chorus 
I^dy' says that Ml.ss Stahl has been 
received with greater acclaim than any 
American actress seen in London 
even excepting Ada Keban, and it is 
matter of fact that many of the 
phrases In "The Chorus Lad> 
mmediately been taken up. and 
heard on the streets in London. Mr. 
Harris fur her states tliat Miss Stahl's 
engagement is such a prosperous one 
thft every IndKatlon points to a year s 
stay in London. Mr. Harris Immedi- 
ate v after the opening night of "The 
Chorus Lady." was In receipt of cables 
Yom mitagers In Hflln and Vienna^ 
asking for the producing 'K'^V^^.V?/^ 
Austria and Germany, and closed with 

^*'F^'f the flrat time in his career as a 
manager he *rtH produce this coming 

setsot^a foreign P>f ^^ ^ ^%'"« , ^"'- 
the reignrlng Lond<in fatce 
The N<'ble Spaniard. 
Somerset Maugham, author of 
Frederick" and "Jack .Straw.' 

'•The Noble Spaniard" 

played In London with 

trev as the star. 

play Is laid in 



Henrietta Crosman announces that 
"'^ [atl she win play, the role of 

Charles Surface in a revival of Ihe 

School for Scandal. 

• • • 

Charles Richman. who has become a 
Shul>V.rt star, is to appear In his own 
play "The Revellers." opening at an 
early date. ^ 

(Tporire C Tyler, who is filling en- 
gagements in Kurope. ha.s sent a POstal 
fani showing a bull fight at Madnd. 
Inderneath this .scene he has wi.ltt-n. 
■Walter Hackett Is fighting the bull. 
Hackett is a well-known news- 
man and dramatist 
ttie guest uf 



Mr. 
paper 
ellng aa 



RAE and BROSC 

in "JUST LIKE A WOMAN" 



BUSCHE-DEYERE TRIO 

AND COMPANY in 

.\n Illustrated Mi-.sioal Novelty. 



chased 
cess, 
by W. 
i>ady 



suc- 
written 



the 



is now being 

Charles Haw- 

The period of the 

the early tlftle.s better 

Crinoline period. This 



for the use 



of 



an 

for 
her 



of 

donna 

panles. 

Cincinnati 

"iioUemiaii 



Girl,' 



Harris arranged 



Degree,' 
tjiealer. 



known as 

play was purchased 
Robert Kdeson. 

f r''the prcSt'lon'Vhere this coming 
an, wi..^"an"fglisb ca^t of Charles 

^'t'"ruluu1'g''it'thJ'Hud-n . 
L':;^ nlsofo'r the production in London 
o? Martha Mortoi^s adaptation of Leo- 
i5 K-nmnf's sociological drama, "On 
?hi EveTwhIch'L to^ave It« Premier 
V t;, America this coming fall 
"'•^VHar";.f a" o arranged for the r^^ 
turn to tills couuUy of Ruth au 



He is trav- 
guest uf Mr. Tyler. 
• • • 

lune 5 Grace \'an Studdiford begins 
a return engagement in Montreal, pre- 
sent ng—nie Golden Butterily" for th^^ 
second time in that city. A letter ha.s 
rhls^ to .say: "Although Miss \ an 
.Studdlfiird does not come to Montreal 
for a month, every seat in the house 
has been taken for her opening per- 
formance at advanced prices. Durliig 
1 -r ^i^^^agement the prima donna will 
e extensively entertained at dliiners 
and receptions by Montreal's most ex- 
clusive smart set. She is a very great 
favorite here and is certain to do a 
spfendlJ business. Special trains are 
to be run from all the near-by cit es 
With this engagement Miss Van .Stu 1- 
^iford ends her long tour. It has been 
styoeiss Manager Charles Brad "^V 
town last Sunday and had this 
•Yea Mi.ss Van Studdiford is 
a record-breaking tour In 'The 
Butterfly" and leaving a splen 



JERE SANFORD 

WliistlIng and Yodeling Comedian. 



McDEYITT and KELLEY 



Eot-ntric Diuiots. 



EXTRA ADDED FEATURE 

SIX CORNALLAS 



iVnierican (;yninastM. 



a 

was in 

to say: 

making 

ilidden 



did impression alt 



along 



the line.' 



H.- I. \V. WllltamnoD'ii Letter. 

TfVv I W WliUamson. Huntington. 
w V a writt^s: "This la to certify that 
r'used FolWs Kidney Remedy lor 
ner"^.M exhaustion and kidriey trou- 
hfe and am free to say that t wlU <io 
alf that you claim for it" Foley s Kid- 
„ev Reniedy has r«-8tored heal h and 
strength to thousands of weak, ruti 
down people. Contains no harmful 
drugs and is pleasant to take, bold by 
all drugglata. 



HARRY WEBB 

In New IUustrat4Ml Sonffs. 



EDISON'S BEST PICTURES. 



KvenlngA at 
Telephones. 



8 and 9:30 — 



>latlnee Dally. 2:15— 10c and 20r. 
10c 15c and 25c. Order SeaU* by Both 

' S<hf>oI Cliildren's Matinee. Saturday, 2:30. Perfornianoes 
day .■Vi'ternoon and Night. 



.Sun- 



DEFECTIVE PAGE 



iiiinniiiipi'iipi 




■iiiiiiiiiiiiiii 




THE DULUTH EVEIIING HERALD: SATURDAY, MAY 22. 1900. 




.... iiiiiMi liiiiiiiiniii 'l " ru iiiii -nn iii r" 



AT THE LYCEU 



f 1 i: , >;:LL Co .. .'} !-V)K TWO NIGHTS 

I r- ;)t-iK!;" AND JAY gUluLhY PLAYERS 

I \\;lL ui'tN SL- :? Sr^ASON JUNE 7. : : ^ 



.* • i;l art. i»l a I n t rod ti f.e t H u s t r n l • '< I r ••• r I ( b ■ w ' 
H..H!i.. filpslnff and aoloa on l« ri'iirii >.i 
■ :uii viiVllnR Til-' ■"■t I •' 
, I III rir»l-r »»«:-» lt'>- •< '-tr' ' 
,.1 i;.f t-iUjiUi, ui'i I. as rc<,'"-i vi-<1 itun-u 
Iin»i*»* ('t"fii i«r< '-;-: .•ikI pul»lt<- wiitT'*- 
fvn ' ■■< ainifj'ii'ti'tl, 

, ,. .nilii*'nt '«•''■<■* '"'ti 'li'' *»til 'vili 

• !.-l».,"Vti' !!"■■': 



Mh 



•a," will tii 



li.i 



<ii 



it I, tf fiirii'V' 



if 



Mil 



r 



:''' N.I, l..,,iM I I !(.• r 

all I"* tu••.^■ :iii.t 



I 111 fill Intl. (»I 

■ --rrhlog pnrt»- 
•it;l I It at ■ 
111 ,;, n, „>iiisji 1 ■'' '■■•'*• '" t»-'"'"i ''*y Jen: 



1 tl'l"'*!:. 
iji'il Uiw 



r.>.:l.t 1..--I - 

Sfiil -. II. 1 \ 

wMI I..* «(■.■■:. ' '•' :" -■•'■■' ■ 

riltllil. 




• r; 
ir- 1 j 



GOSSIP OF THE RIALTO 





i^/e/^ 



, ' . ...... \ ....,■ , TI ,. : . i ■ -I in 1 In- vv ■! y ''t 

• . i 1 I : 1 1 . 1 M - i 1 1 : . . ' s I ; ) ', ■ • i ■ 

. a4 , I "!• 1 '!'. l''< : IH .1 rill 

■"■ ^"'^- " ■ ■ ^ I . .,. ,:_ ■,.. s. ■•(: ,11 I, i;.' 1 l;i '•- ■■■ ' 

,,, .. . ■ . M\ * ' • > ' '!■ ' ■•■■' ! '■' ••' ■■ ' ' ■'■ 

.V t r '.» ..MM'-' ^ I -V ... 



.1 

• • • 

»v X- lOi! uiri-'i- will I>'it <i.it ': 

* • « 

. ,,1,,, .1 !■ .-,■-; : -. will »I>>-n.l !i- 



-H 



WILLIAM, COiLlER SCORES HIT IN *THE MAN 
FROM MEXIC0"-REMARKAB1E PERFORMANCE 

BY FUJl^KO, JAPANESE ACTRESS, DANCER AND 
SINGER. 



■•A' 



h.^ii lilt H 



l.llll 11 I- ■. -,-■ 



.;l, St"'-'"''-* •'*''■■ ''■■'' ' 



OF MRS. TAFT 

Has Aroused Much Spec- 
ulation in Washington 
Society Circles. 

V\i-fi\\:t'.^>''Xi. ^.t-iy -- — Til.- i:!ri",«;': "I' 
: : s V.iii h.i - .It •'u-',| uv'.-''.\ -■ p •.;;.' ■ 
tt MM, in tl.'.* ^ >■■'•- ■! y .■;r"I '- f ■ ■ 

' ■•: T'.M.i '■■^ it' •> 11' ■■ '^ - 1 I'. . • . . . ■ 

: ;>■) 1 -in >li ol ' ! ,-• ' i1 -■ : ■■■■ '1' 

. ,, , ' ''li 



I I' l.s J>ii.V "■'.'■■> ll>' '^1 I'!'" '• • '-1 



«, • • 



'K ■niM!*,.\NY. 




,i,,i ;■! t.'t. Uicil the r»- | '^ 
vlv ■■ " ■■'",', 

J'" 1,1 1 



1 U .V ■ '^ 

• k'^ lliii- 



1,.J,| I 1 >•(,■;,, M, -,!M 

liti'k .t (s UK." (I 



WlllllitU ) 
„i ! t t, 1 1, ."', t I 



, ,r f >, 



IV- II- 

:I ■ il,.' lit ^! ! I'lV 'f 

. •:iin i!:ii. U ' I; ■ "It;' 

■ ■ i ,;: • (-11 • 



,-->i I, I-., in, ■*,»-£ 



To P'f- 



,^..^ -» ....-.,..,, it-.>jM>_ 



I i I! ■ 
■t! 11 



PITTSBURG MEN 
ARE E^ MARKS - 

Por Beautiful Woman 




on 



'- r 



■ 't*\ ,i"i,i '- .-i > tt ill *N,ii'n; ill. •--1--1,.,,, 11 a I. i-i-.!i« .M'-\if„>. ■ 

' -.- • I -,, I..IU !*»:tJ l,ti,ill.l Ht ■-•'■'■' •»'-•'-'• '■ '- -","*■ • I 



AM'JSZM^. 



* ;•-/ ' 



li'W 

''"-i *■ lit tti-e- N »■:'■■* 'i 

lii'» I M,.,. ..I 111 l.;,= |-i. 



1 - 1 . ■ ■ M 

;i-„lt t !li i 
.,,!« 11..- i l'--'"- 



If' :r,.rt L i > 1, ' 
• • « 



„«-■ !■: 



.„». 



It'll <:> of ih9 



r'>rt'i. 



• • 



•IMi.- TiM.-I"' 
... I I ,_ 



; Ami- 
. .< >! V - 

1 fr •- 
! t f ■ ' ,i 



in- I 1 !■■- 

I i|,tll.'M.llli,f*,"«,l ' 

! - iiiir»'»r». 



AT 






i: f 



'■»' (' 



, "i "I ii * '" ;:f I 



BjJOlL 

^ '1 .\X'SICAL ART- 
.^::D ON NEXT 



1 : , •. 1 . ■■■, 



Wi^i.tv ^ \' 



L ILL! AN RUSS.E,LL,,,_ ,. ^^ 
Com-ing to tbt Lyceum ,10- ""Wildfi-re. 



• • • 
,,,,,, M . , K |,ir 




■ • • t, * '1 1 1 1* 
.,.,-„. . :, ' ■ 'th'iou* 

'iJr'hiii,! ,ii" w'>,i'Ki* "It •■"''• 
'(iffiNfiM'K !•' 'I ■'■••■• ■■•<■ >-'""3n 
'iiininiii, ' 
W" It'll lit 
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inii' "It to ii'^<'-ir. " 

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■[■^... M- : I > 'A'i i',»n'. 



LYCEUM 




C. .4. ,'1A«SI.4LL 



MA,Y SIsf mnd 

,J1/MS' lat- 



MONDAY AND TUESDAY 



JOSEPH BROOKS Presents 

LILLIAN 
RUSSELL 



I'll tlir lU =fit; <''•«'!. ''I.v '^»'*' «,''^ 















1, 


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IJv *'i'N»r«r B-matili'ii-r-Ht ,a.ii.i *i*^'>rtp^ V. I,'I.»rMi..rt 

SKAT HAIvr.. >n>XI»,.'lV. MAV 21, I'lClCM-S, r»»h,- to »2.1K»., 



Wf<<'k iif Ji;-n«> 71 h — T!h'' .lav Qtil«l«*,y Plaj-'Ora 
In, '-''WlicH liiiieiH'Ji*****,.! ^^'i*'"* "i Mimc^r.- 



Comminelng Mtiiif iitfptt mi ■••!• 
Polltf Vaudffillt for isites, ifiitltiiii 
anil Chiidfcn. The Wtek*s Ittraetioni 



BROSCHE 

in "JUST LIKE A WOMAN" 



Hit; ai .->" 



• « • 



! * 1 ,*i 4i,UI 

■ , ri'M* 



-1, ilIM,l- 1, ti'- 

, , . rv It Willi' 
-till :Hi t'Xn- f"!' a, ■ ■- 
.u'k "m N'"»* V.trk. I t'li 



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'V'ttll ,S.'H1'I '•till I'l B "'if I ' 
... ,- VI ■,,.■!!' 'in i-l'I'I-l , •- 
,..-ri<'-!:u"- 



BUSGHE-DEVERE TRIO 

AIID COMPilliY in 

An IlIust'iTiteil M»;-si<-iil .\'iv.-!t>'. 



in.i ,11- 

M', M' 



JERE SANFORD 



Wli'istling and V itl.'liui;' • •.tu,i-«,Iiiin,. 



McDEYITT and KELLEY 



i:.-.-.-rir.ri'- D'lwiff'". 



'Il'lf! «!• ' 

iiiirlni"'!" ■■'•*' ''■'** 
.1 It, rt ili I.' •I'l Mil 



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..... (., tit.j .-lii.-.T' ,rl,-. ;1, 



I XTK\ \in»5:i> Fi:\rr!:i: 

SIX CORNALLAS 



I .\t :,| -l^ll.lli., 



Viu.-rifaii <;viniiasis. 



-r 



N..l»l'- 

i 111 ' ' 

t!i.- ,sl.ir. i 



;i.r''.-;^i' '!! "'.li '' ' '"4 !■ ■ 



l,:-;l"* 



HARRY WEBB 

III !N>vv llli«sH-fit»'»l S«Mie-«. 



Mr. Il.ii Ms 'li 



EDISON'S BEST PICTURES. 



1 \.*nl!..;.. n H mill !»;;'.<»— 



t ,1-111 I ' 
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3,Ial,inws l>''iii,l.v. 2-'ir»— KW* uml 2nr: Vsynu..,^ n 
,,j,. , -, ...1-'. . : i.-r > -Uf, '»v 51 ith 'l«-l -itlfui.-.. 

' N, ii.."-i i ■t^UU' ir- y.Aii-.u-i: Saluriliiy. 2::M. l*vri*>mmni\-n Sim- 
la v VJt«Tn'>«>u .ma Ni.;«it- 



J i : i ' ,1 1 ,1 

t;i r'at'U- 

<"'"': • a, 

1,1 Mil ."•■'' ..^ 

i>"'*inii":li- ' ' ■ - V ■ 

*U*lw.m-nfctt iiuX" "Xte t-tt-ua«J(i at *iu-c- 



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i!i^,:'!nir co-u;''i,i' ^'uui" sL ' iii^ 



!*•■"=—- 



'.i tiu ri.,ii ' 
Li„„i i,ake,. Sui 1 J} 



DEFECTIVE PAGE 



mJENTIONAL DUPLICATE EXPOSURE 




THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD:. SATURDAY, MAY 22, 1909, 



11 



- \ 




Every t' 
Hon of 

•lers in Du! 
m betr ; - -'- 
at ai'. 

'ThJ« 
m«o';is 
It 



It 

d 
f. 



lairt'i 



(1 ^,ld^■ 



II 

that 
tills. 



made by local 

f:0 HVr. liyiiiK 

'9 for the 

prograia 

tijis bet- II pro- 
aiiil uuthuslasin 
as a whole,, th« 

r a. (BfOfid tnr'n- 



. . .i time- 
; a ut'i-itt fur tlu' 
i"ular stress nil! 

s' dolnir in l»ii- 



madti lo beiu 



A I 



I'. 



f,.i,«'.'iii.'ii'- f-.r thtr blK RHlherinp'. 

l iH-re June 10, 11 

:i!f.iig In fine shap*. 



i lUffl 

V, : V , 1 > 1 , ., ; 1 1 . and 
lanled by other 



ciilriR day, 

! will lituJ 

rriivr-lers 

. •••. at 

Hntl 

In- 

the 

. ,,;....,. , nun- 
I rfsporul on 

; ,..„ , ..,,.• trtl triiVf lets. 

T. W il.igo. Who w.is 11., ' !»tn the 

KiFt ('i.iii\'e!itlon was helu , will act 

as < halrnian of the mettiriB. and will 

.U]iv.r an address suitable to the oc- 

There will It an address hy 

^ <sman J A<iiini Bede. and B. 

»■ .\'-ir ivill speak i-n ■•'1'^;^ Hus-liifSS 

M< f's \'lew oi Trav* .uip Men F^v One 

\V8. " E. U Millar 1 and 

. .!ar friend ot th. • Hng 

ir.en, kuvwn per»«inally lo neaiiy *'very 

ont In thl» Jurisdiction, will epeak on 

,1 in the morninK the 

.1 ■,.. .^Mi ic * xpected lo rt'port at 

Knlglns of Pythias hall. Tlit Y. 

(- \ V W P A M:]s-.in.« T"ik> and 

the 
- , tor.« 

,.VfTV -: .:.%.it^\Ve 

them f: . 'f','\>' 

alst" ai'viifs to tiie lot; 
r<.rn'n«-nial chit' In parti 



I t 



in ■ 
tl.-; 



C«.il 



l)f a.loweii 



li 
a 
h. 
t. 

J.: 

t 

1, 



wUl 

Hft'TnCM' 



to the 

f..r- 



.«fpii to t'. 
:iy on th«'lt 
A t iu're win be a i - 

> Knights of Pytl . 
last durip the rernalntifr 



Wbil 






.ui 

1 >■*:■ 



iijiiinitti'f 
Mf:., Th^- 



at 



m T 



l';!s ■(•= 



for 

tiirfji 



.i i:ri >■ 

1 and 

V. ff 

.,1- 



t. •■ 



wlU oo ♦- 


.\ «:• 1 1 1 ; '■''■■■■ 


the K. P. 


lia 


•':f' ladies el:- 


progrr 


n,ni . 


At !• ■■' 


M 


open -a 




T.f-u I rr,. 




At 


1< i- 1 ic'Ck Iht 1 « 


'-; 


s-es«h'n. and ^v .. 




ladles win 




till* boiilfvar 


to 1 




he 





.hit-' tluff 
■ w o r k 1 n 
nmenl for 



.It. I •. i u- 



..f 



conimertlftl. industrial and manufac- 
turing Interests will have Meats, and 
altogether It Is believed the parade 
win lie one of the best of the kind ever 
attempted here. Automobiles and car- 
riages will be provided for the ladies. 

FoHowlng the parade, the commer- 
cial travelers and ladles will board 
thr<e excursion steamers which will be 
waiting for them at the Fifth avenue 
wes-t dock, and the boats will carry 
them up tlie St. Louis river to Fond du 
' fi' Idnner will be servtil In Cham- 
grove, and there will be a ie>ng 
interesting program of athletic 
events during the afternoon. A feat- 
ure of the program will he a baseball 
; <tween the Caljrary and Du- 
mmercial travelers' baseball 

The lioats will start <n the return 
trip di'wn the river at 4 p. m., and in 
tl.r evening the Ancient and Mystic 



FOR BLISTERED FEET 






C^/l//P/^/fA/. 



■ut 
»• 1 1 ! 



• rtiinB' 



A granii 

will be 1. 
i!i<»rning. 
lake part 
three pla' 

(^\|.fcf e-d ' 



• -\rmory. 



|*,irii<l«v 



All 1 1 

•n t!. 



rce. '1' ' 
d Ord* 



IbU'. 



tic. iiit;::;t i.e-iu ii j ijurai-t-, lu^u uv^ucv. 



I'.- a 

N in 

n a 

:)1 1 

win 

en- 

- c s 

.....a 



1 i ■- "Will 

\\\\\ he 
also 
will 



^■"'JUJSu iliU 



Suffered in Turkish Bath Establish- 
ment (arl Asks $4,5(K) Damages. 

St Li'uis. Mo.. May 22. — Carl Jan- 
spei ht. traveling for a New York con- 
ct m. has filed suit here against the 
Planters' Hotel company for $4,600 
• inmajr* s f"r blistered fe<t The plain- 
tiff alk'pes that when he went to take 
a Turkish bath at the Plant* rs' hotel, 
and stepped into the "very he>t" room 
unattendfd, the doors slammed upon 
him. and, the floor being uncarpeted. 
hlF feet were badly bllstereei and he 
fainted. 



CHILI) IS A MANIAC 



Since Witnessing Murder of Her 
Mother By Latter's Husband. 

Atlnntii. Ga.. May 22. — As a result 
r>f witnessing the murder of her sleep- 
ing mother. Mrs. Mary Burge, by the 

latter's husband, fil-ytar-old Sarah 
Pritton, the woman's child by her 
first husband, has become a raving 



Avesta Guild of the Bagmen of Bagdad, 
a subsidiary order of the U. C. T.. will 
confer degrees at the K. V. hall. This 
will be open to all the visitors, Includ- 
ing the ladies. 

The coming convention will be the 
sixteenth annual reunion of the U. C. 
T. of this jurisdiction. Duluth was 
the first city to iiave a lodge In the 
piesent jurisdiction of Duluth. The 
order itself was incorporated under the 
laws of Ohio, .Ian. 16. 1888. The Duluth 
lodge was started In 189S, and soon 
alter this lodges were established In 
St. I'aul. Minneapolis, Fargo. Grand 
Forks anel other Northwestern cities. 

The management of the order is un- 
der control of representative bodies 



maniac. Burge entered his wife's 
room and stabted her to death as she 
lay in bed asleep. Little Sarah Brit- 
ton, who was sleping in the room, was 
awakeneel and sfiw the knife driven 
into her mother. The child went Into 
convulsions, which were followed by 
mania, and physicians say she will 
never regain her senses. 

CLOQIETY.M.C.A.HAVE 
A MEMBERSHIP CAMPAIGN. 



organized along lines of national gov- 
ernment, the subordinate councils 
being restricted into Jurisdictions com- 
prising one or more states or prov- 
inces, with a superior or governing 
body known as the grand council, 
which in turn is subservient to the 
known as the supreme 



the Duluth lodge 
senior counselor; 
junior counselor 



Cloquet, Minn.. May 22 — (Special 
to The Herald.) — Tlie membership 
campaign of the Y. M. C. A. is making 
great headway. The mark has been 
set at 5 0O members and from Ineilca- 
tions the prospects are bright for 
reaching it. Last evening a band 
concert was held on the street, after 
which the little boat, "Membership." 
was placed upon the ladder to begin 
its upward course, each new member 
advancing It one notch. 

Fireworks will be used every even- 
ing to report the progress of the cam- 
paign, according te. a set of signals, 
which has been given out. The cam- 
paign for subscription members was 
successfully closed last Wednesday 
and preparations are now under way 



head body, 
council. 

Present officers of 
are: C. a NMxon, 
George M. Peterson, . 
C. W. Sutton, secretary-treasurer 
Nate Ellis, cenduclor; W. G. Holcomb 
papet: R. W. Fenton. sentinel; H. B 
Knudson. E. W. Russell. B. P. Neff, G 
W. Wells, executive committee. 



for a grand rally to mark the end of 
the first year of the association's ex- 
istence In the city. This will take 
place sometime in early June. 

TEARS BLINDED HIS EVES. 



Therefore Negaunee Suicide Could 
Not Finish Explanatory Letter. 

Negaunee, Mich.. May 22. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — The funeral of John 
Stek-obbetti, who committed suicide 
Tuesday night, took place Friday. He 
left considerable money to some of his 
friends in this city, and he also wrote 
several letters before committing the 
deed. One was to his friend, Peter 
.Mussato, a well-known Italian resident 
of Xegaunee. The substance of It was 
that he wished to be excused for his 
action and that he hoped lo meet him 
In the next world. He ended the let- 
ter saying that his eyes were full of 
tears and that he could not write any 
more. 

The deceased has two brothers re- 
siding In Pennsylvania, but attempts 
lo communicate with them have so 
far been futile. 




G. W. WELLS. 

FRIGHTENED BY AITO, 

TEAM IN BAD RUNAWAY. 



Menominee. Mich., May 20. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — Two prominent 
Menominee county Polish farmers 
were badly Injured and Dr. Eugene 
Grignon of this city escaped serious, 
if not fatal, injuries yesterday when 
the farmers' horse.s. fear-maddened, 
dashed along the principal avenue of 
the city and. after running half a 
mile, struck the doctors buggy re- 
ducing it to splinters and then 
crashed into a telephone post. 

Dr. Grignon, who weighs nearly 250 



B. P. NEFF. 



pounds, was hurled into the street, 
but luckily escaped serious injury. 
The two farmers struck the curbing 
heads foremost, sustaining slight frac;- 
tures of the skull and other injuries. 
They are being cared for at the Me- 
nominee hospital and will recover. An. 
aulo frightened the horses. 



Manv weak, nervous women have 
been restored to health by Foley's Kid- 
ney Remedy as It stimuates the kid- 
neys so they will eliminate the waste 
matter from the blood. Impurities de- 
press the nerves, causing nervous ex- 
haustion and other ailments. Commence 
todav and you will soon be well. Pleaa- 
ant to take. Sold by all druggist*. ,, 




tlon 
•ler 

at 
ea." 

Th 

21... 

01 



V ■ ., ..'le by lucal 

, wtoo arts Hying 

Hu ni.ii\:ii(5 ill ia..i<cmenta for the 

JilTair a rid JadKiiisr by the pr. -yearn 

• s been pre- 
; enlluisiasni 

tl Wholt:*, tilt 



B ' 

lu- 
ll. 

& 
tv 

ti!r 
t>. 

kc in iju- 

; t-ar upon 

auU tiit- Zeiiitii 

r r\« V\'in .«»•<; til it 

tiiiii. Uin nude lu belie Vf 

ttiis. 

It Ik < r<«%«d CunilBK. 

j|,.|-ft,.n<. - . ■ '-i ('.I- the btp e:illifrinir 
wt . ■ ■■,,■•.'■■■ 

(It 
l-'i 
t; 1 
h« 
N. ■ 



, , . - .,t tr.i 

A: ■ k t (K- <■(.. 

Zenuu ti-'iiMCii unii tSie bitmi ■ 
a pnx. 5»!-lor> of cornmeitia! 
' •<-, the Arrnmy. 



Rev R. J. M 
V oca turn. Tl. 
sslng. Mayor 



will ref|" 
.rrria! tr- 



an Bch. 
Laslon. Tinre 

ex-Congres-snian ," 
I". Neff will spt-ak 



i.y 



men 

;. and 
other 

- win 

ill b«' 



: lis. lift 



Hiiml Ih 



<1< 



V. 



11- 

.oll 

Itiev 

»'f 
.... . . . : . K 

^.inxi lliJie liitj' bad 
^\ tlieir friends are 

i:ii«nKed. 

: .1 has 

ill ion 

:uiiiittee, 

.iK. Tlie 

........... JllIU 

ie band and 

It I' N*. rr 



I . ri 

rorruiil i ift. s 

iiuimitti'i' 1.V 

to makf 

I tfT till urn fill 

■ ' tit. 11 will 



i.iii ilie 

A-IU act 

and win 

to the oc- 

- •' - by 
: n. 

t ii.j frill ess 
M. n s View of'Travt !nip Men, By One 

Wiiu Knuwa/' '■' ' >i ■ - .. : ■■• ;...,i 

very popular 

men, known v*. ; -- ....i,.> .■ ....... ... . -^ ■ , 

one In this Juri-HiUtlt.n, \v;U si'cak t-u 
■•iniluth '• 

At 1 ic In the morninK tlie 

v:^.^tl■r^ :< ( xpeeted to rt-i'.irt at 

ivnlgtits oi PythSa» ha : Y. 

A.. Y. \V. C. A.. Ma.'«*-n.' ^ and 

iclai clubs all will Mptn the 

f iheir VtiindlnRP to the vieitors 

».\ t-i-\ .1 ■ . •■:. and Kive 

ti.em fi -es. This 

al.so ai " . ' liic 111*: ' "" " 

Commt lb in part i. t 

to be iin<u'i-.«--t>'nd that -■ .- 

men will bt- treat»<l 

'- 'he citv as member.^ ... ;...v .-. f,., .../... - 

i:, and will be allowed every priv- 

T^ •• V w (' A. is anxious to 

■<l(.ie t'i.i;i-le«y to the 

.. ..ii t;:» I (.!i!ii,it tt t' on 

aiT'a ni^'rtr:. ! or- 

l.n! :, rs . , ■ nnf.' 

iiK ^I>e^l:ll 

entertaln- 

l ar.d It win t>e seen to that time 

s !n>t drag' heavily on their hands. 

At 2 o'elf.^ k it^re will be f.':.- 

sesBlon in ti.« KtilKhts of f: .al! 

which win last durig the rfniainder 

r.t ttte afternoon. While Ihle Is go- 

inK oil th< ' '; he a reception for 

lailles aii.i ;ll;itl)«n vt soiivenlru 

at tl::c • ■■ ■ ... .a I club. 

At ^ k in the evening there 

win be I ... ...plifyinK degree work In 

the K. P. hall, and entertalnmint (i i 
tlie ladies eluewiiere. All detaiii? of 
the f roisrrnm ate nut yet complete. 

M. l"riiin.\ there will be on 
• Tt by ' ■ ■ions Third 
. ! ill J hcadfninr- 

L' o clvCk ttu-i f wil" ' ■ 
.«et--."^b'n. and wlille ' 
! he lailieu will b« k ■ i a 
lid the boulevard. ! ■ m 2 
,i in the afternoon l.'.ti* will 
.-i.v a lid othfr forms of en- 
• !» tlie different buildings 
in the evening, begln- 
> k. ih» re will be u grand 
the Armory. 

IlifE »>tre«t PHrnde. 
A grand indut>lrial and i ivic parade 
will be held at 9 o'clock Saturday 
morning. All the city officials will 
take part in tliiF. and there will be 
ilirt. ". • '.s of police. It Is n:--.-. 
.■\l.. tlie fire depart Mi' .'.t \' ' . 



commercial, induptrlal and manufac- 
turing interests will have floats, and 
altogether it Is believed Die parade 
will l.e one of the best of the kind ever 
attempted here. Automobiles and car- 
riages will be provided for the ladies. 

Following the parade, the commer- 
cial travelers and ladles will board 
three excursion steamers whicli will be 
waiting for them at the Fifth avenue 
west dock, and the boat^ will carry 
them up the St. Louis river to Fond du 
Lac. I>lnner will be served In Cham- 
ber's grove, an<l tliere will be a long 
and interesting program of athletic 
. ' ts during the afternoon. A feat- 
f the program will be a baseball 
l,.. ,.,. between the Calgary and Du- 
luth coinniertial travelers' baseball 
teams. 

The bi.ats will start on tlie return 
trip down the ri\er at 4 p. m.. and in 
the evening the Aniur.t and Mystic 






-^^Zm^ 



C^/i//d/^/tA/. 



FOR BLISTERED FEET 



A; 



At '.' .-I 
ope II -a.; 
Heglnw 

t'-rs, 
ttusin 
priiL- 
liriv. 



nan. 
ninj- 

ball at 



Suffered in Turkish Bath Establish- 
ment €arl Asks $4,500 Damages. 

St. Loui-«!. Mo.. May 22. — Carl Jan- 
specht, traveling for a New York con- 
ci rn. has filed suit here against the 
Planters' Hotel company for J4.500 
damages for blistered feet. The plain- 
tiff alleges that when he went to take 
n Turkish bath at the Planters' hotel, 
and .»-tepped into the "very hot" room 
unattended, the door.s slammed upon 
him, and, the floor being uncarpeted. 
his feet were badly blistered and he 
fainted 



( HILD IS A MANIAC 



•» I i— - 



divisi..!,.- t- 

Ijy a bai' 



Since Witnessing Murder of Her 
Mother By Latter's Husband. 

Atl .a.. May 22. — As a result 

if witnes.'^ing the murder of her sleep- 
ing mother. Mrs. Mary Burpe, by the 
latter's husband, .^il -year-old Sarah 
Britton. the woman's child by her 
tirsl husband, has become a raving 



Avesta Guild of the Bagmen of Bagdad, 
a subsidiary order of the U. C. T., will 
confer degrees at the K. P. hall. This 
will be open to all the visitors, Includ- 
ing tlie ladies. 

The coming convention will be the 
sixteenth annual reunion of the U. C. 
T. of this Jurisdiction. Duluth was 
the first city to liave a lodge In the 
present jurisdiction of Duluth. The 
order itself was incorporated under the 
laws of Ohio, .Ian. 16, lSg8. The Duluth 
lodge was started in 1^9S. and soon 
alter this lodges were established In 
St. Paul. Minneapolis. Fargo. Grand 
Forks and otlier Northwestern cities. 

The management of the order is un- 
der control of representative bodies 



maniac. Burge entered his wife's 
room and stabbed her to death as she 
lay in bed asleep. Little Sarah Brit- 
ton, who was sleping in the room, was 
awakened and saw the knife driven 
Into her mother. The child went into 
convulsions, which were followed by 
mania, and phyj'lcians say she will 
never regain her senses. 

( LOQllET V. M. (\ A. HAVE 
A MEMBERSHIP CAMPAIGN. 



organized along lines of national gov- 
ernment, the subordinate councils 
being restricted into Jurisdictions com- 
prising one or more states or prov- 
inces, with a superior or governing 
body known as the grand council, 
which in turn is subservient to the 
head body, known as the supreme 
council. 

Present officers of the Duluth lodge 
are: C. 6. Nixon, senior counselor; 
George M. Peterson, Junior counselor; 
C. W. Sutton, secretary-treasurer; 
Nate Ellis, conductor; Vi . G. Holcomb, 
page; R. W. Fenton, sentinel; H. B. 
Knudson. E. W. Russell, B. P. Neft, G 
"W. Wells, executive committee. 



for a grand rally to mark the end of 
the first year of the association's ex- 
istence in the city. This will take 
place sometime in early June. 

TEARS BLINDED HIS EYES. 



Cloquet, Minn.. May 22 — (Special 
to The Herald.) — Tlie membership 
campaign of the Y. M. C. A. is making 
great headway. The mark has been 
set at 510 members and from indica- 
tions the prospects are bright for 
reaching it. La.«t evening a band 
concert was held on the street, after 
which the little boat, "Membership," 
was placed upon the ladder to begin 
its upward course, each new member 
advancing It one notch. 

Fireworks will be used every even- 
ing to report the progress of the cam- 
paign, according to a set of signals, 
which has been given out. The cam- 
paign for subscription members was 
successfully closed last "VS'ednesday 
and preparations are now under way 



Therefore Negaunee Suicide Could 
Not Finish Explanatory Letter. 

Negaunee, Mich., May 22. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — The funeral of John 
Steirobbettl, •who committed suicide 
Tuesday night, took place Friday. He 
left considerable money to some of his 
friends in this city, and he also wrote 
several letters before committing the 
deed. One was to his friend, Peter 
Mussato, a well-known Italian resident 
of Negaunee. The substance of it was 
that he wished to be excused for his 
action and that he hoped to meet him 
In the next world. He ended the let- 
ter saying that his eyes were full of 
tears and that he could not write any 
more. 

The deceased has tw^o brothers re- 
siding In Pennsylvania, but attempts 
to communicate with them have so 
far been futile. 




G. W. WELLS. 

FRIGHTENED BY AITO, 

TEAM IN BAD RUNAWAY. 



Menominee, Mich., May 20. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — Two prominent 
Menominee county Polish farmers 
were badly Injured and Dr. Eugene 
Grignon of this city escaped serious, 
if not fatal, injuries yesterday when 
the farmers' horse.s, fear-maddened, 
dashed along the principal avenue of 
the city and, after running half a 
mile, struck the doctors buggy re- 
ducing it to splinters and then 
crashed Into a telephone post. 

Dr. Grignon, who weighs nearly 250 



B. P. NEFF. 



pounds, was hurled into the street, 
but luckily escaped serious injury. 
The two farmers struck the curbing 
heads foremost, sustaining slight frac- 
tures of the skull and other injuries. 
They are being cared for at the Me- 
norriinee hospital and will recover. Aa 
auto frightened the horses. 



Manv weak, nervous women hav» 
been r'estored to health by Foley's Kid- 
ney Remedy as it stimuates the kid- 
neys so they will eliminate the wasta 
matter from the blood. Impurities de- 
press the nerves, causing nervous ex- 
haustion and otlier ailments. Commence 
today and you will soon be well. Pleaa-- 
ant to take. Sold by all druggista. ,; 

I 






12 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: SATURDAY, MAY 22. 1909 




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M/NES /N WARREN DISTRICT 

Production ConUnues on About tlie Same Scale- 
Ore of Sliglitly H/g/ier Grade Being Mined 
in the Bonanza Circle. 



Bisbet. Arte.. May 22.— There is 
srarccly an Inel. !■•!!« worthy of mentit>n 
In the Warreti 
week, -Vu 11. 

are w«>rkh'..8 ab"Ui ;i> 

since tht> tir«t of lh*> ■ ^ , 

In the mineii remain the suiuu au'. U"- 

ore production ha:^ m* vn ; !-'1 nifi t.-rM. i - 

ly, ahowingr a 

of the compai. 

crease nor Inc 

present. The 

Calumet & 

Fltt'«'burfir •' 

a a' 

tinti 

bii t 

pr'it' 



haa been of 

- ' -■'- tf con- 
luctlun, 
, VI* (111 Id 
: titer In 



fered Willi there temporarily while the 
ivrtter was being cared for •I^i''*,,^ 
[ „ew water In Uie mine, but »» t '« 
lae encuunler..d on the upper levehs. 
Tlie .«*hart is not slvlntf more water aa 
H whole than for some time in the 

''^The I'alumt't & Arizi.na " at present 

ni.-talllns a new pumping l>''"\^ui di«" 

\r.vU Foi.I shaft In the Courtland Uia- 
rict This plant will be able to handle 
he water V- greater depths In the 

i,r"-"v and Us provi-slon Indlrutes 

t, April Fool ahaft 

t,, ... ::.e an tnipi>rldnt > 

in the new district. This 

now carrying on work -i 



AT THE LA KE COP PER MINES 

Tamarack Company's Exploralions on Its C//ff Property Satis- 

factory— Oneco Tract to be Diamond Drilled to Locate Baltic 

Lode— Drifting in Tecumseh Mine of LaSalle Company. 



■d 

■•V 
,!iy IS 

Llirce 



i to b- 
■OUt::d 

Brlffgu and 
now entering 



I'l- 

i t; - 



thi.^ 
that 



ncfii-infr tti« 



low .sraae 
eiieounterei' 
wards the 
dred feei 
bodies. T: 
future Is . 
rcBulta in 
Junction n 

H oat. son s. • ■- 

field 

1 ..^ ---■&■■'■' 

made for ciiltlnK ^ .-tlalJt.ni at !. 

From this levni drift insc v. 

BtartrJ,, pr in th. 

the Stialtu- >•• iH the 

llon. Qootl th. »*;.•* ar.- ■'■"•' .'iL\Ji'J,'«: 

level as the ground i promising 

and important or. '!.*!! 

Consld.Table w--^ ."^": 

tared In the drift u.i u.e i ;.'■', -L..v.t.evel 
of the JuacUon and work was Inter- 



shafts tn the Courtland ,'i^^^"^'-— J '^ 
Gerroania. the April tool and th*, 

^"'^'"'- ■ ■ ,u-w ur.raises 

• ; dur- 
sliow 

>.v th© 

,,.rty has 

\\iiut' by tho 

tlu> fiOO-foot 



At the Stinttnfk t"'" 
wpre b'?Kun 
rriK th«^ pres.' . 

:• .-•xt.-nl of ti..- '.':■'■ '' 

ifts <jn that k-vi'l. '1 . 

ven great proof ui it^ 
-velopment work or. 
level during t! 
Ore from the d 



tliree months, 
cnt work is be- 
ing placed in the .nn^ and when t.hese 
are f1!h-d another shipment will be 

'>ni.MU work 15 b-ing con- 
; tlo- Kfim, biif '-■ -'"■'•hti r^ .1- 

li.'cii ifport' 
: he drift -siarlv . ■- ■; ' ' 

I level lia.H pr..c.'.-i'-i nmelv 
' ■•' drift has bf-ii i*tartea 
fvel In thf* direction of 
Thlr. drift 19 to test the 
ground at t(:l3 h-vel l>eneath the one 
fncount.M.a on tlie 1.000 and 1.100-foot 
levels 



e; 
th 



THE WOLVERINE & ARIZONA 

Believed That Ore Shipments to the Copper Queen 

Smelter at Douglas Will Cover Expense of 

Development for Some Time. 



Houghton. Mich., May 22. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — The exploratory 
operations of the Tamarack company 
on it.s Cliff property are meeting all 
fxlM ( t.iti'itis. The company recently 
riKSod up a diamond drill outfit In the 
horlzf»n <if the Kearsargc lode and has 
sue. in taking a core from what 

presumauly is tlii^t formation. Tho 
drill cure was well charged with cop- 
per. Am exploratory shaft will prob- 
ably bo put down this summer. The 
alto of the pr.»pi».sed new shaft 1» wlth- 
lH a few thou.sand feet of the Ojibway 
No. 1 shaft in which first-class copper 
ground has been opened to a depth of 
800 feet. 

Oneco. 

Oneco is planning to diainond drill 
Its property in an effort to locate the 
Baltic lode which formation was re- 
cently disclosed by trenching upon the 
lands of the New Baltic company 
next south, and presumably strikes 
acros.s the gieatcr part of the Oneco 
trad. The work will be in charge 
,t th.' local management of the Han- 
oi k C.wis.jlidated company. Oper- 
ations ar. rxpected to begin this 
month. 

I. a Sidle. 
Operati-.ns in the Tecumseh mine 
of tilt; La Salle company continue cen- 
tered in drifting, and with generally 
satisfactory results. The disclosures 
of <oppcr ground at the eleventh, 
twelfth and sixteenth level.s are par- 
ticularly gratifying both In the uni- 
formity of the mineralization and the 
high average copp.-r .■.>ntenL of the 



rock. The shaft remains bottomed 
at the seventeenth level awaiting the 
installation of heavier hoisting ma- 
chinery. The company has a stock- 
pile of about 25.000 tons of exceptlon- 
o"ly rich copper rock, taken from open- 
ing work entirely. The Caldwell 
shafts disclose nothing of value. The 
shafts have attained a depth of about 
ToO feet. The work at this end of 
the property Is entirely In the nature 
of explorations. 

While Pine. 

Calumet & Hecla is engaged in 
sinkir.g a shaft on the old White Pine 
property In the Porcupine mountain 
district in Ontonagon county. The 
White Pine Is the property of the St. 
Marys Mineral Land company and is 
held under option by the Calumet & 
Hecla, which company has been con- 
ducting exploratory operations there 
for the past year. Diamond drill bor- 
ings are said to have shown an un- 
usually promising copper deposit In 
what probably is the Nonesuch lode. 
This lode, first opened in the old 
Nonesuch mine in 1S67, gave early 
promise of out-rlvallng the famous 
Calumet conglomerate, and though the 
rock Is extremely rich in copper, the 
flaky nature of the mineral has thus 
far baffled all efforts to secure a 
profitable extraction. The more receiit 
work of the Calumet & Hecla on this 
property discloses other copper beai-ing 
lodes of apparent promise, and it Is 
expected that the further exploration 
of these beds at depth will result n 
the opening of a copper producer In 
that generally dls<Medlted district. 
>>\v Baltic. 

New Baltic's operations continue 



^ ^■ » »» »»»»»») | c»iK«»») Kf**»»» »»»»»»*»**»* »* » *^-' 



OUTPUT OF GLOBE DISTRICT 

Production Not More Than Three-Fourths of Normal, 

Owing to Curtailment by the Old Dominion, 

Due to Low Price of Metal. 



I confined to diamond drilling and .sur- 
lice trenching. The diamond drill hole 
has attained a depth of about 200 feet 
and is penetrating a conglomerate 
bed overlying the west and main 
lodes of the Baltic formation. A core 
of mixed ophite and amygdaloid 
taken from a depth of between 150 
and 168 feet carried a small amount 
of copper throughout the entire 
eighteen feet, the last ten feet be- 
ing somewhat the richer, though ap- 
parently not commercially valuable. 
The drill outfit is now operating day 
and night in an endeavor to get down 
to the Baltic lode within the present 
month. Trenching has also resumed 
after several weeks' su.spenslon, due 
to the flooding of the pits by the 
spring freshets. This work Is con- 
fined to a conglomerate bed. pre- 
sumably identical with the conglomer- 
ate Just overlying the Baltic formation. 
Isle Uoyale. 
Isle Royale is gradually increa.sing 
Its mining force, and now has be- 
tween seventy and seventy-fiye ma- 
chine drills In operation. About forty- 
five of these machines are engag.?d in 
stoplng in the Nos. 2 and 6 workings^ 
Operations In the Nos. 4 and 5^haft3 
are confined to opening work. Recent 
developments tn the newer workings 
to the south show no great variation 
from the average ground opened In 
the past, occasional spots of excep- 
tional rirhne.ss being followed with 
due regularity by stretches of only 
?al? avfrage ground. The general 
average, however, remains fairly high 
and is probably better than twenty- 



Globe, Ariz.. May 20. — The copper 
production of Globe district is at pres- 
ent not more than three-fourths of 
normal, owing to tho curtailment by 
the Old Dominion, the company deem- 
ing it inexpedient to make a large out- 
put when electrolytic copper is selling 
below 13 cent.s. The average price for 
April, on which settlements for the 
month were made, is 12.5625 cents. Old 
Dominion produced last month 2,845.- 
000 pounds of copper, the smallest fig- 
ure for any recent month. Develop- 
ment work has progressed steadily, and 
the already large tannage of ore was 
added to materially. In fact, the phys- 
ical condition of the Old Dominion :nine 
was never better than at present, and 
with the early improvement in the 
market for copper, which seem.s as- 
sured. Old Dominion will he in posi- 
tion to increase its output to 4.000.000 
pounds or more when deemed advis- 
able. 

The Old Dominion management has 
abandoned its early intention of plac- 
ing the new pumps in C shaft, on ac- 
count of bad ground at the tenth and 
twelfth levels, it being estimated that 
to make the foundation for the big 
pumps secure at No. 7 shaft, thirty- 
seven carloads of cement would have 
to be used, and then there might be a 
doubt of the stability of the station. 
.\fter carefully considering the matter, 
the management decided to install the 
new pumping plant in A shaft and 
work has begun on the station at the 
twelfth level, to cut which will re- 
quire two montlis or longer. The 
great pumps, which are of the Nord- 
berg tvpe, will have a capacity at that 
depth "of about 6.000,000 gallons, which 
is about the same as that of the pres- 
ent pumos. which after the new pumps 



go into commission will be held a» 
an auxiliary plant, to bo used only in 
an emergency. 

The progress being made by the Ari- 
zona Commercial Copper company In 
tiie construction of its tine plant at the 
Eureka ehaft becomes more apparent 
eacn succeeding week. >MtK:h of the 
material for the various buildings has 
been received and Cinstruction work 
is advaj'.clng rapidly. Also, most of 
the machinery for the smelter power 
house la on the ground and the con- 
crete foundatlon.s have been put In, as 
well as the foundation for the new 
hoist. Supt. J. E. Pemberthy stated 
that all the water had been pumped 
out of the .shaft and that the pumps 
were handling, without difficulty. 
1.500,000 gallons per day. Drifting has 
been started on th© 600 and 700-foot 
levels *ind Interesting developments 
may be expected upon these levels 
' within the next few weeks. At the 
I Black Hawk workings the water is be- 
ing lowered about five Inches each 
day, and the management will very 
90on resume sinking the winze which 
Is opening a body of fine ore. assaying 
12 per cent and better In copper and 
six to eight ounces silver to the ton. 
It is certain that drifting from this 
winze at «00 feet will open a. jfig body 
of high-grade ore. 

The management of the .^izona Com- 
mercial confidently expeels to have 
the smelter completed and blown In 
by Aug. 15. before which date both the 
600 and 700-foot levels should be 
opened between t!ie Eureka and Black 
Hawk shafts, placing In sight a very 
large tonnage of ore. General Man- 
ager Bennle says the company should 
produce In September 1.000,000 pounds 
of copper, at a cost of 9 cents per 
pound. 



rcontinued on page 23, third column.) 



Blsbee. .' ''-- '■'■' ■ '■" ' ■•• ^^ 
tne & Arl: 

Bhlpments <." 
at DouiTlaB. 

of the d «*'"'•■■ 

devo'ifipn'ii, 

the Hlggl;..:: : -. 

The wlnie which wa.s ; 
has r€'ached a dc-pih o: 
The formation at pre».;-r.t !s 
lime, porphyry a~fi leached mat 
Indications i> ' " warda tlie 
of- ore at grt-- .lipth. 

There l3 no i.: j.^pect at present 



tl'.io-. 

of l! 

U'-rt. 



ugh 



find In g 
of 



< 1 1 u ^ 

;■ ill 

1 1 '„> I 



•f;;: 

kii 



1 W 1 1 1 (i 



H-k 

Oi i'l- 
if Htl'i' 



cady 
r«tur 
dovt 

futUf 



.netit, 



but it 



'Ve*l 



feived 
. .. u\n al- 
that the 
carry on 
me. Tb« 
bright. 



MASTERY /minp AVIS-DALY 

Reports From Colorado Mine NoTsatisiactory to Butte People - 

Conditions on New Levels of North Butte Gradually Improving 

—Butte & Superior's Find Encouraging Other Companies. 



SHATTUC K'S ANNUA L REPORT 

Reasons Why It Has Not Been Deemed Advisable to 

Build Smelter at Present— Advice of Well 

Known Copper Experts. 



T^if. f.illriv 



vS . » ; K 

one-f 



^ of d' flnt 

i.r.st comi.. . .. nent 

.. up to tlie present 

,, .ir-iwfi(^utf'il IIP, less 

...fty 

■ to 



er iiali 
I ined li 

<\\n up in Lii:s 
• y to hf> mined 

and the ^ ' '■' '-^ 

, ering larg. 

ii: the same rf«ir.ft'-a ais- 



a 

ly 

Ut 

el 



work that i.H beh 

jii-fipert!es in of 



t» 



.1" I 



> on ad- 

advan- 

• iiper 

■I. & 

11 tig up 

-i which 

.ilch. of 

(titer ore bod- 

f.o"d in the 



' iui 



. 1 ~ 



a: 

t 



I ! ..I ; .t If . i. '• . _> V ■ 
1 1 1 uek. 

It lias l>een deeme.i ri.j..><ible to 

tuil'l SI snv'Uer at present, or until 

k ha.s progre.wBed aui- 

iiable tlie plain to be 

■' • :•,, itv and In 

,-r. and the 

.., ..,, ,,..;• ■- ' satis- 

thts 

.e of 

IS, who 

-tv. but 



Butte. M..nt.. May 22.— (Special to 
The Herald.*- There seems to be much 
mystery about Uavls-Daly Copper in 
Butte, even among some of the In- 
siders, and the reports from the Colo- 
rado mine, the only property being de- 
veloped by the company, are not sat- 
isfactory. From New York have issued 
stories ab.Hit a big strike In the Colo- 
rado but th.* New York office ha.s also 
iasued very emphatic and peri-mptory 
oider.f to the company's oftiters and 
employes in Uuite not to give out any 
information about the Colorado or 
other property and not to talk about 
the reported strike. There has been 
considerable Hutte selling o' j^a^' f* 
Daly stock, one of the men originally 
interested In the company and a close 
friend and as.soelate of F. Augustus 
H.-inr.e being among the sellers. 1 his 
m.sider has ju.st •diseovercd that 
there was a possibility of another as- 
ses.sment on the .stock, and that there 
wa>< still duo on the stock $3 per shaie. 
Which the directors had a"l'';VlV' »»>^ 
levy at any time. It appears that the 
public generally had the notion that 
the $•-* assessed and paid on the ex- 
■ l.anKe of the old stock for the new 
paid off all assessment.s. but It le now 
made public that another Joker like 
unto ti e one In the old agrpf*'"*"'' .^ '* i 
the original vendors, which perm tied 
tiiem to turn nto the Davls-Uaiy 
reasury slock at $15 per share In lieu 
of cash when the stoi k was selling at 
$5 vvas contained in the agreement or 

plan-s or the new ^•""'P^"^.?",!, si are 
additional a-ssesamenl of |.> pel snare 
migh be expected. At this rate the 

Md stock had an ^"'^''f "'^^ Yhrnew 
15 ,,er share, the par value of the ne\^ 

stock h.-ing 110. 

Butte Public I ocany. 

Probably everything about the affair 
t« nl rlKht but the Butte public re- 
membering the remarkable stories 



that were sent out from New York 
about fabulous copper strikes in the 
Davis-Daly properties. Just before the 
collapse of the <ild company, when no 
strikes had been made at all. a»e a 
little uneasy about the n«w stories 
from New York In view of the tact 
that local Information about the prop- 
Irty 18 strictly j.rohll.lt.d It Has been 
published m various localities, aa com- 
ing from authoritative sources, that the 
Davis-Daly company has nearly f 6o0 - 
000 left In the treasury, as the result 
of the »2 per share assessment, anU 
again tliat the treasury had something 
like $400 000. If the company has that 
much money and the Eastern stories 
Cf thVTtrlke in the Colorado m ne are 
only half true the company will prob- 
ably not have to call for any more as- 
sessments It Is a fact that the com- 
pany has Pald off an Its indebtedness 
on the properties and there are no 
more deeds In escrow. The be.st In- 
formation obtainable is that all claims 



CORDOVA TOHAVEN EW SHAFT 

Hovland and Smith Inspect Property and Sinking of 

Three-Compartment Shaft tias Been Started-" 

Live Oak Tunnel Progressing Rapidly. 



formation ouiumrtuio j= v,. — --- -- - . . 

atralnst the property have been paid 
o^ Another bit of information given 
oul from the East is that the comimny 
is negotiating with the Washoe smel- 
\It uTva raie and that If urrangemen s 
cannot be made with the Washoe, the 
old Basin Reduction company smelter 
at Basin. Mont., will be fitted up to 
freat the Colorado ore. This inference 
of a doubt that satisfactory '^rrange- 
ments can be made does nol appear to 
bear out the beautiful stories about a 
recomlllatl.m between Heinze and the 
Amalgamated Copper company and of 
a brotherly relationship that Is e^ st- 
inir between Mi». Helnze. John D. K> an 
L"id Tiromrs F. Cole. One of these 
stories ha.s it that John D Ryan, man- 
aeing director of the Amalgamated 
comifanv had discovered that one of 
h 8 companies had been '"'"InS a lot o 
ore from Davis-Daly ground and that 
he w-en7to Helnze and offered to pay 
for the trespass, but Helnzo. stirred by 
thl new brotherly feeling and frlend- 



Bhip, positively rjf"^^'' *° /^^^inte'^ 
money from Mr. Ryan or Mr. "eln" .s 
old enemy, the Amalgamated Copper 
company. 

Worth Butte. 
The reports from the North Butte 
mine are to the effect ">^l/»}« <=%% 
tlons on the new levels at the i.ouu 
and 2 200 are gradually Improving and 
Uiat the drifts are getting into good 
ore Gradually the facts about the 
new levels are coming out. it ap- 

lars thaf two distinct faults were 
found in the Edith May vein on the | 
new levels west of the crosscut. One 
faiTlt threw the vein north and an- 
other threw It back again, and the -ire 
Tn the fault was of a very low grade 
The drifts are now through the fault 
and Manager Cars.)n Is author ty for 
fhe sTatemlnt that they are gettitig n- 
to irood ore. About the defalks of the 
conKns in the mine or o" the new 
levels all officers are as reticent as 
were Thomas F. Cole and John D 
nyln. who refused to talk at all ami 
declined to see Interviewers. The 
North Butte will probably alwa.vs be a 
blK nine, at least for many years to 
come The ore bodies on the l.bOO 
and i.800 levels are nothing fhort of 
marvelous, and the company has stil 
500 feet of unopened veins to tho west 
on tliose levels and 200 f^.TrMVif -^ is 
while the faces of the drifts aie .n a» 
good ore as any that has been taken 
out The same Is true of the Jessie 
vein farther north on the same ievels_ 
The Nortli Butte has a vast lot oi 
ground yet to explore and tne po-sBl- 
billties for opening good veins in the 
Berlin group of claims are g.^od. The 
company Is also engaged in developing 
new fev-els on the old Speculator vein 
8.!uth of the shaft, where some good 
ore was found while connections were 
beinj made from the Edith May t.. he 
workings of the Hig h Ore mine of the 

(Continued on page 23. third column. ) 



Globe. Ariz.. May 22.— Preliminary 
work has been commenced on a new 
three-compartment shaft on the Eu- 
reka property of the Cordova Mining 
company, adjoining the Miami prop- 
erty. H. B. Hovland. president of the 
company, after a day spent in Inspect- 
ing the property with Hoval A. bmith 
and M. E. McCarthy, decided on this 

Tlie new Sullivan shaft is located 
about 2o0 feel from the property line 
of the Eureka and Miami properties. 
It is possible that at the beginning a 
two-compartment shaft will be sunk 
to the ore body and this afterwards 
enlarged. 

The Live Oak property was also in- 



spected and found to be in a v.ry sat- 
isfactory conditi.jn. 

In inspecting the development of 
this property. Mr. Hovland found same 
twentv-live feet of 4 per cent concen- 
trating ore and about 120 feet of ore 
running 2 per cent or better in cop- 
per. 

The Live Oak tunnel is progressing 
rapidlv. there remaining about 400 feet 
of work to be done, 
completed, the work 
.shaft will be resumed. 

It win probably take three month.s lo 
.'omp'.ete the tunnel. 

Huv-.and. .Smith and McCarthy wH 
next inspect the Globe Consolidated 



1g L 

With thus work 
of sinking tlie 



(Continued on page 



third column.) 



R/\YCENT RfkUSORE TONNAGE 

Estimates of 5,000,000 Tons in Sight Believed to be 

Far Below Acfual Shov^ings Now Made— 

Foremost Engineers at Mine. 



In 

1 i ,H.V.' 



.Illig li 

. ,ite th.ii 

.i very lii h mine- 
pert y Is owned in fee 
!.^ fully i)aid for, 

:,'i.Mii iin.l develoi' 




hv the 

■ Ills. I 

H.- 
dls- 
uheii 

lliird column.) 



DECREASE IN THE PROFITS 



Last Year's Output of the Coeur d'Alene Mines 

Shows the Effect of the Low Prices 

Prevailing for Metals. 



LAKE SUPERIORJRON MINES 

Demand for Ore Increasing^and Number of Boats in Commission 

steadily Enlarging-hhn T. iones Preparing to Put His Fur- 

nace for Low Grade Ores Into Commercial Operation. 



Spokane. "-"'■-' - 
in pro0t8 ! 

tif;- Hecla i'j i'' 
erai proper I leo t>- 
men is by the vari 

t". ■ 



■J 11 



.1 



(r:.tis!...rlaiion. $i:iH.19:l; 
•.11, betlerrili'lU-s 

■ . , ■ . . n..'t i.i-ofits. 



;:ipanie.- 



!a Mining ompiioy evi i :.'>1, 
■ I .. . .r H i;ros!< \'a . !!.■ .»f 

; ..f .■.vtr.iruiiK. $:::i;i.- 

* ■ • and re- 

■: . ■ ; better- 

;tii.i i.-|.., 1, -., «... .■,.■19: net 

s $l'ts.7!ts 

fi.^, ,,-,.. t'.,r i!i.. siatiJard -.M.tm- 

ai>-: Tons ex- 

V!ily. $-J,r.sa.961; 

• HI. *l.t>:.y.T:M . cost of 

t r'ius[>.iitii I hKi. $S13,- 

- net profits. 



1 1 1 ■ i t i: ■ ■ 


■ I thf La.sl (.:ua!u.-e mine "';"d- 


u, niiiiv - 


Mifl report .«ihow..f: T..>n.i ~d, 


L Tli- 


■» ■ ' ■■ .>f 

ii.l 


• ss aii'i 


the M<*Mi" 


■ ,. w. i , ,..^,ra. 


xt a small 




.,.,- :....; „ i.,:. . i-Tts it ex- 


,r 


tracted 18!*. 975 tons ,,{ .,f .>f a gross 




vii,,,. ,o- ssi-'..7,'ir. : i ■■-* -r r.\tractlon. 




trans- 




pairs. 



& SuIHvan Mining &\$2^.ill. 
,■,,.. IT, ■(•;v ;'fi..)rts n-^t ' Tli'^ 1 



44". 

fi.; 



,:nf at Burke 

figures are: Tons 

gro.is value, $155.- 

. tlon. $136,263: cost 

trantip'^rtation, $61.- 

^.' I'. .St ji leijaiis. $17,544, net lo.ss. 

$n.'859. 



A=! has been expected, the iron ore 
tr.i- i. .sliouing improvement. I ur- 
nae.« are enUruvg the market again 
A considerable demand for ore has set 
in and. according to advices reaching 
the l^ke Superior mining region, sales 
aggregating a number of millions of 
ton. have been made the past fortnight 
for d.Hvery this year. Because of the 
-y depressed stale of the Iron 
„,,„ .,,Md buslne-ss. predictions were 
made during the winter that the mines 
wouM be forced to accept lower prices 
for their product this season. How- 
.. thf. various operating concerns 

"! . t; fa r befow the guaranteed stand- 
a"d and with a similar graduated .scale 
|'ot-e?;:?ng ^he .transactions the^f uota- 

\ri^ forthe^oVd ?ange a-1 the Mesaba 
J'roduct. respectively. These^ prices ap- 
parently are satisfactory to tne con- 
suming Int-rests-at least no particu- 
f«, nr^-ssure has been exerted in an 
tffort to obtain concessions-and they 
^re satisfactory also to the producers, 
i, clde^UaUy carrying tne assurance 
that there will be no reductions in 
the wage schedule at the mines. 

Shrpn^ents are hampered somewhat 
on account of the lake marine strike, 
ut the number of hulk freighters In 
c.mimi^.S3i n Is steadily enlarging, and 
IherT is no fear that all the ore need- 
ed w^iU be forwarded before the close 
of t^ie season of navigation. It is al- 
ready assured that by the ^-nd of the 
nresent month the deliveries at lower 
Take ports will foot up some>*;ha In 
excess of 2.i00.000 tons. This will be 



only about a third of the norma 
month v capacity of the fleet, but it 
will be- materially In excess of the 
amount that had been shipped the 1st 
r,? June last year, when the ""^^J'V^"^ 
fell lielow 300.000 tons, and It wl 1 be 
looked upon as a happy augury. Indi- 
cative of better things to come. 

As is true of the (juotations, the 
carrying charges remain unchanged 
from last vear. These charges are 6d 
cents from Two Harbors. Duluth and 
Ashland. 60 cents from ^^arquette and 
Pres.iue Isle and oO cents from t.sca- 
naba and Wells. Only In two seasons 
In the history of the trade have the 
rates from the head of Lake ,^uperior 
been lower, and that was in 18»S and 
1899. when 60 cents was the contract 
figure The Marquette rate is the lovv - 
est It has ever been, with the single 
exception of the .season of 1897. when a 
few "wild" cargoes were forwarded 
at 55 cents. During two seasons— 
these two being 1897 and 1S98— ore was 
taken out of Escanaba tor 4o cents a 
ton. and in 1899 and 19oS the contract 
rate was 50 cents, but aside from these 
exceptions the Escanaba ca/ry "g 
charge has always been higher than 
is the case this year. 

The J*Be" FHrnaoe. 
Satisfied as a result of the various 
practical tests of the process, revolu- 
tionary though it is. that his newly In- 
vented furnace has solved the problem 
of the profitable treatment of low 
grade ores. John T. Jones, metal urgist 
and miner, of Iron Mountain Mich, is 
preparing to put tlie plant into com- 
mercial operatbm. Associated with 
Mr Jones In his venture are a nuniber 
of Lake Superior mining '"'^n- o^. ^.V;?'.!' 
one is George A. St. Clair "t Duluth. 
Mr Jones is well known on the Me- 
saba range. Writing of his furnace 
and its p..ssibllities. Mr. Jones sajs. 

••One of the greatest questions of 
lodav Is the .onservlng of the elements 
fdaced on earth for the use of man. 
The high grade iron ores of the United 
States will last only a few decades 
This Is confirmed by statements of 
men who know fairly well the amount 
of such material In sight. Assuming 



that there are 2,000.000,000 tons of high 
Krade ore, at the rate of consumption 
in the last prosperous year. 190 1. which 
was about 52,000.000 tons, these ores 
would last, roughly speaking, between 
thirtv-five and forty years. . 

"Tlie occurrences of high grade iron 
ores the world over are entirely acci- 
dental. All high grade ore »)odies have 
a lenticular shape, generally with a 
flat upper side an.i a convex shape on 
the under side. This is true of the 
Chapin deposit at Iron Mountain, and 
all ore deposits even on the Mesaija 
range of Minnesota. Now it is P ain 
tliat these ore bodies are being rapidly 
exhausted and will have to be replaced 
with other ores of much lower grade. 
The iron ores of the world will have 
to come from the mother vein, which is 
an accompanying vein of great width 
and depth, that will yield in metallic 
iron from 37 to 45 per cent. Ihe aver- 
age Iron ore shipped from the Me- 
nominee range for the last few /tars 
win not yield over 4a per cent and 
from the Mesaba range the yield has 
been reduced to 52 per cent metallic 
iron. 

"On the Menominee range there Is a 
large belt of tliis ore. On the Rand- 
vUle range we have developed an ore 
body at RandvlUe 600 feet wide. The 
belt extends many miles in distance. 
The largest and most persistent belts 
of this class of ore are in Michigan 
and extend the full lengtli of the 
known ranges. My associates and I 
have secured eleven leases on these 
ranges These ores are all adjacent to 
good lake ports. In making a rough 
Comparison of the amount of this class 
of ore with the high grade ores. 1 feel 
safe In saying there are 1.000 tons of 
this low grade ore for every ton ef 
lilgh grade ore. as above mentioned. 
Cannot Be Shipped Kant. 
"The practicability of conveying this 
low grade ore to furnaces In Pennsyl- 
vania or on the lakes Is out of the 
question under the present metho.l of 
manufacturing pig iron. This low 
erade ore contains from 40 to Ao per 
cent sili ca, and very small amou ntsjjf 

(Continued on page 23. fourth fcolumn.) 



New yjrk. May 22. — Ray Central 
Copper company stock, which hung 
around $2.50 for several weeks, jumped 
last week to $4 a share, reacting later 
to $3 50. The Mining Age says toal, 
while there was no public news given 
out to explain this jump, it transpires 
that the work recently started by the 
Lewisohn engineers Is showing up bet- 
ter tlian anticipated. At the pr^^«»t 
time there are six workings on the .iO i- 
foot level that are all being pushed in 
ore. making six faces in a commercial 
product. Among those who undfi - 
stand how rapi.ily reserves of thus 
character accumulate it is plain that 
a new tonnage will be added to on a 
large scale from week to week. 

In addition the company shaft is be- 
ing set down below the 300-foot level 
and these workings are also under- 
stood to be in ore. At the Calumet 
nropertv of this company the surface 
workings of which have shown an un- 
usually large deposit of carbonates a 
new shaft Is being sunk, while churn 
drills have been Installed to add to the 
exploration equipment already on hand. 

The ores from tlie averages already 
secured .show better than 2\ per cent 
copper. The tons In sight hava been 
variously estimated at all figures. Fltz 
Mac the well known mining writer. 
has been willing to be quoted gtvitog 
the property a very large tonnalo 
while O. A. Turner, one of the original 
characters connected with the mine 



^ 



/ •• 



has estimated that ore exceeding 25.- 
000.000 toiLS would eventually be taken 
from the property. . 

These figures have .all been consid- 
erably exaggerated, and t ) date the 
engineers who have measured the 
Brounl have felt that a 3.000.0.>0-ton 
total was giving tiie ground a liberal 
e-stimate. , ,, . - 

It developed this week that from 
very good sources tlie news lias drift- 
ed East tliat the company has in reality 
much more ore In sight than It has 
ever re'^elved credit for from conserva- 
tive sources, the figures given show- 
ing at least 9,000,i)0n tons of reserves 
of probable ore. It is the dlstriliutlon 
of these well - authenticated reports 
that has had the strong effect on the 
st'ick during the week. 

Figuring the company s output at 
1 500 tons of ore per day. within two 
years, and estimating a recovery by 
oncentration of forty i)oui.ds of cop- 
per to the t'in. It would show an earn- 
ing capacity of over 75 cents a share 
a year for the stock, for a perl.)d of 
twenty years, on a 13-cent market, es- 
timating costs at 8 cents. 

It is known that W. H. \Veed, one of 
tho foremost geologists in the United 
.States, has spent considerable time at 
lla". Ariz., recently, while In the em- 
I'.jy of tlie LewiSijhns. In addition, 
other well known low grade porph>'Ty 
engineers of world renown have been 
giving these ores the very clo.sest at- 
tention. 



COMPAN Y IS IN GOO D SHAPE 

Annual Meeting of Arizona Gold Mines and Milling 

Company—Frank Fauike of Fort Wayne, Ind., 

Declines to Retain Presidency. 



Tombstone. Ariz.. May 22.— The an- 1 
nual meeting of the Arizona Gold 
Mines & Milling company was presided 
over by President Frank Fauike of 
Fort Wayne, Ind. A general discussion 
was entered into by the stockholders 
of the conditions and affairs of the 
company, which all agreed were 1" ex- 
cellent condition. The report of a 
committee showing that the bo.iks and 
various statements were found to ne 
correct with the report of the manag- 
ing direct.tr were then adopted on mo- 
tion of Ed M. Bates. ..i^^toH 

The following directors were elected 
for the ensuing year: Charles U. 
Wright, Sr.. of Webb Clt>^ F D Mc- 
Pherson of Los Angeles, M. E. t-ang 
don Los Angeles: J ^.^ ^wayzee. Pa a- 
sronla and John J. Wyatt of Tomo- 
sulne: Immediately after the meetln,? 
of the stockholders was concluded a 
meeting of the directors was held and 
fife foll..wlng offi.;ers elected: Charles 
L Wright, Webb City, president; Fred 
Kckert Fort Wayne, Ind., vice presi- 
dent- F D. McPherson of Los Angele.!. 
secretary: J. Allen Hardy, Sr., Webb 
City! treasurer and J. J. Wyatt. man- 
aging director. , 

The report of the operations of the 
company during the past year shows 
that there was some 600 feel of tun- 
nel work done during the seven months 
^t the company was operating, a 
•down being necessary on account 
"r receiving word from the for- 



est reserve ranger that they could not 
have any more wood for fuel from tho 
i:eserve, so that other arrangem'jnts 
had to be made, which was met by the 
Installation of oil burners which work 
is not quite complete but it Is expected 
to be done within the next thirty 
days and a supply of oil on hand by 
tlii. I time. It is the intention of the 
rompany then to start up both the 
mine and the ten-stamp mill and to 
keep them running night and day. 

The only regretful feature of the 
meeting according to the stockholders 
was the fact that Frank Fauike, who 
had been president of the company for 
the past three years, refused to again 
accept that po.sltlon. (stating that on 
account of pressing private business 
matters he could not give the attwn- 
tion to It. ^ , , ^^ , 

An excellent drawing of the mines 
and workings drawn by Grant LewU 
was exhibitted to the stockliolders and 
proved of great Interest to them, many 
of which had not be^n down to tho 
prop<^rty and had no Idea of the extent 
to which the property had been devel- 

A number of the stockholders left 
to visit the property at Patagonia 
while others went out to insepect the 
company's holdings in the South Pasfi 
district, as well as to visit the camps 
of Courtraland and Gleeson. Most of 
them will return to their homes In tha 
East within the next few days. 



\ 



) 



DEFECTIVE PAGE 



iiiiiiiiiip 



|ll|IMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIH^ 






!«-« 



. \ 



EAT HEARTY 



Good Things to Eat 
at the Right Price ! 

i- .r-,. .:, '■■ --h, per Uux. .20<' 

< < amery, lb. S8<* 

I t(.ck, hu sl.lO 

I - iigaf fiirt'd, lb . 14^' 

! per 111 . - 10<* 
I Tic, liOc. -r>c. llOit 

[ } 11.- '25t 

S ^■•i!i- '*''■ 25c 

•IMPORTED DELICACIES, 
BIG VARIETY." 

; ■ ■ - i/ai) . . . 18<? 

i vit-.S©** 

! , .rin. JUT K'l! ■ • • ■ 25<* 

J ,: , St 

PINEAPPLES. PINEAPPLES. 



^kHOBHa 





be li> accordance with tTi^ 
NorweKlaiT style ofTJ^fSs" and colors of 
the Fatlierjuad will ba everywhere In 
WlUence as decora tons. 



lunijiJti' Will 
wegrliin 8 



11 



Mav Festivil, 



w 



OLD SYSTEM 
ANTIQUATED 

Senator Works Urges the 

Commission Form of 

Government. 



.»>•< 



for 91.40. 

cr, our teas and cot fees 
li .1 fef cup quality. Our 
J 11 faded 

-olicitcd 

iiuiility 

Like care of 

. -iulrtiv and pruptiiy. 



}'(.H.ll <„'l 



THE 



T. J. ANDERSON 
GROCERY GO. 

BOTH 'PHONES. 4199. 

Corner Sixth St. and Tower Ave. 

SUPERIOR, WIS. 



Is More Economical and 

Is Otlierwise More 

Satisfactory. 



"" • •' n rally acceptetl im 

iitit» in rll()^•t ii.: 
Is unhii.-; ;i. ^s-: ike, 1 rrespt>ii»il»k'. ti'iii- 

ji)k-alfii :■ ';• \ii>;t: arnl ex t ra v ■ < l .. 1 1 1 
u us tli' ■;" tlie talk ^ i vt.-n : 

cilur S. V. Works ut Maiikato, wi.u iid- 
tlressed Ihe memb« rf of the ^"ity T'erno- 
cratil: club last »■••.>• 1 1 : n j, , -litll 

cm ''T-ltc (-'ijJiuui.'-s'iiiM I'..,.,, *.; i'lty 
Ciovirnnu-iit." 

SaregiiaiiU-cl with ll.f iti;i- 

live ami rt-fi-i i-mliuii. i».' - lun 

form ol juutiicipal i iil< w;.- ...i . . . .i it >i 
l.-v .^■(iiialnr \V^lt■k^ .i>s hviiij; 1 ;u Miipc- 
imr lu t):c I'lll .'••.Mi-Ili ot li.kV ilig a 
lu..:. . I ■.r.:>] a.dfi in.ii. He said Ihal it 
UU.S inA ;.atd to find in n"v iit\ .<.tin- 
cll "men wtio are m.ii'.v ..rt.- 

■- after municoi-ai an.,ar.s. ' 
liave altaintd alder man- 
ic t ti> liaviuK a pnliiii/iil ini'A. 



I .lit. I- .reek, wliicli is being enclosed 
tiy a runcrete culvert. 

banqleTTo 
lincoln grads 

Pupils of West End School 

Have Delightful 

Spread. 

A banqiiet to ili< Kiaduating class of 
ti.e Linculn school ui Twtnty-fiUh ave- 
nue wt>'i was .served in ti.e scliool 
building last r-vi mtijr. 

There are i<jrt\-i:!ne graduates in 
this year.-' i lass, and the dinner was 
served I'V lit inernber!- ef the B 
eij: litll tiahti. 'I'l.c ttacherfc were alBO 
gue.si!, (.1 i,..iM.i at tile affair, and 
j)latei< weie laid fur ninety-five in all. 

Ruby Gitrnian acted at- teastmistret^s, 
and tlie loliowint t<Ji.>t^ weit. respond- 
ed to: 

B.-yy' 

Mis.s Irn... I .. . . -e. 

( i 1 I ! >■ ' • 

\ ; ■. a: '1'! ^.< . '11. 
Li tietdn .'^< I 1 



■'l-Jie 
Tl.. 



Eli/.ab' li. 
v_ ia>s I'rt>|il.o< >• ■ 

I. la !-■ 

"Oai .\1. 111., WijiK 

Millie 

'lli' lanquel was 



( 



: II !ii:. 



.i I.ll \\ III " 

I...\V. 

^erved in Hit low- 



1^1 




:t \ 



,g eeiH 
■rntioii: 



1 1 1 . 1 1 i Is 




I 



whtcb lUoatxatta 
Masaaff* Move- 
men ta and con- 
t a 1 n a valuable 
beauty aecreta 
••v«ry •wommn 
should know. 

Actresses and Society Women 
All kdorsc ^ 

M. Btirnhtm's Cucumber and Elder 

riffwer Cream, a. cleanser and beau; 

tlflex, i>*r botlle Ol»c.-f l.OO 

B. Bumhiim'* Hygienio Bktn Food. • 

Uiiuo Imllder. per Jar »i.tn» 

Oil. Burnhum* Medicated Complexion 

Powder. 4 «}ii!uies. Brunette, Fie»h. 

Whtt* and Blenaed. i>»r box ««c. 

«. Burnbam-e Halx and Scalp Tontc. 

fwomotee grow ih or hair mad renders 

It mti a ad tloaey. per bottle. .^ _„ 

And fifty (BO) other toilet prspara- 

Hons. all (ruaranteed tind*r tit Food 
luid Drug Act. 

WOR a AIM BT ALL. I>EALER)3. 

E. BURNHAM, 

WHOIJSSALH. RETAiU 

m E. WajWiigttin .St.. TO and 72 Sut. St.. 
Chicaco, 111. Dept. F. 

NOTE— If your de^lara cannot eupjily 
you, ••nd 10<.;. (to cover malllo< .aE- 
pmmmt tor sample* aad booklet. 



. 1 1 ' • iii ! ..•' 1 v\ I . • ' a re 
j , . i.i.(,<(l tl' di-.il Willi 

L'JK lluitiu'ts. 

Old )(yateiii 4nti<iuate(l. 
The speaker stale. 1 thai ine .dd ward 
syKteni tended t.uaul an extiavuKant 
form of K<>v< rnineiit. •'Tliere may be 
waf«te of luti.Is in national affairs, " he 
caid ■■V....1 tome unnecessary e.xpendi- 
tiir» be authorized In the state 

leg. , but 1 fail to se.- tlie loiric 

of wa^^K- '-'f rnon.y In nini.i. ii'al at- 
falry." , _ , , 

A!. il.»r objection raised tn ili»- al- 

dt riiiM. [dan of rule was thai in nn>^?t 

instaiKis r»'sp..nKibllity (vv misinan- 

afreiiiit'iit .a- inistakef could riever be 

tiittnular per-'i'in. "'For 

^i^i.i. "my own city of 

■ . .. ..vv vear.<< ago was stricken 

fever fjddemic. Huudredii of 

J,. , were aff*. tt-d and hftv were laid 

ill ti.'-ir !-'tav.>. I'u^iivd 1 ispunssibility 

i,,il<<! I., hx Uif i-l.i'ii.. It cos?t the 

..lit J'iMi tM.it« and Ki^^'<-" it f t^el- 

;■ ri.iif cr live \'ears/' 

VV.'iks' j'lan ■' 

.■f three ii;' , 

,i nilli certain duti.s, nn-i . a.-a 

ilde to the people lor his de- 

t»ne would, fur instanie. be 

i. look after public affairs. 

•■'^t- •< property. Ar..itlier 

1 be that " ant.« 

; .-1 ^ ui'f-r\ . "Ver 

Thf third 

i pel in ternl- 



all pii 

I 1 • I I . a i i .- 



er hall, and the upper iiallB were uFed 
fur Karnes and danciuK. The class 
. ..1. an. pink and Kt»en, were used in 
ih.- .l»'c»irali<in.«, and the music was 
! i,: ),,sl..-d l.y tl.«' ;:ra.laateK of the 
..la.-'- .'t r.Mi? It \■.a^ .tie of the most 
d.-:i8hltul school closing exercises 
Kiveii ill iMilnth ihiB year, and was 
Ihorouglily enjoyed by the members of 
the graduating: class. 

REVIVAL MEETlN(i8. 

Lai'^e Atteudance .Nigiitly at Sned- 
ish M. E. Church Meeting^. 

■. iariie attendame is rtjioittd at the 

HI I'lPetinj,'" that are nightly be- 

iii>, . . :'..,: Swedi!-!. M. E. church, 

!■.■,; . i, i. west and Third 

U. \ ■ I r.klund. conductor 
It ine sirvi.»-.s, .--peaks every evening, 
and the songs are In charge of the 
famoUK evangelist, Prof. C Wermine. 

Tomorrow afternoon. He v. Kcklund 
will hohi a special eervice at 3 o'clock 
foi n.en only, and it Is expected that a 
large number will attend. The regular 
revival hcrviceH will be held this <»ven- 
Ing and Snndav night. Tiie meetincrs 
will .• i.ii.ui- ever\ night until May 31. 



Final arfangemeiits tOr the annual 
May festival to be presdnted Thuijsdav 
evening by the i Guild of St. 

I'aul's Lutheran ... ., were made 
last evening at a itgular meeting of 
the guild. 

The entertainment Includes a splen- 
did program of recitations, with vocal 
and instrumental music some of the 
best known amattur artists in the city 
having promised their aseistance. 

After the program th« members of 
the guild will serve light refreshments 
in the parlors of the church. 

Revival Services. 

A comparison of the present time re- 
vival services with those of former 
days will be made Sunday evening In 
the Bible lecture at Columbia hall. All 
Standinavians are Invited to attend the 
meeting. 

West End Shortrails. 

Iver Anderson returned yesterday 
from Ashland, Wis. 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis Petereon have 
moved from lH Nineteenth avenue west 
to Superior. 

A. Carlson. Minneapolis, is In the 
West end today on a business mission. 

The Svea tJJlee club will give a Dec- 
oraiiin day dance on Monday evening, 
.May al, at Lincoln park pavilion. 

The West end lodge of Odd Fellows 
will meet Tuesday evening for the 
nomination of officers and work in the 
second degjee. Kefreshments will be 
served. 

H. O. Hanson has broken ground 
foi a new residence building on West 
Third street, between Twenty-third and 
Twenty-fourth avenues west. 

Mr. and iMrs. Emii Vianc, 2803 Rail- 
road street, are the parents of a baby 
gill. 

Joe Simmington and Patrick Ken- 
nedy returned last evening with a 
good catch from a fishing expedition 
at the liead of Millers creek. 

Emil Baniuist hat changed his resi- 
dence from 19 Nineteenth avenue west 
to llii:J West Superior street. 

The United Garment Workers of 
America are planning on giving a 
dance in the West end Tuesday. June 8. 

The ladies of ^t. Lukes Episcopal 
church of the West end served a fine 
New England dinner last evening at 
the vestrv, which many attended. 

A s-jv was born yes-terday to Mr. and 
Mrs Theodire Wotczak of 2529 Wel- 
lington street. 

John Germeroth is erecting a |2,0C0 
frame dwelling on Third street, be- 
tween Tv.enty-sev» nth and Twenty- 
eighth avenues west. 

The cast of tlie •'Hypnotist, ' the play 
to be presented about the middle of 
June by the young j.eople of the SSec- 
ond I'resbvterlan church, w.ll meet tins 
evening for a rehearsal at the parlors 



I A Few of the First Contestants 
Entered in the Borden Baby Contest 



WILL LAUNCH BOAT. 



A. Bluett Has .New Enjfine and 
Equipment in the Pwkegania. 

A. Blucti Will l.iui.cli "tlie Pokeg- 

ama, ' a jileusure launch and one of 

the bePt e<iulpi'ed crafts at the West 

fiid. t.'n.orrcw. TL. i"at has been on 

the .Irv dock during the past week, 
ha\iMK the finishing touches put on. 

' • WHi: also run In the water 

lait it was not entirely 

,.; that lime. The interior of 

I hris since I'cen r« finished and 

.ighi.s have been installed. It 

pout ilul engine and is g'ood loi 

liitteii miles an hour. 



Tii. 
Inst 

e ' ; " • ' 
tl 
e 1 1 

lias a 
at.ot.l 



■...•onlil 1 



A NEW ('0N( EHN. 

Minnesota Brass Works Opens Tp 
in the West End. 

\ : ' -' '- 'in iiiii'i jaTatt d a^ the 



I ken ail 



NoticetoGontractors 



~ \\'(irks lornpany has 

quail 1^ ;. t tlie West end 
ris-'agt in tiic manufacture of 

Journal brasses, brass 

i.K.M ..:. <fn, and other- " V' 



of the church. 

A daughter 
Mr. and Mrs. 
Third street. 

The Young 



was born yesterday to 
Wigging of 2308 West 



T;f 



f 1 1 . 



.i.-.it.. ('. 



i 



,1 It 



\\ 



.Lrteis ol 

. orks. 
toward instal 



ter. 
. Li- 
the 

ling 



1 ! . 



oiher tquipment m 



1.1.1 



t' 



rt 

fi: 
Ii 
tl 



.1 by il 

! o til I..' 



^:ii 11 



W. iks slut'd 



to tsuit 



.-f V 

J ■ i . • 



vv KESTLIN(J BOUT. 

\\ hittle and Dillon of Adams Asso- 
ciation Will (Jet Toji:ether. 

. . ' ' 1 ; in this 
• • • : ^ of the 
• t!i. new 
■ 1. \'\ . . 1 .or street. 

■ t :. , • r Idllon wll! 

riship htmi.rs 

, vvald will act 



.; !.i 



■*lo 1'. 

in tl. 



u in 
l»e- 



it as 



a..a 1 ' 



r.i 



d.'.l '.■\ • 

- "i( V I '. ■ 



TAR MA( ABA.\I (ROSEN. 

Property (hvners on Twenty-Ninth 
Avenue Select Paving. 

... v.._.-t 

lat Miacadam on 

e opinion voiced 

of the prop- 

I' < th on the 
.. . • ;. .. \\tst 



Th:.t Twent. 



NoticetoGontractors 



f Twt 



M: 



'.]■ .! n'pnn f 



tcil 
I»U- 



<ni U,;t 
aa- ni. 



itter 

'.■ .•Ill -. ■ 



left tiii.'" ni.'riil:i}Lf f' 



majority of the 

ivt!=t property 

ight that 

.e just as 

tar macadam 

In front of 

I resent, jire- 
; t on the pav- 
,. mounting to 
i>e circalated 
.1 tc author- 
woiks to let 

nialter to a 

.perior street 

. west as far 

, i ( bably be the 

• up wh(r. The 



li 
t. 

ti- 
lt 

I' 



and 
Mart 



.i"r 'I. (•' V 



Notice for Bids. 



5«'{ilc.l M.1< IV i! 



tt ■ 



Melit 



.1 lid 
Ut I't'ject 



i)flit..t tiltirs it 



J. WHIT I-:, 
City I'l.ik, 

Minn. 



OPEN SEWER 
IS DISCOVERED 

Drains Into an Open 

Lot in the West 

End. 

A rnlsdlie. ted sewer has been dis- 
covered in tlic West end, and the nt- 
teiith n of ll.v I id of public work.s 
was yesterday la.Ud to It. 

fi^ fjtream of sfwaee. which drains 

111 frori. ■ ■' 
< I self 
wcntv-fovii III it vf- 
I and" Third .streets 
■■■ ''-.r;.!. 

is investl- 

ii.d il is un- 

■ f public works 

,-,,,,.. ....ii:.r. The stream 

be directed Into the storm 

on Twenty-thlnl avenue west, or 

could be mad« to follow Us cuurst; iulu 



1 \\ .111: 



SWI.MMIN(i ( LI B. 



\e\v Organization By Adams .\th- 
letic Association. 

The aiivent of warm weather 1» 
looked forward to by the members of 
t in.s Athletic asst-ciatlon, who 
.. organizing a swimming club. 

Einll Palmciuist. .1 swimmer with a 
record, will be at the head of the new 
organization. Swimming will be one 
of t!i€ summer activities of the club. 



Hi 

dc' 
w 1 i 1 
cmih:l 
sewer 



The ''Saterfest." 

1: t Iiai ations for the anntial .^aterfcst 
of the First Norwegian-Danish M. E, 
church, which will be presented Tues- 
day, May 25, by the young people of 
the church, are nearlng completion. 
Last evening the young people met at 
thi- church for rehearsal. The dress 
al for the affair will take place 
night. 

Tl.i program will include a number 
of iiistniniental and vocal selections, 
recitations, dialogues, etc. The cos- 



People's Society of the 
Zion Norwegian Lutheran church met 
last evening at a business session. 

John O'Brien is here from Chicago 
on a short visit with his parents at 
lfc06 West Superior street. 

The next meeting of the French Nat- 
uralization club will be held Tuesday 
evening. Summer activities will be 
planned and " final arrangements made 
for the observance of St. Jean Baptiste 

day. , „,. 

G. N Brathen of Hayward, ^ is., is 
visiting at the home of Rev. H. K. 
Madsen. pastor of the First Norwegian- 
Danish M. E. church. 

Rev. A. Skosberg. Mmneapolis, pas- 
tor ol the Mission tabernacle for a 
number of years, was a visitor at the 
West end yesterday. He is well known 
in the West tnd. _ . 

Rev. J. A. Krantz. pastor of Elim 
Swedish Lutlieran church expects to 
leave the first of next week for Port 
Wing. Wis., where he will attend the 
annual Lake Superior mission district 
conference of the Swedish Lutheran 
church. 

Thomas Hughe.s of 2620 Huron street 
underwent an operation yesterday at 
St. Mary's hospital. He was reported 
as doing as well as could be expected 

The delegates who attended the state 
Sunday school convention at Crook- 
ston about two weeks ago will have 
a convention meeting tomorrow even- 
ing at the Second rresbyterian church. 
» 
C bnmlterlniii'ii Liniment. 

Tliis is a ntw prtpaiat.on and a good 
one. It Is especially valuable as a cure 
for chronic and muscular rheumatism, 
and for tiiC relief from pain which it 
affords In acute inflammatory rheuma- 
tism. Those who have used It liave in- 
variably spoken of it in the highest 
terms of praise. Lame back, lame 
slioulder and stiff n(ck are due to rheu- 
matism of the muscles, usually brought 
on bv exposure to cold or dainp, and 
are quickly cured by api>lying this lini- 
ment freely and massaging tlie af- 
fected j.arts. Soreness of the muscles, 
whether induced by violent exercise or 
Injury, is allayed by this liniment. For 
sale by all druggists. 

MANY BABIES 
ARE ENTERED 



Contest Editor Swamped 

With Pictures of Pretty 

Children. 

The li.st of adorable Duluth children 
is large and it would seem that a good 

I share of these adorable young ones 
have been entered in tie Borden baby 
cont( St and ever>' mail brings to the 

' contest editor rriore pictures of lovely 
children. 

The pictures shown in The Herald 
tonight were the f^rst to be received 
in the contest which began Monday 
of this week, and arrangetnents have 
been mfide by the Borden company by 
which a number of photographers will 
take pictures free for the contest. 
This morning a prize of a solid silver 

I baby spoon was pre.«enicd free to the 

I frrst" baby to have his picture taken 
at each of the three studios. 

The conditions are simple. Any 
child under thr^e years of age may be 
entered, the picture to be sent to the 
Baby Contest Editor of The Herald, 
with a label off a can of Borden's 
Eagle Brand Condensed Milk and a 
coupon cut from The Herald. 

The studios of those photographers 
who have been engaged by the com- 
pany to take the pictures of the chil- 
dren, present a most interesting ap- 
pearance during almost any portion of 
the dav. Taking the baby's picture is 
always a matter of vital importance 
and to get them in the pose which 
will do them justice Is the earne.«t ef- 
fort of the photographer, the mother 
the cousins and the aunts. 

No Duluth baby should be denied 
the privilege of entering this contest 
and the mothers in large numbers are 
looking to the rights of their chil- 
dren. 

PRIEST IS MIRDERED 

FOR POLITIC AL REASONS. 




Tbe more you know about tea, the 
more you will appreciate the delicate 
fragr.ince and delicious flavor of 
"Saiada" Tea. Ask your grocer for a 
yucket. 



Tomsk. Russia, May 22. — The priest 
Ignatius, leader of the Monarchist or- 
ganization in Tomsk and editor of the 
Monarchist organ, was found murdered 
In his bed today. The crime was ac- 
tuated by political motives. 

PRINCETON CLUBS MEET 

FIRST TIME IN DIXIE. 



Louisville. Ky., May 22. — Orange and 
black are Louisville's colors today be- 
cause the Western Assuciation of 



,..' 



Here are some of the ct>mpctitor.s: 

The illustrations shown Jierewith are some of the first 
children lo enroll in The Herald BORDEN BABY CON- 
TEST. It will afford many the opportunity of judging of the 
different types of features which are taking part in this unique 
contest, and also give a ."ilight impression as to the problem 
which the judges have to solve in the selection of the winners. 
The names of the above handsome little children are: 

NO. NAME. ADDRESS. 

1 Baby Burns 410 North Fifty-second Ave. W- 

2 Baby Cuddy 6117 Nassau Street. 

3 LilHan Ives 3120 West Third Street. 

4 Gladys Lowery 817 Sixth Avenue East. 

5 Baby O'Brien 412 North Fifty-second Ave. W 

6 Baby Peterson 429 North Fifty-eighth Ave. W. 

7 William Smith 5215 East Superior Street. 

8 Florence Phillips 217 West Fifth Street. 

9 Babies Nickols (twins) . . .1918 West Third Street. 

10 Baby Snider 5812 Halifax Street. 

11 Raymond Kerr 2705 West Huron Street. 

12 Margery Johnson 1101 West Superior Street. 

13 Willis Peer 512 West Second street. 



LIST OF PRIZES: 



pinST— Bra*s Bc<l. drop sides, best woven wire spring, foil fop mat- 
tress, feather pillow, eoniplete. 

SECOND— Solid Silver Cup, gold lined, suitably engraved. 

THIUD — Solid Silver Oiild's Set- 

FOURTH — Solid Silver Baby Chain and JyOcket. 

To the live next be.st In order, a SoHd Silver Baby Spoon. 

To the next 20, a Diploma eaeh. 



Rules Governing Contest. 

Mail a cabinet-size photo of 
the child, now under 3 years of 
age. addressed to "Baby Con- 
test,' The Herald, Duluth. 

Inscribe on the back the full 
name uf the child, its weight 
and the parents' name and ad- 
dress. 

Attach to the photo a label 
off a can of Borden's Eagle 
brand Condensed Milk and cou- 
pon properly filled out, found 
elsewhere in this paper. 

These photographs will pos- 
itively nut be returned and the 
entry to the contest is free. 

There are several prizes of- 
fered in the contest and the 
winners v.'ill be selected by a 
board of judges composed of 
prominent local people. 

If you have ncj photo of baby 
take label from can of Borden's 
Eagle Brand Cf>ndensed Milk 
a.i'l coupon, found elsewhere in 
this paper, properly filled out, 
to any of the following photog- 
raphers, who, upon receiving 
same, will take a photo free. 



LIST OF PHOTOGRAPHERS 
WHO TAKE PHOTO- 
GRAPHS FOR CON- 
TEST FREE: 
Ely Studio, 7 East Superior 
street, (exccp* Sundays); Lund- 
r'list Studio, 1715 Broadway, 
Superior; Frank E. Green, 109 
Central avenue. West Diiluth. 



Princeton Clubs is meeting in this 
city, for the first time in Dixie. Presi- 
dent Woodrow Wilson le here to pre- 
side over the councils as is James B. 
Shea of Pittsburg, president of the 
Western alumni of Old Nassau, whose 
successor is to be elected during the 
sessions. 



DITCH QUEEN ABLE TO 

WALK OUTDOORS AG.AIN. 

The Hague, May 22.— Queen Wllhem- 
ina, who gave birth to a daughter April 



30, is now fully convalescent. She 
was out walking this morning In the 
palace grounds. accompanied by a 
nurse carrying the princess. 

"THE LINE WAS BUSY." 



Lineman Nearly Bnms to Death 
While "Central" Hesitates. 

Cedar Rapids, Iowa, May 22. — Be- 
cause a telephone line was "busy," 
Amos Scott, an interurban lineman, 
was fearfully burned and also badly 



hurt by falling from a telephone pol« 
while making repairs. Scott was 
caught In a short circuit and the wir© 
began burning his rubber gloves. A 
fellow workman rushed to the tele- 
phone company to tell the power house 
to shut off the circuit. But "central' 
said the line was busy and disre- 
garded his protests. Finally another 
workman cut the wire and Scott fell 
to the ground. He may recover. 

• 

For IndlKentlon 
Take Hontfurd'H Aeld PbOMphate 
Espcrl.TJly ncf.inttuii.'Kl f. r tlic- relief ol uertouA 
dytpciisia, loss of aiivc-Ute kud Itead&cbe. 



4 



I 



-— T" 








THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: SATURDAY, MAY 22, 1909. 



T^l ir^ f^l /OMIXT/^ UCD A I P^ K« successfully done. The convicted men got bail, | have $222.50. Planting 10 cents a day would make 

1 nC CVClNlINvJ nLlKi^"-l->'!and Sanderson w;.. in Brooklyn awaiting sen- $445.36, and 15 cents a day will grow $668.18. 

AM INI»E1*ISNDKXT XEWSPAinSH. tcticc. Soiiic time ago lii-S counsel became aatistU-d Twcnty-iive cents a day will amount to $1,113.75, 

= ■^■-^=-^ '- ' ' ■ , rr-= :^.^-^ ♦i,-,^ ,^..a .,f» lii.iw. ,>f n npw trial, and Sander- and a dollar a day will make $4,455.75. 



Published at Herald Bid*.. Flr«t St.. Op. R O. Snuare. 
THE HERALD COMPANY. 



that there was no hope of a new trial, and Sander 

son collapsed wlu-ii hope departed. From that 



OFFICIAL PAPER FOR T BE CITY O F DilLllTH 

SI iJSCRIPTION RATES PAYABLE IN ADVANCE 
I i>ll«-fl StaleN and Canada. Poataite rTcpald 



'.M- year. In advanct* 

ix months, in advance 

• months. In advance. 

month, tn advance. 



§4.0(1 

1.00 
.35 

Mlt UT. 



Kiit.M.d ai Duhilh Po.'itofticti as Second 

DULUTH WEEKLY HERALD 

per .v.'ar, In advari.^e '*"!tH ' 

Klx nn.mh«. In advance ** 1 

Till • '^ months, in advance •*•' 

I I til Dululh l'.)st<»ft!c0 as Second-Ola.^s Matter. 



^^^^S. ?.u Vi Rooms 112G point iK- sank to hi. death. It was easy, ridicu- 
•Phones: Counting Room. 324. Editorial Rooms. ^^^'- l^^^^^^ ^._^^^,^ ^^., ^^,,, ^,,^. ^^^^^^^ ,,j Tcnnsylvania of 

this fortune. It vv.is ciisy, ^{loriously easy, to 
spend it having a good lime. But it was hard, des- 
perately hard. I j Jacc l!u- inevitable punishment. 
It killed Sanderson. lie died of shame and dis- 
grace. 

Nor did he die alone The state treasurer, con- 
victed with him, died early in the winter, and San- 
derson's waa the tilth death among the circle of 
exposed plunderers since the frauds connected 
with the building of Pcnnsylvania'a graft-stained 
capitol were laid bare. 

There is satisfaction and comfort in money 
earned by hard and honest work, in money gained 
by giving honest bervice to society. But there 
seems to be a curse attached to money dishonestly 
gained. The tive deaths in this circle of Penn- 
sylvania make a deadly parallel with the many 
deaths among the insurance and other swindlers 
exposed during the recent investigations of the 
affairs of high finance. Besides those who have 
died, there are unnumbered offenders that have re- 
tired, with nerve-, wrecked and health gone, to 
await their turn t.> face what lurks beyond the 
void of death. 

"The wages of sin is death.'.' 



r...Mi law (Sec. 4, pulates that papers 

mallfd at the pound rate niu.si l»e paid In advance. 
Thr,.. inontha are allowed for renewal, but after 
t le tho paper must lit' ulopped. 



m CARRIER, IN TBE CITY. TEN CENTS A WEEK 

ICVKKY KVKMIMi — l»ICLI%'EHKO. 

SinglM copy, daily ' '4^ 

One moutli •** 

Three months • *•?* 

Stx niontlK-j f-^ 

One year . •*•'"* 



TO SUBSCRIBERS; 

It i8 Important when deslrtngr the address of yotir 
paper chansed to give botli the old and new ad- 

d re.'iHea. 



THE RIGHT TO CITIZENSHIP. 

The api>earance of the Northwestern Reporter, 
with the full dccisi-.n of the Minnesota supreme 
court in the case of Marius Han.sen. involving his 
right to citizcn^liip papers, dr>os not tend to calm 
the apprehension that the .supreme court estab- 
lished in tliat case a precedent that is not good 
public i» 'Iicy. A layman should not. perhap.>. i lov 
tion the law of the decision, but it seems necessary 
to question the condition under which such admis- 
sior iztjnship arc possible as the one involved 

in ti:i^ >..,iae. 

The licciai HI i> one of those 3-to-2 all airs, Jus- 
t.c ■. [-:iliott and Jaggard dissenting In his dis- 
sen niion Justice Ell- *hat there 

ought to t)e some limitation i'> luc ns!.i of citizcn- 
.ship, and that it ought not to be coiitcrrcd indis- 
criminately. Surely he i.-. n<lu in this. As to the 
amount of discrimination shown in this ca^c, the 
testraony, quoted by Justice MUiott. is illuminating. 

This man was 46 years old, hid lived in this 
country twenty-four years, and liad children going 
to school. Que^tt >ned by thr ^ /.rr.mcnt attor- 
ney, he didn't know what pulyganiy was. Asked 
what it meant to be a citizen, he said. "Well, I get 
all the papers." He didn't know where the na- 



tion's capital was; didn't know what it meant to 
take the oath of allegiance; didn't know what the 
Constitution of the United States was. but had 
heard of it; asked who was president, he said 
"Ain't it George Washington?"; asked who was 
governor of Minnesota he said "I ain't get him. I 
don't remember his name;" asked what the capital 
of Minnesota is, be said "Ain't it Washington i""; 
when convinced that Washington wasn't in Minne- 
sota, he said the capital might be Duluth or maybe 
Minneapolis; asked who made the laws he said "I 
guess the governor." When the court took him in 
band for {[uestioning he thought Roosevelt was 
governor of Minnesota. 

This man was made a citizen of the United 
States, and the supreme court upheld his right to 
e:?i/ 'ii -!■;[,) 

ifric t >i;I<J hardly express di^rsaii- taction with 
this deci>ion more emphatically tha:i did Justice 
Elliott in his dt.Miiting opinion, even though he 
wa.* commendably polite ui d uni> v. Said he: 
"To hold that a nuin who believes tli.il Washing- 
*..., :. n.^siJent, that Minm ipolis or Duluth is the 
the state, and that tlu- law. are made by 
the governor, is entitle.l to citr/.cn-,liip, \v>uld seem 
lo me 1 if it were not for the fact that a 

majority -t tny brethren think otherwise." This 
18 a very polite reservation, the example of which 
The Herald will have to tollovv 11 iv.over. we 
agree thorouglily with the follownik^ niotitiHi 
from the di- 
man has Ii\ c. 

makes against him in 1 in his fav^r. as it 

shows i?ross and culpable ni<litT t.> matters 

whicli .; most intimately connected with the 
pulitK-at vlulics he desires to luTform." 

That man can ii'w v >ie The most brilliant 
and most learned and wisest w-man in Minnesota 
taiiiii I> iurther comment necessary' 



A STRANGE DOCTRINE. 

In a discus;»ion of Social!-.m in Scribner's Maga- 
zine J. Laurence Laughlin proposes some objec- 
tions to its purpoi^e^ in which there is uncon- 
scious humor that i-. almost tragically sardonic. 
He savs; 

As a cure for the ills of this world Social- 
iani i.ropoaes a echemf based on a change in 
tlu) p .s.ojssion of material wealth. That 13. 
will thi- .spending: uf more money directly lead 
t . th« iniprovemerit of character? All history. 
..!.(i 111.' pre-sent conduct of our richer cia8rt«3, 
bf.-m to show that Kieater self-indulgenoe ful- 
luvvfd by a weakinlnt? of rtbor. with a lowered 
moral purpo.se. are the inevitable results ot 
unreatrulned expenditure. Tlila liolds true in 
apite of tlu) theory tliat. by e.iuallziiiK the 
expenditure of all elas.sec. the poor would bo 
elevated in the moral scale by bavins? more to 
expend, and that the wrong-doing of the neb 
would bo redur.-d by taking away the P'>wer 
of .self-induU'-i..- U cannot be overlooked 
tliat human naturo 18 much the same in ai 
classps. Increaj»ed expenditure in itsell wili 
not provide the character to govern the spend- 
ing; ijo that self-indulgence will only be 
iransf^irred. Clearly, an inert ase of material 
reward-s— wliile a gain to those already hav- 
!ni? a moral sense — would give only wider pia> 
I,, ll.t: exl.stir.g d-feoUs of human nature. 

Surely no stranger argument as.; lin-t S- ..irdism, 
,vr ag:iin>t any > ■heme for the improvement of the 
mas.es, lia. e\er been uttered. If it is a valid 
argument, it holds not only against Socialism, 
hut against such doctrine as that promulgated in 
the last Democratic national platform, which con- 
templated the ultimate end of giving to each indi- 
vidual due reward for hi» services to society, no 
more and no less. That object—which is not in- 
trinsically different from the object of the Social- 
ists—would, if accomplished, take away part of 
the riches now going to the inordinately wealthy, 
and divert it to the masses of the people. If J. 
Laurence Laughlm is correct, that wouldn't be a 
good thing to do, because it would give the plain 
l-eople more money to .spend, and that would 
weaken the f^ber of the people and result in deter- 
ioration of the nation. 

Working on that theory, attempt, t.. .--o labor 
a higlier wage arc socially dangerous. If labor 
gets a fair share of what it produces, labor's liber 
will weaken, because its ability to spend money 
will increa.se. If a clerk getting $I(X) a month is 
raised to $150, clearly his moral hbcr will deter- 
iorate 50 per cent. If a laborer getting $3 a day is 
able t.) induce his employer to give him $4.50 a 
day. that employer will be doing that laborer a 
deadly itvjury by giving him the means to weaken 

his fiber. 

If J. Laurence Laughlin is correct, we ought to 
honor our plutocrats and be grateful to them, be- 
cause they are saving the people from a deadly 
weakening of their moral t^bcr by depriving them 
of the opi)ortunity to spend mr.rC money. Accord- 
ing to his theory, it is better that wealth should be 
congested iti the hands of a few, even at the 
^ expense of wi.lcspread poverty among the pe.^ple. 
.n The fact that this ■ '^ ' " ■ • ■ -^-■^- -' 

> for twenty-four years 



and a dollar a day will make $4,455.75 

Put a drdlar in a savings bank and leave it there 
twenty years, and it will grow to two dollars, with 
19 cents besides toward a third dollar. But if you 
add a dollar out of yoof IV^^^ every year, in 
twenty years it will make $30^7. If you can plant 
a dollar a week, in twenty years that will amount 
t > $1,612, though you have actually planted only 
a little over a thousand dollars. 

That is the way to get capital. When you 
have capital, whether it is $100 or $1,000, you 
should seek investment. Leaving it in the savings 
bank at 4 per cent would make $4 a year on your 
$100 or $40 a year on your $1,000. But there are 
other ways. You can buy bonds that will earn you 
4 per cent up — some safe ones 6 per cent. You 
can put it in a real estate mortgage at 6 or 7 per 
cent. You can put it in a city lot that has a 
chance to advance in value, and make much more 
than that. You can make the first payment on a 
home with it, and pay the rest so much per month, 
just like rent. 

Hut don't put it into the bucket shop. It looks 
attractive, of course, but it isn't your game. The 
fellow that keeps planting his dollars in good soil, 
where interest is steady and compounds itself right 
along, even though his planting is in a small way, 
will come out in the end ahead of the fellow with 
bigger capital who trusted his fortunes to the stock 
market. If you don't believe this, just pick out ten 
of your friends who have dealt in stocks, eliminat- 
ing of course those who have made money by 
printing and selling stock certificates, and ask them 
t'> tell you exactly where they stand. If every one 
of them hasn't lost money in the long run, we 
miss our guess. 



HOTEL GOSSIP. 



because that c .n;Mi.-. the weakening etYects of 
m.)iu-v to the iit.cr of the few, leaving the many 
t(. gr^w strong on the uplifting association with 
poverty. Plutocrats, therefore, are the friends of 
society because in taking s.niety's ni .ncy they 
also absorb mo,t oi the temptati.m to that weak- 
ening of fiber which money-spending provides. 

But— 

We wonder if J. Laurence Laughlin has given 

much attention to the weakening of fiber which 

THE PRICE OF DISHONOR. comes fr.m the poverty which is an inevitable 

J^din H, Sanderson died in Brooklyn the other } condition at the other extreme of society from the 

plutocracy? 



day. and the i- "— r of his death made many 
people think 1. ry is SO strong a point to a 

lesson that i-. taught every day tliat u i- good that 
it sliall make as many [)eoi>le think as possible. 
His ' . ! death form a sermon from the text 
"the t'i.' transgressor is hard" that needs 

fio t^. N make it effective. 

Sanderson was the contractor for the furnish- 
in. I'ciinsytvania st;itc capitol. Everybody 
re: ab'>ut that. Peiui>ylvania has a tax 
i»v . aider wliich the state derives its revenues 
ill :ent of local taxation. > > it has no direct 
state tax Thu. a surplus wa,-. piled up in the 
tr and as none *>f it came directly out of the 



HOW TO GROW DOLLARS. 

Kvery worker in the ranks hopes for a com- 
petence that will make his old age comfortable 
and independent. Sudden strokes of fortune are 
rare, and besides tluy .cM -m come to those who 
fail to put up their lightning rods. There is no 
royal way to wealth, and the only way the aver- 
age pers':.n can h 'pe for that competence is by 

saving 

You must plant pennies and nickels and dimes 
now, that they may grow to dollars when you need* 

rather a sli>w way. to be sure, 



STIRRING UP BITTERNESS. 

There seems to be a concerted effort upon the 
part of the press of the Iron range, with a few 
exceptions, to stir up feeling on the ranges against 
Duluth. 

Why this is docs not appear upon the surface, 
but it is a fact, and a very unpleasant one. Nor is 
it a new thing. For some reason that has been 
the policy of several of the range newspapers for 
some time. 

A late recruit to the ranks of the dissatisfied 
and disgruntled is the Hibbing Tribune, which 
complains bitterly of Duluth in a recent issue, 
without specifying the items of its troubles. In 
the course of its article on thi.s subject, it follows 
the example of several other range newspapers 
and criticises the attitude of the St. Louis county 
delegation in the legislature toward the range 
communities as follows: "Take the 'St. Louis 
county' delegation in the legislature last winter, 
for an instance. It was an able delegation, good 
fellows, fair-minded fellows, and the way it stood 
together— for Duluth— was wholly admirable— 
from Duluth's standpoint. But it did not repre- 
sent St. Louis county any more than the last 
hair in a dog's tail represents the dog. It was 
amiable and willing to serve the ranges when 
no Duluth interest was affected, but let Duluth 
be concerned in the slightest measure and it talked 
about its duty's to the state, the necessity of econ- 
omy and such like academic subjects of conversa- 
tion. Instead of the bread you wanted, it offered 
to get you by the doorkeeper for half an hour so 
you might see how neatly it turned tricks for 
Duluth." 

This is a sample of current range newspaper 
discussion. The object, of course, is to prejudice 
the people of the ranges against Duluth, though 
why that is a desirable object to a range news- 
paper man we cannot see. 

Won't the range newspapers kindly furnish a 
bill of particulars as to their complaints against 
Duluth? They say Duluth "hogs" everything- 
what has it "hogged?" In this matter of the con- 
duct of the St. Louis county delegation in the 
legislature, what did it fail to do for the ranges? 
Of course its time was mainly taken up with the 
tonnage tax. Was that a Duluth matter solely? 
Didn't it interest the iron ranges of St. Louis 
county as much as it interested the iron ranges 
of Itasca, Crow Wing and other counties, which 
seem to appreciate the work that was done very 
much? Were the range district court and the 
range judge Duluth matters? Two years ago the 
ranges were nettled because they didn't get this 
court. Now they have got it. and a range man to 
preside, and the range newspapers are more bitter 

than ever. 

We have heard of no complaints against Duluth 
and the St. Louis county delegation except from 
the range newspapers. Before the range people 
let the range newspapers arouse bitterness against 
Duluth. let them analyze this newspaper talk. 
What is there to it? What has Duluth withheld 
from the ranges? What has it taken that does 
rot bel'Mig to it? What did the St. Louis county 
delegation in the legislature fail to do for the 

ranges? 

If the range people are asked to hate Duluth, 
they ought to be told why they should hate it. 
The range newspapers haven't told them anything 
yet except that they ought to hate the county seat. 
That oughtn't to be enough. There must be a 
reason. Let us hear it. 



ir diiu ..3 M'uv ^'1 .1 V ^ -. J — - -".. them. That .sei tus 

pc.i... the people didn't pay much attention to | hut it is the only way. You can't any more hope 
what was being done with it. S,. vvlien the new le kmui indepvn.lence by spending all you make 
capitol was buiil. certain .ttiei.il,. c .inLtned with j than y ■■; can h-.pe to grow potatoes by eating 
the cjiuractors, dipped their lingers into that sur- them. Besides, it isn't nearly so slow as it seems. 



In tha opinion of Qeorge J. Vodst 

of Uacremento. Oal., an attorney, who 
waa at the tapalding laut night, the 
trouble Willi ttio present prosecution 
of bad trusts and uorporations, ia that 
th.ough we liavo tho laws with which to 
treat these trusts, the laws against 
tli'-'.se combinations will not execute 
themselves. 

•'Trust prosecution in the United 
Stat<is la a new development of our 
euinmerclal history." said Mr. Vodst. 
'\No have of recent years been placing 
laws upon our statute books lor the 
regulating of these trusts. These laws 
arc upon ine statute books, yet there 
)s 111 many cases no adequate inaciiln- 
ez v for tiie eniorcement of the laws. 

"Out in California we have seen 
mucli of this. That state has led in 
the i-rosecution of trusts and grafters. 
Our slate legi.iiature liaa made laws 
regulating the corporations, and then 
in many instances the administrative 
pari of ilie sifcte government has found 
ihal there is not the necessary meana 
10 put tile law into execution. In oth- 
er words, thai the law will not execute 
Itself. 

"Tlie prosecution of wealthy offend- 
ers against the law was unknown in 
this country Kn years ago. It is only 
of n.-ctnt years tiiat the prosecution 
of this class of malefactors has begun. 
It Is for this very reason, that many 
of the laws are e.vperlments, have not 
been perfected to that extent that they 
cun be applied with the desired re- 
sults to many of the trusts and cor- 
porations doing illegal business in tills 
country. As the years advance and 
liie laws becomo more adapted to the 
Complex indusirial development of this 
country, you will lind that for every 
law agaiiidl tho corporations that is 
placed upon the statute books, there 
will be some provision for the execu- 
tion of this law. 

"The wealthy corporations of this 
country have employed the very best 
legal talent in the country to combat 
the deficiencies of any of the anti- 
trust laws that have been placed upon 
the statute books. 1 have woii<iered, 
at different times, whether this, in the 
end, was not a rather shortsighted 
policy. There are two sides to the 
story. The exposing of the weakness 
of tiie laws enacted for the regulation 
of the trusts, the showing that these 
laws cannot be applied. Is bound in tlie 
end to aid the people and the lawmak- 
ers of the country. 

"1 might say at the present time 
that there is a greater understanding 
iimoiig the lawyers of the conn try. 
The commercial development has been 
ahead of the law. In other words, tiie 
groat development of the trust.s and 
the combinations of capital within the 
past decade has been so rapid and so 
sudden that the law has not kept pace 
with it. But within the next few years 
you will find that the law.s of this 
country, in regard to the regulation of 
the trusts and comhlnations Uial seek 
unfair methods, or illegal methods, in 
the conduct of their affairs, will he 
adequate to deal with tiiis class of 
powerful offenders against the busi- 
ness ethics of the nation." 
* « * 
Here Is a story, based upon the 
vanity of the gentler sex, that was told 
last evening by A. B. McLoughiln at 
the Lenox hotel 

"My father is very fond of fried pork 
and "baking-powder bi.scuits. i-]very 

once In a while he would insist that 
we have this favorite dish of hl.-<. He 
would prepare it himself. He had been 
in tiie woods for a number of years and 
was an excellent cook. With this 
fried pork and baking-powder biscuits 
he wouhi prepare a thick gravy, made 
from flour and baking powder. 

"My sister waa about 12 years of 
age. She was one of the romping 
girls, that spend most of their time 
out in the summer sun and wind. Her 
music teacher was one of the.se deli- 
cate people. Also, she was In the habit 
of sneaking on a little rouge and face 
powder. 

"Vou know In those days, some 
twenty years ago. it was against the 
rules and regulations of simple so- 
ciety for any one to paint and powder. 
But as I say, this music teacher was 
in the habit of sneaking a little on 

"My young sister's liands and checks 
were as brown as an Indian's. Tho 
hands and cheeks of the music teacher 
were as white as the poetical lily's 
beautiful petals. My sister envied 
the whiteness of hand and cheek of 
the teacher of the pedal stunts, so 
she went very secretly and with many 
qualms of conscience, and purchased 
some face powder. 

"Sho did not know where to place 
the powder after she brought It home 
from the village drug store. Finally 
she put it in a royal baking powder 
can and placed In in a dark corner 
of the pantry. 

"One particular afternoon father 
came home and had the hunger for the 
fried pork and the baking powder 
biscuit, with the delicious gravy. He 
went forth to the kitchen and prepared 
to cook the meal. At six bells the 
family — there were six growing ciiil- 
(ji-en — came trooping into the dining 
room prepared to do justice to the dish 
that tickled the fancy of the pater. 

"We found father In a very 111 humor. 
The biscuits were scrumpy affaus at 
best Father complained that they re- 
fused to rise. They looked as if they 
had been frosted In t heir early youth. 
Everything tasted kind of peculiar. 
However, we kept on eating, and 
Brother Bill, who was about b feet ... 
and still growing, stowed away a vast 
quantity of provender. 

"it wasn't long after supper that 
father began to feel ill. Then some of 
the rest of us began to feel rather 
peculiar. Then Brother Bill got so bad 
that we sent for the doctor. 

"I^lttla sister, she of the brown hands 
and cheeks, quietly left the room. 
She with fear and trembling, sneaked 
into the pantry and took a peep into 
the royal baking powder can that had 
contained her face powder. Not a 
grain of the powder remained. 

"Little sister came running Into the 
sitting room, crying, and asking for 
forgiveness. She then informed us of 
the mistake father had n^ade'n choos- 
ing the powder to make his bis.uits 
with. The doctor, who up to the time 
of the dramatic confession of little sis- 
ter had been rather puzx.le.l, knew ex- 
actly what to do. He gave all of us 
medicine, and we were soon over the 
effects of the face powder menu. 

•M.lttle sister never used face powder 
until she was quite a grown lady. 
• • • 
At the Lenox: Oscar D. Williams. 
PlUsburg; O. F.. Mccormick. Fargo H. 
o Covington, Chicago; H. B. ^i;a.>. 
Chlc'^go; J. W. Keane ^n^i.^r^^^'o^ew 
York- Andr€W Freach, bt. Paul. u. m.. 
White. St Paul; C. J. Hartman,_Mlchl- 



York; John A. Dalzwell, Minneapolis, 
J. It. Donahue. St Paul; W. L. Kelly. 
Chicago; 12. C. Barber. Minneapolis; E,. 
E. Parke, 8t. Paul; J. W. Palmer, Chl- 
cag-o; W a. Hutchinson. Chicago. 
• • • 
At the McKay: Frank Smith, Min- 
neapolis; John Oliver, St. Cloud; L. V. 
Osborn, Holdlngsford; Mrs. Carrie 
Gattes Holdlngsford; Mrs. Mayme Eln- 
berf. f»roctor; A .F. McUermott, Min- 
neapolis; E. Nyers. St. Paul; C. Lewis, 
New York; A. H. Perkins and wife. 
.St. Paul; Charles Weets, Hamilton. 
Ohio; F. K. .Scmltz. Minneaolls; L. E. 
Hoseth. Eau Claire; U. H. Barrett. Chi- 
f-ago; Martin Gasser, Chicago; W. D. 
Ferguson, Mount eVriion, Iowa; John 
Zelch, St. Paul; S. W. Johnson. Hill 
City; Mrs. J. O. Finlayson, Foxboro; 
Miss Mario nFlnlayson. Foxboro; I. V\ . 
W^oodaworth, Palatnlia, Mich. 




THE WEATHER. 

Temperatures 
have t)een Just 
about the same dur- 
ing the last twen- 
ty-four hours, with 
sunshine from early 
morning until after 
supper time. No 
change in tempera- 
ture Is predicted, 
but showers are 
predicted for to- 
night and tomor- 
row. 
The weather a year ago was clear 
ami fine. 

The Bun was on the Job bright and 
early this morning, at 4:24, and it is 
scheduled to go down at 7:44. 

Of weather conditions Mr. Richard- 
son says: 

"During the past twenty-four hours 
showers fell over Atlantic and West 
Gulf states, the Itocky mountain region 
and most of the Northwest, due to 
barometric disturbances central over 
the Carollnas and I'tah, respectively. 
Tiie liarometer lias fallen over the 
Itocky mountains and Eastern slope. 
Pressures continue high over Eastern 
Canada and North Pacific districts. 
Temperatures are moderate generally. 
Conditions indicate more or less cloud- 
iness, with a possibility of showers at 
the Head of the Lakes during the en- 
suing thirty-six hours." 

Following were last night's lowest 
temperatures 



SMOII^OAY NIQIHIir 



.\blk-no 60 

.\9l1cvllla 50 

Allaiiln 60 

HatUef^rrt 52 

'UUm;irck 56 

Hoft.m 44 

Buffalo 50 

Cairo 60 

Cal«.iry 40 

rimrleston 60 

Clil.-ajji 4» 

Cliinutiatl 54 

«'onri>rJlii 5'1 

Oavuiport 50 



MemphU SI 

Miles City 54 

MUw.iukiw 4« 

.Mliiiiednsa 4'> 

Modana 38 

M'lntK'imery 62 

Moorliea.1 4.* 

New Orleans TO 

Now York 4« 

Nnrfolk J^B 

NorthMeld ii 

North Plalte 40 

OkUlioiiid 60 

OnialiA 



...46 iPliooiili .... 



40 ; Pierre 



Denver . . . 
nplrDlt 

UeviU Lake 50 | I'ort Arthur 

I>o.ige 50 PUUburg 

nuluUi 4'1 I Porllaii.i. Or. . 

Kilmoiiton 44 ; qu'.\i»liell« ... 

Kl Paso 5C Rapid «:ity ... 



«0 

54 

42 

5i) 

42 

42 

...4H 



luSL-analia 
Or.iucl Haven 
Grwn 11 ay . 

Havre 

HeU'iia . . . . 
Hiiu«hton . . 

Hur.>ri 

Jacksditrllle 
Kami.) ips 
Kausuii City 
Lji Crusse . 

Laiuler 

UUIe UiK-k . 
I»s .Vngelus 



...44 St. l/)ula 54 

...48 St. Paul 

. . .44 I Sail Anl»iil.> .... 
. ..Sil.Sau Kranc'Uco .. 

. . .44 I SaulH Va 

.38 S.^ulf .Ste. Marie 



50 ' Shreveport 

70 Spokane 

H4 Swift t'urrtfiit 

58 WaiihliiKtou . 

.50 I Wlclilta 

36 WllUston ... 

.. . .62 Wlniieniucea 
. .. .50 Winnipeg 



MaMuetle 42 j yellowBloiie 

MeJklue Hat 50 



..48 
. .64 
..44 

..46 

.41 
..61 
..48 
..50 
..4* 
..60 
..50 
..38 
..42 
..40 



Department of Agriculture. Weather 
Bureau, Duluth. May 22. — Forecasts 
for l%venty-four hours ending at 7 p. 
m. Sunday: 

Duluth, Superior and vicinity, includ- 
ing the Mesaba and Vermilion iron 
rangea— -Probably showers tonight or 
Sunday; not much change in teinper- 
aluie; n odei'ate tiortheast winds. 

Chicago, May JJ. — Forecast for twen- 
ty-four hours ending at 7 p. m. Sun- 
day: 

Upper Michigan and Wisconsin — Fair 
tonight and Sunday; not much change 
in temperature. 

Minnesota — Generally fair in east- 
ern portion. i)robaljly showers in west- 
ern portioi' oi .Sunday. 

North Dakota — Showers tonight and 
Sunday. 



Th« Village BlnckMinitii. 

If It had been written by Robert 
Browning instead of by Henry Wads- 
worth Longfellow. 

Beneath the tree known as the chest- 
nut 
The village smithy stands. 
(We garner from that tree the best nut 

In this or other lands.) 
The smith he will wear coat and vest, 
not — 
Bare are his breast and hands. 



The Man With a Grievance. 

About the worst thing that a man 
can nurture within hla breast ia a 
grievance; but it Is one of the easiest 
things to foster. Weeds grow faster 
tlian flowers, and evil tendencies with- 
in us often outstrip the good. A griev- 
ance grows like a snowball when the 
snow Is damp. It begins as a little 
pin prick of resentment arising from 
real or fancied injury. It ends aa a 
mountain which shuts out of view the 
smiling landscapes beyond it. Nurture 
this viper long enough and you will 
even suspect your closest frlenda, 
think and talk nothing else, lose sleep 
that was meant to refresh you. become 
sour and finally end up In the mad- 
house. 

Not that everybody who allows a 
grievance to grow within tliem cornea 
to this deplorable end; but he cannot 
help being warped in hia Judgment 
and made less pleasant to live with 
and less capable of doing well his part 
of the worlds work. Here is a man 
who iiaa a grievance against some or- 
ganization with which he was once 
connected. Possibly It may be the 
C^hrlstlan church. He thinks that he 
has been unjustly treated or over- 
looked or altogether Ignored; hence- 
forth he will not give a cent to the 
support of the Instllutlou or favor It 
with his presence. He looks upon 
those still loyal to It as either mis- 
guided or hypocrites. Nursing hla 
grievance day by day he pull.s further 
and further away from an institution 
of whicii he was once fairly fond, and 
all because of some perhaps minor 
slight of bygone days'. 

Grievances against other individuals 
embitter life for not a few peison.s. A 
disagreement, perhaps, on iion-essen- 
tial.s led to misunderstandings, harah 
words and permanent estrangement, 
and now when Smith thinks of Jonea 
lie does not remember Jones" many ex- 
cellent qualities, his generosity, his 
hospitality, his friendliness, but simply 
that one unfortunate episode when he 
and Jonea grew warm under the col- 
lar, perhaps shook their fists In each 
other's face and went away sworn 
enemies. 

Grievances against men are bad 
enough, but when clierlshed against 
God they shadow and narrow the life 
cherishing them. God has done 
something or permitted something to 
be done that you cannot understand. 
It has been a hard experience and the 
first Impulse Is to deny the existence of 
a Father In heaven, or. If admitting It, 
to vow that you will have nothing 
more to do with such a God. wiio can 
let such things happen to you. You 
condition your belief in Him and your 
trust in Him on Hia acting Juat as you 
want Him to act. 

From the point of view of strict Jus- 
tice, there is just enough ground in 
almost every grievance to make It 
easy to cherish it, provided one ia so 
ilisposed. None of us likes to be in- 
jured by any one else. Something 
within us smarts under the blow and 
we say "That Is not fair." But does 
tliat justify tho fostering of this sense 
of being unju.stly treated? The best 
thing to do with a grievance Is to bury 
It out of sight, to stifle It before It la 
fully born, for, depend upan It. the 
nurturing of It will magnify the orig- 
inal offense far beyond its due pro- 
portions, and make your own life 
thereafter all the weaker and more 

unhappy. ^ ^ , . i 

Think, when disposed to cherish a 
grievance, whether there may be no 
one else In the world who has oc- 
casion to feel resentment toward you. 
Have you been so considerate, so abso- 
lutely scrupulous In all your dealings 
with your fellow men that no one has 
any occasion to feel sore or wounded 
with respect to you? fl^,,„. 

Life ought to be full of confident 
trust In God. even though we cannot 
explain all Hla dealings with ua and 
our fellow men. and Hfo ought to be 
so full of loving service for those 
about ua that we shall have neither 
time nor disposition to cultivate any 
sense of being Injured by others. Let 
it smart if It will, for a moment, then 
bury it fo rever. THE P ARSON 

ME.\i\T TO BE FINNY. 



school homeward 
be- 



plus and drew out nearly $IO,lAM),00«} that didn't 
btlons' *'• ftetn 

S.. . IS liis share $4,(MX),r>'X» or $5,000,- 

000 more than tie was rightfully entitled to, and 
he was. he thought, tixed for life. So he was, but 
in a way very different from what he supposed. 
He moved to New York, married, bought i yacht, 
took up his residence at Sherry's, and prepared to 
enjoy li fc on h i > ,> i ■ ■ 1 en i> »rtpne. 

Il was t xi to last, of course. Presently 

llie r, :. Pennsylvania was corrupt, but 

in th: i' 

ti; li an investigation, the prodigious thefts 

were laid open, and last March Sanderson was 
conrteted of a conspiracy to defraud the state, 
(ilon^j v/ith the state auditor, the state treasurer 
and III- superintendent of grounds, whose con- 
nivance wa» necessary that his plundering might 



GOVERNMENT BY COMMISSION. 

The commission plan would not, as Senator 

Works wisely told his Duluth audience last night 

in his instructive and enteratining address, perform 

'to"^grow"p'"'tatocs by" eating a miracle and cure all municipal evils by magic. 

But it would, beyond any question, accomplish a 
marked advance upon present conditions, and it 
couldn't make things worse than they are now. 

"There is no government so ineffective and so 
crude as the present government of our cities." 
said Senator Works; and there he put an unerring 



It i^ slowest at the start. It gets faster all the 
time you keep it up, and then is when it will begin 
io be really inlere-.tiiig. 

If you put a nickel in your home bank now and 
another nickel tomorrow, that is only 10 cents, 



itii-ither nickel tomorrow, lliai la omy iiJ vtiiia, , 

amthtr mcKii '" " ' ' ' . jj^ ^r on the greatest blot upon popular govern 
:.nd It doesn't seem worth while. But it you keep , u"g^ b „,,,.orn 



it up for a year that is $18.25. and you have made 
that much without ever missing a penny of it. 
Put money doesn't grow so well just by planting 
in that \\:\y- Vou have to have good soil, just as 

^^„...,j ..... ,.., .--. you have to grow potatoes, and the best soil to 

tented. The thing was exp-^e I. ; j lant money in is the savings bank, where it will 

draw interest. 

That nickel a day, the price of a 5-cent cigar, 
will amount to $182.50 in ten years. But at 4 per 
cent interest it will earn in that time $40. so the 
net result will be $222.50 instead of $182.50. Just 



ment in this country. Even the best city govern- 
ments are unbusinesslike, and must be from the 
very nature of their beings. 

If you had a business of as great magnitude as 
that of the city of Duluth, you wouldn't think for 
a moment of having it run as the city's business is 
run. You would be far more likely to organize it 
according to the commission plan, because the 
present government is political, and the commis- 
sion government is a business management. The 
commission form of government is coming, and 



net result will be $i^^.5U instead ol^.«^..o. just , considering it earnestly 

stick away a nickel a day, and m ten years you , i^*'*"" "»*" 



4Vmme;"joseVh'Deisinger Milwaukee; 
a A Skarmis. Minneapolis; L. H. ti- 
mer^' Minneapolis: w. ^^,^-y^^.^' j^"^;^' 

K4.^Mrnn^U>Sls C^.a.le3 f^3 No^d- 

^^^1^' r''^. 'SiniV^^c|(icaoT\^R. 

Drown, St. Paal; W. DBollnger, Chi- 
cago W C. Phillips, Brainerd; C. J. 
indeVson. Minneapolis; G Pierce. 
Houghto"i; W. A. F1«'^1"S' Orainerd; 
L. Trautman, Minneapolis; H. K. Ad- 
ams. Lisbon. N. D. 

At the St. Louis* W. C. Gerl^eV^'j' 
.St Paul! Matt Hayes,. St. Paul. Mell H. 
Hersey St. Paul: E. L. Mulford, St. 
Loiifs- W H. Burton. Chicago; W. P. 
\ber New- York; L. H. New house New 
v!;^ir'- I P Schute. Buffalo; Charles 
^pengler, MkrSueUe;' O. C. Ailing. Chl- 

l^"•*\^''^MatUson .St. Loula; W. L. 
Gorrie. St. Paul: E. C. Haycox, Mlnne- 
anolta F. W. Chafee. Carrlngton N. 
n John McGrath. Two Harbors; M. J. 
H.'.riPv Hlbblng: J. A. .Savage, Aubu- 
honloVa Thomas Sullivan. St. Paul; 
r H oriton, St. Paul: J. B. Boyce. Two 
HaVbora H L. Bagerman. Winton; W. 
H Reker Minneapolis; A. J. Arrivee. 
"rand Forks; Lew PhllUpa, Minne- 
apolis. » • • 

At the Spalding: R. A. Alger, De- 
troit; C. B. Pike. Chicago; F. M Al- 
ger. Detroit; H. Herges. New_>ork; 
Charlea Madden, Cincinnati; W. W. 
Morton ClUcago; B. Schloss Chicago; 
W B. Moore. Chicago; Mrs. J G. Har- 
ris Foxboro; George Franklin. New- 
York A L. Redden. St. Louis; F. R. 
MpOii'een Minneapolis; E. P. Brown, 
M&apolL^ R. L. Sprigg Cincinnati; 
ioulB P Gailand. Boaton; Sidney Atern. 
New York; H. O. Ordemann. Minneap- 
olis- J P Kelly. 3t. Paul; James Mor- 
ula St PauirW. W. Becker, St. Paul; 
P J Raley. Chicago. J. H. Wise, New 



The children from 
trudging 
Look through the open door; 
They watch the soot hia face 
smudging. 
They hear the bellows roar — 
A roar like winds "gainst cliffs un- 
budging, 
Or waves along the shore. 

He sits within the church on Sunday 

To hear his daughter sing. 
Glad that in all the week there's one 
day 

He need not do a thing. 
But ready once again on Monday 

To do hia blacksmlthing. 

He turns the circle of a horseshoe 

Between the dawn and eve. 
Each morning brliiga to him one more 
•shoe 

To beat and hold and heave — 
Observing this. I think, of course, you 

The moral will receive; . 

lln Venice once I knew a friar 

Wlio said the same as I.) 
We smelt our great deeds in the nre. 

Spite all the hue and cry — 
Now laugh loosely as a liar, 

Rul point me out the lie. 

VVILBL'U D. NESBIT, in Chicago 

Evening I'osl. 

Southern Minuesota People Fair. 

New rim Review: Speaker Rockne, 
we believe, voiced the true sentiment 
of the people of .Southern Minnesota 
regarding the tonnage tax proposition 
when he said in an interview the other 
day- 'The farmers of Minnesota can 
be trusted to do the right thing. They 
do not want anything that is uniair or 
unjust, as tl;e tonnage tax undoubted- 
ly was. The veto of the bill will have 
a" tendency to place its merits and de- 
merits before tiie public, something 
that had never happened before. The 
only thing that made the tonnage tax 
strong waa the cry of the 'steel trust. 
At the mention of that name every- 
body took to cover. The fact of the 
matter la that It did not particularly 
touch the steel trust, but did strike at 
Northeastern Minnesota and at Duluth. 
Suppose some such hostile measure had 
been directed against Minneapolis in 
the sawmill day.s. Minneapolis would 
not be what it is today. Tlie sawmills 
are gone now, but Minneapolis went 
right ahead and is now a great city, 
and that i.s what will happen to Du- 
luth. Even assuming that the addi- 
tional revenue claimed by Mr. Bjorge 
would have been added to the state 
funds as a result of the proposed bill, 
it would have meant only about 7 cents 
to every quarter section. All that will 
be necessary in the southern part of 
the state is to put the facts before the 
people. To Insinuate that the farmers 
of Southern Minnesota want something 
that is unfair and unjust is a libel to 
the residents of tliat section. 
■ 
Reflpcttons of a Bnoiielor. 

New York Pre.ss: The only foolish 
thing about being extravagant is when 
it's somebody else. 

The only kind of public policy that 
can Interest a man Is when it affects 
Ills orlvate pocket. ... 

A m.an likes to have theories that 
never work out right, so he can say 
he Is too practical for that sort of 

^^^Tlfe reason a woman knows her 
husband is brave Is he Isn't afraid to 
swear over the telephone when Its 
aealnst the rules. 

The thing that can make a woman 
talk about her country estate In the 
surest tone of volce^ls for It to be a 
suburban cottage she rents by the 
month. 



Christian Register: "Yes," said the 
old peer "my son is willing to stand 
for parliament Unfortunately." he 
added, after a slight pause, •Parlia- 
ment does not reciprocate. 

TIt-Blts: Brown — What did your 
wife .say about your l>eing so late home 
the other night? .. ^, . . .„* 

Jones— Nothing at all. She just sat 
down at the piano and played "Tell mo 
the old. old story."' 

Louisville Courier-Journal: "He lota 
his wife do Jffst as she pleases." 
"Nothing startling about that.' 
"No; but hi does it without an ar- 
gument." 

Chi'-ago Tribune: Provoked Mother — 
Tommy voiire the plague of my life. 

Tommy (snugg'ilng up to her)— y^u 
wouldn't talk that way If somebody d 
kidnap me. would you, mamma? 

Life: The Doctor— Ah, yes! Very 
nervous Irregular pulse, palpitation of 
the heart and feverish. Let mo see 
your tongue? ^, ,.. 

•'There'.s nothing the matter with 
in.>. sir. I just come to ask for your 
daughter's band.'" 

Philadelphia Record: "How many 
ribs have you. Johnny?" asked the 
teacher of physiology. 

"I don't know. ma am. giggled 
Johnny, s-tuirming around on one foot. 
•Tm .so awful ticklish I never could 
count "em." 

Newark Star: Bangs— What is the 
difference between a woman s whist 
club and a man"s poker club? 

Wanggs — Why, in one you get home 
to dinner and in the other to break- 
fast. 

Los Angeles Express: Said Uncle 
Slla.s; "If beln' poor wuz a crime, gee, 
what a police department wed needl 

Chicago News: Money that comes In 
drafts is not the only kind that la 
cold cash. 

Washington Star: "Lady," .said Me- 
andering Mike, "you don't want to lis- 
ten to no hard-luck story, do you? 

"Not a bit of .1." 

•'You relieve my mind. If you want 
to heair .somethin' worth while, you 
jes' g-imme a chance to show whjit l 
kin do as an after-dinner .speaker. 

Yonkers Statesman: He — .So you 
favor w.iman suffrage? 

She — I certainly do! 

He— Well, in ihe last election, for 
Instance, would you have voted for Mr. 
Taft or Mr. Bryan? , ^ 

She— I would not have voted for 
either. When I vote I'll vote for a 
woman or not at all. 

Poluted ParMgrnplin. 

Chicago News: Men are born, but 
husbands are made. , , . ,. . 

Some men get an awful jolt when 
Ihev fall in love. 

The man who has nothing to live for 
can afford to loaf. 

One smile of fortune Is better than a 
dozen of her laughs. 

Happiness has a peculiar way or 
coming and going without warning. 

The actions of a man who looks out 
onlv for himself will bear looking Into. 

It's wonderful what good mcmorlea 
people develop after having done you 

* Any'^magrazlne will gladly accept 
your contribution — If It comes In the 
form of a subscription. 

It Is a pity that we cannot reverse 
things and start at the top. It would 
he ao easy to reach the bottom. 

A man's memory serves him well 
when It enablea him to forget the 
things he doesn't care to remember. 

If fond lovera were to talk their 
sweet nothings into a phonograph, how 
it would shock them to hear the re- 
production ground out a few year* 
hence I i 



DEFECTIVE PAGE 





— ■ t 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD* SATURDAY, MAY 22. 1909. 



- \ 




TWENTY YEARS AGO 

Taken From the Columns of The Herald of Thb Date. 1889. 



•••In tho di'itri'-t court yealerday. on 
motion of A. N McJlndley. Thomaa J. 
Mltrh«ll wai a«1mi:te«i to practice in 
a)) lh« courts <>r tlie state. 



i ' ' i ''"ill. 1 I t • i a I > . .1 . t ' 1 ^ 1 1 .-> * -^ ' I , 

Cat tlrjer, Gt'orije Speiutr, C F 

Jfiji .., Herman Hm-''^ '^-'^ w iir.u.Ki. 

J^ I) Kay. A R N' ' I'l'. 

James McAullffv. "'' 'i i-l"'^ 

La.li»'3' Ubi-H :„ai.,.n are dlss- 

«in).-.tr'to<1 bf. :■ -•'■.' ladles werf* 

niii nt€»d. Tht^ >itv council has 

affi mak^ a half mill levy for 

tliu Lipjiurt • ibrary. which will 

yi«t.l f»bout * 



•••K H. Htntj.M- returned Ul^^l nlRlit 
ironi tin- I'..>-t He was in tlif Grand 
Trunk iailwa> wreck at Hamilton. 
Ont., a month apo. hut was uninjured 



***Mrs S M Mc*;,.w:in airiv>"l y«>s«- 
• (M<liv (11 Sill Friiu is. o from Japan, on 
her way liomi- t'> imiuth. 



'* •'i'hi- 



. f the 



■ ' i'aul. Iri' 
ijlijl li. seci 



1 

• ■ > 

N. 

Charles 



lit 



.=*puty i^herlff A I Free is 
iwn a viiiuable claim on thi- 
• T^iilnth & Iron Range rall- 

' - rtT.>>nt!y i-lected city 

t»iit rt' fused to ac- 

trpi, the oiii«'<' 



1 1. 
Tfi 
Wl' 



iiiifnii.'nt of a 
H L.'uls. Ih in 

..^,.,-1 ,,v T- T 



ips and 
1 by the 

. M.fer with 



•••The wedding '>r B.m (?e Astle. pay- 
int? teller of the State Bank of Duluth. 
ml Miss Emma Thompson will take 
r.lK (• this evening. Th« ceremony will 
1. . . ,1 on the Norwegian style 

at t! vuglan Lutheran church by 

riev. llciter Ncis...,. Misses Bertha 
Aake, Thompson. Wisted. Williams, 
.lohnson and Bre.l.s..n will be brlde.s- 
inalds and Otto Mvlirt^ and OU' Hobe 
will be b*»3t men. The followlnsr ladles 
irid Kentlemen will as»l.«it In the cere- 
mony: Mr and Mrs. M O. Hall. Mr. 
and Mrs. Paul Sharvy. Prof. Tonnins. 
Mr. and Mrs. Stetison. Mrs. Thompson. 
Mr. and Mrs. Wisted. Mr. Ira. 

Gates. Mrs Aske, A. Erlck.-*oi md 

Mr-; Nelson. Mr. and Mrs. EncKaon 
Mr and Mrs INHer John.-^on. Mr. atul 
Mr.s. Bernt .lohn.son. Mr. Sund and Mr?(. 
IJrcdeson 



of the man's polltcs. I think them 
horrible; but I lo believe that it is 
the duty of both partle.s to send to 
this capital the ablest men they have 
to leg^lslate for the people of thl.s Mg 
country. I don't know whether there 
are any Democrats loft in Iowa or not. 



NTHE- 



I doubt if there are a baker's dozen 
of them, not Bryanlzed, and if there 
Is not one fit for senator, I hope Per- 
kins may bo given opportunity to wind 
up hia career Hke Alli.son did his. 
• • • 
One of these <iayH before the sum- 



mer solstice I intend to complete this 
letter and tell a word or so about some 
other Iowa men, dead and living, who 
played big parts In this town. 

I have only to repeat that George 
Perkins, In my opinion, is the ablest 
man Iowa iia.s had in either house of 
congress since John A. Kasson. 





♦••The .Siipcii.M i;o(U chilj completed 
orcaniJiati.m la^t ul«ht and elected the 
foriowlng director-^: A it. Heitland, J. 
T. Murphv, iieoriKt' I). Moullon. A. T. 
Thomaa. W H. Batik.s. M irk Piiine. T. 
C. Tennis. 1> 1>. .smr-;id, G L. Percy. \\ . 
11 Stack and Wllllan Bcrnent. 

• •*W B. t"!liamb*'rfl has begnn the 
rection of a theater in Wast Superior. 
at the corner of Banks and P'ourth. It 
will be thret' stories hlsh. 40 by 80 
(cet The stafife will be 26 by 50 feet. 
Tlie house will seat 800 people. 




ALBERT B. CUMMINS 



BY SAVOYARD 



^U.Jl 




kEM have s.--" " in the 
tree: but In the 

sapling; they have looked 
on It m the strt,am, but 
never In the fountain"— 
I .1 Mtc (run memory — 
and such la the proud 
b-.ast of the iUu.striou3 Scottish house 
of D mglas. and the house of Cummin, 
If n .t s<» renowned. Is equally as 
anrlenr ' " innected witli everj' noble 
family -tland. the Cummin blood 

was poured out lavishly for the good 
and «Iorv ot th;it historic people, who 
gave to irm.H Wallace and Bruc.\ 
M"' and (.■laverhou:-'.'. 'irid to 

1 • irns and Scott. Huinc ..md 



.vlia-.' .u 1' . 

th^> ■ . ' f'*n\' 

i 

' rom th'' vntv of I 

t,, ;. , .-i more uit. and : '■^' 

■clcnce waa never rid of the sm — not 

.,f ,1,.,. ,,„.=,.:.a<5ination. but of the .s'-ena 

It The lord of Lome. 

a II.- sr KH'isiiiiui '''f Ih.j Comyn. hunted 

Urui 1' to th.i III ira.is. and f-)rcerl him 

to "itie hi" ■ ■ ■ " • : >ok.H." 

to •■■■•roueh "* tb(j 

:iip.fl he tiiu.-i undurwcnt ' 

•;fd thP fo'i-erfnl phys: ."i- 



ni 

t!' 




■tl' 

to ' 



.> and aeai liiin 

!y- 



SENATOR A. B. CUMMINS. 



■Hint; 



ind 
ins 



An Hi.. ( ■■uii.ini-., ri:!u!\' in Anv.'ri -:; 



f -I • 

it 
In 

lie r- 
the 

Af' 

Vi I 



The Juni'ji >r 

fr>im !'■"• ''- 

Pcnn.^'. 

.rom th" IV. ... >. 

onyn :,>t' Scotland 'if 

<umrni!!H \\ a.s born in 
' irk and 
he tii»ht 



.■iving 
uinniffi 



■ .11 the 
.1 Chi ■ 
11' >t su 
I a ruv 
movi 

< 111' y'^<' ..ind ■• ■ 

!i the practi 



a..n i;;- 

40 I he 

W"' tind ni . -•• 

l».Miioir:it.s d'nvn in Iventucky, iwi-jr 
1,11'J rnorf vear.s at?o were wont ' 
1! and threat thin;;s 

... ■ , Viowe\ I , ... i.''l> "f ■-" '"'■■ 
'■" . ; ...mm-.ins lul^jht h 

'■ He ■■*t U' rv I • 

y. from which all 







: <n. (. unniiiii.s k 
hri*ad ha.s go 


bti 






tM . 






fori oul 






atil. Br. 






If the Soutt 






f^ft i ' . :i r 1 i r T u 11 






It 




tci-.'d little 


C'r 




■'■' Jcrrj' S'x. 


H- 




of 


f 




'- .lid \'. 
atry in tl. 


we i.>ui It 1!- I 


1 1 


" 1 . 


er 


• 


m m 

< gt'it to he 
»r more t 



M ■ 



1 1: Pop...' AnR-ch.- i oi,r, 

r I . > \' r . 1 .ill . . 1 i r 1 1 . - . 1 



1 ■ ■. 11 I H t S 

til.' l>.'Hi 



.' c-th '!■ 
t»r»..»k%*ri the riouih. But lii- 
tlii.i' .i>..'tui>ii.s an. I on the ot'h." 

■ 'iiiris. I.H i-'i>. 
I , ■',..,•,.■!'• J ; 1. 1 Ci ' * 

J- 

the 



adej It 



/!•« 



made a bi< f ortun. 
hpen r*niarkab!y 
the gani'' of jioliti.-.s 

David i: H. oidu! -^ on, a i^cotchmrui, 
a F wh'> had left a leg 

,n f . of Shiloh, a fervid 

oior-lj.-Mr.r of the bloody 
man of as imnh lung as pa- 
tnotisTu I btdieve I will again tell 

<f a Bpi'f ih T heard him make In 
F »rty-ninth congress He wa.s 

i. .. iving of the bloody .shirt with un- 
usual ^•nthu.sia3m, oven for him, when 
r "'^ ■ utter aalonisliment iind Im- 
: dismay of lii.s own scholarly 

pinv tis*sociates. sucli as Willie Wallle 
Phelps, in an ecstasy of patriotism 
md a thuiid. -ration of voice, he ex- 
•-itmed: -From Highland Pass to 
lund Moor, treason never found 
.rn.tit in Seotti.sh breasll' The 

■k ejaculated and away lie 
Tlie Hon. Henderson had Just 
I -matrated that the South wa.s at 
V'O-v i'Kt iio .,f time a.s full of 

r iiog.s, if .1 

n-, were ai)}iotnt- 

funtrj- that couM 

-,i.o-a' mo;-' U'.i~.-i: (■> tlie8<juare inch. 

^iich a.s JelTeTMon iMvis and H<d)eit !•;• 

committed, hy a unanimou.s- re- 

■ they would award the pahn t'> 

hut the Hon. Henders >n 

wu the hou-se, and that wa.^ 

wiuit he wa.s after. 

m • • 

■ f i' I ".tuslu.s was fr'Oii the 

. jy Tliird di.'itri<-t. lie Is a wonder. 

i.ble of everytlilng but industry. 

lucre wa.s a member of the British 

■ >mmon«, late in the eighteenth cen- 

'' 'Ml •I.r.iid Hamilton— con- 

• i; - ^ ith Fox and Pitt. 

One night he 

l)V making a 

: migiil hiiv.' . hallenged the 

■ rator who ever sp»>ke our 

He li. v^T repeated it. re- 

.. ! ..o .., ..r after in that body. 

In liistoiy as "Single 

i i.i:i:i.i..n. 1 oiif day heard 

. innke a. .speech jn our congre.ss 

Olid li 1 ' en a credit to 

cilge. kian, or William 

hut he never made another 

h it. nntl he i^ in danger 

known as .-^: ' "^pe^-cli" 

(• H-'[>!)iii-n ■ ;-her 

.md h'-. I ■'■. .-. .1 (ino 

\s«»uld <i'--iiiire that 

:'=-'■' -t tti.at Sir 

Ibuck had 

. a knowledge 

I icy of facts — 

..a.s it — lu- ' he tlie 

>M the H- ,11 .side. 

•n said that it is worth a 

tile Mlssl.ssippi to the Po- 

,1 ' . h.ir Hepliurn say "the 

-' s ; ■ <»n the senate .side 

' i;t ! ;. iuildiean orator. 

: !.i.s In a nation with a 

., -N vviii n.tt use tile definite 

Tnited States." but 

st:u.> ■ is this, that, or 

L other tunig. Just a.s Ue would .say 

Kngtarid or France. Is this or that. 

' what the most bril- 

■ >rrespondent thi.s 

rtes .>^um- 

■d. -ridlc- 

-ity." Joseph I! :vi, ( ullough in 

I .... rueiilina' on. M eh :.if,:i,-; .••■rized it as 

i "on- '■k:.i>.sit)e>." 



t-i 



I i i i ' ■ li ^ 



lillman an<i Bailey; 

'. "1.1 the octupusj 

nans hi p. fh/[ 



■r,i cort- ••■- '-i — 

•!v sf 

n 11 Gear, a 
scn.se, who had 



Books and Magazines. 

Reviewed on this page an he se- 
cured at 

EDWARD M. STONE'S 

BOOH Nioiti;. 
221 Wc«t Sniierlvr M., Duliitb. 



Jonathan, P I>oJiiver was also in 

the 1-1 i*M...r.., fTf t,,,-, is an 

jrat-ir. ■ Bro,)d an epl- 

''^ .li.'in J.-nniugs Bryan — 
; 'h-'H he tries 

11 in ! !»y far the ablest 

,. In t;. .ri was George D. 

Perkins of .Sioux City. If that man 

had the l,MIvery and the presence of 

Hepbui < ago. he would have 

been a r .and a cms; >ii nous and 

honored and trusted 1 t his 

t...Ttv throughout tlie I — .. Xot- 

nding his poor delivery it is a 

i. ..L,, , to the Intelligent mind to hear 

him. 1" >r h • i\>-vi'v Indulged a word 

f laptru' or non.sen.se. He is a 

• in. lihitit man. of fine Intellect, who 

(jelleves .sorwething and is not afraid 

to tell it. I do not believe a word 



THR INNER SHRINK. Anonymous. 
New York: Harper & Bros. $1.50. 
This workmanlike novel, w^hlch is 
brilliant If uneven, and wholly ab- 
sorbing In the bargain, was published 
anonymously in Harper's Montliiy, 
and it is now set afloat as a book, 
still lacking an autliur. It Is good 
enougli as a novel to explain why 
there has been much discussion as to 
its authorship, and the nature of tlie 
Impression It is making can be easily 
imagined from the fact that it has 
thus far be^n attributed to nearly all 
of tho.se novelists wliose books every- 
body likes to read, and to none whose 
work comes l)ent'ath the first class. 
It is obviously tlie work of no 
■prentice hand at noveling. and except 
for tlie mystification of the reading 
puliHc It Is difficult to see why the 
autlior sliould have wlthlield her 
name. The feminine pronoun is used 
advisedly: the book was written by a 
woman, or we miss our guess. 

But after all it Is the book itself 
that concerns us here, and the chief 
ir;convenience about the absence ot 
tlie author's name Is the lack of a def- 
inite place to place the praise tliat Is 
coming; for half the pleasure of 
praising is lost when the party to be 
praised Is not in evidence. If it Is not 
a great work. It falls little short of 
greatness, as greatness goes nowa- 
da>s In novel-making. It is a so- 
ciety novel, with far more tlian the 
u.sual depth and human interest that 
characterize its class. It parallels 
the society of two continents, placing 
file social customs of New York in 
vivid contra.sl with the social 
i-ustoms of Paris. The chief 
tigure, Diane Eveleth is a 

French woman wlio had .an Irish 
iri.'ther, and who liad been reared In 
I lie ways of Parisian "society." .She 
has ruined — without realizing it — her 
.\merlcan husbaml. who has been 
taken to Paris l»y his society-loving 
mother, and tlie husi*and and motlier 
more than lialve the blame for his 
final downfall, which occurs as early 
as the first chapter, when he Is killed 
in a duel over a piece of scandal in- 
vnUhiu Diane. Diane has been 

oi vei-y tliin Ice, as tlie 
i 1 asliion Is, and though slie 

Imsnl gone througii it. she has helped 
otiiers to poorer fortune In that re- 
spe.-t. Hi-r husband and his mone.v 
Kone, i>iane and her mother-in-law 
•etiirn to N^iw York, wliere the real 
story begins. The plot is too long 
and too complex to be more tlian 
liinted at here. .Suffice It to say that 
Diane's Parisian ciireer. Innocent 
thougli It was from a Parisian view- 
jiolnt, gets her into a lot of real 
trouble when It Is exposed In distort- 
ed form, with the help of a lying 
French nobleman, to the more prudish 
vision of New York society, wlilch, 
tliough probably not more moral. Is 
nioii; circumspect than that of Paris. 
The story chiefly Involves a love 
theme embracing Diane and a mature 
New Yotk banker, who is Jealous and 
stuidd, a combination prolific in mis- 
chief, poor Diane, thougli marvelous- 
ly di'fL In untangling tlie affairs of 
othfr.s. manages her own not t|ulte 
si> wtdl. They get Into a pretty tan- 
gle, therefore, and they are not easily 
straightened out. The telling of It 
all, with the brilliant analysis of 
character and customs involved In the 
jiroce.ss. Is beautifully done. In spile 
of the unevenness hinted at already, 
the work has positive brilliance ana 
shows actual genius. Whatever the 
motive back of the concealment of ttie 
autlior's name, it was most assuredly 
not that of timidity as to the merit 
of the liook. for anybody clever 
enough to write so good a novel Is 
nndouhi.du clever enough to know 
th.'it a is good. 

• • • 

LIFI-rs DAV. Glide Posts and Danger 
.Signals In Heil!!! Bv Wlliani Sea- 
man BainbtldK . -\ U . M. D. New 
York: Frederuk .\. Stokes company. 
$l.;j."i net. 

T'l.' mm who is efficient to his ut- 
ni.>si caiiacily, who gels the most out 
yf life and gives to society the most 
out of hiinself. must he a well man. 
Ill hi alth. with its inefficiencies, comes 
from Ignorance or recklessness. Thi.i 
volume, evidently, is ilesigned to dis- 
sipate tin* one and point out the perils 
of the other and this it does In very 
practical and effective fashion. Its 
advice, if followed faithfully and In- 
telligently, shoulil enable one to be- 
come and remain well, and therefore 
to be efficient. It Is a manual of 
health for the busy man and woman, 
providing in entertaining form the 
knowledge necessary for the mainte- 
nanc; of good phvsical condition from 
before birth until death. Taking up 
life's day from dawn lo darknes-s, it 
pavs special attention to the critical 
periods of infancy, childhood, adoles- 
cence, middle age and old life. It cov- 
ers the whole ground, and covers It 
sanelv and well. Its author l.s the pro- 
ponent of no fad of diet, exercise or 
anvthing else except the fad of good 
health, which is within the reach of 
(»very normal human being who will 
take" such advice as this book gives 
and follow It consistently. As a guide 
bo.dc to health it fills the bill better 
111. Ill anything ttiat ha.s recently come 
I., eiir notice. 

• • • 

.s. MlADISM VS CHKKSTIANITY By 
Edward B. Hartman. New 'iork: 
Cochrane Publishing company, 
in tlie .saving of society tills author 
puts Socialism and Christianity Into 
two opposing and irreconcilable camps. 
It Is true that a great many people will 
not agree with him. They believe that 
es.sentiallv they are the .same forces — 
that Christianitv cannot do Its duty 
without socializing its efforts, and that 
S.Hialism is applied Christianity — the 
Golden llule translated into human ac- 
tion and made the basis of an economic 
system. "There Is mucli to be said for 
that Idea, hut this author does not 
say It. However, he approaches both 
sublects with candor and fairness. 
Though condemning Socialism as un- 
christian, he admits its appeal to those 
wlio wish to see society redeemed, and 
who se,. that the church Is not redeem- 
ing it. lie approaches Christianity, on 
the other liand. with reverence and 
c-ortim.iiilably implicit faith. It Is an 
e.i md an honest study, made in- 

t. '.• and wltliout too much dog- 

nuitt.-Hni Socialism Is* looked upon as 
a logical outgrowth of admitted abuses 
for which no .other creed seems to of- 
fer a plausible remedy It is ad- 
mitted tliat Its sprea.j is the result of 
abuses of tiie privilege of priviite prop- 
erty which are making necessary the 
ultimate at>olition of private property 
in the forms from which abuses flow. 
While this author seems to find So- 
cialism and Christianity about the 
same tilings In oliject. "by scriptural 
quotations he aims lo show ttial their 
methods are opposed. He seems skep- 
tical of evolution, both blologic.il and 
economic. Probably he does unwitting 
iiarm to the Scriptures by too literal 
an Interpretation, and to economic 
theories by seeking to square them to 
that interpretation. The fundamental 
and irreconcilable differences between 
Socialism and Christianity. In his view. 
is that while Socialism clings to a 
belief of the innate goodness of man, 
who is bad because of remediable con- 
ditions. Christianity believes in tiie de- 
pravity of human nature, which can 
he redeemed only by a new birth in 
Christ. Christianity looks to God for 
relief, Socialism to man. Mr. Hartman 
admits that the church has failed, and 
says that this in because, while preach- 



ing good doctrine, it has failed to give 
the secret of attainment. Socialism 
purports to give this secret, hence It 
is taking power that ought to belong 
to the church. Some of his views 
appear to be based upon a dogmatic 
Interpretation of Clirlstianity from 
which it may be that modern tiiought 
has drifted somewliat. The work shows 
much study, consistent and earnest 
thought, aiid a facility of expression 
which the author too modestly dis- 
claims. 

• • • 

THE JOY O' LIFE and other poems. 

By Theodosia Garrison. New York: 

Mitchell Kennerley. $1. 

.Mrs. Garrison is a prolific author of 
m.agazine verse of a lively and enter- 
taining style, and nearly a hundred of 
her liest poems are gatliered In this 
volume. We don't fancy that books of 
poetry, nowadays, are a very lively 
commodity In the book market, but this 
particular one is likely to be an excep- 
tion, for it has elements of popularity 
and excellence that should give It much 
vogue. An unusual evenness of merit 
is maintained throughout. There Is an 
Irresistible lilt in the lines, an engag- 
ing fluency and ease, a richness of 
imagery and a musical rhythm. Real 
ideas form tlie basis for most of tlio 
poems, which isn't so usual In poetry 
as It migiit be. The book places Mrs. 
Garrison in the first rank of minor 
poets, which is .-aylng much In a day 
remarkable for its appalling scarcity 
of major poets. 

« • • 
OPISTHOPIIOia S, or. The Man Who 

Walked Backv>ard. By C. and J. A. 

Jones. Chicago; W. B. Conkey com- 

panv. 

This very serious book seeks to 
siiow the sufferings and temptations of 
a drunkard, and to illustrate llie pos- 
sibilities of his redemption. Most of 
the incidents occur in a "jag" hospital, 
where cases of greater or less seri- 
ousness are being treated. It is an 
intimate description of life on a "Jag" 
larm and tells how the horrible ex- 
amples got tliere and how they were 
cured. Cases of delirium trenien.s are 
vividly described, and there Is tlie 
cheerful assurance to moderate 
drinkers that they are not im- 
mune to tliat liorrlble infliction. A 
reading of the book Is not calculated to 
Increase one's appetite for liquor, and 
that is evldentlv why it was written. 

• * • 

THE NEW .SCHAFF-HERZOG ENCY- 
CLOPEDIA OF KEMGIOUS KNOW L- 
EDCiE. Vol. HI. Complete in twelve 
volumes. New York: Funk & Wag- 
nails company. Ciotli, $5 per volume. 
Tlie third volume of this voluminous 
and valuable compendium of religious 
knowledge Is at hand, three months 
having separated Us appearance froni 
the publication of the second volume. 
This volume ranges from "Chamier " to 
•Draendorf," treats 755 topics, includes 
the work of !■»:: collaborators, and con- 
tains 516 pages. Though it does not 
contain so many topics as its predeces- 
sor, it has exactly the same number 
of pages, and the fact that less topics 
are treated is due to the character and 
treatment of those covered, some of 
them requiring lengthy treatment. The 
same policy toward biblical subjects 
is pursued In this volume as In the 
preceding ones. Among the articles of 
particular Interest are the following: 
•Christology." by Dr. David S. Schaff: 
•Comparative Religion." by Prof. 
George Gllmore: "Congregatlonallsts, 
by Rev. Norton Dexter; •'Church and 
State" by Dr. George James Bayles. 
Biographical articles are numerous and 
full. Among others Charlemagne, 
Cliarles V, Chrysostom. Confucius, 
Coiistantine the Great, Dante, and Da- 
vid are Included. Christian Socialism 
and Communism are interestingly 
treated, and the first subject particu- 
larly is very timely. 

Tills newest and best encyclooedia 
on theological sulijects will appeal to 
all ministers. It will be found an easy 
means of refreshing tlie memory and a 
ready guide to matters on whlcli In- 
formation Is needed. 

Of Books aud Writers. 

The supreme court of Massachusetts 
has sustained the conviction of a book 
dealer for selling "Three Weeks." It 
decides that the animal and not the 
spiritual, the impure and not the pure, 
appear most conspicuously to the gen- 
eral reader in tliis novel. 

• • • 

The Macmlllan company announces 
"The Romance of a Plain Man," by 
r:ilen Glasgow; The History of the 
State of Washington." by Prol. Ed- 
mond .S. Meany; -A Catalogue Raisonne 
of Dutch I'alnters." volume 2. by U 
Hofstede De Grooi; "Studies In Mys- 
tical Religion." by Prof. Rufus M. 
Jones, and "Wanderings in South 
America." by Charles Walterton. a new 
edition edited by tlie Rev. J. C. \N ood. 

• • • 

Louise Closser Hale had the advan- 
tage of her own stage experiences in 
writing "The Actress." her novel whlcli 
had proved one of the Harper suc- 
cesses of the season. One of these ex- 
periences leads lo a good story which 
Mrs. Hale tells on herself. It seems 
that behind the counters In every shop 
are many girls who are sure that their 
true place Is the stage. "If they rec- 
ognize me when I am shopping says 
Mrs Hale, "tliey tell me all about It 
while I wait for change, and I restrain 
mvself and merely advise them not to 
give up their present position, for a 
while at least. , 

•• 'I should have went on the stage, 
one of" them said to me one day. 

-I strove to be Interested. But 
see how tired I am.' I said to her. I 
have to work very hard as it Is. and 1 
have had to work much harder to 
gain what little recognition I have 

•• -Oh yes." she responded, com- 
placently, gazing at herself in the 
mirror. 'But, you see, I have talent. 

• • • 

"What is vour ideal woman? was 
once aske.l oV Elinor Macartney Lane, 
the late lamented autlior of "Katrine." 
and Mrs. Lane answered: "Notiiln« of 
the new woman. A loving, passionate, 
great-souled generous creature who 
loves children and animals, men 
women, and plants." This thought 
she expressed also through a charac- 
ter In one of her novels, who says, 
"Give a woman plenty of her hus- 
band's kisses, and his babies at her 
breast."' 

• • • 

"The Inner SJirine," the anonymous 
serial in Harper's Magazine, destined 
still to remain anonymous even now 
that It is a book, has been attributed 
to almost every living author of dis- 
tinction. The latest to be named are 
W. J. Locke and J. C. Snalth. Some of 
tlie others have been Gertrude 
Atherton, Edith Wharton, Gilbert 
Parker, Mrs. Humphry Ward, Booth 
Tarkington, Richard Harding Davis, 
and Margaret I>eland. One naturally 
wonders how a single novel, especially 
one th.at maintains a consistent style 
throughout, could contain so many dif- 
ferent trails of style. 

Among the Magazines. 

Young's Magazine for June arrives 
with eight additional pages of rending 
matter, and an opening novel, entitled 
"Crossroads." by Elizabeth Guido, 
wherein Dodo faisclnatlng divorcee, 
typical exponent of 8ociety"s creed of 



"arriving at whatever cost,"' presents 
an absorbing study of tlie modern so- 
ciety girl. She has position but no 
money, and she becomes the "sandwich 
woman" for an enteiprising dressmak- 
ing firm; her famous diamonds are 
leally excellent paste; she cozens and 
kbbles and "succeeds," while Washing- 
ton gapes open-moutlied at her au- 
dacity. Her standards and ideals have 
been bliglited and waiped by tlie false 
conditions and meretricious morality 
of her "set,"" but wlien tlie riglit man 
conies, she is transformed into a new 
woman. It's a charming story of a 
da/zUng, enthralling woman's person- 
ality. "On the Elepliant of tlie Mahar- 
ajah." by Lilian May Troy, is a story of 
convulsing humor, wherein Jeanne, a 
I onvent-lired maid, relates her adven- 
tures, and experiments upon men witli 
"tricks of llie eyes." 

• • • 

Van Norden Magazine for June has 
drawn upon the world for its news — 
fact articles. Congressman James A. 
Tawney has a scathing denunciation of 
governmental extravagance under tlie 
title of "How I'ncle Sam Pay., the 
Piper," and tlie chairman of the house 
committee on appropriations is an au- 
thority; Read Gordon discusses the 
other side of the food preservative 
controvcrs.y In an Incisive article; the 
"Real Patten and His Wlieal Deal" Is 
set forth by William A. Orr; "When 
Islam Calls, ' by Wallace Hirst, tells of 
the problem In Turkey where religious 
inlluenccs appear opposed to progress 
along Occidental lines: A. H. Parnall 
sums up the •'World's Finance" and ox- 
plains liie British income tax proposals. 

• • • 

American heroism is tlie subject of 
the opening article in Harper's Mag- 
azine for June — the heroism of mili- 
tary scouts, secret service men, dur- 
ing the Civil war. William Gllmore 
Bevmer tells the touching story of 
"Rowand," a scout, in the first of a 
group of true tales of gallantry and 
reckless daring. Howard I'yie has 
made the paintings to illustrate it. 
In tlie same number appear some de- 
lightful pictures by Castalgne, Illus- 
trating Marie Van Worst's charming 
account of the Danube river. Another 
well-known artist Thornton Oakley, 
contriliutes striking pictures to ac- 
company his own article on "The 
.Shipyard.'" Ellzalieth Shippen Green 
has made the pictures of Richard Le 
C«alllenno"s fairy-story, "The* Stolen 
Mirror," and there are a number of 
reproductions in sepia of Frank W. 
Benson'.s paintings, accompanying an 
article on that artist's work by Charles 
H. Caffin. Still another artist, Charles 
W. Furlong, contributes drawings to 
lllustrale his own exploration article 
on "The Southernmost People of the 
World." Prof. Lounsbury. of Yale, 
writes on what he calls "Wardour 
Street English." 

• • • 

AInslee's for June has an unusual 

table of contents. which Includes 
Harold MacGrath's serial, "The Goose 
Girl," a complete novel by Marie Van 
Vorst, and eleven short stories by 
Clara E. Laughlin, Mrs. Jacques Fut- 
rell, Charles Neville Buck, Norval 
Richardson. Steel Williams, Quenlin M. 
Drake. Will Levlngton Comfort, 

Francis Willing Wharton, George Lee 
Burton, Owen (^)llver and Roy Norton. 

• • * 

The cover of the June number of the 
Popular Magazine Is the latest Inspira- 
tion of the celebrated artist. J. C. 
Leyendecker. He Is without doubt the 
leader in this particular style of paint- 
ing. It Is full of real life In color 
and In action, and. like all his work, 
It contains a certain "go" which can- 
not be equaled. 

• • • 

The leading article in the June num- 
ber of Hampton's Magazine is "The 
Story of the Wonderful Water Melon 
Patch." which Is a remarkable exposi- 
tion of the tactics employed, and the 
means resorted to. by the giant corpor- 
ations In their process of stock water- 
ing. Charles Edward Russell, one of 
the closest students of economics. Is 
the writer of this remarkable article, 
and he handles a dls:igreeable subject 
In a most delightful manner. Other 
articles of interest are "The Unknow- 
able Negro," by Harris Dickson; 
'White Coal Mines and Water Farms," 
by John L. Matthews; "Our Undis- 
ciplined Daughters." by Reginald 
Wright Kauffman; "Women of the Cir- 
cus." b)' Hugh C. Weir, and "The Amer- 
ican Millionaire," by Gilbert K. Ches- 
terton. 

• • • 

The .Tune number of Scrlbner's Mag- 
azine contains many interesting pic- 
tures. There are four beautiful full 
pages In color representing "Dav a- 
Fishing" — Trout, black bas.s, salmon 
and muskallonge. There is also a 
very elaborately illustrated article on 
Ingres by Frank Fowler, who considers 
him one of the very great portrait 
painters of tlie world. H. G Dwlght. 
who was wounded in the recent revo- 
lution in Turkey, has a most entertain- 
ing description of "A Turkish Village"" 
wliere he lives, near Constantinople. 
From this village ho was going by 
boat to the city lo see tlie fighting 
when he was hit by a spent bullet. 
•Gen. Shermans Letters Home" are 
concluded with the letters giving an 
account of his great campaign through 
the Carolinas at the end of the war; 
his negotiations with Johnston; and 
the political troubles into whicii they 
drew him. These letters also show the 
friction at Washington after the war 
was over between President Johnson, 
Grant, and the members of the cabi- 
net. There has never been a more di- 
rect light thrown on those troublous 
limes. James Ford Rhodes, the dis- 
tinguished historian, writes an ap- 
preciation of the great work of Ed- 
ward Gibbon, the author of 'The De- 
cline and Fall." Ho pictures him as 
tlie "Kreat3sl modern historian." 

• • • 

The Smart Set for June contains a 
number of features of tiecullar excel • 
lence. "A House to Let," by Mary Mul- 
lett; "The Woman In a Million," by 
Marie Belden James; "Green Char- 
treuse." by Frederic Taber Cooper; 
"Miracle!" by Adelaide Stednian; "To 
the Devil and Back." by H. Eraser Hill; 
"As They Would Have Told It," by 
Louis Baury. and "The Trick of Time," 
by Frederlco Marian I, are all clever 
stories of the sparkling, breezy type 
that have made the Smart Set "the 
magazine of cleverness." Tom Masson, 
Theodosia Garrison, Elsa Parker Chan- 
nlng Pollock and Wllberforce Jenkins 
are represented by other stories, 
sketches and verse. 

• • • 

AH the children will be delighted 
with the June St. Nicholas, from the 
frontispiece, "Half Way Up the Wind- 
ing Road Stands the House that I Call 
Mine,"" to the letter box and the riddle 
box at the end. "The Sinking of tne 
Bark Kathleen"' Is a handsomely illus- 
trated sketch by Frederick Booth. 
"The Story of Dutch Painting," by 
Charles H. Coffin. Is written In a style 
to enlist the intei-est of young readers, 
and Henry Hatton and Adrian Plate 
tell about "Methods of Magicians" so 
that every one can understand how to 
perform tricks with cards. There are 
all sorts of stories and verses and 
pictures galore. Altogether, It Is a 
great number for the young folks. 

• • • 

An article from Louise King in the 
House and Garden for June, under the 
caption of "Simple Curtains for the 



To fix your garden and window boxes? Let me supply you with 
trees, shrubbery and plants. Order your wants for Decoration Day 
early. You'll save money. Pansies, Perennials and Peonies by the 
dozen or a box a specialty. Purchase of $1.00 car fare both ways 
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Mo. lest Home," is timely and full of 
adaptable and practical suggestions. 
Her descriptions of llie possibiitti.'s 
which lie in cotton prints, chint/., 
cheese cloth and stencil are not onlv 
inspiring to the amateur house dec- 
orator, but materials are so mo<lest In 
price that tliey interest the householder 
from the economical standpoint as well. 

• • * 

Summer from many points of view is 
reflected In the beautifully Illustrated 
pages of the Delineator for June. Alice 
Lounsberrv writes about "The Return 
of Hose - Time," and Mabel Osgood 
VVrlgiit describes "Birds We Ought to 
Know.'" For those who are going tit 
Europe and for those who will stay at 
home M Landon Reed tells, most amus- 
ingly, of "The Hard Work of a For- 
eign Tour."' Mabel Potter Daggett 
contributes an article of rare interest, 
a study of "One Woman's Civic Serv- 
ice " the one woman being the Rev. 
Caroline Bartlett Crane, who has 
achieved national distinction since she 
began to work for municipal reform in 
Kalamazoo. 

• • * 

Anno "Hagan, who is a farmer when 
she is In Connecticut, a prominent 
member of the Women's University 
club, as well as an author, has contrib- 
uted to the number of Smith's Maga- 
zine now on the news-stands an essay 
on "Marriage and the Working Wom- 
an," which every thoughtful woman 
slnnild read. The same number con- 
tains twenty-four splendid full-page 
art studies of stage favorites, and stor- 
ies and essays by such writers as Ru- 
pert Hughes. Marion Hill, Holnian F. 
Day, H. Addington Bruce, C N. Wil- 
liamson and Annie Heasllp Lea. 

• • • 

The People's for June celebrates the 
month of roses in Its bright, attractive 
cover design, the Rose Girl. Turning 
the page, another beauty strikes th« 
eye. This is the portrait of Miss Frltzl 
S'cheff. an exquisite color plate, print- 
ed on a fine <iuality of paper, and con- 
vevlng perfectly the vivid and winning 
personality of the comedienne. The 192 
pages of fiction continue the rich sum- 
mer tone, and are filled with the fine, 
fresh vigor which is the keynote of the 
magazine. 

• * • 

E. Phillips Oppenheim, Anthony Hope 
and Arthur W. Marchmont are three 
star writers represented In the fiction 
of Gunter's for June. Oppenheim's lat- 
est novel. "Jeanne of the Marshes," be- 
gins In this number. Judging from the 
first big instalment. It will be as gVeat 
a success as the same author's 'The 
Missioner," which Is one of the present 
.reason's "six best sellers." "Jeanne of 
the Marshes" Is lo be brought out In 
the fall In book form by Little, Brown 
& Co The second part of Antlumy 
Hope's two-part story, "The Fight for 
Lord Arpenhoe." is full of many de- 
lightful surprises sprung in the inimit- 
able style of this master of romantic 
writing. 

• * • 

Thirteen at table, that most widely 
dominant of all superstitions, is the 
motive of tlie story given leading place 
in the June Century. The tale, "With 
the Coin of Her Life," Is one of three 
on the same theme to appear In early 
numbers of The Century, and how they 
came to be written Is interesting. Some 
time ago. when discussing the Influence 
of a point of view on human judgments. 
It was suggested that two or more 
writers be asked to write separately 
each a short story on a chosen sub- 
ject. Dr. S. Weir Mitchell, Margaret 
Deland and Owen WIster took up the 
above subject; and the stories were 
finished without any one of the throe 
having knowledge of what the other 
two had written. The editors declare 
that guesses as to the author of this 
first tale are likely to miss the mark. 

Hoarseness, bronchitis and other 
throat troubles are quickly cured by 
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and heals the Inflamed throat and 
bronchial tubes and the most obstinate 
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the genuine Folev's Honey and Tar. 
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SCMMON.S — 

State of Minnesota. County of St. Louis. 

HS. — 

District Court, Eleventh Judicial Dis- 
trict. 

Eugene J. Bunker, Plaintiff, 
vs. 

A. W^. Lappalalnen and John R. 
Helno. Defendants. 

The .State of Minnesota to the above 
named defendants: 

YOU ARE HEREBY .STTMMONED 
and required to file your answer to 
the complaint of the plalntKt In the 
above entitled action, with the Clerk 
oC said Court, at his office In said 
county, wliere the complaint of the 
plaintiff Is now on file, williln twenty 
(20) days after the service of this 
Summons upon you, exclusive of the 
day of such service, and if you fall 
to answer the said complaint within 
the time aforesaid, the plaintiff in this 
action will apply 'to the Court for the 
relief demanded In said complaint. 

AND YOU ARE HEREBY N<:)TIFIBD 
that the said action la for the fore- 
closure of a Mechanic's lien upon the 
premises hereinafter described, for the 
sum of Two Hundred Four and ^9-100 
Dollars t$204.e9): that the premises 
affected by this action are described as 
Lot one (1), Block forty-four (44). 
London Addition to Duluth, County of 
St. Louis and .State of Minnesota. In- 
cluding the building thereon; tliat the 
Improvement out of which plaintiff's 
Hen arose Is as follows, lo-wll: Plain- 
tiff lietween June 17lh. 19o7, and May 
21st, 1908, at the special Instance and 
request of defendant. A. W. Lappalal- 
nen. furnished and delivered to him a 
quantity of lumber and material for 
the erection and Improvement of a 
building on said premises and said 
lumber and material were in fact used 
in the construction and improvement 
of the building thereon. 

Dated at Duluth, Minn.. May 7th. 
1909. 

S. T. & WM. HARRL^ON 

Attorneys for Plaintiff. 

608-611 Torrey Bldg., Duluth. Minn. 
Duluth Evening Herald. May 15, 22 and 

29; June &. 12 aud 19. 190i». 






J 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: SATURDAY, MAY 22, 1909. 






HE EVENT of the O'liiing \v< .k proin. 
of music, ivhkh will be pr* :-. lUt d at 
Saturtlay. Nev.-r in tlie history of 
tions for a lnu^!c.^l affair tQiiiilKcl 
atul a lirilliiint autlifi" 
Friilay .veiiinfr 



t s ti< be 
th«- Lye 



tiig 



It v-tr.al 
I onctrt 



t}u- May f.'i^tival 

uiii, Friday and 

Diilutii liav. tlH- subscrip- 

thost:' alroaily i budged tor 

is pt"'i:iist*U for Iht- oi'en- 



There is nmch geiu-r<>.sity 



liith w 

ailii i't 



una !■ 



havf, 

rt^ to 



•ral I>u- 
I «xten<l 



the pltasurt 
otherwise w 
necs will make the t 
antl th< assistliiie sol 

Ti thus. \' ' 
exterultiJ as fur a^ }io»>itu. 
noon at 4 o'clock, if? one of 
concert A tharniinK I'logram ha** been 
delssohn's ■W.diliug March" and "Stirin!? 
the Mas(aK"i "" Intermezzo." the i 
and beautiful numbers, in which uiv I'l 
and rerr«-( t(v to the tittle folks. 

I; 



b.ing displayed, and .>^- ^ 
with their sultscriptions, arrangevl U 
a nuniif r of students and young {.eople who 
h^ar ihr music This fine .spirit of 
music by th.- Miniuap di ^ Syn»phony 
ptcial interest and pl;a.-ure in I>uluth 
.nallv anxious that the inlluence of 

the clvildren's matinee to be giv.n Friday after- 
Ihe most important and d« iiglitful 



uiK«eIi;.-h- 
orchchirii, 

music be 



ftalures of til. 
arranged. It will in. hid. Meu- 
Song." Schumann's "rraumerei." 

,11 ■.Minu.t •• aiid oth. r w-ll kn<ovn 
nounced melodies will appeal directly 



at West Duluth. in honor of the 
ti.\./ith anniversary of her little 
son Mlnard. An hifornial evening of 
games was enjoyed by forty-five 
guesta. 

• • • 

Mr*'. I. A. AncUrson of Went Puliith 
left during the week fur a vltjit witli 
friends it Minneapolis. 

• * 
jVIiss .-Vgnes Hrad.v 

returned the firnit of 
visit uitli friends at 



of Weut Duluth 
the week I rem a 
BuyfleJd, Wi«). 



Mr. and Mrs. I' 
loilutti r(turne<l 

from :i'i l':istern 



at 

or' 
a ' 



tha 

list. 

the 
and 
by 

Wh- 

mmAe an. 

A? •■■■ 
liome 
iarly .■! 
to the.. 

Tht and 
among th- 

IM r ' 
a 1 



Udicnct Friday afternoon ther. will be none more ai.preciatn i- 

'■-, m the "Webster school. iMirinj? the wint-r tliey havo 

lerture mu.sicahs by Miss JMSt-fhitu- <'ai»-y .aid yester- 

at the piano, tiie projiram which 

numbers were played separately 

1, w.'i-t ;.;iven. and tin y they w :<■ played 

: annoiuu-inj* the numtier. and the audn-in ■ d.-rided 

- d The little folks at ttus schor.i li.,v, n. .>riy all 



I 



litth- fnlk.' 



n. 
UiUi ni 



•II made foi- the 

,;■ it is proliaidv that 

. thert. but some kuul I 

the week. 

t Friday an<l Saturday ntght i" 

' : .shioiiahle <'t" the seasi>n. 

f the orchf^tra. will he 

rciay at tiie e'oinrnen ial chili, at whii- 

l>e hostf 



h 



Mr 



at tlie C'hihlren's 

tliuuglu fiarticu- 

iil probably come 



. and -Mrs I i' r.- 



ari 
the 

tvtl> 

« * 

.M IS. < >wen ( hldnas 
viMtinK friends at 

f. w dJiVs-. 



IS IJeml ry of 
first of the 



We.sl 
week 



III .\l).ena, Mieh., 
West Imluth for 



Ml.-. I'. 1 
Rise of St 
friends at 



;i.ti e ..n>i !.ir i'K 

Thtimas. (Jnt., 
\Vfest I>uiall. 



ti 



i«^r, Frank 
e visiting 



Mr. 
Wtst 
from 

N. I «. 

West 



a n d 

end 

their 

. and 



Mts. i:. r;. i ■ ■< "f the 

returned during llie week 

wedding trip at .lamestown. 

are now at loine at 2018 



F..inth 



stieet. 
• * • 
Mis> M i.a Snasiad uf tlie West en<l 
left during the week for lier liome at 
Bruno, Minn., after a visit with Mrs. 
Andrew Thonips..!, el liiMJ- West Supe- 
rior street. 



ph. 
w( 
da 

r- 



Re'., 
and t. 

Me&dev 



crrenmny took 
t Meadowlands 

' 'tea Arnidd. 
Bishop Ar- 

• I,. 1,1 i.n> ,.(■ 



t<f tit 



tlie 
. Tidd 

h<.iuie at 



\v*'t k 



Dulath 
In ' 
mt . 

Mrs. Sti I'iliiis. M: 
of Warren, Ariv 
known te th.* 1 
liridfc n.irir.K the 
well kiii'Wii la 
made tlieir iionu: 
Ing the last nv. 
and her daut- 
of Mrs Sroitf 
warren. Mr. Cad well 
of the street railway 



I. ,. li interested 

! the engage- 

th. tlaiitii.ter of 

lialpli Cadwell 

h was made 

friende of the 

The family Is 

Iniluth, where they 

until last fall. hnn- 

months Mrs. Smith 

i.ve been the guests 

Sterling Smith at 

iB superintendent 

lines at Warren. 



The wedding will pr 

during Augutt at h- 

Miss Smith and her mother wi 

the Bumrner. 



dinbly take place 
B Angeles, where 



speiid 



ing ai lier iiom*- a,t 
honor of her gue^t: 
-Andrew Git>son. 

• « 
.lean I'oirier 
the week. 

* • 
Marke 

for 



Hu!iU-i s 1 



.Ml 



and 



k in 
Mrs. 



MISS JOSEPHINE CAREY 



Presents lier 
0(h>rnuui. in 
ti.t i»i:oi*i.irs 



pupil. Miss l^vretta 

a lecture niushal in 

I.KCTI KK <<ll U!<K, 

Lester Park M. E. Church 

Tickets. 25 c. 



Wednesday, May 26. 



served in the vestry of St. Luke's 
Episcopal church by the young girls of 
the Altar guild. The table was pret- 
tily dtcoraled am) spread for the af- 
fair, and twenty guests were present. 
There was an informal program ol 
toasts following tlie dinner. 

• • • 

Mrs. Oliver Lynch of New York ar- 
rived in the city today to be the guest 
of lier parents, Mr. and .Mrs. Baker of 
I'ark Point. 

• • « 

Misses Helen and Ehna Anderson en- 
terlained at a bundle shower Wednes- 
day evening at their h'une r.l9 Garfield 
avenue. In honor of -Miss Bertha Mehl-- 
ir.g, whose wedding to A. Gibson will 
take place June L'. Cards were played 
at four tables. Tiie prizes were won by 
.Miss Bertha .Mehllng and Miss Aleda 
Hellene. The rooms were prettily dec- 
orated for the affair and twenty guests 
were entertained. 

• « • 

The members ot the Kodahpa club 
will entertain at a dancing [jarty at 
Klaaten's hall Fridav evening of next 
v.-eek. The conmilttee in charge of 
the affair are: Executive. Hay Johns, 
Gilbert Ketcham ami Ray Fenton; re- 
ception, .Allen Trux. Ted MacKenzle, 
Phillip Ihdgate, Hoy MacCrea, H«.bert 
Jidinson and Willis Putnam; floor com- 
mittee. Edward Hilllard, Lynn Whll- 
Hon Flank Faik. Norman Norrls, Har- 
ris Tru.\. Earl White ami Earl Hanks. 

• • • 

.Mr. and Mrs. J. Friedman, who have 
come to Duluth from Chicago to make 
their liome, are nov at the Spalding. 

• • • 

Mrs. K. M. Mcholes has returned 
from a trip through the South and 
Wtst. -Mr. and -Mis. Niclioles will be 
at home for the summer at b Chester 
terrace. 

• • « 

Miss Molly .Mulally, who 
guest of Mr. and Mrs. Lane 
of East FIftli street, 
her home after a shoit 

• * • 

.Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Noll have an- 
nounced the engagement of their 
daugiiter. Cora -Mae, to James J. Scott. 
The wedding will take place June 8. 

• • • 

Mrs. L. P. Antrobus entertained Mon- 
day evening at a plate shower in honor 
of her sister, .Miss .Matliilda G. Met- 
ier, whose wedding to Arthur A. fcpearin 
will take place Tuesday of next week. 
The guests were: 
-Messrs. and .Mesdames — 



.\i 



! 



.Mls.< 
during 

Mrs. Edgar 
Deerwood. Minn. 



vv as in 



>t. Paul 



West Du- 
tlie week 
ity, Minn. 



Mr-. 



■nl. 



Mr- 
Thli 
OhK. 



A lex ami* r 



-Milra- 
isiting 



at Coll 



laf'US. 



iHllUth 

a visit 
-Minn. 



is 
ot 



Mr 
from 



a 



1 ■■ ; 1 1 ! t ' 
we 



k 



r < 
I lie 



til 1 iie<l 
l-:.ist. 



Mr 
Hunter 
apoUs 



il 



U- l.as 
\iMt III 

.\'. Ryersnn of 
guiu' to Minne- 
visit. 



Mri=. U 


V, 


Pearson entertH;ntd at 


lur. ' 




:\X her home. -1 ■'' i ' ■■■ti- 


d« 




.or of i.t r ■ r. 


Mu 




engfi KenU'iit v. -. »-n - 


n( 




n VValdron, Jr., of 


N<.-.'. 




• « • 


Mj-s <"j 


U li 


• t;, ,~ .(. ,1 lids Will leave 


KuiiuiO' ' 


.>(' 


-. visit ai < Ham! h;ii .'Is, 


Mull. 




• • ■ 


Mrs. T. 


W, 


Tilk* "f . . . -''"t Tiiu-'i 


street ha- 




■ . i ,; ,'[ I)..: dealli 


of her Ti 




■■.V.i\. 

• 


t- 




■ . » ' l\ ■ 


ei. 







seven 

ami -Mrs. W. 

s Park have 

fur a f* w days 

• « * 
Mrs. John P Gordon last the first of 
e w. ek for a visit at Buffalo. 

• • • 

Mrs. E. A. Sln.n s vvlio was the guest 
of her dautrl.te; Mrs. A. E. Walker of 
Chester ter r several weeks lelt 

tlds week ttle. 

• • • 

Miss Miller who was the week-end 
guest of Miss Ethel McLean, returned 
the first of the week to Eveleth. 

• « • 

Miss Florenee Han.lall of Ishpeminji 
is visiting Mrs 1; (■ Hutelung.'? of 711 
F:ast Third str. i 



,1 Mi( "i i ni iek id 
,iiu-.t the hrsl el 
...rt \ isit Ht Hush e 

• • • 
II. .1. H.mson ol W 

1, ■ hrsi ef the V. < ek 

u .lauglUt-r a i inain 

• * • 
M,ss Nellie l-;vans ef .Minneapolis 

visiting l.ei sisiei .Mrs. G. H. Latsen 

West lejhitii. 

• • * 

Tlie Wedding uf Miss Blossom Scott 
and II. Frank Kohnen will take piace 
next -Monday afternoon at the parson- 
age of St. Pauls Episcopal church. 
The service will be read at :' o clock by 
A. W. Ryan. The brides attend- 
will be Miss Angellne Kohnen 
groomsman will be George 
Kohnen and 



was the 
McGregor 

to 



has returned 
visit. 



A Reinke. 

E. Tessman. 

G. Spearln, 

V/ Laurenz, 

A. -Me Iter, 
-Mlsse.s — 

Hattie Tcske. 

Anna Nelson, 

.Mary Garvey, 

Nora Rvan 

Edith Foaten, 

Jennie BBennett. 

.Mary Jacobs, 
Messrs. — 

<;. Spearln, 

H. Metier, 



G 
J. 
J. 
F. 
A. 



Teske, 

Cullen, 

Heettcher, 

Harried, 

Hingsrud. 



Ruby Cullen, 
Olive Neil. 
I^ouise Zuck, 
Hazel Crasswell, 
Pearl Metier. 
Florence Flett. 



E. 
W 



Tessman, 
Metier. 



Uev. 
ant 
the 
Mr. 



II M' \ e I 



Margartt U. 
visit at Minneai" 

• • • 
*• I- James 1" 

tr*et hav. 
,1, vv,,k.«* trip. 

• • « 

-r.,.-c,.. \( K. :ir 



re t iirned 



f Mi 



W'-r k. 



I 



t) 



t. 

nipeg. 

Mr- 
nlng 



n- 
b. 



•\ -1., ;ind Hear the I'ann.us Vi«.nnist 

SKOVGAARD 

Willi His e\.i,ipariy. 

Sunday Evening 

AT FIAATEN'S AUDITORIUM. 

212 West Firsl SIreel. 



and 
Rvan. 
his bride will be at 
home after June 10 on Park Point. 

• • * 

,1. ir .McClaran has returned 
from > nicago, vvliere she was graduated 
last week from the Columbia College 
of Expression. She will spend the 
fiunnuer in this city. 

• * • 

Airs .lohii .\iidersun was the guest 
of a-nor at a pleasant suri>nse party 
Tuesday afternoon at her home at :.li 
Vernon" street. iMrs. Anderson was pre- 
sented with a cut glass vase. The 
quests v.'ere; 
-11 rs — 

M. -Meiisen. 
C- Shursen, 
A. Johnson, 

A. W. Anderson, 

F. Sandsledt, 

B. Olson, 
William Sund- 

berg, 
A. Anderson. 
L. Jenleft, 

G. Peterson. 
J. Ericksort. 
Christcplierson, 
Thompson. 



.Mesdamos — 


A. 


H 


Liverson, 


J. 


Wold, 


C. 


Hi 


tnsen. 


Ch 


ar 


es Peterson. 


O. 


Jo 


hnson. 


C 


A 


..n. 


.M 






P 


1 ■ 


- > It, 


i; 


,J. 


:i risen, 


r. 


P" 


lersoii. 



Anderson. 
Olson. 

derson, 
(.;re*-nnr, 
a W Smith, 
Miss .Vnna .\nd. 



G. 
M 



.\Ir, 

tin- 



May 

and ' 

I 'rug 



■:z. 



at ^:i:> p. 
Tieket.q 



-l"i . 



-■t 



.•Vdnils'-ion. .er 
;:,1.- at Ahletfs 
-nperier st r< ft. 



Mr 



.-,nd 
\w "k 
two n..'ntiis 



Mr 



H 



r.eon. 

• • 

. .t. 1 



,ch 



will 

. .iSt 



leave 
for a 



The members of the Young Ladles' 
Club of the First .Methodist church will 
entertain at a .May pole party Monday 
evening at the church parlors. There 
will be a program of vocal numbers by 
Mrs. Zimmerman. Mrs. Culbertson. 
Hoval G. Wilson and Walter Smith. 
a reading by .Mrs. H J. Kolling, a vio- 
lin solo by Roy Flaaten and piano 
solos by Mrs Calmer and -Miss Neff. 

At the conclusion of tlie program the 
Mav pole will be wound with the 
streamers bv twenty-four of the mem- 
l.ers of the club. Friends of the mem- 
bers are invited to l-e guests at the 

affair. 

• • • 

The last dance of the season at whlcli 
the members of the Ionic Social club 
will be hosts will be held Thursday 
evening of next week at the ballroom 
of the Masonic temple. 

• • • 

The Ladies' Aid .Society of the Les- 
ter Park .Methodist church will meet 
Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 o'ciock 
with Mrs. Lovland of 5222 Colorado 
street. The hostess will be assisted by 
Mrs. Eaton. 

• • • 

Miss Elizabetii Bailey of New Jork 
city is visiting her sister. Mrs. C. P; 
McClure of the Adams apartment^ 
Bailev was well known in 
circles in iMjluth, and her 



Miss 
musical 
work in 
the East has been watched witli inter- 
est by her friends here. She will spend 
tlie sutnmer with her sister, 
probably be heard in a recital 
tile sunimer. 



and will 
during 



has returned 

il,. s] ent the 



Miss Clem Blackwootl 
from Torfoito, where .^ 
winter visiting friend- 
• • • 
M- - F <; Ciiurch left .Saturday for 
Ch'cagj^ to meet her daughter, .Miss 
Church, who spent the winter 
., ,r ir, tlip ( oieiil 
« • • 

1.= ., t:. J M 

V were t!o' Kuests 



Clare 
ti avt 



T! 
M, .11)11 



a 



bamniet Tues.lay even"lng 



and Mrs. 
r honor at 
which was 



W hoiipiiiB CoMgh. 

This Is a more dangerous 
than is generally presumed, 
a surprise to many to learn 
deaths result from 
fever. Pneumonia 
it. Chamberlains 
been used in many 



disease 
It will be 
that more 
il than from scarlet 
often results from 
Cough Piemedy has 
epidemics of whoop 



with 



the best 
Harlan 



Ing cough, and always 
results. Delbert McKeig of 

savs of it: '-My boy took whoop- 
UKh wh?n line months cdd. He 
had it in the winter. I got a bottle of 
Chamberlain s Cough Remedy which 
nri.ved Kood. 1 cannot recommend It 
FJo highly." For sale by all druggists. 



luwa. 
ing cot 



te 
a 

• e 



li 

T 
h 
C 

I 

II 



t 



rt 

a 
I 

Ai/ 



Mrs M- 



\\ 



- . 1 1 1 , »* = , 
l.akes.d 



Miss 



Helen 

,1 to Hi 



I' 



"V " 



ke. wli' 



1 .- 1 1 1- d 



AT» 



C 
I 

M 
J.' 
U 



tail Hia li 
1 two 



• • • 
.ml -Mis, F .\ .\Men. Mr 
rles .\r' 
Hall '■.■• 
parlv at wi.ieh t. 
.\- Wvk .-lub ent 
|;h.ii last evening 



\V 



ieft 
tlie 



VSE OVR AVTO! 

FINEST IN OULUTH 

. Titfrtain your friend ride 

;it ; )ulnt h.' Heiiily win ... . ar«', 

BOi!>RD OF TRADE LIVERY 

e»t I'Jrtit Mreet. >eiir l*«»#itoffiee. 
Both l'h«.^iir». 



W 



<;. 



1 i. U 1 1 



M. 



sen slr« 



:m 

toi :. 



liurtia 

nd Ml 



V: 



I w u 



Wi 

W t. 



Ml'. 

'est. 

i.lte. 



lavorii were Won i.^' 
St n. and llie men's 



t n 



The 



y. 



1. 

t ui 
W V 

be 



raowr 

-.V ,.,f 



■win 



M 



Mf 
fern.. 



,- , '.. t . < 
Irenvv 



n t h 

ood. 



M 



and and ' ' 
■ eratlons 



(lauyiit'-'r 

.'dcCoy, and 
.ice Tm • ■' 
s Cat In 

,1 I. t s 



Ml 

pri 



les a 
, i.iid Mt 
/.es we'll t 
ke. U' s 
t>oUt the 



['ark W.IS 

e n r i n g 

at 

l- 

Tiit Kanie 

I and tin 

Man 

. Ml. 



I. 



. ; 1 1 1 e r 1 n f • 
\\v. atul 



Iren-i 

Mrs. 

Ciilinan. 

..]..;.■ at St 

-ervici." 

r .. : i,.-r .\u- 

was attended by 

.McCoy, and the 



. a n 

g 



was 
tin '• 



\V 



, a 
tlie 

27 



.\i' 



. . 1 V e n U t" 

left for 

.lune 1 

Point. 



II 



Interstate Cleaning 
& Dyeing Co., 

CLEA\ERS, DYERS A\D TAILORS. 

Prompt CoKections and Delivery., 
217 East Superior St.. Both 'pohones 



west 

a S 1 1 n 



H 



! ! 



.\r;ders<.n. 
wedding 
heme of 
Twenty- 
Mrs, tiil- 
trip. and 
liome on 



Iinh 



Is ..f 

' niniend. 

* • 

aceompa 

jht. left 



tl 




eli 

Ui- 



■;ist 



SLUiis Mi ny 







'^ 






Don't forg et to 
photographed im me- 
diately after this in- 
teresting occasion. _ 

And don't forget to 
have the photographs 
taken by 

CHRISTENSEN, 

The Photographer 

25 W. Superior St. 

Zenith 'Phone 1218D. 



LORETTA O'GORMAN. 
Fifteen-year-old Pupil of Miss Josephine Carey, Who Will Be Heard in 
Lecture-Musicalc Wednesday Evening at the Lester Park M. E. Church. 



The May FeKtlval. 

"Tliere is no tirganizallon of men, 
perhaps, that becomes so truly unified 
Into a single force as a big symphony 
orchestra, under the baton of a skillful 
conductor. They play, to use a tom- 
mon comparison, like one great musi- 
cal instrumfnt. Yet tlie perfect fusion 
18 only attained after association in 




known local singers, Walter Smith and 
Fhilip Gordon Brown, and the intention 
is to have the closing concert as a 
fitting and memorable finish to the 
crchestras tour. The festival will 
rtallv open on Friday afternoon with a 
matinee for the pupils in the high and 
grade schools, when ten compositions, 
ranging from INIendelssohn to .Strauss. 
will' be presented, and at a cost of 10, 
15 and 25 cents, aceording to location. 
This school matinee will be a great 
ffature of the festival. 



The Shovganrd Uecltal. 

There is much interest bcmg dis- 
played In the concert to be given to- 
morrow evening at Flaaten's audit- 
orium by .Skovgaard, the Danist violin- 
ist, assisted bv Marie R. Hovey. so- 
piano and Alice McClung. pianist. 

Of Skovgaards appearance in Leipsic 
was v.ritten: , .., 

■The concert by Skovgaard. the 
Danisli violinist, was a rare musical 
event. Fkovgaard Is a perfect master 
of this Instrument and his audience is 
invcduntarily drawn into a state of 
perfect harmonv with him. He over- 
came the greatest technical diffieulties 
with ease and the taste and thorough 
comprehension which characterized his 
playing prove that he possesses a com- 



audiUTium by tiie piano and vocal pu- 
pils of Miss Mabel Pulton. 

The vounger pupils, wlio opened the 
prografn. played daintily and neatly, 
and the two tinv tots who sang. Ir- 
win Kuncrth and Marjorie McTague, 
aged r. and 7. respectively, were a de- 
light to the audience. 

The older students, pianist and sing- 
ers, on tlie program. all acquitted 
themselves witli credit. 

Those who presented the program 
were: Martha Fulton. Irwin Kunerth, 
Helen Thrall. Borgil Dahl. Marlon .Mc- 
Clure. Annabel McLeod. Slieldon John- 
son. Viola Carlson. Marjorie McTague, 
Martha Sanders. Frederick Campbell, 
Margaret Beresford, Kuth Larson, 
Amelia Fiedler, Percy Dennis. Millieent 
Fisher, Lueila Cloutier. Violet Flaaten, 
Ellen Nessier. Esther l>onald. Matilda 
Landfaid, Gertrude Smith. Pauline 
Solem and Ida Broman. 



Do It Now. 

Now is the time to get rid of your 
rheumatism. You can do so by apply- 
ing Chamberlain's Liniment. Nine 
cases out ol ten are simply muscular 
rheumatism due to cold or damp, or 
chronic rheumatism, and yield to 
vigorous application of tlds 
Try it. You are certain to 
ed with the quick relief 



the 

liniment. 

be delight- 

wJiich It af- 



MR. HEDGE. 
Soloist at the May Festival. 



the exercise of their one common func- 
tion — the making of music — and every 
large orchestra contains widely varied 
Individual units. 

The musicians of the Minneapolis 
Symphonv Orehcstra are, almost wit!; - 
out exceptiun, men of European birth 
and education. All are professional 
musicians, wlio devote tliclr entire time 
to music, and every country of Europe 





fords. Sol d by all druggist.s. 

GAINS DESPITE 
TARIFF DELAY 

Improvement Area In Iron 

and Steei Rapidly 

Widening. 



— It. G. Dun S( 
ol Trade today 



_'> Its ll'tM!'" AT rt.t U-HIAOIN ' • * 
•■^ f" " ..■ • -" ' li 



with 

goods market 

doniliu;ted by the 
the raw 
irrcgularitiea 
tliere. the mar- 



MISS ORMSBY, 
Soloist at the May Festival. 



Mr- 1 
birthday 



parly 



• • » 

P.;ites . 

Tuesday 



i.. a at a 
evcuiiiK at her 



MISS EFFIE SMITH. _, , . 

Who Is Well Known in Duluth Society, and Whose Weddmg to Ralph 
wno w CadwcU Will Take Place m August 



has given of her talented sons to make 
up the personnel of this great orches- 
tra. Another striking point in the his- 
tory of the musicians assembled under 
Emil «)berhoffers baton is, that there 
IS liardly a famous orchestra in Europe 
or tills counti V that has not contribut- 
ed musicians to the .Minneapolis or- 
cliestra and hardly a great conductor 
in the world under wliom some of the 
musicians have not played. „„.^, , 
The question lias been asked, v\ nicli 
evening provides the best concert?" 
and the answer is, "Its simply a mafTer 
ot personal lasle.' To the well-in- 
formed musical person, Tschaikovskys 
'Pathetic Symphony," on Friday night, 
will be the magnet to draw them. To 
lie person who desires an evening of 
absolute pleasure, without a critical 
knowledge of music, the operatic night, 
on Saturdav, offers the greater induce- 
ment ' Who has not heard the "Tann- 
hauser" overture? Very few. and yet 
it IS alwavs fresh. Then there is 
QuaVtet from '•Rigoletio," the 
fiom "Lucia." and the grand 
from Gounod's "Faust," to be sung by 
exnert" in the art of operatic work. 
At the chsing concert all the vocal 
vcdoi.sts will take part. Louise Ormsby. 
Esther .May Plumb, Garnett Hedge and 
Arthur Middleton. 

The second tenor and bass parts 



plete knowledge of his art." 

And the Musical Courier said of his 
appearance: , , 

"A concert of more tlian passing in- 
terest was given on Dec. o, by 
Skovgaard, the Danish violinist. There 
are manv violinists who play very 
artisllcaflv, who please, and who are 
in great demand in the musical world, 
and sometimes tlie line of departure 
separating the good from tlie great, 
very neariv approaches the Intangnde. 
However, "when tlie truly great 
violinist appears before one. he is im- 
mediatelv recognized, and all otners 
fade into the misty sphere of med- 
iocrltv. In tlie class of the really 
great" violinists belongs Skovgaard, 
the I'anlsh violinist, who plays with all 
the cliarm of virtuosity, elan and musi- 
j cal feeling of the innate artist. ' 

■ 

The piano pupils of Mrs. D. H. Day 
were presented in a deligntiul recital 
'afct evening at the Pilgrim Congre- 
eatlonal church. The church was 

hrettllv decorated in flowers and palms 
for tlie" affair, and a large audience was 
present. Mrs. Day had as ushers dur- 
ing the evening Dr. Day and Messrs. 
Janu-s McLennan, William White, Jr., 
and F'red Wolvln. . 

The numbers were prettily presented 
bv t)ie students, and Miss Virginia 
Harrison, who played Godard's "'Sec- 
ond Mazurka," w^as twice recalled by 
the entliusiaslic audience. 

Those who appeared on the program 
were Marion McLennan, Rae Cook, 
Martha Wall and Beryl Wallace. 
Marlon Baxter. Cyrilla Gross, Vera 
Lindahl, Lillian Westgaard, Vivian 
Turrish Helen Edwards. Dorothy 
Meakin, Ethel Gonsky, Alica Hollahan. 
Edith Fitzslmmons. Alice Lang, 
puerile Getz. Esther Gomberg, 
Kin'a Harrison, Gertrude Logan 
etle" Gomberg, Alyda Flaaten, 
1 inner Maud Gilbert, Helga 
Dora Polinsky and Olga 

Tho assisting artist 
Paul, who sang 
ing manner "It 
Victor Nessier 



New York, May lli 
Co.s Wtekly Heview 
savs: 

Almost every development, except tha 
lengthening del-ale on the tariff, 1? 
favorable, and gains made in sjute ot 
the tariff disturbHnce are a ta;r indi- 
cation of what may be expected wneii 
that is out of the way. Domestic 
agrieullural conditions are excellent, 
and vet jirices of farm products t on- 
tinue" to advance. Tlie area of im- 
provement in iron and steel is rapidly 
widening and a notable event ol t lO 
week is the restoration of wages by 
independent jroducers. Reports of rail- 
roads are of steadily increasing busi- 
•less and the latest earnings show a 
^aln of 14. !• per cent over last year, 

I he dec! ease, as compareu with iJ07, 
:,eing 1-.^ per cent. 

The primary cotton 
-till continues to be 

.igh level cd prices for llie raw ma- 
erial. Althougli slight 
nave (tecurred liere and 

wiioie is siiady, with manu- 
reiuctant to enKr into eon- 
iracls for any extended «l*-l»\«'V'v, -i^- 
j.ort huving has bei-n restricted. Cli na 
' aving wili.drawn entirely from the 
market for the present. There is some 
intuit V from the Red Sea at lower 
r.vices than manufacturers are willing 
to concede, while about 2.0(.ti bales o^ 
standard drills have I.een sold to India 
and considerable more business has 
i been done in prints t<.r Manila and 
South America. The print cloth mar- 
ket is f-tin firm, with sales moderate 
and more demand on the finer 
for converters and cutters, 
woolen goods division duplicate busi- 
ness on heavy weigiUs has been fairly 
satisfactoiy and a further improve- 
nunt is aniiclpattd. as clothiers now 
know the general trend of f^ijiand 
The principal feature of the Jiade is 

II e higher level of prices at which 
business is being done, In the dress 
goods division a scarcity in 
season is anticipated 
level of varn prices is 
comparatively little 

"ThJ^UgM 'improvement in shoe con- 
dilTcms still conVinues and whi e there 
lias been no especially hea>> tiaoo, 
business shows an Increase 
"11 lines and large New 
mLifacturer's expect that the footwear 
market win soon be restored to its 
mfrma! posilhm. The '^taple lines show 
particular improvement ^ith larger 
sized orders than for some '">^ '^^^^ 
Prices have again advanced, ano a 
fiirtl.er general rise is announced 

hfde ' markef 'has ""ruled coiisiderabl 
e«« active since the liberal buying 
last week, and country hides ar© 
sleadv. The advance 
been cheeked for 
country take-off. 
have advanced si) 
of all kinds are 
lack of offerings 
Calfskins are strong, 
the whole leather 
nouncement of a 
ririces of union 
i J 



kei as a 
:'aclurers 



ctiunis 
In Hie 



The 
higher, 
Increase 



the fall 
general 

although 
in busl- 



in nearly 
England 



In 



in 
packer 



prices has 

both packer and 

Foreign dry hides 

11 further, and stocks 

up with a 

river plate, 

feature of 

is the an- 

advance ia 



well 
from 



sold 
the 
The 
market 
further 
backs. 



the 
Sextet 

finale 



Mar- 
Vlr- 1 
Jean- 
Martha 
Frank, 
Murvold. 
was C. Lawrence 
In a finished and pleas- 
Was Not So to Be." by 
and "A Son of the 



A 



Skin of Beauty it a Joy Forever^ 



D 



Desert Am 1," by 



Phillips. 



iLe Sextet will 



Executive Board Mcetlnsr. 

Tie" will be a special meeting of 
the executive board of the Twentieth 
Century club Monday morning at 10 
o'clock at the ciubroom of the 
rary. 



lib- 



MlwH FuHon'n Recital. 

A recital which proved attractive 
last evening before a large 



Flaaten s 



nor and bass parts m was given ."'-' "^-^''j I'L ~ '. 
be taken by iWo well-isuia enlhuBiaaUc audience at 



R. T. FELIX GOURAUD'8 
Orlantal Cream or 
Magical Beautifier. 

Removct Tan, Pinplss, Frrck* 
lea, Mctb Patches, Ra'h an(| 

bk.B DtscSMt, 'n i *^'^*|( 
blemUh OB t>«iuty, tB't d«4 
I ftn detection. It hu ttoo4 
' the tc(l of 6o \ enn, and ti ttt 
hsrmlckS «e t«»te 11 lob«| 
lure it I* properly l«»d«. Ac^ 
ceptno countcrfeli of iiaiilu 
■ame. Dt. 1-. A. S«ytc fcO^ 
to a Udy of the I ><ittoB 'k 
lUieatii *'Asrou •dl>-s wiU 
u»e tbem. I r»eon.inr'i# 
•GOfR.^UD'S CREAM at 
li e Ie»si harmful of all Uil 
' akin ire iratloBa." f^ttilt 
by Til dru«gi«t» ai*-! Fa-i<?| 
Goo.it Deueri In ll.e L'nl ^ 
Stale*, Canada a.d 1 litof^, 

M^ X. p ^fciM frag- S7 ^i^*' J^** ^^ "'^ ^'"^ 





THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD SATURDAY MAY 22. 




OUR YOimG 



rOLK5 



R^GE 




Old Bingo: A Story of a Boy and a Dog> | 



B 1 



Ji 



fiitlii- 
Mr. 

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il 

ln< 

th'- 
fc 

A 
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1 
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V. 

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t 

bin 



WILLIAM WALLACE. JK. 

RCIIIE'8 father h«(S not approved 

»f IHiigo wlv II Archie broviKht the 

.11 r.-M-vw iiouie one eveulug after 

N.t tbiit ItlnKo was an 

-y dog, nor t»e<-au.se Archie's 

II unkind man. hut because 

> Ar. hlea fatlicr did not ap 

■ ;t «loK» in town. He de- 

or ctty wna no place for 

tlieruf'irt*. when Archie 

-adlux b*;side him a flue old 

th sh.Mili his bead and saltl: 

yon know how I feel regard- 

iJ :h In t.tvvn Why did you bring 

! nv here, und where did you .get 

..... -.V, tills way." »ald 

;:id (iDlne hla best t'> 

- . , .1, T j,^, thiit 

"As Tom 

■'-V bai'k 

■4 Tom 

V.' got a 

• .ii" And 

I «iw ihirt til" '-''• 

.■fitly beside ir.. -'■ ■ ■" 
if bo wnK'S«'(J bis tail 
ed to be noticed. I 
you come fi'oin, fol- 
ly wagged bis tall 
-r to uie tliau he had 
]• i;,:T, thjit the do)-' 
- : (rtnn some of 
that have 
iver bank.-* 
\im1 he s.-.'uis such an in- 
■.\v ilKit It vv..uld be a shame 
adrift '>ii the town, for he'd 
III,. .,,,111)1 Oh. iliJit woulil be 
Archic'H fa<e wore 
: ,r lit the thought 

.liftl Bliiso over, then 
hl« would do with him 

with hini. sir," spoke 

a smile of hope lu 

worthy fellow. Tapn. 

{pilte sure his nam -JO. ♦or 

ti'iii sewnil nni:;' ■ ■"« he 

.-lie of them, and it 

....; he ie!ii>,...i HI) at my 
1 lis tb'- • "iie*! **•' 

■"■"'"'■'"' ."Ml 

lied Mr. Smith. 

■ ■! It he 

,.■ we'll 



rie 



felt 

a 

■ tor 



iin 



:ii. 


:;id 
And 


ra n 


, each 


. 1 lis pJlii.ded 
Smith b:i'l 




:»d- 


lliu 


work 



to do. Even a dog In belter employed 
thiu Idle." 

On the neit day- It being Saturday— 
Ar<hte decided to pay a visit to a younj; 
frlPiid who lived In the country, and | 
called to Btxigo to accompany him. Archie 
would walk the dLstai.ce of four miles, 
for he was quite an athletic fellow, and 
five or sli miles was au nothing to him 
when the weather was flue And old 
Biu»;o. Arehie knew, would nd feel fa- 
tigue from s!irti a walk. Si>. br!;,'Iil nid 
early, boy and dog 8ft out. boy whlstUn« 
giill.v and dog trotting beside him lu a 
happy mood. 

They were soon In the country, and 
Archie fonnd inn<"b to Interest blra along 
tho rondsiile. Tder- were many fresh 
viuug i)lnuts heloiiijing to the weed fam- 
ily — that vve;<> wortli esauilulng. for 
Archie wn« d-eply Interested In botany 
and exercised liU knowledge of plants 
whenever the opportunity presented It- 
self. .'<'• hiir the day had passid be- 
fore .Vrelile realized that he was prolong- 
ing his Joismey too uiiich. for he knew 
his young friend would be expecting bliu 
for the noon dliincr. un<l he wn.s a'AU a 
mlk» from the farm where he \va.j to pay 
the visit. 

"Say. Bingo, we've loitered," Archte 
said, tlirov^'liiij dii«'!i a h.'ilf-i>peii huil lie 
had be«'u aisse.tiii^;, "Ci'iue, let's get a 
sudden iii,)-e .ni, and cover this mile In 
i:o time. Sny, old fellow, there's that 
ur-at pastnru we mlgbt ctit through and 
save cUnUdng the hill, :i1s., i-uttlng off 
a finarter of a mile of dlstnnc*. We'll 
take the <llnrfOiml cut acros.s tin; meadow, 
and peach the farmb'Hi.se ten mlnutea 
soouer than If wi* went by the road. 
What say you. old ''hii.?" 

Hltigo looked Ills :i|>|ii .smI. and Archie 

strode off towinds a bullied vilro fence 

%vh!ch C'Hitlned h meadovv pasture. Archie 

• ■1 tU.' pa>*turi.! uii.s line n^'-d f"r 

„- --:-....; the nillk cows, lint be h.w ii'.,> 

■ dltle anywht're. "Well, Hini,'o. ' ii • sufd. 
tiH he and dog '-rawled under the 1 iv\est 
wire of the foiK'e, "we're now In n fine 
pasture, and we ni;iy meet a long homed 
cow. Should she lake offense at our iu- 
tinslou well, you'll give her a •*ound 
of your voice. Your bark Is enouish to 
frighten the life out of the ordinary 
animal or man, too. f .r that mutter." 

So the two trudged alon;;, wading 

throu.i;b the fv-'t'. ^\--"^ ernss lind rich 

(■kn-er. On Vr i ;ii I,' uvi\ .• of 

yoiim: tlnilief i.nu- ■ ,-ii>,v a >^m.il' ground 

ariituiil, fiinl ru'i .iftcr It v\iih ail Ids 

•' ' : ^" ■ ' M niinal b*<l him a ciiM.-*" 

4!"ve, tnklng hliii t ■ the 

j n|' .f it. tfiux ••Mttin,.; bliu off 

fr-' -■ '. ievw .'■--! i . Arehie was 

I att'iiit t<i whi.Hil" fi> ! ' rejoin him 

and .'inlt hl.<j fruitless ...... m,,.,-.. i,.,ene,l 

right in front of tiim ii wild 

' ■:" hi.-; hcM.l 1!ffi-'i M:,'!i. i..- '.i--^<i.<^ 

■ 1. He had -;t"|.i-d fi^ni beiiliid a 

cIii.Hter of I.h..h!i,-4, uliii-li h.' : -alcd 

lilm fr-^jt, .\n•iiie■^^ siicht ti.. and 

It I he <*mall lioy as if ask- 

• yiiii dart; to hitrudu here, 

y 

\ - b.ilr standing on end. 

seemed fro:ien hi his veins. 

,N...»;.i;.. ..• .1 -,an to retreat, wnlkiii;; liack- 
wardd and ke€"pl.ng his eyes ,,n those of 



the animal. And at the same time be 
whistled furiously for Bingo, who was 
some distance off. standing near to a 
small hole. Into which the little ground 
animal had slipped. But hla quick ear 
heard hl.s new master's whistle, and he 
knew that he was wanted. He quickly 
.orgot the ground animal and turned to 
Join Archie. Just as he did so the young 
bull took it into his bead to chase the 
two-leggpd Intruder out of the pasture, 
and also thought It would be great sport 
to tosH the said two-legged Intruder on 
his hoiiis With a furious bellow, a pre- 
liminary pawing of the earth with his 
strong hoofs and a swlK-hlng of his tail 
in an enraged manner, he started, bond 
down, for Archie. The boy, thus men- 
aced, turned to fly, but know that his 
chance to reaeh the fen<'e was small. 
He ran with all liin mi;,'lit. but knew 



the pasture. Not ton rods from where he 
now stood the bull waa engaged In a 
strenuous tussle with Bingo. The brave 
old dog- a powerful fellow in size and 
strength— had caught him by the ear 
and was b<ddlng on lor dear life's sake. 
In vain did the bull try to shake him 
off. Bingo only fastened his long teeth 
the firmer and held fast. The bull was 
Infuriated, but Bingo was calm, so the 
latter had the best of it. 

Then Archie began to call and whistle 
to Bingo to come to him. "He can 
drop off the bull's ear and gain the fence 
before the bull can reach him." he said 
to himself. "<'ome, BIuko! Come, fel- 
low!" Then he whistled again. And 
in response to the master's call Blugo 
suddenly let loose the bull's ear and 
came with Ughtnlng-Uke bounds to the 






A Story for Wee Ones 



Blackie Gets Even With Goldie* ByHSenrDaTis. 



^^ OLDIB was a little girl five years 
m Z old. She was called Goldle because 
^^V of her golden hair. Blackie was a 
^^1 new pet belonging to Goldle. 
Blackie wos a strong, fat kitten, 
at)out three months old. He liad been 
brought to Goldle by her uncle Tom "who 
had bought the funny little fellow from 
a cat peddler. 'He'll do for Goldle to 
play with," Uncle Tom had said, with- 
out ever asking Blackie If he would like 
being the property of a very mischievous 
little gin. So Uncle Tom had paid a 
dollar for Blackie and had carried him 




Only a Matter of n Few Seconds 
Lay Between HIni and a 
Pair oi: Sliari* HornN. 



tli.it t!i.' ii>::' V. US only a short distance 
II' hill,; him nnt] tlmt only a matter of 
a f.-w si>cond8 liiy l»ct\\een him and a 
pair of slinrj) liorns. I'osslbly it would 
mean his death! The very thoug'it was 
Si> horrllile th.it Archie almost falntetl 
from tear, lint be was save«l from thin 
disaster by hearing Bingvt's low. deep 
bark, or a wnarl It was now, and Archie 
knew that his faithful friend was close 
beside the pursuing liull. 

"Ah. Bingo's come to my relief!" he 
tlionght. "He'll bol.l the liull's attention 
till I'm safe bcvond the fence." And 
NO it did happen "just that way. Within 
H minute Anbie had gained the fence 
anil rolled und-U" it to safety. Then get- 
ting to bis tiet (juhkly he looked into 



fence, and with a powerful leap cleared 
it, landing several feet from his young 
master. 

The bull, thus sud letily released, stood 
gazing toward boy and dog for a few 
seconds, then shaking his head, from 
which bbxjd was llowtug, for Bingo's 
teeth had pierced one of the animal's 
ears, he slowly turn<'d and made off to- 
ward the little grove in the pasture. 

And It was a thrilling story of Bingo's 
bravery, Intelligence and strength that 
Archie told bis father that evening 
on returning home. And after hearing 
the account of Archie's close call at the 
horns of a bull Mr. Smith said feelingly: 
I "Bingo's well worth his board and keep, 
son, and from henceforth shall be one of 
the family." 

And of course Archie and Bingo were 
both very happy over this verdict. 



that same day to Goldle. and Goldle was 
much pleased at having a live toy. Her 
dolls, her Teddy bear, her Noah's ark 
animals, were all so stupid; never moving 
of themselves, and having t<> be put luto 
posltbm by Goldle herself. So, she fouud 
Bl.ickle very amusing. 

On the third day after Blackle's ar- 
rival in the home of Goldle, the lUtle 
four-footer and long-taller found himself 
very unhappy. First of all, he missed his 
nice warm mother, against whose side he 
had slept so comfortably. Next, he found 
himself looking in vain for his sisters 
and I)rothers with whom he had played 
so merrily. And many, many other recol- 
leiiions of the very recent past flitted 
through little Blackle's mind as he was 
wool»d and pulled about 'oy his new mis- 
tress, Uttle Miss Goldle. 

•Ah, you are such a f)ad kltteu!" cried 
little Miss Goldle, squeezing poor Blackie 
till he mewed pitifully. "Why, do you 
want to get out of my arms, you ugly 
fellow? Aren't you having a good time? 
Oh, I ktjow what I'll do— I'll put one of 
Dolly's dresses on you. Oh, how very, 
very funny you will look. You'll look 
like a live nigger doll, with your funuy 
black fa«."e." 

Then Goldle ran to her pi lyr lom and 
got one of Dolly's dre.s.ses. But she 
hadn't given poor Blackie a chance of 
escape during the time she was going up 



and down stairs; no, she had lugged (that I 
is the only word that describes the man- 
ner of Ooldle's carrying Blackie) the poor 
uncomfortable kitten with her, squeezing 
his poor body till he suffered real pain. 

Once again on the big back porch, 
Goldle proceeded to dress Blackie in the 
doll's dress. And the poor fellow soon 
found himself in a garment very tight 
about the neck and arms (Blackie's front 
legs served the purpose of arms when in 
a dress). In vain he mewed and mewed, 
begging to be taken out of the tortur- 
ous clothes. Goldle had no pity, and 
kept hold of the poor Blackie, scolding 
him for mewing, and slapping him oc- 
casionally over the ears, all of which 
made Blackie very miserable Indeed, i'ou 
know a cat has feelings Just like a 
human being's, hut cannot express his 
pain or Joy In words. So poor Blackie 
had to suffer and suffer, his little heart 
almost breaking. 

The next day Goldle conceived the Idea 
of dressing Blackie up In a doll's dress 
again, for her Uttle friend, Fred Scott, 
had come to play with her, and she meant 
to let Fred wool and pull and tea.se poor 
Blackie In his uncomfortable clothes. But 
Blackie had been thinking all the night 
before and had arrived at this conclusion: 
A cat has his rights, and one of them la 
comfort; another one. liberty. And why 
should he, Blackie, submit to the tortures 
inflicted u{)ou him by Goldle? No, be 
Would tight back, he would. If ever again 
she tried to put tho.se horrid clothes upon 
him he would protect himself; he would 
use his claws aud teeth. What else were 
claws for? So, the following day, when 
Goldle got the doll's dress and began to 
put It on Blackie the determined little 
fellow sprang at her face and dashed l)oth 
paws across it. One went slap across 
Goldie's nose, leaving a tiny bloody streak 
marking the claws' progress. The other 



paw stroked her chin, leaving a twta 
streak of blood to the one over the nose. 
Goldle. screaming with fright and palu, 
threw Blackie to the ground and rao 
in the house to tell her mother. Fred, 
also afraid of Blackie. having been a 
witness to the scratching, ran after 
Goldle, Intending to testify to Blackle's 
terrible conduct. 

And Blackie was now at liberty to go 
where he pleased, and he pleased to run 
with all possible speed to the alley. Ar- 
riving there, he found a snug barrel, 
turned ou Its side, full of straw, aud 
into It he crept. Half au hour later 
Goldle and Fred came to the alley hunt- 
ing for him, calling "Kitty, kitty, klttyl" 
But Blackie kept very still and the chil- 
dren went away without so much as sus- 
pecting that he might be In the barrel. 

That night Blackie crept forth and 
found a garbage barrel lu the alley, from 
which he got a pretty good supper. Then 
he traveled on, and when morning came 
had entered the yard of a nice old lady 
who bad no children about the place, and 
who, seeing Blackie, fed and petted him 
and made him kuow he was welcome to 
live in her house. And as soon as Blackie 
found there were no children about be 
decided to stay and to pay for bis board 
and keep by catching the mke In the 
cellar. / 

And to this day — which Is ft year since 
Blackie found the happy home with the 
old lady — he has remained and grown Into 
a genuinely fine niiiuscr, and his present 
mistress thinks he Is the Unest cat in the 
world, and treats blm as though he were 
human, for she knows that cats feel th* 
same as do people. 




He Soon Foand lliiu.felf In a Garment Very Tigrlit About the Week and 

Ariii!«. 




HEL.PFUL. HUNTS F^OR OUR VOUINQ ARTISTS, 



i.i:s.so^ \o. rsi— JiiiiN ihiw^ivn >ii:rrs a %or^« i,ai»%-. 



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ETHEL MAY'S REWARD. 



£ 



try. tc 
aiift I" 



In 



"le 

In 



IlY M.vri* WALKICR. 

;■■• - , three of the Anderson 

fnele. «..:'■■'! t">: .la-'lc. 

' '. . jigetl 11. And 

idlug the snm- 

. .1 .utnt in the coiui- 

I arm near to a sum 11 

!'l:il,'«». 

tiomc w;is 

th.-y found 

1 inanv sur- 

I ( rv. i in-i c st't.'lh ■(! no 

y of slpht.« and s..e.,inds. 

).iiiie.«»rlc animals, fowls 

the fields, gardens, 

and tit Us. Ami then 

..ok.«» and ponds, ftill of 

and woods full of birds 

■ts. 

■ ■ la.st week i^f May 

M;,i-v i-jili.p.l t'.ejii TO 



H slie l.s ar 

. ..!, for her 

;.-r from 

4-4 me to allow yoti 

.e of her company. 

u picub- the day after 



d" 

A 


:!ll three 

time: "1 

•hlug nicer, 

.. r \t.\ w Hd 


V. 




toU.Tj 

I.ick. 

i - 

I 




>'■*• lliiui Jiuy tiling." 

.!i!l he I'.i-Kfut^i-d to ■'t;irt 


tvt 9 




'.:. on tbi' 


1 




•4 >'-y ■-.-..'■■' . ■ ■•■ 
d t'l.'ir yon to ca.rry with 
■ in, will lake you in th 
. .lones' bouse. From 


■ : 1 

you. 
e car- 
there 



Gr V 
and slsle 



you'll go afoot t, t lie wootls vvlncii l^ 
only a mile distant fi.);u Mrs. .loucs' 
lilitce." 

at course, the cblllren talked of noth- 
ing else all that day except the c.tnlng 
picnic In the woods They bad never en- 
Joyed a country picnic, aud thl.s one held 
much pleasuie for theni 

On the day of the pi.nl. t!ie Aab-ra.n 
cbUdn?n were ready to start to the bonn* 
of Mrs. Jones long hcio:i- lohn had the 
carriage in readiness. And their linskets 
were !i!le*l with lunclieon. the very best 
that Aunt Mary's flne old colored cook 
could prepare. 

It . mtlng a quarter of nn h <ur 

till : time set for stitrtiai: whe; 

.Lini'. LUe liousemald. calle-l V> tlia<ie: 
■■» ome »•' yoiir Aunt's room at once, 
taken suddenly ill." 
compauied l>y her brother 

ran upstairs to Aunt Mary's 

room and f.miid that good old lady lying 
on her !■ ! -cry pale and lU-looklng. 
After a lew iuiiulriea Aunt Mary ex- 
plained that she had Ijeen very miserable 
all night, h'lt that ihe bad triol to 
die«H in onler to come 1 >wu to see the 
chll.lren otT on their days ouilng; but 
she hinl become .so faint that she was 
vMUcd to lie down, md 'o call to Jane 
t. om.) to her a.sslsi.:!. c. 1 h.-ve asked 
her to phone to my doctor, who lives In 
• he vilhi-e and he'll be here within nn 
; ry to have sp. ' 'ir 

.U....UH. ....„.cu. dear." So -. - 'cl 
Annt Marv 

"But .-.Uull we go to the picnic?" nf.ked 
Ethel May, solicitously. "I don't think 
•A -! lid leave Auatle when she is 111." 

A ;1 passed over Grade's face. It 

was plain she did not wish to be dLsap- 
pointed lu the picnic. She turned to- 
ward Jack, who st >o.i looking his dis- 
pleasure at Ethel M.iy for having made 
such a blunder. He. too, did not wish to 



remain awrt> from the picnb-. Then he 
spi>ke np: 

"I really don't see what we kids could 
d,i for Annt Mary. Thert^ is Jane to wait 
Il !,. doctor will be here dl- 

re'tl... I tiuiiK wed better g<> to the 
idi-ni for Mrs. Jiiiie», aud the Jones kids 
wU: ;.lng for us." 

"\,, ., id tJracle adding her argu- 
nieiu to Ja k s. Auntie will be well 
cared for liy Jane and the doctor. Wo 

us Jack says -can be of no use to her. 
We'll lie in the way, only." 

Kltnl May's face reddened, and she 
tinned a sharp look on her brother and 

..I \v.-n • slie said, "we may not 

e IIS fur as waiting on 
,v i.i :,• is ..u' fined, Init we can be com- 
pany for her and try to cheer her up. I 
for one, won't leave her while she's 111." 

Aunt Mary put out her hand and 
tombed Lthel May's hair gently. "Dear 
little girlie," she said feebly, '.vou shall 
not sacrlflce your day for me. I shall 
Kct on very well with Jane to nurse 
me. And as Jack and Grade are so 
iinxioiis to j;o to the picnic I would not 
for tiie world detain them here. No. all 
of you :;o, And It Is time you were off. 
John is at the gate now with the car- 
riage." 

"Weil. Annt Mary, I hope you'll be O. 
K. when we get home this evening." ex- 
claimed Jack, hurrying from the room. 
'Til g<t the luncheon baskets In the 
carriage, girls, while you are getting 
on your Jackets and huts. But hurry!" 

"All right. Jack, we'll follow immedi- 
ately." called out Grade. Then stooping, 
she kissed her old aunt's cheek. '"Good- 
by. Auntie!" she said. "1 hope you'll 
be well soon. The doctor will fix .vou 
up all right. I'm sure. Come. Kthel May. 
don't stand there and worry Aunt Mary. 
1 fancy she wants to be left alone. 
Come." And Grade was off down the 



stairs like a flash, all thought of the aged 
sick aunt vanished as she saw the car- 
riage waiting at the gate. 

"Why d.m't you go. child?" asked 
Aunt Mary, turuiug to Ethel Slay, who 
still lingered In her room. 

"Because, Auntie, I j'lst can't go off and 
leave you sbk in bed. And I wouldn't 
enjoy the picnic were I to go. knowing 
you were here alone aud HI. 1 know just 
how Jane will do. She'll come to you 
when called and perform Just the Uttle 
errands you require of her. Then she'll 
hurry down to the kitchen to gossip with 
cook and the gardener. I know her, and 
the ot!ier servants, too. They'll neglect 
you. So I menu to stay aud look after 
you." 

Tears trickled down old Aunt Mary's 
cheeks, and she canght Ethel's bauds lu 
her own an<I pressed them tenderly, say- 
ing, "Thank yon, deSrle. It la sweet to 
have someone with you who loves you. 
Servants want only mouey. You stay 
with me because " 

"Because you are the dearest old Auntie 
In the world, aud I love you," declared 
Kthel May. "And now I shall .see about 
iiiaklng you more comfortable." And the 
Uttle Miss .soon had her auntie In a loose 
robe and back Into bed, where the piHows 
were fixed Just righ,t, and the window 
sliades were so adjttsled that the morn- 
ing sun and air came luto the room but 
did not fall on the bed. Then, runiUng to 
the garden Ethel May pbked a bouquet of 
roses and placed them In a va.se of water 
uear to her aunt's bed. 

The doctor came and found Aunt Mary 
feelile and "run down," as he expres.sed 
it. Nothing serloas, but a sort of break- 
down. He advised a change of scene and 
climate. 

"How would California do?" asked Auut 
Mary. "I've loug thought of making a 
nice trip there." 




Bears Are Out c/lgain. 



Then in chorus loud together 
they cried, 
"Weil eat, play, hunt and 
fight. 
And we'll make our day ju.st six 
months long, 
For we've had six months of 
night." 

And Mother Bear, with a look of 

pride 

On her children .t^tanding there, 

Said, ''1 know that you will all 

grow up 

To terrorize folks everywhere. 



OLD Mother Bear and little 
young bears 
All winter had lain in a hole. 
But as soon as the first spring 
days arrived 
From the gloom and darkness 
they stole 



To the light of day and pure "You'll frighten boys and big 
sv.oet air. _ „,^„ . ^ 



And each little bear laughed 
with glee ; 



men, too, 
And 'twill be such jolly fun 



Willi KICC , rr-. I 1 J 

"Ah ha! It is fine to be wide To see those queer two-legged 

awake, t^^'"^^ 

To have light, air and grand Turn pale when they see you 

liberty!" ^"^ run." M. W. 



proven your unselfishness this day and 
deserve a reward. It shall be In the form 
of a visit to all parts of interest on the 
Pacific <:oast as far as we can go and re- 
main lu our own country. And maybe 
next year we'll go to Old Mexico— you 
and I. Yoii see. dearie. l.)''e dislnt-'rest- 




§ Qur puzzle Comer 




OllV€ C _ , 



ril Get the UuMketa In the Carriage, Girls, \l('hlle Yoa Are Getting: On 

Yoar Jacket*. 



"Just the place, my dear woman," de- 
clared the doctor. "And go as soon as 
you are a bit stronger. You'll be able to 
start next week." 

After the doctor had departed Aunt 
Mary turued to Ethel May. saying. "You 
and I will start for Califoruia this day 
week, dear. So you may make your plans 
accordingly. I'll write your parents to- 
morrow about It. They'll be delighted to 
have you accompany me ou this enjoyable 
trip." 

"Aud brother and Bister— will you take 
them, tooT' a."^ked un.selflsh Ethel May. 

Auut Mary shook her head "No. chlldle, 
only you shall go with me. You have 



ed love— Is a rare thing, and when one 
finds It, as I have found It In you today, 
one must value It dearer than all else. In 
future you shall be my dearest one. and 
I shall try to repay you for your sweet, 
youthful devotion and self-sacriflclng kind- 
ness." 

And Ethel May's Aunt Mary kept her 
word, and that time next week found 
them driving to the railroad station lu 
the village, where they would take the 
train for the great and gbwloua West. 
And Jack aud Grade returned home to 
the city and had ample time to ponder 
over why Ethel May should be taken aud 
they left behljid. 



My 
My 
lief. 
My 
My 

My 

My 
Mv 
My 

cake. 
My 
My 

also. 



LETTER EMGMA. 

first Is in Joy, but not In grief, 
second Is In army, but not lu re- 

thlrd is In car, but not in train, 
fourth Is In kill, l>ut not In slain, 
fifth is In smile, but not in tear, 
sixth Is In terror, but not In fear, 
seventh Is in oven, but not In bake, 
eighth is Is in candy, but not in 

ninth is In come, but not In go. 
tenth you have found in my flfth 

My whole spells a game 

That children will play 
■WUien It rains out of doors. 

Aud Indoors they must stay. 

ZIGZAG PI'ZZLK. 

The words of this zigzag contain the j 
same number of letters. If the words are 
rightly guessed and written one below | 
the other In correct order their zigzag j 
letters, beginning with the upper left- 
hand letter and ending with the lower 
left-hand letter, will spell the surname 
of a famous French woman artist. The 
cross words are: tD A seagoing vessel. 
(2) The place In a barn where hay Is 
stored. (.3) A place from which minerals 
are taken. (4) That which looms far 
above the earth's surface. <5) A place 
where boats laud. (6) To be consumed 
by Are. (7) Part of a melon. 

BEHEADIIVG.S. 

(1). Doubly behead one who makes his 
living on the water and leave the name 
of a famous American general. (2) Triply 
behead a snake aiii leave a fired brick 
that Is used lu building grates. (3) Be- 
head the plural of a sharp-bladed weapon 
and leave that which no language can be 
without. 

ANSTi'ERS TO L.\ST "WEEK'S 
FIZZLES. 

LETTER EMOMA: Swimming. 

VAOZAO PUZZLE: Buma. The croas- 
toorda are: 1, liud; 2, Fur; 3, Her; 4, 
Ink; .5, .Sun 

BEHEADIN08: (1) Lichen-hen. (2) 
Ballad-lad. (3) Person-son. 



COMXDRl !»IS. 

When are pigs like letters? 
M'hcn penned. 

V>'hen ere lighthouses like castles? 
Wh-cn ainrmed. 

What men are always losing their pa- 
tience (patients)? 
Dociora. 

Why are carpets like old .'^bocs? 
Both o'-e foot-worn. 
When Is a boy like a saddle? 
When pii in meted. 

A\ EASY REBT.S. 





4« 







MiNOT MAN 
RETURNED 

MIssIni City Treasurer 
Was Temporarily De- 
ranged By OverworK. 

Alleged Shortage Disap- 
pears as Expert Ex- 
amination Is Made. 



1':<1! wh!lf at work in lii>-' store. In a 
dj«-aiTi he saw the lust j.-\v. 1 swopt out 
t>i f-r^ store ami dumpt-.l "to ii barrel 
' 'pings which siooil ni the yard 
1 his hull (ling. 

Ill , l,- so tltcp an iniprfP- 

WHM HI litl that he titi idcd to 

make- an . v.i.u.oation of tlie tcmtents 
vi the barr«l. Aftt^r tanylnK on the 
uork for sonu' lU-,"- In- siuhlenly cauKiit 
tht' reflection .utliir.K un\ivu:iny 

l.ris^ht ;ii.>l Kli -■ "'"' 'I pio\.-a lo 

I , • (Ha lli.'l;il. 



FLA(; DAY PR(K LAMATION. 
(Jov. Daudson of Wisionsin liges 



i> 






(Misei'vance of June 14. 



'1', 



-Tom* an Came- 

■ . ■ :. niisa- 

. home 

,-, ,.,n had 

iiicide, 

i.ad 



MInot, N TV. M'-^ — 
rori, ' 

Ing t.u.^ -1-- ■■■•-. - '- 
Thursday nlK'-t- 

Fri' ' ■■ ' ' ^ 

not - 
us r- ' 
li'^cainv 

At tl.. 
inlnlf?trritU'n M 
thor<''!"''- ^r.v. •■ 
affHi 
Cam< 
the < 
Ing ... • 

nm. 

Expf-rtP 
aino! 
the 
couv 

beeii 

lltink Aet'oiintii »trnlKl>t- 

/^,, ....■,,,,.,.,: .vv.;.v :i--is!aiit r:i>-liiei ■ 

™", •■ ■•' t3ipert> 

: :uUUt lll<; city 1.....'kf' 

*| , , .^ .•(■uld be riiaih- >>n 

Tuesday. iif w. — ■ ■ ' ' '^J"^ 

to struiphten out ' ■"", 

Ing • : '"« «■ 

His .. . ■'- at t' 

".h andV' istVict; of both of 

^', •. ' ' '" ";its''foun<l T!. 

„. ...... city's accoui- . . . ■ 



. ; a«l - 
,^ orufffii a 
f the city's 

.It Trfif-urtT 

■A deiiuli*;'^ "'^ 
. ; It If linif i.iur- 



d I SCO V ered d 1 *■ cr epffl nc i < s 

- , f 1 ,. 4... 11 Tl >.'! 



.M;i\ 22- — Governor 

the following flaB 

, yy T . -Cttif huitdrcd and 

■" cK" 'H t'i«' 11th of 

--, I'f tin- riiitrd States 

sheti b.\ htw the diviKn of «'ur 

(If late viars th.- .>;ignilkance of 

: ' h.iv h.( on,, more generally 

.. . ^ ^1 by nur p"ojile. and the an- 

ni\. t.^aiy iitt'ingly celebrated. A »pe- 
. iiil t-ffort will be made this year by 
patriotic citSzcnn and organizations to 
have til is int nicrable occurrence ob- 
served. In full sympathy with the 
Impul.'SfS actuating these lovers of our 
country and all it .stands for. I. J- O. 
P;.> . ■ ;i<"r of the state of 

\v",.. . ;.ae Monday. June 14. 

1901*. aj* FhtK day, and 'all upon all 
public otfuers, upoii th« mediums of 
information and t-dmatinn. and upon 
all who 1<\.' tht flajr and 'iir country 
to join in ;-ri ■ n* iiu.- ;..' ".* ■ i-i'-avor to 
mnk<' this y. ai .•- ' • ' an' ' a notable 
( : if, 

'1 request that in. asr be displayed 
from public buildhiKf* and .mr homes. 
and let u.s present to th. young and 
K-fresh for the old, the lofty ideals of 

our fathers." 

j FIVE BABIES AT ONE BIRTH. 

Medical Men of Wisconsin Are 
Astounded By Nens From Thorp. 



, tuecn 2.000,000 and 3,000.000 eggs 
were collected, fertilized and put back 
into the lake. There are about 

160.000 eggs to the ouart, and esti- 
mates are made on thi.s basis . 

CROP OUTLOOK BRKiHT 

NEAR THIEF RIVER FALLS. 

Thief River Falls. Minn.. May. 22. — 
(Special to The Herald )— The tie Ids in 
the neij,'hborhood of Thief River Falls 
were n* ver in more desirable condition 
ana th.- farmers are elated over the 
prospects for a bumper cr«»p this year. 
The weather conditions are perfect 
and the early »*>«" grain is fast .show- 
ing above the surface of the soil. A 
noticeable fact is that a heavy acre- 
age of potatoes and corn ^^"' "^ 
planted this season, some farmers hav- 
ing gone to the expense of securing 
the lat€st machinery with winch to 
plant and cultivat. potato' s. 



n n VDU SEE THIS CAN 

IT IS FULL OF PURE SWEET MILK 
EVAPORATED TO THE CONSIST- 
ENCY OF CREAM. The milk 
is obtained from the best dairying 
sections of United States. 



Eau Claire. Wis.. May 
f Eau Claire wer. 
by a well-autli' 

'■i'tu Tl;orp. north oT 



Medical 
ided yes- 
d repctrt 
itv. tliat 



\!i« F.iv li'i.^^lj. wife of a well-known 
man ol tliat town. }o,.i iriv. n birth to 
five babies— three • •"ul two 

sons — at a sinple . ;.-iit. 



not 

C 
all "'. 
pa I" 
left 

11 «.►■'■ 
unbalat 
ditlcm ' 
hlm^ 

home. 1.1 is c. 
mud and ther 
that lie had > 

leaving Minor 

had not been i- _«•. 

It i^' 

Ills •■>•■■ " -..■ •■-■•-. 1. 1-1.-., ..• 

and that a final v ^vi.! khuw 

everythinK intact H !way>» been 

one of lb' 
M i 11 1 ■ t . T 



u< )k.d In tlie bank nearly 

and l«-ft the lity s 

'; ; i-viT tb'- offict'. He 

and a 

oiarily 

■ on- 

..; to 

■•■ II ; pint, 

i " retume.l 

■■f-'d witii 
lication 

UU SillCt 



;ich 



In hia pocket 



Ist.^. 
dei 



ilettb 1.1' 
iiO had 



at that Urne 



NEARLY DROWNS 
IN GASOLINE TANK 

Plumber Has Harrowing 
Experience in an Apple- 
ton, Wis., Garage. 

Appleton. Wis.. .May i;2 -- J'-s-i-ii 
Toonen, a ilumbtr. had a nam • 
cape froii "" ation and drownn.- .- : 
a tank of . . ae yesterday. 

Toon en was sent to the Stat« n par- , 
age tn install a nt-w pump in the hig i 
gasoline tanl< 'Hie work re<iuired 

him to climb into the tank. Ten mm- ] 
utes later Toonen's companion, who 
remained on a ladder on the outside 
of the lank, luard Toonens liammer 
drop in the tank and then heard a 
splash Climbing to the opening he 
aaw Toonen lying unconscious m four 
f(».>t of e.'isoline. He had to snnmion 
a^. . to pull the imperiled man 

th..-..^.. tile openinrj. His condition 
Is serious, h" havlnf: 
by the fumes He .■■■ 
some *'asoline. 

SMALL TORNADO 
IN SOUTH DAKOTA 

Barns. Windmills and 

Other Structures Torn 

t« Pieces. 

Brit toll. S. iv. Ma; --. ■ =■ j 

countv vvixs visited i>y a small tornad. j 
this week, which daniaged properly 

dlffei-fiit «•■<■! io!l^=. Ole Tlnquist 

:oi. was the heavie.-t \ 
:■■.. :i<i bv 60 feet in ( 
• i tlie sm.iU 



Jl DCiMENT IS AFFIRMED. 

Court of Appeals I pholds Verdict 
Against McClure Company. 

Milwaukee. Wis.. May 22.— (Special 
to The Herald.)— The Cnited States 
court of appeals. New York, has af- 
rirmed the S15.000 ver<lict s-, ured by 
E. L. Philipp, presid. nt <t th. I uum 
liefrigerator Transportati.'U company, 
agamst the S s McCiur* Publishing 
company for a libelous article pub- 
lished in .Mc< 'lure's Magazine. 

This de( ision is final, there being rio 
tiu«stifn involved in the suit that will 
permit an appeal to the United States 
supreme court. . 

The article that caused the litiga- 
tion was written by Ri.y Stannard 
Baker and appeare<l in the McCluie 
-nzine In .lanuary. U<o6. It was 
ted to bv Philipp because it 
cnarp.d him with r. < eiving illegal re- 
bates from thf r.iilriads. Baker ad- 
mitted on the stand that he based his 
charges solely on a letter written to 
Senator I.a Follette by .lohn \\ . 
Thomas, then state railway tommis- 
Bion*,'r. 

ASHLANll RElilLATIONS 

ABOLT MILK SPLENDID. 

Ashland. Wis. May 22.— (Siavial to 
The Herald. I- -Assistant Stato \ •teri- 
narian Wolcott. wlio was 'u the city 
this week, state, 1 that Asliland lias 
now th.' best regulations for the sJUe 
(,(• ,, any city In Wisconsin. He 

.,,ok. : ;..e rapid weeding out of dis- 
,. V, ,1 n.il.'h I'ows ht r.-. and said that 
by cart ft: nv watching the cattle in 
the vicinity for the '" f > *';'r <->: ^^^ 
no community in the state wUl have 
,.„r..r milk. Aft( r tlu- weeding out is 
^hcd oniv now and then a cow 
, be found to b. diseased if care 
is taken in buying from outside. Mr. 
Widlrott gave a demon.stration in dls- 
se' Zing diseased cattle at Cumberland. 

[Thursday. ,...tti<> 

The complete list of , 1 eattle 

[taken from A-hlaiul now • r luty- 

FIVE YEARS* SENTENCE 

FOR EMBEZZLER NILES. 

Minneapolis. Minn.. May 22. Ellis 

\V. Xiles. former recovli-v •■ : " ' , 
Fir'-'t National bank, an'! -'■'' ''"■- 

of $'i'MtOO, was vf.NH.iM.iy sen- 
to <n-ry five years In the state 
J,. uite\uiary at Stillwater. <;•;'""> '^f; 
havior vvlll reduce ihe nine to ihive 
years s.-ven months and eigl'teen 
d a >■ s , 

FIRE AT MINNEAPOLIS 

DOES $100,000 DAMAGE. 



DIS(HAR(iED SOLDIER 

ATTEMPTS TO TAKE LIFE. 

St. Paul, Minn.. May 22.— A. J. 
Stewart, wliose parents live at Hold- 
ingsford Stearns county, was found in 
a dying condition in a room at the 
Continental hotel. Thursday morning, 
the young man having blown out the 
gas ai.jarentlv with suicidal intent. 
A bottle of alccdiol. partly emptied, 
was found at his side. The man was 
taken to the city hospital and it is 
state,! tliat he cannot recover. 

Stewart enlisted in the regular army 
at Little Falls three years ago. and 
had just been discharged. No mo- 
tive tor t he deed is known- 

NEW CATHOLK (HIRCH 

AT (iLlDDEN DEDICATED. 

G!id<!<n. Wis.. May 22.— (Special to 
The Herald. (—This town put on its 
lioli.iav regalia yesterday and business 
was practically suspended on account 
«t the dedication of the new St. Paul 
and St Peter's Catholic church. The 
. hurch is a fine edifice and reflects 
irioiv 11, an ordinary credit upon the 
paii.-h and people of Glidden. Tiiere 
were several priests and church dig- 
nitaries present, and all classes, ir- 
respective of denomination, participat- 
ed In tlie ceremonies. There were 
visitors from all the towns along the 
Wisconsin Central. 

Olive Hill Cietii ».'.,OiK>. 

Stillwater, Minn., May .:'. — Miss 
Olive M. Hill, the trained nurse ot 8t 
Paul, was awarded a verdict of |f..000 
auaiMsi Hugh A. Jones, the station 
agenl at tlie villaBe of Newport, in 
her brc.i a of promise of marriage suit. 

• — . 

Northfleld .Man Won. 

ton. Wis.. May 22.— S. T. Soren- 

St. Olaf s college, Northfield, 

won first place in the inter- 

latorical contest last night, in- 

representatives of ten states, 

' Bruce McClellan of Knox 

Hi., in second place. At the 

of officers. J. Willis Hainblln 

Alester college, St. Paul, was 

] t . sliienf. 



Apple 
son of 
Minn., 
state oi 
eluding 
w i t h C 
college, 
election 
of Mac 
eU'Cted 





1 FIFTY lEkm' 




Don't worry about 

obtaining pure sweet milk. 

You can buy it from your grocer. 



Ask For PEERLESS UNSWEETENED EVAPORATED MILK. 

BORDEN'S CONDENSED MILK 



COMPANY 




JESSE NORTON. Selling Agent, Duluth 



Sudden Ueuth. 

Park Falls. Wis.. May 22.— (Special 
to Tlie Herald. )— Minnie Wells, a 
graduate of tlie high school and com- 
Dusitor on the Park Falls Herald, died 
very sutldenly Tliursday night from 
quincy. She had been sick but tweniy- 
tour iiouvs. 

» 

Uurued to Death. 

Hazel S. D.. May ui;.— Friends gatJi- 
ered liere to attend the funeral of C. 
C Smith, an old man who was burned 
to death by the destruction of the 
farm resid. iice of Walter Hammetter. 
one mile soutii of town. The origin 
of tlie fii. 1.- a mystery. The old man 
was the onlv person about the place at 
the time, iiml it is supposed lie met his 
diati. Willie sliiving to txtlngulth the 
liam< s. 



Killed Itj IJiflitnlDK. 

Siieut t">iitir Minn., May 22. 



I.e SiK ut <"'iit.i Almn., .May •-'-■— A 
heavy thunder Mono passed over this 
section late Tliursday aiternoon. At 
Lake Emilv about fourteen miles from , 
licre", Ed Hurst was killed by lightning 
about r. oeluck. He was out ma boat 
on the lake when llie storm broke. 

■ ■ • 

At MInot In Decemlier. 
Grand Forks. N. I'.. May 22.---At a i 
meeting of the executive committee of 
the North Dakota iMlncatlonal a.'^socia 
tlon, held liere yesterday i»ec. ^8. .J. 
SO and 31 were fixed as dates foj tbe 
annual convention of the association to 
be held in Mlnot. The inogiain lor 
the meeting was outliii'«!. 

•- 

Fire Bt Inland Lake. 
Bemidji. Minn.. May --— I" ''« entire- 
ly destroyed ti.e big store and stoc^ of 
ifoods at Island Lake, owned by F O. 
Siblev and his associates .vesterday. 
The lire was of unknown origin. Mrs. 
Sibky who diseovered the blaze, was 
awakened bv the discharge of cart- 
ridges whhii were in the bu. ding 
The total loss was between t-. '-'*'<-. and 
IS, 000. 

Buys HanliT I'aper. 

Big Falls" Minn , May 22— (Special 
to The Herald.)— John T. Oyler has 
purchased the Uanler Journal and will 

ke charge of that paper next week. 



action for the recovery on a phy.Mcian e 
bill Incurred through the examination 
of the school children of the city. 

Little Fork— Miss Ellen McPartlin. 
who has conducted the primary grades 
at this place during the year, has ac- 
cepted a position In the high school at 
Baudette for the coming year. 

Moorhead— The first of the coming 
series of commencement exercises un- 
der th* auspices of HV* ^l^'^''^^ ^,fn'h; 
tional institutions in Moorhead, will be 
the one for St. Joseph's parochial^school 
next Thursday evening. May -'<, at o 

''Ean" Grand Forks—Fred Bailey the 
newspaper man of Osnabrock who 
parsed a worthless check In this city 
was given thirty days in the count> 
jail and willingly left for the Queen 
City In charge of the deputy sheiifl to 

■''¥t''\-loud— lt"is reported that Attorney 
General George T. Simpson has decided 
tc^ take a hand in the Roscpe saloon 
controversy, end that he will instruct 
County Attorney J. B """s^ Jo see 
that the license is taken away lioni 

''"p'rlnJt ton-Mrs. Gust Johnson died at 
her home In Bogus Brock township on 
saturdav Mav IT. at 1 o'clock fi;om 
htart disease," aged £8 years. She iiad 
been a great sulTerer for five years and 
her death was ii<t unexpected. 



prominent Odd Fellows of the Copper 
I country, was Wednesday night pre- 
sented with a handsome past grand 
patriarchs Jewel, at a big meeting of 
Foster encampment held In honor of 
the visit to Hancock of Grand Scribe 
William Penfield of Vlcksburg and 
Grand Patriarch John J. Foster of 
Three Rivers. 

Marfiuette — An order has been issued 
for a special term of the United States 
district court at Marquette June !^. 
the May term having been allowed to 
elapse. The Jury drawn for the May 
term is not likely to be called, and In 
consequence another list of grand and 
traverse Jurors has been drawn. 



orating the agreement between the 
.jankers and trust company officials. 
was concurred in by the assembly. 



I 





PENINSULA BRIEFS 



\\ .iler 

smok'e."r'es'ulting from a small 

daniHged the Stokes building of 

niiRland F^irniture <Sj » arpet 

between Fifth and Sixth 

!<. un First avenue soutli. approxl- 

;v fK'O.lMtO last night. 



Minneapolis. Mlnn.^ M 
and 



^ 1 r ' 

a 1.1 1 



n 

size, bt : 

buildlnt 
lose 

Tl 
\ 

f 

SI!.-' 
b'o" 

Sim r 

Har! 
th< 



rtived. His 

.rch in 

, .., .1 -. .1 i roni its 

windi: .lolm Has- 

twl.^ii . . ;!. the barn 

foundaiH II. and liis 

.li.^hed. At E. W. 

^ide of iVie barn. 

:n tiie .'<torm. wa^ 



blown out .ia.eri Friedman s barn w 
duni;ji;-v(l. :\v.i\ a. large corncr'.b on 
( H farm was destroyed. 

'1 . will amount to several 

thol..^aaa .b.-.-.r::'. 



DIAMOND F OIND BY DREAM. 

Urns Search the Followiog Day Re- 
veals Loiiff Missing (iem. 

Slou.t Fa :-, s. ! '.. M.^ I^'-*«' 

jjjjj, , t-'ratik J.eJ.re. ,. ..a.:.iness 

j„j^, . \Kf,< flfoilv of tiie belief 

that 

flf; 



'n 



til 1 ti j f-.i iii 
iJi:..r»: iti-l a wiiu.tiMC ...amoild lust 



BANKER ASKS COURT 

TO PROVIDE COUNSEL. 

Minot. N. P. .May 22.— 1-. W. Dale, 
cashier of a bjink at Loraine. has ap- 

,.d to Ju.Itre Coss for the appomt- 

lit of an .ittoi -i. V to defend him at 
the June term of court on the charge 
of murder in the second degree. He 
is (barged with l>eing implicated in 
the death of Miss tlina Lein. 

If an attorney is appointed by the 
court the highest charge is $2 ''- 

KILLED HER CHILD AND 

THREW IT INTO A POOL. 

.«ault Sle. Marie. Mich.. May 22.-- 
Mrs. MarvBocli of llie village of Pud- 
vard Is under as rest here pending an 
investigation of tlie death of her 2- 
months-old baby, which was found 
dead in a pool in the woods. 1 ne young 
woman disappeared with tae baby last 
Sundav. and when she was found wan- 
derincf about the country the child was 
missing. She Is thought to be dement- 
ed and is said to have confessed that 
she killed the Infant before throwing 
Jt Into the \vat»^r 

. ♦ 

ColhtttHl Many l*H«o t'lrpp". 

Fergus Falls. Minn.. May 22. — (Spe- 
ciJil to The Herald. 1— Deputy Game 
Warden J. H Jones has completed 
the work of collecting pike eggs at 
Battle Lake, and estimates that be- 



r MINNESOTA BRIEFS 

t ^^^^^.^J.^^ ^J .^ J.^-^^^_ » ^J^J-u-w^> ^ ~ « <^^ « -^ ^ ~ ■ ~ ^ ^~ »< *V*v~ ' ' 

Hinckley — A. U. Mcintosh, a farmer 
llvinK in Pomeroy townsldp in Kanabec 
coiintv died recently from a tumor 
near his heart. He was alone at the 
time his wife having gone to a neigh- 
bor-.,' for some medicine that was to 

kve been brought from town. The 
bodv was found near the road and his 
ftltiiful dot? was standing by. 

P e City-The logs of the Knife and 
Snake rivers drives are dowij to the 
cu .'ff, which is as far as they will 

onie down the river only as they are 
boonie<l and towed down by the Dirty 

'^'\da - Ole A. Sandvold. aged 74. one of 
th'e pioneer settlers of Anthony, and 
one of the most highly respected citi- 
Izens of that town, died at his home last 
I Friday of pneumonia, after an Illness 
of alaiut five days. 

Owatonna— News has been received 
of the death of H. A. Tiffany, an old 
former resident of Dwaf.nna which 
took niace at his home in Maiden, this 
Itate on May Mr. Tiffany had been 
sir ouslv ill for bver three months with 
bean trouble, and finally succumbed 

^''Biuiu.s\''me-The committee in charge 
of the arrangements for the observance 
of Memorial day. announces that Col. 
McBrlde the well known veteran of 
Fergus Falls, has been secured to de- 
liver the principal address. v,j„i,. 
Perham— Gust Thonia of Richdale 
^hiDoed a carload of baled hay to Du- 
Uul?''!he%ast week „ "^^ '«.^,/<^*,^^: 
article j"«l now, but Kicnoaie nas 



Calumet— Bishop Eis of Marquette, 
head of this diocese of the Roman 
Catholic church, who has teen in the 
Copper country the past week. Thurs- 
dav morning oonflrmed a large class 
oPcomnuinlfants at the Polish church. 
Seventh street. 

Mmiirbton ^n 11-pound daughter 

ha" bcS born to Mr. and Mrs. William 
Watchhorn of Montezuma street 

Tinncock The steamer Plowbcy •win 

lea e Ashland next week for Portage 
ake and shortly after Its arrival here 
will ifegln a regular schedule of trips 
U- ween Hancock and Houghton and 
the White City at the Portage Entry. 

Laur um-The orders issued recently 
through the health department of the 
village of Laurium for a general clean- 
ui of the town are having an excellent 
effect and bv June 10. the limit set 
by the authoHiies for the cleaning-up 
work the town will be spick and 

^^Hancock-Garrett Nagle .of Hancock 
Wednesdav morning received a dis- 
patch announcing tbe^ death of Ins 
brother. Jerry Nagle aged 39 at Butte. 
Mont, the cause oi death not being 

^'calumet-The Calume^t Gurnet & 
Eagles has engaged the Calumet & 
hT-p W and the Tamarack bands to 
fike par in the big Eagles' parade 
during the state convention here next 

"' HaScock-N. A. Metz. one of the most 



Milwaukee— William Pt!*''""^^""T f 
painter employed on a building at Jef- 
ferson and Blddle streets, fell three 
stories from a scaffold, a distance of 
thirty feet, at 11 o'clock 'Thursday 
morning. He fractured Ids right hip 
and elbow. At the Emergency hospital 
It was said that he will recover. 

Sparta — A petition ha« been filed 
with the town clerk of the town of 
Little Falls, Monroe county, against 
the granting of a license to the saloon 
on the west line of Monroe county 
known for years as the "Monkeys 
Roost." This ealoon has borne a bad 
refutation. , , „ ^^, 

Menominie— Lewis Seeley of Seattle, 
■Wash., and Esther McGillvray. former- 
ly of Baraboo were married here on 
■Thursday Thev will rteide in Seattle, 
where the groom is In the lumber 
business. 

Belolt — Fred AVoodard, aged 10 years, 
was run down on Broad street 'VVednes- 
day evening by Nicholas Frendahl In 
an automobile and is seriously injured. 
The lad was playing ball on the street_ 
Fort Atkinson — John Gazelly Is dead 
at the age of 92 years. He was born 
in North Edmonton, N. Y., prll 24. 181*. 
In the early days he came to Chicago. 
where he was for several years post- 
master and also county clerk of Cook 
countv. With one exception he was 
the oldest cltizf;n of this city. 

Shawano— Mrs. Richard Webber, 
need 24 wife of a Belle Plaine farmer, 
committed suicide by hanging on 
Thursday. Twice before she had tried 
In vain to kill herself by hanging. 

Eau Clair— At the meeting of the 
directors of the Chippewa A alley Rall- 
wav Light & Power company, held 
Thursday officers of the company for 
the ensuing vear were chosen as loi- 
cws! President, O. H^ Ingram; vice 
president, J. S. Owen; treasurer, B. A 
Buffington; secretary and general man- 
atrer George B. Wheeler. 

Tpp^lon-The g^oline launch ,of 
George Jackson was stolen from the 
boat house In Neenah Wednesday 

"'ffadison-Senator Falrchlld's bill 
regulating the trust companies, Incor- 



Fargo, N. D. — W. H. Deitrich has 
been elected delegate to the Interna- 
tional Tvpographical union convention 
at St. Joseph, Mo., in August, with E. 
C. Fleming as alternate. 

Bismarck, N. D.— The grand Jury, 
which has been In session in Emmons 
countv has made a report to the court, 
and among other things has recom- 
mended the removal of the entire board 
of countv commissioners of that 
countv. charging the commissioners 
with being negligent and incompetent. 
Minot N. D. — The State Association 
of Countv Auditors closed a two days 
session here Wednesday. The new of- 
ficers of the association are as follow.s: 
President, Hans Anderson of Grand 
Forks: vice president. I. W. Healy of 
Bismarck; secretary-treasurer, R. P. 
Irving of PVirman. . . . , 

Bismarck, N. D.— One inch of rain 
fell Monday and Monday night. It 
extended all over the slope from the 
Canadian line to the southern boundary 
of the slate and as far west as Glen- 
dive. The fall was steady and all the 
moisture was absorbed by the soil. 

Fargo, N. D. — The now famous water 
and light plant bond Issue was sub- 
mitted to the supreme court Friday. 
Attorney E. H. W^right, representing 
the plaintiff and City Attorney W. C. 
Kesser the city. 

Grand Forks, N. D.— Plans have been 
placed on file with the Grand Forks 
Builders and Trades' exchange for the 
new high school which will be con- 
structed at Cando this year. Tiiis school 
was authorized by the people of Cando 
in their recent election, at which time 
bonds were issued. 

Grafton N. D. — At the annual meet- 
ing of the Grafton Business Men's club 
these officers were elected: President, 
D C Moore; vice president. John H. 
Fraine; secretary. Franii H. Sprague; 
treasurer, N. D. Erie. ^ , _ , ., 

Grand Forks N. D.— O. A. Lykseth, 
residing at 721 Chestnut street, this 
city and emploved by B. O. Paulsness, 
has been missing since Tuesday rnorn- 
JnK His friends have been making a 
search for him, but thus far no clue 
as to where he disappeared to has 
been discov ered. 

EDITOR SAYS UNCLE IKE 

"GOT VALUE RECEIVED." 

Madison, Wis., May 22.— Yesterday's 
session of the senatorial Investigating 
committee was taken up with the ex- 
amination of Editor George Dee of 
Chippewa Falls. Dee submitted a 



statement covering $150 expenses to 
Stephenson for space in his paper. Tha 
committee, after examining the ac- 
count, accused Dee of "padding." 

After considerable argument th« 
witness said: "I think the old man got 
value received." 

Dee could not remember to whom ho 
disbursed f200 for workers to dis- 
tribute campaign literature. At tha 
conclusion of Dee's testimony, the com- 
mittee adjourned subject to the call 0* 
the chairman. 

NEGRO WRITER 
OF SONGS DEAD 

Hogan. Who Wrote "All 
Coons Look Alike 



to Me." 



j> • 



New York. May 22. — Ernest Hogan, 
one of the best known of the negro 
comedians and song writers, died 
Thursday morning at his home, 1002 
Brook avenue, the Bronx, of tubercu- 
losis. Hogan had been 111 since last 
winter, when he was taken sick on th© 
stage of the Fourteenth Street theater, 
and was compelled to give up his en- 
gagement. ^, _. 

He was born in Bowling Green, Ky., 
about fifty years ago. His mothcT was 
a cook In the family of Adjut. Hogan 
at Bowling Green, and the boy took 
the family name. When he was 20 
vears old he left Kentucky and went 
on the stage, playing with minstrel 
shows through the South and West. 
For several years he was with BlacK 
Pattl and her "Troubadours, " and later 
went to Australia, where he remained 
two years with one of his own shows, 
"Lucky Coon." 

Later he went under the manage- 
ment of Hurllg & Seamon. He w-rote 
the book and music of "Rufus Rustus, 
in which he starred for two seasons, 
and then of "The Oyster Man, which 
he was producing at the time of his ill- 

Hogan wrote several hundred songs, 
of which "All Coons Look Alike to 
Me" was the most successful. It Is said 
that he cleared |40,000 from this song 
alone. Among his other songs were 
"Lamb. Lamb. Lamb" and "C-h-1-c-k-e-n 
Spells Chicken." He was billed always 
as "The Unbleached .American. His 
wife was Anna Wilkes, a colored slngw 
er, from whom he was separated, and 
who la now playing In Europe. He ilvod 
with his mother. 



For Your Needs 



oTiWrK laA appettt., f^ ^^%j!? too W4 -^a » »«>«« 

Ud ^ need oi a gtr «i gthe nto g vH** "^ 

fl » womtfi, take &e ▼QBlMl'i er-- ~-rvr m^ -a 

Sxii gentiMUJtmg, Btrength-bxtfldbg Te^dy hl^ fw wrer w 



Use It or not, as your doctor says 

You could not please us better than to ask your doctor about 
Aver'? Chem/ Pldoral for coughs, colds, croup, bronchitis. 
^CLnWfaSalways kee/tt '" ««« ^ouse^ The approva^ 
of their physician and the experience of many years have given 
film fi rLt confiJe n,-^ in thi. cough medicine. jaailjat 



1 



'■'peV'h.i'i.UVi.e SKveuB Co<;P.%«« 
,.<.,nn«nv received a new forty-flve- 
Kisrowerbofl^er and thirty-live-horse 

or xver engine this week for their mill 
^; S-tar Lake. The engine they are 
iiKinir out tliere Is too small. 

Rifvh Clty-Llttle Alvah Anderson 
the tvear-old son of Hjalmar Anderson 
met with an unfortunate accident a few 
kvs agS While playing in thte yard with 
Iloward Matson, by breaking lilg left 
arm between the wrist and elbow. 

Bralnerd— Mrs. Susan Pcallen. mother 
of Edward Scallen. 203 Glllls avenue 
northeast- died Wednesday evening at 
The age of almost »7 years of diseases 
Incident to old age. The remains were 
aken to Minneapolis for '"termen^t^ 

St. Cloud— Judge M. D. Taylor 
Wednesday afternoon ^^^t the calendar 
for the court cases. Monday tne ca.se 
of Dr J. C Bohem against the city of 
kl Cloud Will be taken up. This U an 



Bjttem 



!/'..§. 



Unneceaeary paini and aches, like backache, beedache. arag- 



gteg feelhigB, inability to walk and similar Bymptomfl have been 
relieved by the use of Cardui 

Mrs. Mary Treeman. of Paint Lick, Ky., 
y^^ writes: "I M^e taken three bottles of Cardm 

/4Sff >./-. and It haa done more good than any medicine 1 
^^^^^ ever took in my life, I think it is the only 
medicine on earth that will care female troubl^ 
TwaeXwn in my b|i nearly all the time and 
hftd c^*r trouble*. Now ny back is nearly well 
and ffie other troubles are about gone." 

"mtf Orugglst 18 sure to keep Cardui on 
hand «U the tan*— just like your grocer keeps 
fiov aSa 8Uga]f. It is a standard part of a dnig- 
gkt*« atock. Q«t a bottle today! 



Take CARDUI 



oaio 



.^»' 



-I* — — - 

- -■ ■■ ■ 



- 




THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: SATURDAY, MAY 22. 1909. 



tt 




JOHN y w/$f WMO ucrr puouc u^e P/t/JU/f» /^A/^/ ^uq^o who 



9UCC£^3 *N TH^ t^ ^ 



Wtitten for The Herald by E /. Edwards [Holland. 



] 



(f ■i»»rii.tfei. 



irn^-M 



III 

>'• 

f 0. 

tv 
ri- 
p: 

0' 
Bi 

fa:: 

i;: 

t; 
6 



11- 



IIW». toy iho .\»*.,>rtatr}d Uter»:iy Vrem.i 
VEKT American boy learna 
while he stin t-, in the 
prhiiary sch ; r. some 

lay he may be president 
..f the United Statea. and 
may, when he becomes a 
man. be stsnt to conKre^s. 
All thl.s Is «t-«-iAt dtuitl- 
v»n It Is 

ted to 

■■-•'! of 

!in 

I (i I 1. ' ' i ' ' (III. t 

II Wh ■ :n- 

•vi 1 ! ' . i I'l'i 



: V t; I 



.l\-tj 1 1 



I game 



■m 

if 



-i-ly to 

1 than 
,, r*>lat** 

o r 
SI- 

ana in 
consider- 
the pre:-!. 
service 

§oor thii . ■- ■• "■ , ■ -» V ■ ^ ■'" 

Is frlen'ls to luak? up tor bun a pur^a 
wluTflwilii an Im-ome suffiolently mod- 
®.^t tf> suiiport his family, could be se- 



' y 

( .! r 



*ror 

a 



di, 

to J.:i, 
"tiilly 

ll': 
tl 

a. 
tt 

w 

l3.: 

a.' 
II 
ll 



:n- , 

^1- I 

or I 



i9t 



years of -■ 
■Liiilarv dl 



•iilua- 



Iltlcal filed, and so when b.» r tir.-d 
from President Arthur's tt.,- 

only money he had laid as; li.ii 

whfch he had been fortunate cuouifli t'> 
a. Lure In certain real estate liivest- 
menta In Washington. 

Doubtless because he realized tliat 
this small fortune '.vas not sufficient to 
meet the wants of himself and hia fam- 
ily and leave anything over for the 
rainy day. he set about collectinK data 
for a history of his twenty years' 
service In consress; but not until he 
uaa seen day after day busy atnld the 
alcovea of the old Congressional li- 
brary, whither he went to collect much 
of his data, did he confess that he 
contemplated wrltlntf such a history. 

This work n prog' 

time of his ca i for th- 

in 1S14. On the morning after the ei«o- 
t!on. when It was announced that 

over C' ■! had defeated htm. 

:. Blaii: , up hl3 pen and com- 

pleted this work. According to the 
understanding at thw lime. It yielded 
• ,11 a little more than $.'500,000. i- ' " it 

uatltuted the chief part of hi 
[>ut for It Mr. Blaine, notwith.^tai. ..ntf 
Ills pre-eminent inliuence In his own 
party, would have retired from public 
1 fe a comparailvtjlr pjor m;iu. 

.Senator Hoar 1 as a m<Mul)t;r 

..f the lower hou I years, and ha 

■I member of ti;'; .^.-...Ate twenly-fivo 
years, a gratid total of tliirty-five years 
of imtrioti*' labor. It wis «"•'' by •'o 
■ li.siingul.siied a lawyer 
"'^r that, if Ooorgo Fri.. .„ ;. 

aalncd In practice he i 

juld hav*' rsinked with his 

:111am M. ia\TU-|.s, a:.'l •v\i>uld ha\ 

.'VI UTilvrr.S:li! \ !■■ "Klilzud a.S ti.'' 

i>r oi the N -:land bar. In- 

L-fi'l. lii'wever. ■• ling hinificlf tu 

,1 :ional ci!--.-!. Ml H".if •4:1V.) 

in. ..f his pi'A.'i-.-, .m-i .%>Nii.s \-i i.i.s 

(.ounlry. and, tliougli he had a small 

fortune when he entered congress, he 

■yertheleas was dependent upon hla 

liary. first aa a representative and 

then as a senator, for hia dally bread. 

So nece.fsary, Indeed, was his salary 
for his dally support that the senator 
was not abl« to sriatify his ambition 
of many v- ' lin^j to take a on- 

slderable lo"r until within 

two or till ' * \ I MI'S before lila death. 
At that thne a' propo.sUlon was mad.- 
him that he nhoaid write his reniln- 
iices of puldlc men and events. The 
r waa ii-r .tupanled with a sllpula- 
I fvir m .> merit which the .«mt 

: r>K:i: an am;i/.lngly luuid 

.n. In i*::i(^t. it r-'pr.-- 
-it r«''tufn f<)r ii slim In 
•V ha*l 1 ■ '■ 

i WhhM 



nt the 

,1 iim;,' 




^^ Or An fiitiDEMT Fan 

aYoungMan? 



iH reported to have .said that It would 1 
nave been much bettor for him. from ! 
the viewpoint of success in civil life, 
had he retired from congress ten year* 
earlier. 
A. Buy ReprcneBtatlvr'M rivll Sncce«a. 
Thus ttie queiition, "Is congress a 
< aicer or an Incident for a young 
rniti.'" Is partly answered. Liut what 
it the chances of entering congress ' 
arly life and remaining in that 
ijii.Mti' service until highor succis.ss 
coniOH? McKlnley and Uon. Gaitit'^ld 
are thu ciinsplcutjus oxot-ptlons of rep- 
roseii talivcs so favored. On the other 
Ivin.i rfi-M.' are many cases telling of 
s hich have followed the put- 

t, _ jf the temptation to romaln 

in congress aftur a service of one or 
two teruid in that body. 

Some lim>j In the month of April 
there appeared before a committee of 
th'j Now York legislature at Albany 
J o.sfiph H. C'hoale and George X. Post, 
riicir purpose was to make argument 
In opposition to certain proposea legis- 
latlon relating to mett <jpol:tan rapid 
tran.Hlt and other lallway regulations. 
1 ii" . .!ir i. Mr. Ohoate need.jd no intro- 
.1 the other hand, George A. 
:nkni>wn, evct^jmng that he 
iuid lifvn Identified as the organizer of 
f!!u N itional Itallway Men's Business 
i'jn. He apiieared before the 
ee not as a paid lobbyist, but 
.i.s Liu; representative of this assocla- 
ilun. He .spoke with a plain, business- 
like bluntneaa and emp'iasis. which re- 
minded some of those who had heard 
Mark Hanna speak of the latter's ear- 
nestness and uructlcal every-day man- 
ner of appealing by argument to a 
tympany uf listeners. And so there 
were inquiries lor further information 
respecting this man. 

In the oarly "SOs a political conven- 
tion was held In one of the counties 
of Northern Pennsylvania for the pur- 
iMjse of nominating a candidate for 
congress. Th« delegates were mem- 
!■ -rs of a party which was In a minor- 
ilv In that district. The nomination 
of candidate.sf for congress was looked 
upon a.S a m^re perfunctory honor. It 
w'j.s 'iPTered to several citizens, and de- 
( ! ti i ind then, with some sense of 
ti.i .1 tlie convention named as Its 
ninlhlat^- a young man who would 
b. just if age t,f .(uallfy as member 
■ iigress In case h* were elected — 
-;« A. Po.st. Thei*» came of a 
■n a eyelonic factional disturb- 
which <')mplelely demoralized the 
■ I nmnant party, and wa.s followed by 
the nomination of a candidate by each 



■' 'he factions 
votes wei' 

■ It vv:i,> I 



A,^ 



■II red 



l^: 

ri 

w 



"1 iM- 



I 11(0 



f.,1 

k 



It 

K 

C' 

R! 

n 

ti 
li 

P 
t 

h: 
tl 
P 



It 



) 1 y 

i>f 

tun'ii'.s; a 

ike unto 

in the 

- ■ > n . I n 

at 

...•■■Is 

: iri>m 

I the 

■■fi hy 

, 'i-hfo1 



til tin- 











lU-U !!• 










. l.>:ig-'i 


V'l 


l>eH; 
iln 


I 1 
rd 


to 


Il<»ff1n nil ( 


m 






\. . <L. 


.>v'iin u 
w.-il the 

;l ..f til.'- n 
,01" IhluUJili 






-Ion. 








. 'i 


rtW 


It! w- ,■ I .s J t ; ■ 



result, when 

on election 

tliat the boy 

-it, had l)een 



Over %KMin' 



VV h>'ti Ml. I'oSt 

■ ■■'' ■v_ \v';'> bad 



I'-ty 



; before Gen. 

si'ii speaker 

■iitatives. to 

, .sophomoric, 

ue did the 

'■ar. that he 

lous member 

;e, and wlien 

line f'>r iioiuinati'ins for 

the next congre.^s Mr. 

urged him :it,':iin to be a 



tliat he 

I'ar' 
-k 



WM."« its sp 

Kent or ky 

from that t x.jiitfd .>iXi> e 
retary of tlie trea.siir 
1" ■ . '■ ., ' "■ •■cond adminisi 1 Mii'Mi in^ 
1 represtinlatlve. senator 

i'ui'l .■*.•. -lei '.-... ..| Cor tw»—''- v.-,.'S. 

and he w • old wi ■< 

com pel led ■ ' the [>: 

law. hlH tlrat lov, in onier 
might liv 

On I. ■-•'■ ••f f'^i'"' '-i '■^''■' ' 

,,rMTM-.l ■ . ■■tTtre I: N-'W "»'■> 

■■•liily ilisi'ovei ■ - 

i.^I I1I.1 witlt' rt'i- , , . . , 

. iie would have uieau-i d!fficu;t.y 

'mlhlinn up n law practice tlian 

«-..■■ ■ ..-!,. case had !■■■ ' ■ ■ < 

.,11" ■^v York wi. .1 



• to him In 

I .-. tlrst piolit- 

:m nearly four 

1 •> til., ri l-.l iO ',■'.> 



wliat 

<.■• 



th 



n a close 

i of some 

learning 

political life 



f 

it: 

}• 

11 
1 

1 

V 
V. 

I 

V. 

!■ 
\ 
I- 

V: 



t 



I'r 



■ ■Mi'-y ;; 
. it.) tlo- 

"i .till V. 



•tr.l 



l.; 



I !. 



-II. 



if Mr. i.'iir- 

that thi.'« 

:\.n opi">f- 

: k a prolil- 

.VI f. 



•latl or 

11. -il ti' 



.M. 



%•■ \«.' 



•lit 






t ': ' :-t t M : 



■■Uld ..tl,.-! 

'■> '■'?< I'l..', 

■.'.I's re; 
,-,..,... .' -■:. :ii»wled^ 
attract to turn a 1" 
.■'i.-nlele. 

.^ true dial t' 
.lemand for V 
mill his «ucee.s.H . 
Y »rk city cnild h 

' - ■ i n.>t 111."-: 

. ,)se of hi.-^ 



i . I" 

.. ex - 

-ilike 

i 1 1 . 1 u n i - 
! ^ w.ttild 
l>iotiiahle 

:.bT^ 



for the Vi^ung matt OlDo m to Depcna oit f)\$ Om Re$ottrce$ 
m mmtf 1$ "fln IitcWenr' from Such llleit a$ frank S. 
Black, €Urks €. Citileflcld. George E, Post, Judge Philip 
fi. iigro aitd WilUam ItlcJIdoo, Who Served in Congress and 
Quit to make a Civing. /. /. /. /. .\ /. /. /. 



1 



■:-c: man ' 
I rig the 
■■ of Co I.., 

• :itlons to 

: .. .. much of risk to a suc- 

areer they offered. He thero- 

ded that .)ne term in congress 

was enough f.o- a young man who had 

his career and hl»i fortune to make 

He r.-all7.ed that af --.md term. If 

a rn.'mh.^r of congr- led to temp- 

•rve a Ihirl t.*rm, then he 

- leasf .«!'■» far as 1 business 

..1 pr.if««.-<l..nal •' would bring 

a eftntpe'.»TU.. vi . 'd. Mr. Post, 

h, \vn s! . ". i iiiat one term 

ft; -n u t^ .V .r'h while for a 

y.Kini; man, wheiii'-r he contemplated 

biLHliiesa or a professional career. 

■ ■ -i term expired he enter^^d busl- 

■. became successful In his 

i: ..s. 11 viH-atlon and is n«iw consplcu- 

OU.S iimong the railway authorities of 

the I'nlte.l Stat.'S. 

Prom 4'unicr«>«M to thit Benrh. 

'r'.-re fip[)erti e,i before rfamuel J. 

i ill. the last time he. as speaker. 

■ in members .)r .-.tngre.ss, a slen- 

lark-eyei. .t.ilct -mannered youn^ 

. ;.. who until tit' stood before the 

-.p. iker to take the oath, wis presum^^d 

' . ! ■ the clerk of a comtnltt.^.-. He was 

n«f-st member . '." fj. ingress 

., M.ivr-mh.*r, IHS'i .s.ime of his 

I lie opinion that he 

t ■ as a representative 

t.\ .11 ;\ tw.> .r three nt.>nths — In other 

w r.ls he WIS not 3r. years of a«re 

wh.>n elect«'d. but was of that age when 

j4wr.irn in. 

• IS Philip Henry 
I , I Harry. He had 

;:i'-iu •.•■■I ' '• bar "if New 

•y only ' years when 

to congr ■.^.. He Inherited 
ind his fa'her was on Intimate 
...s with the Tammany Hall 
rs of that day. He could have 
inplated a career as a representa- 
wltliout anxiety as to his pe- 
tty Inilependence. But before Mr. 
a.l finished his first term he 
. thr» conclusion that congress 
no possibilities of a career 
■ ung man unless he pos-^esaed 
I ,.• p'ltiliar and distln.-tlve gifts fi>r 
tlie kind .if public life whi'h service of 
the li>wer housi^ of congre.ss reflects. 
He tiuallfled this .ipmlon by saying 
that for a voting man representing one 
of the new districts of the United 
States In the remote West or some 
pitt.-« .)f the .S.iuth. long continued ser- 
ii; .'.jngie-ss mlRht lie an accept- 
career. but this ould not be trui 
young man representing any dis- 
in the m.ire populous parts of the 
try 

> young New Yorker, therefore. 

■inine.l to put behind liim any 

, . iitation for continued s?rvlce In the 

lower ho'i.se of c.jngress. He returned 

t ' N -w York city, and before he was .30 

1 might have been nominated 

)r with certainty of election. 

':.,4.i I .t his friends advlse.l him that 

1 p.'f.ii.inent and highly dignified and 

, Mitial .-areer was pos.slble for him 

igh :icceptanc'' of a nomination as 

J i> i-e of .the supreme court. N.>m- 

irated and electe.i. and h.aving had 

',.)ttn .service upon the bencli, Mr. Dugro 

!■ '.s that his Judgment tliat a career 

:i: .)ngi»'ss is a mistake for a young 

man has been perfectly \in.1icated. 

The Kxperlence ot a SrnatMr'M Father. 

Frank H Bran legee. n-iw junior 

senator from Connecticut, had served 




JOH^ g C j^ ^J^ /S" X* JB 






-f^/^jff. 



/y/>^ ra rH€ fdi/vA r£i 



VI' 
I h 
'I' 



two terms In the lower house of con- 
gr.'ss while still a young man. when, 
by owM lit the accidents of politl.^3. he 
was transferred t'b the senate to serve 
the unexpired term of Senator O. H, 
Piatt. In all probability, but for this 
transfer. Senator Brandegee. at the ex- 
piration of his second term. would 
have t4ult congress on the advice of his 
Venerable father, n.jw in the Si)s, who 
wa.s persuaded by his .>wn experience 
that It Is a mlstako for a young man 
to serve longer than two terms In the 
lower house of congress 

Augustus Branlcgee, the father, was 
elected a member of congrcjss when 
only a little past 30. He went to the 
lower house with a brilliant reputa- 
tion as an orator. p.jssessing both 
natural and a.'tjuire.l gifts. He was a 
member of that .-.ongress in which R.is- 
coe <'.>nkling serv.-d lils 3e< ond term as 
represontative, and It was of him tliat 
Conkllng spoke, saying that Brandegee 
possessed as high gifts as an orator as 
any member of that b.idy 

In the mid. lie of Mr Brandegee's 
second term It was impressed upon 
him. hy informati.in that came to him 
of the poverty of one who long had 
serve.! In congress, -and who had re- 
turned to private Itf- thr.jugh one of 
the whirligigs of politics, that there 
was grave danger for a young man in 
the temptation to niak.i a proloonge.i 
•vreer in congr^^JS This led him to 
determine that at the end of liis second 
term he would return to his profession- 
al practice aiul .levote hlm^ielf to se- 
curing an income and a competence 
for his old age aa a practicing lawyer. 

In this determination he was Justi- 
fied. P.jlitical honors came to him; he 
was elected mayor of his native city 
of New Liondon. he was a delegate to 
political conv-nilons. and he represent- 
ed the United States at an important 
c. inference at Slir)rbro..)k. Can., where 
he made a brilliant address which be- 
mime traditional throughout Canada. 
Moreover, he amassed a competence In 
the practice of tiie law and always felt 
tliat. had he ybilded to the temptation 
to serve a third term In the lowjr 
house of congress, tils career wouhi 
have been wrecked, at lea.st so far as 
gaining professlonaU «ucces8 and pe- 
cuniary Independence was concerned 
The ISxantplea u( Littlcfield and Black. 
..In recent years _n'j young man ha.s 
entered congress* bringing with him a 
more brilliant rep'its.U<>n for the high- 
er Intellectual gift* -and finer powers 
of oratory than Cl-.arl.?s S. LIttlerteld. 
He was elect i.t'from the state of Maine 
to rill the unexpirad term of Nelson 
Dingley. This of Itself was sufficient 
to concentrate national attention upon 
Mr Llttief.eld. hut be It said In hla be- 
half that his career" In congress Justi- 
tled his reputati.jn and he became one 
of the pjomlnent memh-drs .)f the house. 

But of a suilden Mr Littletield de- 
termined to quit congress and aban- 
ilon politics. l\i) v/as In his fourth fuM 
term when th.^re c:^me to h'ni a full 
realization of th.e fict that for a man 
without a fortune, with a family de- 
pendent upon him for support, and 
with a professional reputation to make, 
it la a fatal mistake to remain In con- 
Ifress longer th<ui tiv0 or LLurea terms. 



He Immediately resigned, sought and 
gained admittance to the bar of New 
York state, entered Into practice and 
has been able to count in a single 
year a larger income than Uie aggre- 
gate salarl.^s he had received in all his 
public service, including his terra ol 
four years as attorney general of the 
state of Maine. 

Mr. Llttlelield Is of the opinion thai 
he did not give up public life a day too 
soon. 

When he was elected to congress from 
Now York Frank S. Black had gained 
what promlseil to be as remunerative a 
legal practice as any lawyer of North- 
ern New Y.)rk had secured. The first 
session of congress to which he was 
elected was not ended before Mr. Black 
perceived that there would be great 
risk to his professional advancement 
If he were tempted to remain in con- 
gress f.)r a longer period than a .sec- 
ond term, and he tlecided that he would 
guard against this temptation by r>j- 
fusing a aecon.l nomination In ca.se one 
were offered him. 

Of a sudden, however, and by reason 
of a peculLir politi.'al complication, he 
was nominated for governor of New 
York Just about the time of the ter- 
mination of the congress to which he 
had been elected. But his success in 
the practice of law since his retirement 
from public life has been so great as 
fully to justify his belief that he wiuld 
have made a grevloua mistake liad he 
been overcome by ambltl.jn to serve 
continuously In the lower house of 
congress. 

Two other prominent men who saw 
tills same danger and avoided It, and 
who are now extremely successful In 
private life, are John S. Wise and that 
William MoAdoo. who was assistant 
secretary of the navy under Cleveland 
and later police commissioner of New 
York city. Mr. Wise, who was one of 
the youngest members of the Confed- 
erate army, decided to put aside con- 
gress ambition even while he was serv- 
ing his first term; Mr. McAdoo. who 
was elected four times to congress, al- 
ways has been of tlVe opinion that. ■ - , ,. ,j 
from the standpoint of success In prl- 1 session, including addresses by prom- 
vate life, he would have been much Inent members of the .state and na- 
wlser had he declined re-election after ; ilonal aeries; 2 p m., theater parties 
the expiration of his second term. [ for the ladies, who will be the guests 
When he did abandon his congress ^f j^e ladies of the Calumet aerie, 
ambitions,, he likewise "^*^*^'"" ' irvenin^ free thketn will he annnliftd 
mined to leave public life altogether fV«"'"^^"2L supplied 
of.>re It was too late to save his nro- '-O an tneaters. „ ,. ^ . 
fesslonal practice, and he later became I Wednesday, June 9. — 10 a m., busl- 
oonnected with the navy and the police ' nesa session at Gaiely- Wiggins' hall; 10 



department of New Yotk city, largely 
through the realization of the fact that 
experience In these two fields would 
give him Information which would be 
exceedingly valuable In the practice of 
hia profession. 

EAGLES' MEETING 
PROGRAM READY 

Calumet Committees Pre- 
pare to Make State 
Gathering Success. 

Calumet, Mich., May 2 2. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — The various commit- 
tees arranging for the state aerie of 
Eagles here next month are rapidly 
getting their plans In shape. Nearly 
all of the details have been decided 
upon and are being worked out as 
rapidly as possible. The official pro- 
gram just issued outlines the follow- 
ing: 

Tuesday, June 8. — The reception of 
visitors; 10 a. m., an open meeting of 
the local members and their guests 
at the Eagles' hall and Oately- Wig- 
gins' hall, and an address of welcome 
by President John T. Dunn of the 
Calumet aerie and by President Frank 
H. Schumaker of the village of Red 
Jacket in response to Vernon J. Bow- 
ers, grand worthy president of the 
state aerie; 2 p. m., opening business 



a. m., automobile rides for the ladles 
from the Red Jacket city hall to all 
points of Interest about Calumet; 2 
p. m., btisinesa session at Gately-Wlg- 
gins' hall, and trolley ride for the la- 
dies to Lake Linden and other points 
of interest near Calumet; 8:30 p. m., 
grand ball at Red Jacket town hall. 

Thursday, June 10. — 10 a. m., busi- 
nes-s session at Gately- Wiggins' hall. 
10:30 a. ni.. drive to the scenic shores 
of Lake Superior for the ladies; 2 p. 
m., grand street parade of the local 
vsiiting members through Calumet 
and Laurlum, Including marching 
clubs from the different lodges in the 
Copper country and bands from every 
station, the parade to be headed by 
the Calumet & Hecla band; 7:30 p. 
m., dancing on the pavements, music 
furnished by the bands; 8:30 p. m., 
grand Illuminated procession through 
the streets of the town, followed by a 
general merry-making session. 

The parade will l>e concluded at the 
Red Jacket field, where a big fire- 
v/orks display will be given to bring 
the three days' convention to a close. 



STAKTLIHRARVWOUK. 



[mci 



mcHinlev U$?d to JIdoise Voung men Dot to Stay in (Congress 
11 more Cban Cwo or Cbree terms— Che Old flge Poi^erty of 
ll Prominent men lUbo Remained in Congress for Vears— John 
I 6. Carlisle s Cong (Uait for a Cegai Clientele JIfter Ceaving 

Public Cife, /. ,\ /. /■ /. /. :. /. / 

I =» 




Excavating Be;^ins for Houghton 
Structure Donated By Carnegie. 

Houghton, Mich.. May 2 2. — (Specall 
to The Herald.) — The sum of 15.000. 
the first installment of the $15,000 
donated by Andrew Carnegie for the 
erection of a public library building 
here was received this week. 

Contractor Johr: J. Mlchels has 
commenced excavating for the struo- 
ture and it will be completed and 
ready for occupancy by Oct. 1. The 
library is being erected at the north- 
east corner of Montezuma and Huron 
street.s, on the site formerly occupied 
by the Houghton armory, and will be 
a beautiful structure. 

The building will be 64 by 37 feet, 
and will add greatly to the general 
appearance of that section of Hough- 
ton. Mr. Stoyle announced this 
morning that the entrance would be 
similar to tliat of the ('entral hljrh 
school building. Cement sidewalks 
will be laid along both sides of the 
building, and to the rear of the 
structure there will be a grass plot 20 
by 50 feet In dimenslon.s. 

• 

If you desire a clear complexion 
take Foley's Orlno Laxative for consti- 
pation and liver trouble as it will stim- 
ulate these organs and thoroughly 
cleanse your system, which is what 
everyone needs In the sprint? in order 
to feel well. Sold by ail di'Ui;tfista« ^ 



jH 



,4 




Carol !ii;i. the 
thv>lr visit I't-iJig 
and Uie Ullor pai t 

T. Bnltei 

KfUi- 

^un.1fi.y looking 

lie Goodman dvxig 

Mc- 



Bemldjl, Mi.m May 22— (Sptc.nl to 

feturned to the . .iv h.uurday night 
alter having been absent fo. thit^e 
months in the iouth. They spe.a vart 
of the time in North 
•nrller portion of 
•pent In the valleys 
In the mountains 

John Goodman and <.eor)? 
returned Monday morning from 
her where they spent 
over the buslnees of t 
■tore at that point. 

Mies Johannah Bowe and John 
Manui of thli city were married Mon- 
day at St. PhllHp-i Catholic church. A 
weddlnK breakfast wae eervexl at the 
Bowe home for friends^ of the bridal 
ooupie. Mr. and Mrs. Mt-^^anus hay* 
rlnUl a houte in Mill Park and will 
continue their residence in Bf'"><lJ'-,.„„ 

Charles Schafer of Duluth, traveling 
laseenger aerent for 
Shore & Atlantic 
day nlfifht and part 
Bemldii. looking up 
road. 

A. E Witting, who 
Charles Trondson 
operations in the 
and elsewhere. 
Monday night 

vlslilng with — III-.,.!, 

when he returned to Black- 



turned Tuesday from a short visit with 
relatives in Duluth. 

Miss Mary McArtliur spent Monday 
with her frUiKl, Mins MayLelle llaak- 
ejisen. 

Mesire. Jamet* and Bert HaU y en- 
tertained informally a nunih. r ot 
friends at their home last Satuiday 
evening' -A very enjoyalde time was 
had. uUh.MiKh the bad weather pre- 
veiited many trom attending: Those 
prestrii were Me.«srf*. and Me«darne8 
Hamilton. Heatr. and Mrs. Wafkins 
v( Monlicello, Ind. Mlsse.s Dagny Beik- 
land, Anna Lyngstad Huth Lcfstrand 
of Payne, lolet Yell. M.sses Ne^f^on. 
Carrie Peterson. Aniiu Broberp, Kthel 
Hamilton. Mis.ses Bell. Messrs. Kallen- 
berger. Berkland. Haley. Peterson. 
Kuhlmey, Olson. Watkii..-*, Klees. Wil- 
son and Swartz. 



the Duluth. South 

railway, spent Tucs- 

of Wednesday In 

buslnfsa for his 




is associated with 

in extensive logging 

vicinity of Blackduck 

came from the North 

and remained In the cjty 

his family until Tuesday 

evening, 

*'*There was a wreck on the Kelllher> 
Funkley branch of the Minnesota & 
International railway early Tuesday 
morning which, while not very serious, 
caused considerable inconvenience 
delay along the route 
ditched at the St Cro 
b»r company's spur. 
from Funkley. trom 

George Wetzel of Tenstrike 
down from his home Wednesday 
Ing He was accompanied by 
Hagadon who was 
pote of proving up 
Tenstrike ^ r- r, 

O. E, Kehman and f . E 
Grand Rapids, who are In 
of the government 
to the city '" '"■■ 
north. 

W. B. Mcl-achian 

?'00d boat Yankee 
he city Tuesday 



and 

Eight cars were 

X Cedar & Lum- 

t w o m i 1 e P " u t 
some unknown 

came 

morn- 

W. C 

here for the pur- 

on his claim ntar 

Williams of 

the employ 

as surveyors, came 

Tuesday afternoon, en route 



Thief 
(Speelal 

Boi.l . f 



River Falls, Minn., May 22. — 
to The Herald ) — Manager 
the local baseball team was in 



commodore of the 

Doodle, arrived In 

evening after an 

river 

sev- 



luw 
L'a- 
thf 



•ventful trip on the Mississippi 
which. It is claimed, covered some 
entv miles and Involved some treach- 
erous navigating He towed a wanl- 
san for th€ use of the Grand Forks 
Lumber company on the company s 
drive in the La Sajle district. 

A partv of Grand Forks. N. D. peo- 
Ble who spend their summer vacations 
at Grand Forks bay, on the western 
shore of Lake BemidJI. have been spend- 
ing several days here arranging their 
cottages for the season. In the party 
were A. A Bruce, dean of tl.i 
BChool of the I'nlvers-lty of North 
kota, Joseph Kennedy, dean of 
teachers' college of the same mstitu- 
tion: Judge C. F. Templeton and L 
M. *!:ooley. a local attorney at Grand 

Forks. 

____ > _ — 

Fond du Lac Minn., Mav :■/- (Spe- 
cial to The Herald )— Mrs Hun- 
Quist spent Friday in the en. 

Mlsf Clivc Scott of the West end wa» 
i.f l.t'f aunt. Mr«*. C. A. Kun- 
•' tilt- week. 
. <ola of Duluth visited 
parents. Mr. and Mrs. E. L. 
the week 



end. 

F Harvey 



■u 



.lo 



a guev' 
qulst 

Mrh 
with her 
Hogstad 

Mr 
the '1' 

>• ■ 

in I'uiuf 

C. A. 1< 
du La<. tttii'- 

Mrs. Gu8l 
Duluth. 

Mr and Mrs. Fred Laiu 
at their home Satunlay . \ 
were i-layed and refi' 
nervt'd A rlti.f-.-.nT ^•^■< 
Tl. 

A ^. 

Olseii H.. '''"1 

Bertha 1 ''i-f; 

erlni' h lii. ■,(...-', .M»->- 
A, K\ ! :.i'" • i; •'"■: 
dore Muii. 
Alfred A 

E.r ■■ 
qi. 

Dulut 
«pend ; ..' 

Kev. Mr K 
nervieen tit 1 ' 

D. L. Bisliop wub 
day. 

E, I- A - left 
Mond: vis- it 
for I ■. t<^ 

T. ( .►.I.f 

Cottagt "" nod 1 .\ 
(iperid the suiuri.er 
lly. 

Judge and Mrs. 
Wediiestlay »'vt.i,;t,t- ,t, 

Mrs. R L 
thf first < r ; 

Mrs. N- ■ ai.d 

luth wer- •,.- <'f 

HfMitt .\l..i 

Mis.--' Inpji ^ .. 
West tl.« n:>r 

S. .- . f riCMi.f • 

Lac caiJt : '1''. ■'■ -'■■•■ '• 



MahiM.ii.en this week and succeeded in 
securing Holsteln for the catcher and 
experts to get Charlie Roy and Bob 
Hallett. 

Manager Ellison of the Minnesota 
Mutual 1-ife Insurance company was in 
this city Monday visiting Examiner 
Wilcox. 

County Surveyor Martz with three 
viewers, Messrs. Glgstad, Blair and 
Haavi of St Jlilare. were out east of 
this city Tuesday examining tlie iiro- 
posed ditches in the towns of Clover 
Leaf and Smiley 

Dr. Booren returned from Stillwater 
on Tuesdav. He was visiting his 
parents, who leave next week n. spt-nd 
the summer months in Europe. 

Perly, the 2 »A -year-old daughter of 
Mr and Mrs. Nels Severson died last 
Friday from an atta<k of spinal 
meningitis. ^ ,^ 

The Sons of Norway society held 
their annual celebration in the club 
rooms in the Masonic block and lis- 
tened to several interesting addresseis 
on matters relating to Norway. 

Thomas Germo, formerly county at- 
torney of Red Lake county has left 
Red LAke Falls. He will likely locate 
In Oklahoma. 

The high school commencement eif- 
erclsee will be held in the roller skat- 
ing rink next Friday evening A. 
Adam Bede will deliver the chief ad- 
dress and alarge number of giaduates 
will receive their diplomas at that 
time. 

Rnmors continue to come thick and 
fast that the Soo railway will not 
wait until 1910 to begin the eonstiiic- 
tlon of the Thief Ftiver Falls-Duluth 
cutoff line, but that active operation 
will start as soon as tlie two locating 
crews, who are now settling the final 
line, have comnleted their reports. 

Several changes in the time of the 
passenger trains on the Soo lines out 
of this city will be put in operation 
next week. The time of the day 
trains to the titles will be cut down 
two houii^. 

A eubscriplion list was circulated 
among the business ment this week 
and $500 was raised to enaide the city 
l< njaintain a good bast-ball team dur- 
ing this season. 

Street Commissioner Melby is busily 
engaged In placing cement cross 
walks on the downtown cross ingH. 
About tlilrty of these must be con- 
structed this sunimer In different 
parts of the city. 

The farmers inthe vicinity of Hazel, 
a point on the Soo some few miles 
south of this city, are forming a co- 
operative creamerv company and will 
erect a creamerv building at once. 



son left this week for Colorado 
Springs, Colo., where they expect to 
make their future hf>me. 

A. E. Hanke and Herman J. Haase 
of Blue Earth Citv. Minn , have leased 
a storeroom In the new Citizens' State 
Bank block. „ 

Charles Bisiar and family loft Tues- 
day for Virginia. Minn., where they 
will make thejr future home, Mr. Bisiar 
having purcliased a hotel and restau- 
rant business, 

George A. McKlnley's sawmill which 
was destroyed by fire a few weeks ago. 
will be running again by June 1. 

D. J. Phillips, conductor on the local 
freigiit between Brainerd and BemidJI, 
lias moved his family to tliut place and 
will camp on the shores of the lake. 

But few applications for registration 
of title have been made so far under 
the Torrens system in this county, but 
three having been entered up to the 
middle of May. 

Rev E. K. Copper returned Tuesday 
from Hewitt, Minn., where he had t'^'^n 
to solemnize the marriage of Rev. W. 
A. McKenzie. formerly on the Brainerd 
circuit, and Miss Cora P. Sutton of that 
place. 

The pupils of St. Cecelia's hall will 
give their annual entertainment at the 
opera house on tlie evening of June 10, 
and will as usual present a musical 
ptogram of a high order. 

Mr. and Mrs, B. Solaski returned 
Tuesday evening from a week's visit 
with relatives in Duluth. 

Mrs, W. H. Onstine and twc grand 
children went to Peyuot Tuesdav to 
join Mr. Onstine for a week on their 
farm. ^ „ 

Mrs. Lundy, mother of Mrs. G. A. Mc- 
Kiniey, died at tlie home of lier daugh- 
ter Tuesday morning, after an illness 
of two montlie The remains were 
taken to Elvsnum. Minn., for burial. 

The Klondike Farmers' Mutual In- 
surance company claims the record. It 
has been running three years and is 
.lust issuing its second call fur an as- 
sessment. 

Mls.<- Emily Quinn returned to Fargo 
Wednesday afternoon. after having 
spent Sunday at the home of iier par- 
ents in this city. _, , ,. , 

Edward Scallen and family left for 
Minneapolis Thursday with the^ re- 
mains of his mother. Mrs. Susan scal- 
len. who died Wednesday evening of 
diseases attendant upon <dd age. She 
was born in Ireland and Vas almost hi 
of age at Hie time of her death. 



Interest In the fortunes of the Moose 
Jaw team of the Western Canada league 
The team is managed by M. O. "Kid 
Taylor, who managed the Virginia team 
for two years and six of tlie members 
of the team formerly 
glnla. The news that 
team iiad defeated 
straight games in the 
hailed with delight by 



played in Vir- 
the Moose Jaw 

Regina three 
first series was 
the fans. 




to H. G. McCaw and A. C. Tedford, who 
will take possession the first of the 
week. Mr. Slater has accepted a posi- 
tion in Minneapolis, and his family 
will go to Andover, S. D., to spend-the 
summer with Mrs. Slater's parents. 

Mr. and Mrs. Phil Savage and son, 
David, departed Monday for Cloquet. 
where they will make their future 
home. , ,, 

Mrs. Bradsliaw and mother of Kelly 
Lake, were visitors at the Wilkinson 
liome this week. 

H. G. McCaw returned Thursday 
from a business trip to Duluth. 

Mrs. Ed Donley was a Cloquet vis- 
itor Thursday. 



years 



of 
F. 



the 
A. 



called 



was the 
few days 



were in 



vitt and Miss Anna 

^•rai day.^ last week 

friends. 

f Iiulutli was a Fond 

.»ii.ntlii y 

Nelson spent Tuesday In 

entertained 
.ir,p. Games 



..I,..] Mrh. C 
and SiKna 

.(. !••• ' -■■■ ..II, 

■fin Si 

I .f ft .'I i nM'll. 

kii.Kn. Theo- 

1 ■. I' Luebke. 

Heaney. Carl 

l>Hvid Run- 



Alborn. Minn., May 22.— (Special lo 
The Herald.) — Fred Asplund of Rush 
City came to Alborn tiie first 
week to become engineer in 
Tiulanders sawmill. 

Frank Brousseau of Burnett 
on .'\lborn friends Thursday 

Clifford Mathesln of I^uluth spent a 
few days with his parents, Mr. and 
Mrs M. Mathesin. 

Gordan Wood of Prt.ctor 
guest of Andy Maloney for a 
returning Wednesday. _ ^ ,,, 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred Mell of P^ngllly 
spent Sunday at the home of IranK 

Joimson. _ * »„ r<i^ 

Miss Nora Trolander went to Clo- 
quet Mondav to take a position at the 
Y M. C A. as stenographer. 

Hans Olson of Braham c^me 
bi>rn Monday. , , . . 

Mrs. Matt Mathesin and daughter 
Sybil went to Duluth Monday 
returned Thursday. 

G. A. Wiseman of Superior 
Alborn Wednesday. 

Messrs. L. B Arnold and 
Hoyt of Duluth transacted 
here Thursday. 

Mrs. J. H. Carr went to 
Thursday to stay for an 
time. 



to Al- 

;hter, 
They 

was in 

W. H 
business 

Duluth 
Indefinite 




hnson. 

re Ti:. 



IS .McGilvary of 
Ff.nd du Lar- to 

.r summer home. 

Ne^v ■ ■• lield 

U.i- IR- •itii 

in the cli% Tiiurs- 



of 



for Mahnomen, 
his uon. I 'red 



Minn., 
Glass 



■w;,.ii 
Mr 

here 



has 

<-:itit 
v\ ith 



rented a 
and will 

JiLs fani- 



Cant of 

t- ;ti F<'i.. <i 



Iniluih spent 
1 1, Lac. 



da UK' 

Mrs. 

■(>] 

I.J Itie 
\^ a s 



tfcl of l'4l- 

Camertn 



frit inls 
week. 
a Fond 



in 



du 



Bert Clark returned to his home at 
Beinidjl lusi week, after an extended 
visit with his brother at this place. 

Elmer iCling was a business visitor 
at this place last week. 

J Taylor has been assisting at the 
'\nipass office this week. 

.vliss Mattle Cramei is enjoying a 
pleasant vacation here wilti relatives 
this week 

B. G. Wattles wh. r.'cntly pur- 
chased the lioyai Highft property, has 
moved Into his new home. 

Mrs. (^eorge Gagnon came in from the 
homestead last Thursday and visited 
%vilh Inends. 

Henry Sherman waf :. huslness vis- 
iter here last Wedrns.ia; 

Mi and Mrs. CiOvin Siiillh of Carlos 
(■,tv Iiiil.. weer ti»e guests of John T, 
I'vlii and wife last Wt ek. 

K. V, .Mr McCaiin was a Bemldjl 
visitor last Wednesda\ 

Ida Labounty. who t.;l^ l>een a resi- 
dent of Margieftfor some tune past re- 
turned to tins place. 

The Tracv family have rn< ved to 
Liltlefork. where they will ren.aji. dur- 
ing the summer. 

Ed Bennett is a>.'a... .-i iillzc:, ..f Big 
I«\'ills. having engaytd in a piofii.-ililt 
enterpiise, 

-_. !' f'-V'nsrin left Siirida:- cv( 1; - 

1), when he will look 

;.ii,.i iiii... 1 ...U'restis in tiial locui- 

ity. 

Countv Treasure! Snyder was an oRi- 
clal visitor here last Frniay. 

The gardening season is now on in 
all ,it> rush, aftfT a deiay of many 
days. 



the 



of 
the 




Deerwcod, Minn.. May 22.— (Special 
to The Herald.)- A. M. J^^^kham had 
the misfortune to cut his knee bad.y 
Tuesday evening with a draw knife. 

Oberg Bros, have completed 
addition to their pool hall, 

Tlie frame Is up for Sewall s new 
drug store building, and the work is 
being rushed rapidly. 

Matt Crosby has shipped In a drill 
belonging to the Crosby Exploration 
compfriy and it will drill the town- 
site of Crosby for lion ore. 

Miss CUson ol Duluth has accepted a 
position as stenographer for the 
Rogeis-Brown Ore company. 

Mr« W. C. White an ived Tuesday 
from their winter home in Milwaukee 
accompanied by Miss Helen Carver 
Rochester, N. Y.. who will visit at 

William Musser of Iowa City, Iowa, 
was visiting here last week. In corn- 
panv with Charles H. Adams he went 
to Gull Lake Friday 8"«J , ,t^/"y|^>- 
Mr Musser left Monday for Little I-aUs 
and the Twin Cities, en route to Ins 

'"jTdge Vlnje and family of Superior 
arrived the first of the week tc spend 
; I,' summer at their cottage on Ser- 

[.♦rit lake. , 

A townsite company is 
have been organized in 
handle the town sites on 
Lange railroad. I<umor 
that the company will piat 

'"it'TriTaul^hat never in the history 
of the c.iyuna range has there been so 
nany drills at work on the range as 
H "^present. There are now. U Is said. 
over flftv machines at work on the 
range prospecting for iron, 
Mrs. Bartens is very proud 



Cloquet, Minn.. May 22.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— Miss Cora English of 
Duluth visited with friends in Cloquet 
the fore part of the week. 

William Cochrane has purchased the 
Northern hotel at Hit bing and left 
Wednesday to take charge of his new 
acquisition. 

Mi.«!S Rose Rosetta of DuluUi was 
the guest of Miss Ada Grenier on Sun- 
day and Monday of this week. 

The Swastika club dance, wliich was 
held in the opera house Monday even- 
ing, was attended by a large number 
ol young people and a very pleasant 
time has been reported. 

Miss Elizabeth Grenier of Hibblng 
visited with relatives here the fore 
part of the week. 

Miss Ella Carey spent Monday at 
Cromwell, attending lo school busi- 
ness. 

F. J. Wilhelmi, traveling salesman 
for the Northern Lumber company, 
was in the city on business a lew days 
tills v^^c€!^k* 

Mrs. J. L. Leroy returned Monday 
from a week's visit with relatives in 
Minneapolis. 

Thursday evening the public launch- 
ing of the Y'. M. C. A. membership cam- 
paign took place. The campaign will 
last for ten days, ending May 31, and 
the aim is to bring the membership of 
the men's department up to the 500 
mark. Ten teams liave been organized 
and a lively campaign is expected. 

The last meeting of the boys' Bible 
class was held Monday evening. The 
season or term Jtist closed was very 
successful, and another will be siarled 
s^ne lime in tlie future. 

If the weather permits, the Pleasant 
Sunday Afternoon club will hold a 
meeting In Pinehurst park, when Rev. 
J. T. Moody, general superintendent 
of the Duluth Bethel society, will 
speak on the subject "From Barroom 
lo Pulpit, " In case of rain or cold 
weather the meeting will be held in 
the Y. M, C. A. rooms. 

Richard Bonvllle returned Monday 
from a few days' visit with reiutives 
in Aitkin. . ^ „ . ., 

M. J. McMahom visited with friends 
at West Dulutli Wednesday. 

The I»olnsetta club was entertained 
by Miss Agnes Greening Wednesday 
evening at the home of Mr. and Mrs. 
M. E. L>avis. 

Miss Mary Mertlnger leaves tomor- 
row for Portland. Or., where she will 
visit for a month with relatives and 
friends. 

Fred Bentz of Bovey spent the great- 
er part of tlie week in this city visit- 
ing friends and relatives. 

Invitations were issued this week 
for the wedding of Miss Emily Kelly 
to William Andrews, which will take 
place at the St. Andrews church next 
Tuesday at high noon. 

The debate at the high school last 
Friday evening on the Negro Problem 
resulted in Rachel Epperson capturmg 
the first prize, Harvey Koch, second, 
and Ruben Swensen, third. 

Tl.is afternoon tli* high school base- 
ball team met the Nelson-Dewey 
school team of Superior in 
home game. Tlie locals were 
In both games of the double 
Coleraine and Grand Rapids 
day, but practice this 
that today's game 
fought, win or lose. 

Miss Nona Dwyer 
Sunday at liome liere. 

Rev. C, W. Lowrie left Monday to 
tend a national convention of 
Presbyterian church at Denver, 

Miss Agnes Long returned 
from a visit with friends 
water. .. , 

Mr and Mrs. George Munson of 
Virginia, were in the city Saturday. 
the guests ol Mr. and Mrs. T. H. \\hite. 
Mr. and Mrs. A, A. McDonnell re- 
turned Tuesday from an extended visit 
with relatives at Memphis. Tenn, 

Mrs. Alex Beiiulieux returned Mon- 
day from Duluth. where she has been 
a patient at St. Mary s hospital suffer- 
ing with appendicitis. . , , . , 

Henry McGugin sustained a few bod- 
ily injuries Monday morning, when he 
was thrown* from a lumber wagon 
drawn by a runaway team. 

Last Sunday, the Cloquet 
team deleattd tlie Spaldings 
14 to 4. It was a very one 
test as the score indicates, 
theless It was Interesting 




convenient 

interests. , , 

The Aitkin Commercial club 
ing some practical work this 
among the farmers. They are 
their influence to assist in the 



varied 



lake, 
ley will 

was 

when it 



Frazee. Minn., May 22. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — John Poppler arrived 
home from Hinckley, where he has 
been emploved as buttermaker. He 
will work for his father on his farm 
this season. „ 

J. E. Flnfrash. editor of the Fargo 
Forum was in Frazee Wednesday. 

Mrs. John Bates, Miss Agnes Ashley 
and Mrs. L. D. Hendry represented 
Fern Leaf chapter O. E. S. at a rneet- 
Ing of the grand chapter in Minne- 
apolis Wednesday and Thursday of this 
w c ^ Ic. 

Frank Travis sustained a painful in- 
jury, being thrown from the carriage 
at the sawm.ill, reulting in the break- 
ing of one of the bones in his hand. 

The machinery for the farmers 
creamery has arrived and it is now be- 
ing installed. 

L. W. Oberhauser made a business | men 
trip to Vergas. , .. ^ 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Schultz visited 
at Perham over Sunday. 

Hon. Henry I. BJorge of Lake Park 
was a visitor here today. 

Boiler Inspector Nelson of Lake Park 
Inspected the boilers of the flour mill 
and sawmill Tuesday. 

A babv bov was born to Mr. and Mrs. 
B. Y. McNany, May 19, 

J. H. Baldwin has moved his family 
out to his summer home near Graham, 

Kenneth McClean has been appointed 
street commissioner and has the work 
of cleaning the streets In good condi- 
tion. ... A 

The Detroit high school nine and 
Frazee high school team crossed bats 
on the home diamond and the score 
was 11 lo 1 in favor of the Frazee high 
school. 

Lester Jarvis was operated upon re- 
cently for appendicitis by Doctors Bar- 
ton and Weeks. _ ^ , 

Born, to Mr. and Mrs. B. Gerber, a 
daughter, May IS. . . o* r>„,.i 

Miss Gusta Herald went to St. Paul 
Saturday to visit relatives. 

Mrs. William Chilton is very 111 at 
her home here with typhoid fever, 
which necessitates the attencance ol 
a trained nurse. Miss Scheis of Fargo. 

Edward Schrom left on Tuesday for 
Los Angeles. Cal.. to see his wife, who 
is not expected to live. 

Miss Jessie Durkin came down from 
Fargo this week for a visit with her 
paients. Mr. and Mrs. D. L. Durkin. 

Tlie graduating class from the high 
school In June will consist of: Bruno 
Beer, Veronica Schmitz and Gottlieb 
Baer The sm.all class Is due to the 
fact that so many of the seniors have 
bad to leave school during the year. 



is do- 
spring 
using 
state 
land sale lo be held here later in the 
season, and a short lime ago secured a 
lot of seed potatoes which they liave 
placed with the farmers to encourage 
the potato-growing industry, giving 
cost price to them, and even Belling on 
time to those unable to pay for the 
seed when they got it. 

Mat Crosby of Duluth was here a 
few dav8 ago and reports that drilling 
has been commenced on the proposed 
townsite of Crosl»y at Serpent 
and if sufficient Iron is found th . 
have to change the location of the 
town. It was not supposed there 
any iron under the townsite 
was first selected. 

Judge Edson of Duluth came here 
a few days ago and went up to his 
summer home at Bandy Lake by way 
of steamer on the Mississippi. 

E F. Krelw^itz of Duluth, father of 
Attorney Krelwltz, has been visiting 
here during the past week. 

B. A. Goff is putting up a store 
building at Glen. 

As considerable opposition arose 
over the proposal to place the Car- 
negie library building on the court- 
house grounds that plan has been 
abandoned and it is not certain tliat 
anything further will be done toward 
accepting the gift. . 

E. A. Gyde gave a banquet to the 
grand jurors at the completion of their 
hibors of the term, at the Foley hotel 
Thursday night. Inv.tlng the judge, a 
number of attorneys and newspaper 
to bring the number up to 
thirtv. A number of bright toasts were 
given and the affair was a most de- 
lightful one. ^ ^ . 

Calvin E. Carr, who has been woik- 
ing on a drill In the new mining coun- 
try, died very suddenly a few days ago 
and his death is attributed 
trouble. He leaves a 
children. 

The county educational meeting 
here Friday and Saturday was a splen- 
did success and lo the credit of County 
Superintendent E. H, Hall, who con- 
ducted the affair. 



Brimson Is tak- 
lo work on hl» 
L. E. Hosford la 



to heart 
wife and six 

held 




high 

lis first 

defeated 

-header at 

last Salur- 

week Indicated 

would be hard 

of Duluth spent 

al- 
the 

Colo. 
Saturday 
at Still- 




Aurora, Minn.. May 22. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The night shift at the 
Fowler shaft has been laid off until 
the mine starts to ship ore. 

Miss Anna Louise Flynn of Fargo. 
N. D., who was elected supervisor of 
music and drawing of the Aurora 
schools for next year has resigned, 
leaving the position open. 

Mrs. Chase returned to Duluth Sat- 
urday after a short visit with her sis- 
ter, Mrs. Darrow. 

William Mudge, Jr., of the Adriatic 
passed through Aurora on ills way to 
Duluth Friday. 

Rev. Suver attended the district con. 
vention of the M. E. cliurch at Duluth 
this week. 

Dr. Buser was over from the Adri- 
atic Sunday and officiated as umpire 
of the ball game with W. J. Rash- 
leigh. 

Mrs. Karnish returned to her liome 
in Two Harbors Friday after having 
visited a week with Mrs. Adolph Olson. 

Married, at the Catholic church, 
Monday morning, James Ogrinc and 
Father Pirnat offl- 
contracling parlies 



has been appointed 
at the Mohawk lo- 



ci.-. 
S . ■ 
r> • • 

b' 

r;i 

al'-- 
A " ■ 

l! : 

T 
1 

•en. 
Mr^ 

fi 

1! 
S' 

V 

o 

Zenith 

Mr. 



J. M. 

rperide i 



:.r.i r I 

L. I. 
s I or ti.t 

lace son It 



Xii'.u. M;.' .^fecial 

,,, , — The N'< I I Or J I. J aciflc 

liii.v» tuiiied out several 
(,. iliji:. r Bins clri'UH, to 
Miiusthcu Jii a wreck last 



reported to 
Duluth to 
the Cuyuna 
also has it 
an addition 



baseball 
of Duluth, 
•sided con- 
but never- 
at times. 
Tomorrow the locals will line up 
against the Columbias.of Duluth. and 
prospects for another victory are 
bnglit. „ , ., 

lidiss Lillian Bisner was a Duluth 
visitor Tuesday, , ^. ^^ , 

Miss Carev and Josephine Carey of 
Duluth were tlie guests of Miss Murel 
Htdfield on Friday. 

M.ss Murel Redfield gave a recital 
at the Presbyttrian churcii last even- 
ing She was assisted by Miss Mad- 
dox and Miss Pressor of Duluth. 

Mrs. E, N. McDevltt left today foi 
Cour d'Alene, Idaho, where she expects 
to spend the summer 



of 




handsome spotted colt born to her gray 
mar' last week. The little fellow is 



S War rw k 



n' t . k 



Cloud, one of 

rii's i...\\' was 

■. 1 1..' 



rertalnlv a l>fauty. 

The voung people gave « surprise 
parly in the hall a few nights ago in 
honor of Marion Cunninghams Iwen- 
tv- third birthday. All enjoyed them- 
velve.« to the fullest extent and de- 
parted wishing Mr. Cunningham many 
returns of the day. 



the even- 
pr t Pi ded. 



Mrs 



vv e 1 1 
I . T. 



-■.:; i-ic I K iiiTi'. 

ton. Berkland, 



Ml, 

■ f r- 

:ys« s 

Si)' 



• ■ity 

aiul 



.Anderson of Duluth is 
.. , \rf ^ Anton Lekke 

visitor in the 
this we^'k. 
Mrs. William Berbig re- i 



. A H. 

• 'ine in 
!tia.irie<l 
of her 

I . \V;H 

and 1 



W 
.Tfi< k 
count y, appraisers 

No. 1 left Monday 



\\ . ft .Ml nuay for 

i'c: 1-. • 'r . a1 ter liav- 

liere >■• :riOi»ths, V'e- 

motht I - ; ' -i liealth. 
.f I of Aitkin and W. L. 
s. Taylor of Crow Wing 




on 
in 



judicial 
company 



ditch 
with 



r tor Aitkin. 



R. K. Wt.iteley. enginec 
to take up their duties. 

H. .'iir< tiow C-! I ".liutli. 
live <'i Mathers KvwJi & 
llic iity Tiie.'-<!ay 

Misses Anntc Nel.-^-'o and L:iura Lar- 



i< presenta- 

Co., was In 



Recohing 

ANOTHER 



Is an ordeal which all women 
approach with dread, for 
nothing compares to the pain 
of child-birth. The thought 
of the suffering in store for 
her rohs the expectant mother 
of pleasant anticipations. 
Thousands of women have found the use of Mother's Friend robs 
confinemeni of much pain and insures safety to life of mother and 
child. This liniment is a God-send to women at the critical time. Not 
only does Mother's Fritnd carry women safely t hrough the pe nis of 
child-birth, but it prepares 
the system for the coming 
event, relieves "morning 
sickness," and other dis- 

rnm Fnrf <; '^*"'^ by dn.ggi»t« at ti .'• • 

ttoijjn&l led free. _ ^^^ „^ 

1B£ BRADFlELD REGULATOR CO. 
AtlAOUu G*. 



Virginia, 
Her 



Minn.. May 22— (Spcdal 
The Herald.)— Miss Helen Collilon 
Moorhead. Minn., is visiting her 
ter Mrs. Jamee D Mahoney 

Deputy Cl« rk of Court 
way Wednfsday issued 
rense tc Oscar Robert 
Jennie Leona Johnson, 

^'Sifss Mabel Reed, primary and kin- 
dertrurten teacher In the Virginia 
schocds. has gone to Cleveland and she 
will not return this year. She Is "uc- 
<»eded by Miss Alida Faleen of Min- 



to 

of 

sis- 

r. G. Hollo- 
a marriage 11- 
Engstrom and 
both of Vir- 



arry women safely t hrough the pe nis ot 

FHIEND 



neapolis. who will remain on tlie staff 
of the Virginia school permanently 

R K. Toms of Ely. -Minn., is visiting 
friends in Virginia for a few days^ 

Boyd Alverstm. formerly yard super- 
intendent at the mills of the Virginia 
& Rainy Lake company here now with 
J. L. Madden of Duluth. was in Mr- 
uinin. Thursday. , ^, 

Keith Malliand returned Sunday even- 
ing from Cul(ago. where he visited 
friends for about two weeks 

.Tames Lavlck. who has been seri- 
ously ill of pneum«>nia. is on the street 

again. , ._ Ti„_« 

W R. Emerson has gone to Port 
Arthur Onl.. where he Is emplcyed by 
the Pigeon River Lumber company. 

Art Walsh timekeeper for the Vlr- 
Kinia Lumber com.pany. has gone to 
Grand Rapids Mich., to visit hlg moth- 
t-r for ab<iut two weeks. 

Mrs Thomas Gill has returned from 
Minneapolis, where she visited relatives 
fi.r ah<.ut three weeks. , , ^ , , , 

E G Bush is packing his household 
furniture proparatory to movins' to Du 
luth. He will live at 1231 
si reet. 

Virginia people are tailing a 



East Third 



lively 



Brookston. Minn.. May 22.— (Special 
to The Herald.)— Mrs. J. F. Ryan and 
two children returned to Cloquet .Vun- 
dav after spending a few days here 
with Mr. Ryan. 

Miss R<gina Keable spent Saturday 
and Hundav with relatives and friends 
in Dui'utli and Lakewood. 

A F. Hutchlns returned Saturday 
from a two weeks' visit in tlie vicinity 
of Brainerd. Mr. Hutchlns brought up 
a carload of stock with him and will 
trv his hand at stock raising, some- 
thing this part of the country is well 

adapted for. , „ . , 

Ralph H. Tedford departed Friday 
morning for Cherokee. Iowa, where he 
expects to spend about a year. 

Theodore Keable returned Sunday 
from Duluth. where he spent two 
months, taking a course in telegraphy. 

Miss Olive Brant returned to her 
home in Superior Monday after visiting 
for ten days with her cousin, Mrs. 
Rowe McCamus. . „ ^ •„ 

Mrs. H. C. Shur spent Monday In 

William Miles returned Monday from 
a business trip to Duluth. 

The fats and leans played a game of 
ball on the local diamond Sunday aft- 
ernoon. The score was 8 lo 5 in favor 
of the fats. . , , . ,, ^ 

A bright baby girl was born to the 
wife of Henry Colson at Barnum on 
Wednesday of last week. . , . 

Chester Howe of Superior arrived iri 
the village Tuesday aft€rnoon and will 
be employed by Hie Great Northern 
railway near Brevator station for some 

time. . „ 

An unknown man was run over by 
Great N(.rthern passenger No. 34 Tues- 
day afternoon. The man was attempt 
ing to beat his way on the trucks 
the train, and when a short distance 
from Floodwood he feU beneath the 
wheels and was badly mangled. 

Mrs E Keable and daughter, Leah, 
were Cloquet visitors Wednesday even- 

'"mIss Esther Larson spent Wednes- 
day in Cloquet. 

Special Agent Moore of the I'nited 
Slates land office at r'uluth was in the 
village Wednesday looking over some 
homesteads on which the holders had 
offered final proof, but which proof was 
not satisfactory to the land depart- 

'"f. F. Slater hAM ieaaed his restauraat 



Spooner, Minn., May 22.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — J. C. gommlins of Grace- 
ton transacted business here on Tues- 

'"mVs Joseph Wlllett of Ashland, Wis., 
has arrived to Join her husband, who is 
emploved as a sawyer at the hhevlln- 
Mathieu Lumber company s sawmill. 
For the present Mr. and Mrs. Willett 
are stopping at the Lenox. 

F Irving Kiser. general representa- 
tive of the Union Savings Association 
of Sioux Falls. S. D.. was here for a 
few days in tlie Interest of the asso- 

*^* Mrs. ' McCari departed on Thursday 
for her home in Ohio, after spending 
the winter months ^isillng her son, J. 

McCar of Baudette. . , ,♦ >,:„,, 

The Rainy river is reaching Its high 
water mark. Logs are coming down 
with a rush. The men on the boom are 
kept on the lookout. ,,,..., 

Mr and Mrs. H C. Habstritt left for 
Duluth on Friday, returning Sunday. 

L>r G. Oppliger, who lias been spend- 
ing six weeks at Winnipeg, receiving 
medical treatment, 
proved. 

Tlie Shevlin-Mathieu Lumber 
pany's sawmill closed down 
day on account of the boiler 

Frank Barsoloux, Sr., made a trip to 
Duluth, returning on Thursday morn- 

"&eorge E. Erlcson and son. George. 
Jr returned on Thursday from an 
tensive visit to the Twin Cities 
Red Wing. 

H C. Habstritt is erecting a 
storage building along side the 
spur by the Spooner bridge, 
the Spooner bridge. 

Mrs. Angeline Bennett, who has been 
a resident of Baudette for the last /ear, 
died Tuesday after an Illness oi six 
weeks from a complication of diseases. 
Mrs. Bennett was 46 years of age and 
leaves a husband. The funeral was 
held Thursday from the Catholic church. 
Father Bane officiating. The remains 
were laid at rest In the Catholic ceme- 
tery at Baudflle. 



Agnes Ule, Rev. 
eating. Both the 
are Hlavonians. 

Swan Skogland 
special policeman 
cation. 

Miss Lllis King returned Monday 
from a week's visit with her parents in 
Virginia. 

Messrs. T. J. Nichols and J. J. 
Hudson attended the meeting of min- 
ing captains at Virginia Friday. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. Gabrilson and chil- 
dren left Monday for a visit at Cam- 
bridge. 111., where they will visit rel- 
atives. 

Mrs. Fred Miller and children ar- 
rived in town Tuesday from Dulut ti 
and will make their home here with 
Mr. Miller. 

Mrs. Wilson has rented one of the 
St. James' boarding houses and we are 
informed that she will conduct a Irotel 
at the place. 

Mr. and Mrs. Abner Boast are re- 
joicing over the arrival of an eight- 
pound son, who arrived at their home 
In the Mohawk location on Sunday. 

Andrew Erickson has resigned Ids 

f'Osition as baggage man at the Iron 
lange depot and expects lo leave soon 
for Seattle. Mr, Rye of Ely has taken 
his place at the dtjot. 



at tlie shop grounds between the gen» 
eral office and ministers' teams, th* 
former winning by a score of 16 to 12, 
Dispatcher B. M. Bergerson was ft 
range visitor a few days this week. 

Mrs. D. O'Leary is visiting relative* 
at P'awnsville, Minn., for a couple of 
weeks. 

Conductor and Mrs. E. R. Fitch have 
returned f i om a month's visit witii 
relatives at Jamestown, N. Y. 

Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Olson and 
Mr. and Mrs. F. Fransen have returned 
from a tour months' visit with rela- 
tives in Sweden. 

Agent G. L. Ault of 
ing a month's lay off 
farm near that place, 
relieving him. 

Another switch engine was *ent to 
Blwabik Wednesday on account' of th* 
increasing business. 

Born, riiursday, the 20th Inst., *to 
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Larson, a son. 

Aaron, Adolph and Gust Elg wera 
called to Brainerd, Minn., the hrst o« 
the week by the death of their father 
at that place. 

The machinery is now about installed 
at the local creamery and the plant 
will be ready for operation soon. 

At their meeting Mimday evening th« 
city council will open bide for furnish- 
ing meals for the city prisoners. 

The concert at the opera house last 
evening by Miss Donna Louise Rlbletla 
and other Duluth talent was largely 
attended and a fine entertainment. 

About 800 ties belonging lo Martin 
Bros, of Duluth were burned at mile 93, 
near Athens. Thursday afternoon. 

The High School Alumni association 
is preparing for its first annual ban- 
quet to be given June 25. With thla 
years graduates the alumni now num- 
bers 66. 

Tlie Mav day social given by tha 
local Socialists at the Scandia hall 
Tuesday evening was a very pleasant 
and successful affair. 

Amundsen & Puent now have a ncvr 
Rambler auto. 

Mrs. M. O'Connor has returned from 

an extended visit with relatives In Hie 

East. ^ .„ 

Mrs. John Rehbein is reported ill 

with typlioid fever. 

The Lake County Republican cluD 
held a special meeting Tuesday even- 
ing. 

The supper given Wednesday even- 
ing by the ladies of the First M. 13. 
church was a pleasant and sutcesslul 
affair. 

A large number of local members 
will attend the conferring of the de- 
grees by the Sujierior lodge, I. O. O. F., 
at Superitr this evening. 

The Duluth & Northeastern Minne- 
sota railway will relay a large portion 
of the steel on Its main line this sum- 
mer. At present it is forwarding but 
about six trains ol logs to Duluth per 
week, the reduction being on account oC 
making summer rt pairs and extensions 
to its line. 

Sam Azlne lias been transferred Irotn 
Fayal lal oiatory lo Biwabik as night 
operator. 

Miss Hilda Holmgren is ill at the 
Budd hospital with typhoid fever. 
There are al present quite a number 
of cases of tlial disease in town. 

James W. Pickering transacted busi- 
ness at Duluth on Thursday. 

The farmers In the vicinity of Em- 
barrass are now finding a ready mar- 
ket for their potatoes al }1.2iJ per 
bushel. . . 

Conductor D. D. Lilly is making re- 
pairs and lmpr«ivemenls to liis lesl- 
dence on Sixth avenue. 

Jolm Larson is ii: at the pestlious* 
with diphthei ia. 

Mr and Mrs. Ed Lindahl are the 
iiappv parents of a non born Thursday, 
the 20lh Inst. . . 

Garland McCoy is recovering nicely 
from his recent operation. 

K 




returned rnucii im- 



com- 
on Mon- 
being out 



ex- 

and 




cold 
mill 



Mwm 



Two Harbors. Minn.. May 22. — (Spe- 
cial lo The Herald.) — H. R. Jeglin. a 
former Luiluth & Iron Range employe, 
visited friends here this week. 

Theodore Johnson is reported ill with 
pneumonia. 

The auction and social given by the 
Swedish M. E. Ladies' Aid society at 
its churcli Tuesday evening was a very 
pleasant and successful affair. 

Supt. and Mrs. Thornas Owens and 
daughter. Harriet, have returned from 
a visit al Oshkosh, Wis. 

Gust Carlson has gone to Baraboo. 
Wis., to work for the Oliver Iron com- 
panv during the summer. 

The first ball game in the new city 
league was played Wednesday evening | Mrs. 



Smithville, Minn.. May 22.— (Special 
lo The Herald.;— Miss Lucile Deru- 
schess of Knife River is spending Ih* 
week here as the guest of Mrs. Fred 
(-'ay wood. .. „. 

Master Helge Nelson of River View, 
Wis,, visited here with his cousin. Mas- 
ter Oliver Renstrom. 

Pupils and teachers here are busy 
preparing for the termination of th0 
school year. There are the final ex- 
aminations to worry about and the ar- 
rangements for the .seveiai functions 
wh'cli mark the end of school work fof 
the graduating class All arrange- 
ments have not been completed as yet. 

Arthur Halmer of Midway has ac- 
cepted a position here with Gulbranson 
Bros. - .... 

Dale E. Case, city salesman for the 
Stone-Ordean-WellB company, was a 
caller here recently. 

Mrs. A. D Mahoney and daughter, 
Eileen, spent Wednesday in Duluth. 

Mrs Jerry Kov ol Shoe Boil visited 
here Tuesday with Mrs. Leo Hamlin. 

Mr and Mrs. G. W. .Meldrurn of &5T 
South Seventy-second avenue west, an- 
nounce the engagement of their daugh- 
ter Miss Bessie Meldrurn. to Robert 
y Dunn of tliis place. Both young 
people are popular and well known 
this vicinllv. Mr. f>unn having 
here for the last fifteen years. 

Mrs. Thomas Carter and eon 
Monday in Duluth, ,. „ . , « 

Misses Ollie and Amelia Erickson of 
Cloquet spent a few days heie with 
their cousin, -Miss Nettie Ainundson. 

Joseph Rutler of New Duluth is 
erecting a few new cottages on the 
Spirit Lake branch boat club grounds. 

Dr Seashore of West Duluth was 

called here Tuesday on account of the 

Illness of the infant son of Mr. and 

Claus Johnson, who is quite slclc 



in 
resided 

spent 



several 
cases 

S. 
Audito 



of 



Aitkin. Minn.. May 22.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — The business of the dis- 
trict court is being disposed of speed- 
llv the civil calendar being about fin- 
ished this week. There are 
criminal cases and some court 
on the calendar. 

The high school will present Kiyo 
Inul, a Japanese orator, at the 
diuni next Wednesday evening. Inul, 
who is a Japanese with an American 
education and an orator of ability, is 
making a canoe trip with an Indian 
guide from Lake Itasca down the Mis- 

* Th^'^Odd Fellows' lodge will send a 
delegation to Superior Saturday tc. wit- 
ness the degree work of the North 
Star team of Minneapolis. 

Don McKay, who has been employed 
In looking after the scale for the .Muel- 
ler Lumber company at Minneapolis 
for some lime, left a few 
take employment in the 
forestry work in Oregon, 
be succeeded by George 
this place, who has gone 
and will be followed by 

Nels Hokanson. a former Aitkin boy, 
!«! now attending the University of 
Chicago and has been put in charge of 
the settlement work for boys In the 
slums, having over 200 boys under him. 

The annual memorial sermon will be 
delivered bv Rev. A. L. Richardson at 
the Methodist church next Sunday 
morning and regular Memorial day 
exercises will be held on Saturday, the 
'>9th The O. A. K. post, Sons of Vet- 
eran« and City band will go to the cem- 
eterv in the morning and conduct me- 
morial ceremonies. In the afternoon 
public exercises will be 
the city park, in 
schools will join the pair otic societies 
Rev A L. Richardson will deliver the 
address, and a campfire will be held in 
the Auditorium in the evening. 

Dr H C. Leonard, who has been 
nracticlng in Duluth. has opened an 
office in this place. Dr. Leonard has a 
fine farm near here and finds this more 



i 



days ago lo 
government 
and he will 
Falconer of 
to the city 
his wife in a 



r. Ashbell Parme\e2,-J7rs^ Vice Pres- 
ident of the N. Y Medical Lepal Society ^ndlaie 
Dean of the Medical Dept. U of Vermont, SayS: 

"I am convinced that the legitimate and conservative use of 
lager heer is not only beneficial to the physical well being of 
most people, but is, from a temperance point of view, worthy 
of recognition and adoption.*' 

The nourishtnent contained in choice tarley malt and the 
tonic properties of selected hops combined make both food 
and medicine. There is, however, a difference in brews, but 
the best costs no more than the others. 



conducted In 
which 'the public 



i:-fH 



m 



.■*«■ '^ 



of cost. 



has been brewed in Dulutb for 25 
years. Every appliance and every 
method that could in any -way im- 
prove the healthfulness and insure 
greater purity has been installed, regard- 
Fitger's is the ideal home beer, delicious, refreshing, 
ill case and vou will be convinced. 



jhing—try a small case and you 

a line or telephone your order and it will be prompUy Wled. 

FITGER BREWING* CO., Duluth, Minn. 



II .\ 





THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: SATURDAY. MAY 22, 1909. 



21 





V 




CITY IN THE UNITED STATES HAS 
BETTER STORES THAN DULUTH 




~f '•••IjijdTTrn 
. . , . V . . V . . . • ' 



YOUR MAIL ORDERS WIL L RECEIVE THE 
MOST CONSIDERATE ATTENTION ^^^,^ It! 



low, satisfaction is assured every buyer; same satisfaction that would be expected by a person who stood in front of the counter. 



Monthly 
Style Book 

Free If You Write for it. 

A monthly publication showlngr all 
the newest 

I, A n I K S • H O H R 
JOIH.-VAL PA'ITERNS. 

We fill mall onlfrs for I^diea* 
Homo Journal patterns and every- 
thing In Dry Goods. 

117-110 We»t i»u|ieri4»r St. 



PANTON & WHITE 

Glass Block Storel 

.Duliith.Mlnr 




Buy Your Clothing of 

Chas. W. Ericson 

RKLIABI.K Ci.OTHIiQU. 



Hats, Caps 

and Gloves 



21« Went Superlwr Street. 



FOR THK HIGHEST CLASS 
RBAOV-TO-WK2AR 

CLOTHING 



COMO: TO THK 




Clothing 
Parlors 

Send for our Hlyle Book — pree. 



I 



Steel Pie Embossing. 

Engraving and 
Monogram Station'ry 

Consolidated Stamp 
and Printing Co., 

t* Marth Fourih Avenue Weal. 

OILUTH. Mi MX. 

■verytliinK In the Stamp and 
Prill tlngr Line. 



Write Us for the Very Latest 

Sheet Music 

Ask us aliout a Phonograph. 
Easy payment plan. 



BRADBURY 
MUSIC CO. 

6 Kami Superior Street. 

A COMPI.KTK I.IXK OP Ml SICAL 
IRiSTRLMKMTS. 



BAR 
SUPPLIES 

5oda Fountains, Pool 
and Billiard Tables. 



E. F. BURG 

108 Kant -Superior Street. 
DILITH, MIIVX. 



ZIIBMERJWAN BROS., 

833 West Plirat Street. 

KODAKS 

\V' h«\-« a completQ stock of 
PI - :iplies. 

l.r- .- iinlsh y-' -i .v-».,Iak PIcturas. 
ICASTMASt FILMS OSLT. 



We nil mall orders for any 
kind ot watcfi made 

E. E. ESTERLY 



Manuiaoturing 



Largest Watch Heasi ia Dulatli 



128 West Superior Street. 
Spalding Hotel. 




MUSIC 



The largv and most complete 
stock of Mi.sic and Musical In- 
Btruments. Talking: M;u'hin*^s and 
Beeords. Band and Orchestra Sup- 

Elips. etc.. at the Head of th« 
akca. Send us your orders. 

INGVAID WESTG4ARD. 

"Dulutb'a Leadinx Manic Huuae." 



1, j jirogram of niu-sic f<»r tlifir romert 

T"»f'roratlon day. 

J.ihii ("1,1 iK.-ii tiMf-, i '.'.! ImisIiu'ss in 

;it 1 I Mlimh 1.! 

-.inn Ui 

Mvn. Joiu, 
end, Dulnlh. is 

son of llrift i,)Ia. 

M'r. ■ • '•■ 
I u t It ' 



I lield a 

it ;i ri<»w t-n- 

iU thl.H week. 
iv of the West 
vvlUi C J. ('arl- 




Lniluth 





Inilutli. Mr I. .M.i- -■-■ -"Special 




■ \<\. 1 1 >i . .K VK I ;ilt>ci ! iiuul.^ 




iriji to Twu llatlxii-, I'li- 


t,. 
(■ 

f 1 


\':orgiitz i." t^rtrtinn: a (ot- 
• boat rltiti trr-nnuls t-tr 
> .tf imiurii. 

T'- . will s-tv<-' a re- 
hall ."^aturdax" 
> iucseiil licr piano 



,] 

tn 

i" 



:ini 


1 f o V I n s 


;nd 


Dehat- 


■ :ne 


in \.\ie 


r '1 • , . 


' '■ <per 




. >r a 




friends 


ting up 


a nice 



.■Ur>., l'.-t'-( .^,)..>.-lti!.«; rin-l V-- ^'■■Ci' 
SJo.-4kI1u.s of Dulutli W'M. l!i. of 

Mf.-s. ."^fosf'li uh" .si.-it''i -M ; .-. . ;..iik 

\V:a.ll thiHsday. 

Mr. jrul Mrs. 1'. l". Tovv.-r ari.l Mr 
ami Mrs (.:. 11. (JiddiriKs uti. ko-.sIh 
of Mr. and Mrs. I'harle.s P<>t'M .s u caids 
Tiiiitsdav evening. 

Stewart (ollina and I»r. Ali!)ott of 
l»nlulh called in New Duhilh Suiitlay. 

Mlaa Alice Glover of West Dulutli 



was tl;.- ;;..•-' "' Miss Kliiel Ueck- 
liiiK' !■ Tt:ur-:^.l • int;. 

.J'.>el l.ee of t'iiit-aso is the gue.st «>f 
Mr. and iMrs. K. .M Hick.s and family. 

.M . s^ I'Mliel HerklingLT w^iif t" l>i- 
iutli VVeilm'Sila,v lu attend ;i .siii.lio re. 
tital. tr'ven 1>.\ .\ll».s .Siiuoii<l«. 

\\ . H. t'rosby of Huiulli .sp.oit 
Wednesday In N'ew I>'iUitli. 

<n wa.s born to Mr. ' Mrs. 

lielndl. Sunday, Ma> 

* irimrd Mekeel went ij i;>niiilji 
Tu«sdu.\. to stn\ for .some time. 

The Hoyal Neighbors gave a p»»nnv 
.-^".iil at tlie Uaplist hall Saturday 
evening. The New Kuluth life and drum 
> orpa attended and adile.l to the even- 
ing's *TitiTtaliuuent with se\-ei-al .•se- 
lections. 

Mr. and .\ll-s. Cu.st, .I.ir.>l..-i.(ii in 1 .-li;!- 

dten spent Sunday at cJluirt Line I'ai k 
Willi M r an d .M r s . Ed J ol i n s o n . 

.Mr. and Mr.s. Charles Peter.s. .Mrs. C 
II. (iiddlnK.<» atid Miss Alice Glover were 
KUt.sts of MI8.S Ktli'l Ueiklinser at 
car«ls Tuesday evenin,.;. 

Miss .Minnie Noael was given a very 
lil>as.ini siirjusf parly at hei home 
'rue^.la\ afternoon, In honor of her 
bli!l.>l.i\. < James were i>laye<l. Among 
thos. present were: Mesdanies Will- 
iam .Millen. August Viergrutz. Frank 
Noael. Mi:<.ses Anna Ilutter. Minnie 
.Iaro.s< h. Katherlne «")'Connell, ICmma 
Fi.silier, Margaret McEachin, I.oretto 
.M« Ka> Rosa Fisctier, Mary Jarosch. 
.•Vjjne.s \\ ill.s, Francis Noael. Violet Vier- 
yulK, Wilhelmina Viergutz. 

Charles Dawe and M. Manthew of 
Duluth were guost.s at the liome of 
Mr. and Mr.s. Martin Erickson Satur- 
day anil .*<unday. 

Miss SmiiU and Miss Llnwell attended 



W. W. Seekins, 

^ Florist* ^ 

M<.)st beautiful con.servatory In 
th'» N'orthvve:«t. 

MAIL OKDIJIS GIVEV PROMPT 
AITKXTION. 

Cut Flowers, Floral Designs, 
Potted Platit"^. etc. Seeds, Bulbs. 
Nursery Stock. 

302 E^st Superior Street, 

DuluUi. Miim. 



THE STYLE 
STORE 





DULUTH 



F. D. DAY & CO.. 

Leading Jewelers. 

815 West Superior Street. 
DULUTH. 

Write ua for anything wanted 
of a flrst-class Jeweler. 



FURNITURE 
AND CLOTHING 



-ON- 



CREDIT 




• E. SUPERIOR STi' 

DLLUlii, .liNN. 



STOVES 

F. ft WADE 

F.^ioluwlve Agency for .— > 

RADIANT 

HOME HEATERS 

WniTK t« FOn PRICKS. 
32tf-331 Central Avenue. 



BUY YOUR CLOTHING 

BATS, SHOES AND FUR- 
NISaiNGS IN DULUTH. 

And get the bcncflt of our low 
prices and large assortments. 

THE DAYLIGHT STORE. 




S31-333-335 W. Superior SU 



The One Price Store 




Orders for Male 



Attire will be properly and 
promptly filled by the 

COLUMBIA CLOTHING CO. 

Formerly 'TIil' Groat Eastern " 
Third Ave. W. and Saperior St.. Dnlulh. 



Shoe Satisfaction 



For the entire family. 
Sorosls Ladles* Shoes. 
Stacy Adams & Co.'a 
Men's Shoes. 



WIELAND SHOE CO, 



123 West Superior St. 



Both Telcpliooes. 



BARTHE-MARTIN GO. 

GROCERIES AT 
WHOLESALE 

DIRECT TO CONSU.MER. 



102-104 West Michigan Street, 
DULUTH. MINN. 



W.&L. Shoe Store 

218 W. Superior St. 
DULUTH, MINNESOTA 



THE LEADINB 

SHOE 8T0RE 

OF DULUTH 



KODAKS 

AND CAMERAS 
from $1.00 up. 

KODAKS, FILMS and SUPPLIES. 

ECLIPSE VIEW CO.. 

Corner 4th Ave. W. and First St. 
Zenith Phone 993-X. 



VI>'IVVAbtR(.^ 



Dry Goods, Millinery, 

and Women's 
Ready-to-Wears. 



DULUTH SUPERIOR 

First Ave. W. 918-20-22 Tower 
& Superior St. Avenue. 







THE LEADING 
JEWELERS 



^^ 



OucuTM. Mimic 

(liii.ijriJ'ir.vt' •!. 



M4riif«'"fiir»r« if 
KINK AND AR- 
TltiTK, J K W - 
EI.UY. Golil aad 

bUvefsnuUiii. 



S»lflsro<^"n— '12 Wait Smxrlor St wet. Ttctorr— 
K>iir«li .\>rrui« VV«st »aJ MloUlaan . Street, 
ProvUJwic* bulMlii*. 




PRINTING, 

ENGRAVING, 

BOOKBINDING 

Mail Orders Given Prompt .\tton- 
' tlon. Write u.s for price-? on 
j Blank Books. Catalogues and Spe- 
I cial Ruled Forms. 

t 

lining DI.Htanee Plioiu- 114. 



The Most Complete Line of 
Ladles* and Gentlemen's Shoes 
at the Head of the Lakes. 
Prices right. Styles for every- 
body. 



OFFRgg 





DULUTH. 



•'Where Values Reifi^n Supremo" 



Dry Goods, 

Cloaks, Suits, 

Millinery and Shoos. 

21'23 Mfesf Swmefior SU 

Special Attention Given 
to Mall Orders. 












'v%X 



•/► '»■ 



<b 



<t % \ \\. r> 






%f <*/ 



\ 



What We Advortl.se You Can 
Order by 

MAIL 

The sam.» .^special price.s will be 
^iv u ..ur mail-order patrons. 

Watoh Our .\d.-.. I or 

Furniture Bargains 




l>uluih, Minn. 



Office Furniture, 

Safes, 

Printing, Lithographing, 

Blanic Boolis, 

Society Stationery. 

EVERYTHING FOR THE OFFICE. 

CHRISTIE LITHO. & 
PTG. CO., 



CHRISTIE 
BUILSLMG 



DDLOTH. 
ML>iN. 



tj, J, L©T@yinni©ay 

Printers, Lithographers, 
Engravers and Bookbinders 

221-223 W. First St. 
DULUTH, - MLNNESOTA. 

The largest and most complete print- 
ing establishment at the 
Head of the Lakes 
SPECIAL AITENTION TO AU MAIL OBDBtS 



ilip teachers' meeting In Duluth Sat- 
urday. - ', 

Mis.s Florence Srpitli of Duluth is 
-snoiuiing the weeKi witii friends in New 
Duluth. .. , : .. 

Don Overton pf Snilthvillo? was a 
caller in New Dulyth Tuesday. 

Mr. ami Mrs, . j. J. Palmer enter- 
tatiiel the hridge club at their honi* 
Saturday t-venin^:. 

John BtM-ger oX iDwIuth spent Satur- 
day In New Duluth with liis mother, 
.Mrs. Barbara B^rgrpr; 

A. J. Dunliaui .^rf )Duluth spfnt the 
first of the week w.ith his family in 
New Duluth. i . ; » 

Mrs. E. Johnstoo nt Duluth is a guest 
at the home of Mr. . ami Mrs. Martin 
Krickson. Mrs. .Tolmston will go to 
Fine City next «vfe«k, where she will 



have charg-? of a large summer resort. 

The friends of Joseph U'oge read with 

regret In Tlie Herald, of liis death at 
W'lnnibigosliish tlam. MoniJay, where he 
was burned to death in the store build- 
ing of E H. Phelps. Mr. Wege was a 
br'>t;ier-in-iaw of Mrs. Ed Bushell, and 
formerly lived in New Duluth. where 
he liad many friends. 

Tiiose who spent Saturday in Duluth 
were: Miss Ethel Beckllnger. Mrs. T.'. 
C. Tower. Miss Dorrla Tower Mrs. T. 
E. Bowl*»s. Miss Violet Huber," William 
O't'onneli. 

J. J. Palmer of Duluth spent part of 
the week at his liome In New Du- 
luth. 

Miss Lsabel Thayer of Duluth spent 
Friday at her home in New Duluth. 

Miss Gladys Wall of Superior was 



the guest of Miss Jennie Hicks the first 
of the week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Herbert moved to 

Walker Monday. 

Mrs. A. L. Mekeel. Mi.ss Rosamond 
Mekeel and Clifford Mekt-el spent Sun- 
dav in West Duluth. 

Miss Georgia McKay of Duluth was 
the guest of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
L. S. McKay Saturday and Sunday. 

The baseball club will give a dance 
at the Maocabee hall this evening. Tlie 
New Dulutli orchestra will play. 

Sherman Wiseman of Dululh visited 
friends in New Duluth during the 
week. 

A J. Meldahl of West Duluth called 
in New Duluth Thursday. 

Mrs. Buckman and Mrs. Green of 
LitLld Falls, Miuxi., have beeu the 



guests of their sister, Mrs. Albert 
Laidley. 

Delbert Case of Duluth was a New 
Duluth visitor Saturday. 

The members of the baseball club 
are liavlng the field tilled in with sand 
and rolled so that the grounds will be 



RHICHESTER'S PIL 

. . J 

DtXSOND BftAND PfLLS, br •« 

ycankBowaMB«(t.S«tet.Alw«]rsRell>bl« 

SOLO BY DRUGGISTS EVERYWHQd 



«#^gc^ THE DIAMOND BRA.NO. 



LadJMl Ask y««r OrascUi for , 
Cb|.«kM.tMr'a IHmMMd Brasd/ 
rilU in IU4 aixl Oold n<etainc> 
buxei, fekled with ^lue RIbboa. 
Tak« ■• •th«r. 




ill 



irtil 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: SATURDAY. MAY 22, 1909 



P 




In a dri» r ' tion during the season. 

Mr. ar, William Millen spent 

Sundav v* m n . ■ n nd>^ in I>uluth. 

C. H. GuMings went to Minneapolis 
Wednesday on a business irlp. 

Samuel Bciieibe of Cloquft tailed on 
old frlendp in N«w luilutli Ti.ursday. 
Mr ScluMb*- It ni.inager of the c lo'iuet 
baseball t.Min ami m trying; to arrajtce 
«, gamf between tiie Cloquet and New 
Dulull. Hints*. 




rufferlnir with pneumonia. He Is now 
gettinK al«:iK nicely. 

Mrs Alex BelHIe was- taken to ht. 
.Tosepirn liospital in Abiihind last Sun- 
day for treatment. 

A daughter was horn to Mr. and Mrs. 
Raymond Plerca Wednesday. May 19. 

The high school will give a play in 
the neai future, entitled "L'ndit the 
I -it u re is." , 

Mr. and Mrs. William .Meant of 
.s< anion Mlun.. ^■i^■itevl in Has tlly vvilh 
relatives la.«t Sunday. 

H i'. I'lv.lir will open a furniture 



on 
rui. 



li.' 



rt't, 

the 



to 1 
■one 

Mr- 
Chk-i- 

Joi... 
cepted 
Kins of 

Jvi> 
Scut '■ 
Is 
T' 

r* 

t! 

t. 
1, 

<!■ 

if- - 

daughter. 



it.. 



on 



5. 




at 


tf 


to 


lak< 

luk, 


i !r 


;'i r - 


r 



Bavtifltl 



A I 



This 

lit !I 



Wll U 



W 1 tr - 



,1 I'owler furniture store, 
..nd the busines.** will be 
old name and uimU r the 
nf J. W. Fowler. 

ariit Tue.sday sixty cans 

L (fin the state tiatohery 

were placed in the Pike 

js thf fourtii placing of 

vaters. 

•f. of Dululh took 

■ f Mrs. A. Des- 

■ i tlie slorf re- 

Mrs. 
n tin 



probably be 
northeast of 
International 




mini f 
at 



J. !l. 



in 



■fr\ ' 
nett 

Bng.- will- re i-lie wili 
mer. 

C. GallagJier and M 
to Green V-.-a\\ Wis., 
Join th- 'all tea 

Biohoi - of the 

guette wj.h in Calun • 
He confirmed iarg> 
Croatian, Frenci) antJ 
chur(?h^-p. 

Th' " •■ ' ' '■ 

Mug- 

fever. 

the Soi:' 
the flrft 
Word 
riage a- 
■on 

COUl' 

A tlaugt.U': 
Mrs. Frank 
avenue. 

The fin;t'rii,i <■.<: .Mr--. 
aged 2- • '■■ • ■ 
Ojala ' ■ 

vivf 
Tht 

I 

1 . ■!■ 



ijiit 

dat< 

hon 

I 

ret I'. 
In ^ 
wah 
met. 

M. M. 



,^ 


. t*-r t H iiifil a 




• vennig 




The 




\vn:. flash- 




lunch wan 


I 


Mils. Ben- 




Kthel Kay. 


■ , I ■ 


t,, i'.>rnwari. 


«1 ' 


! h.Mli- 


Bu' 


I gontj 


wh. 


V will 


m 


,.f i;.,.I r.ty. 


dlo 


f-;, Mar- 



\'i-t-';i-.inef. ^i ' i. 
Herald.*— J. * 

.. Negaunee vi.- 
ol the week. 

Akxandfr M- ' • ' 



liieir 

The 
feated 



th 



1 «. r 



tlon from It^ 

^ame ut I'ni' 



A 
u( DuiuUi 
f(i)e part 



.11, I >li ix, 

ding of 

,; te.'iin d<'- 
uK irr>.'.'.ni/-a- 
it iiiiK -iiiniiig 
'-■.-• •:i.\ iil'ter- 



ti. ;irt 



. jiigcni fur 
.It Calumet 



j.'cm. The KiMTt 
At a meeting «.•! 
Swedisli Lutheran 
Monday evening 
Kev. S. Bergdald. 

,.,, ...,.,1 nj,,^ }|(. TR- 

ermon 

,.,. ,.rge F. 



i: 1 n 
K W. 

wa.s . 

llu: 11 • ' ;•" "' the 

(liurch congregallon 

(l)f> f ».«i l'm:. f ii il< Cif 

lh»- , 
111 Vi- 
a week from tiumia.v. 
Gundorsson and wife 



were vlsi:<-is 



of 
In 



.\ed v.. 
f .•\^■er 
.\. i 
M 1 



the 
T. 



mar- 
Han- 

The 



I Mr, and 
Woodland 

Stewart, 



Stevens F'olnt. Wis., 
the < ity this week. 

I,r N. .1. Kobbins Ppent W edn. !^da> 
at Menominee, examii.irig .ippitt ants 
for the MicliiKi'n National <• 
which he ie examining physu 

Mi»8 Clara Raymond left r>i; 
night for Hit>blng. where she wilt 
her sister Mr^- '"luit^t llar.soii, 



..f 

n < 1 ; L V 
Vi.vit 

lor- 



re.«ierve here. They will 
a.<^8lgned to that section 
Kly and extending to the 
border. 

The family of John Seliskar have re- 
moved to Nevada, the last to leave be. 
Ing the two daughters, who started 
this week. Miss Frances and Mies 
Julia. The former ha;' made an ex- 
lellent record Jn tlie domestic science 
department of the high school. Hhe 
Is preparing herself to be an Instructor 
in this line of work. 

Rev. S. A. Jamieson of Duluth and 
who has charge of the supply work 
In churches of the Presbyterian de- 
nominations that have no regular pas- 
l<irB. supplied here at the Presl>yterian 
churcli last Sunday. 

Mrf. Henrv Ketcham and children 
jirrivcd here a few days ago from 
Minut N. 1>.. for an extended visit. 
She will go from here to Two Harbors 
and I'ulutli for short visits before re- 
turning We.st. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. H. Mitrray became 
the parent,«< of a baby girl this week. 
i:<l Powers has ben appointed by 
M.i v.a- i:isenach as a mounted police- 
jiatrol the outlying sections 
lions and prevent tlie dumping 
. ftnvwhere, except on the city 
t. grounds t^ouiii of the city. 
- uiicil has confirmed the ap- 
pointment. 

Th* Kly Finn ball team recently 
contested with the Winton first nine 
and wert- worsted by a score of 12 to 
13. The h:1v bovs think they can lift 
the sculp of Winton boyfc if they get 
:,ii< ther chance. 

I P Culbertson, W. H. Sargent, and 
>• Kavcnaugh are in the country 

s St of this place cruising. They 

:.!ri.»a from Iniluth recently and arc 
ii:;tklnK their headQuarters at Camp 
>• !'i ..f tlie St. Croix Lumber com- 

.....iLtor Charles Ptlto has gone to 
Ctllbert. wliere lie will erect a business 
block for Hibbing parties. He hav 
ctlter contracts there for tlie summer. 
Judge Thomas Jury had a case this 
week lor vbdatif-n of the truancy laws 
Matt Champa wns fined $7 for keeping 
hh-j son out of school without a labor 
permit from the school board. 

Andrew Toutloff left for the state of 
Washington this week, where he goes 
to take charge of a store owned bv 
Hi.« family will prob- 
tliere In the near fu- 



II. 



'i. 



ed 




t 


died 

siir- 
. ren. 



merly of t i.ir ' i 
L, Voetscli ol 

the late Mrs. J. 

remains arrivod 

has been In t!u„; 
The co^'' -^-M 

for the i!.. ■ 



I" 

Ic-..;- . i-. ■ . . ' 
amount donated 
.-<.,ii:;'f£r;iti' ■: 



UV I ^ ,,i . . I I il 

city since 
of funds 

! 1 : 1 f 
!., k.- 
- I.:i 



at 



.!i- in-law of 
lilier. wliose 
iiiv evening. 
Sunday, 
to i.i i;sed 
t I . ■ ' " 

. ,, . ^t 

the 
hisf 

.;t 



day after spending the winter at 
Bovev. Mr. Burgess conducted the 

& Tinting office and then leased It to 
[r. Sheets, but the lease exidres next 
month, so Mr. Burgess will conduct the 
business again himself. , .. , 

Mrs. Gusfafson of Ely visited friends 
here Thursday between trains. 

Mrs. M. Campalgne returned Wednes- 
day evening from a few days visit 
with her daughter at Two Harbors. 

Word was received Thursday even- 
ing from St. Marys hospital In I>uUith 
of the death of John Nicholas, who 
has been suffering for the past eight 
or nine months with a tumor In his 
head. He wili he brought here for 
burial. , „. , 

Mr. and Mrs. Joice returned Wednes- 
day evening from Duluth after a few 
weeks' visit. They left for their home 
at the head of Lake Vermilion Thurs- 
day morning. 

W. J. Osborne looked after business 
matters here Wednesday, returning to 
Klv Thursday. 

Miss Merrill, teacher at Soudan, is 
enjovirig a visit this week from her 
mother, who resides at St. Paul. 

Harrv Coon, the 12-year-oid son of 
Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Coon, has been 
confined to his home this week with an 
attack of pneumonia. He is reported 
somowliat better. 

The Independent baseball team gave 
a dance at Everetts liail Friday even- 
ing. Lunch was st rved, and the music 
was furnislied by Mrs, Taylor and Mr. 

A I k 1 Ti 8 

Bevv'l McLaughlin spent a few days 
in i:iv the fore part of tiie week. 

Editor R. M. Shetts returned Sunday 
noon from a lew dayt' business visrit in 
Hibbing. , ^ , 

There lias been a large amount of 
fish brought in every day since the 
fishing season opened. The largest 
catch so far was made by K. Murlll, a 
pike weighing sixteen pounds. 

A number of young folks will give 
a dance at Breltun^ hall. Soudan, next 
Tuesday evening. 



ir petting their launches and rowboats 
ready for the season's work. 

The running teams of the local fire 
department are eagerly practicing for 
the coming tournament and expect to 
carrv off a few honors. Tlie track is 
rapidly getting into shape, and from 
all appearances it will be in excellent 
shaixi for the tournament. 

Street Commissioner John Klabunde 
has been busy all week putting In new 
crossings in different parts of the town. 

Mrs. Louis Bennington returned 
Wednesday from a visit with her hus- 
band at Northome. 

The tennis court has been consider- 
ably improved, and tlie entliuslasts of 
that game are eagerly getting Into 
trim. 




party of 

dancing. 

this city 



,- >i 



u. 
I < 



Phi 



: 1 n ■ ; i 1 



. wju;re 
;menl of 



.Vll*. 



■ f tlie 

he 

L.f 

' \' 

, t " ■. Hit' 

.spci-lal- 



.1 i 



silfKt 



lie 

ifr-. 



lil- 



ciiy, 



of Calumet 

here vn a 



for- 

visii 



ti 



«.ti . 



;, liu i»iis. Georp-e 

known liertv .,i v 



1 1,(; \'V. t"< I. Is of a 



Curtiss. 

',, n . w n 1 1 1 



well-kniwi, 
he next ex'M 



't 



K'": 



\. - 

1 1 1 i \ I • 

iodKO. 



his thnigiiter 
ably Join liim 
ture. 

Tlie Ely club entertained i 
gue.sts on Friday .evening a 
The K nut son orchestra of 
fuinislied the 'music. 

<'..unty Supt. S. W. Gilpin was in this 
citv Thursday and Friday, and visited 
the RiKh Lake school while here. 

Miss Gratia Lyman, principal of the 
Central scliool. is uulle sick with an 
atta<k of loiisilitis. 





EveK 
The H. 



\^ 



resent! 



( i 



lUptfl'. 

t Hot' 

1 . wll e 



erT 



Ha vnes 
will 



received 
liliam A. 

' ■ '.e age 
.tor ol 



ht re ol the 
Johnson at 

tif TS \'i'a!"s. 
(Arm e Ei-i'- 



I II t nt 

l't»>l '' 

Tr.. 
er rt 
ago 
one 1 
here \\\ii 

A t a 



Khl 
.1 in 
\ ii-iiiiiy of 
the wet-k 



tlo'U.-.in' 
the lake^ 

tl.i- 



'i' 



( I 



l.-W 



Wi 



\1 



I ! 
lit 



the na * 
terlan 

this di.xirict. 



. t 1 .uton, near tins nt\. 
well known among th** 



the v:i 
.• city a 
(. great tliai 
idered and 's 
lew days, 
meeting of Itie officers 
• •' ViKinirsee baseball team 
K W H. Mitchell was 
II. ! Gl^n Cole captiiln. 



I II H 



, Ul - 

• ks 

•-nd 

< l.:-d 

a n d 



h 



/mttly 
as a 




Mr 



1 n n 



Mr 



■\\' 



II 



Hf. 

I f 



•kii.^' 



A .•-. 
Ht'Ilr^ 

Mrs. Ji 
Thursday 

wir *■■*■■■ 

of 

Bu 

r«i. 

J. 

Ra 

Ids, ■. 
a 1 1 d 1 1 ■ 
thin V. 
th. 
am 



tM Ml and Mrs 



(Special to The 

lusffieh! prin- 

i.ol, ':<il Fridjiy 

\i^H ill -Minne- 

. \j.» t li'.-'r- to re- 



-*'l'ii i\ . 
t v r M 



ci 1 1 i r 



nurt find 
or Eat' ' 

I a 1 1 < ' ■ 

tix-K I 



! 
it. Ill I 

of I 

n 1 1 1 



I epresents 



• 1 by 
'imt-t 



i: \ .\!iM-. M 
Herald. I !■!■■('. t- '■ 
11 pal of I Ik- !ii»--h St h 
morning i"! a lii i' i 
iipolis and Milwaukee 
turn Monday. 

li, a ball i-'am.- here Satuiday 
1,1,11 I i'-d nun w.ie pitted agiiinst 
-:nt-'i« "'♦ n- T'"*" ea'Ti*' w; 
.stintr and was won by l. 
i.v a -r..re of 13 to 10. 

M:ss i-:ugenle Kellogg. 
1 1 ,. i:i\ corps of teach" 
t.arhing in Guthrie. Okla. 
prised lier former pupil 
lag them a large 
davs ago. The 
knowledfTt-d tiie 

■ ' also of letters from 
Kellogge room in 
ansAvtr eacVi U-ttfr : 
menieni 
in iiM'T' 



fo 



the 
tlie 

inter- 
V men 

riiu'iiy «'f 

' ■ t 11 1 • w 

, , ... St mi- 
oses a few 
Ely pupils have ac- 
recelpt of the roses. 

«-arh oupll In 
.', anil 



m., May 22.— (Special to 

F. C. Talboys of Duiuth. 

f( rnuiiv a large merchant here, was 

In toivti Thursday and Friday, visiting 

lends and relatives and attend- 

sorue business. Mr. Talboys i • 

uiKi'-^Kd in Bitter Root valley 1; 

Liuls Johnson, one of the 
known Zim settlers was in town 
in the week on business. 

Miss Blanclie Gattrel of Two 
bors was visiting with friends 
early in tiie week on business. 

M :-s Bertha Lyons and Harry Lyons 
..t the local schools are enjoying a 
visit from Mrs. L^ons 

Mr. and Mrs, Eugene La Mear had 

, Lsitor on Wednesday, 
. . Hibbing. 

Tin- iixal vaudeville 
iKt^n compelled to put on 
Si:nday evening to take 
crowds. 

<'lvde Bender, train dispatcher 
Two Harbors visited here Monday. 

.Mrs. A. M. Weis and 
at Virginia. Monday. 

A (latigiiter was born Monday to Mr 
,'uid Mrs. Jolin Primozich 
street. ^ ^. 

Charles Finlavson of Superior 
In town Saturday and .Sunday. 

Miss Katherine Mct'onald, who has 
b«en teaching music here left Tuesday 
for Ann Arbor, Mich., to attend tiie 
commencement exercises at the Ini- 
versity of Michigan. Hhe will return 
here after a few months. 

Forest Wlckey left for 
early in the week to appear 
nesB in the case In 
Flynn are contrsting 
tiers fi»r some land 
government survey. 



nd. 

well 
early 

Har- 

here 



of St. Cloud, 

as 
Freu Brennon 

houses liave 
three shows 
care of the 

at 

children were 

nday to Mr. 
of Jackson 

was 



St. Paul 
as a wil- 
which Poor & 
Willi some set- 
left out in the 



1 
'biDX of 




Meadowlands. Minn.. May 22. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.)— Mr. and Mrs 
John Tidd were cliarivaried by some of 
the young people on Monday evening. 

The ladies' aid society met with 
Mrs. J. W. Reisinger this afternoon. 

Dr. Clemans of Puluth preached at 
the townsite schoolhouse last Sun- 
day afternoon. ,,„/->, 

The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. u. O. 
Anderson died very suddenly Wednes- 
dav morning. On account of a sus- 
picious Illness among some of the chil- 
dren of tht neigliborhood. the body 
was i)uried at 10 o'clock on Mr. An- 
derson's own land. 

Rev F. W. Hill of Coleraine was in 
Meadowlands for a short time last Sun- 

The Farmers' club was scheduled to 
meet at the Townsitc scluxdliouse last 
Saturday evening, but on account of 
tlie bad weather tlie meeting was post- 
poned. , , ,, 1 

A meeting of the Meadowlands l nlon 
Church society was held after preach- 
ing service at the townsite schoolhouse 
Sundav afternoon. May 16. Dr. Cle- 
mans of Duluth acttd AS chairman and 
William R. McMasters as secretary. 
New trustees were elected. L. B. Arnohl 
for one vear. William R. McMasters 
for two vears and Dr. Clemans for 
three years, with Mrs. John Newton 
Tidd as secretary. 

William R. McMasters and family are 
moving Into their house next to tlie 
poetofflce on the townsite. 

Ed Relkow was in Meadowlands 
twice last week with landseekers. 

Mr. and Mrs. L. T. Tidd and family 
spent Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. Bruce 

Bardell. . ... , , .v, 

John P^benberg left Monday for the 
soutliern part of the state, where he 
expects to remain this summer. 

Charles Worthing and Charles Cof- 
fin of Cloquet visited Meadowlands t rl- 

ll A V 

idiss Florence Smith spent Saturday 

"l^an Payne was In Meadowlands on 

Monday. „ . , <■.»,-.. 

News was received last Frid.iy of the 
death of Miss Lvdia Koopman at Pipe- 
stone. Minn. Miss Koopman was a 
daughter of Mrs. H. D. Koopman. The 
family left Meadowlands last spring 
and has been living at Pipestone 

Andrew Nelson was In Duluth 
day on business. 

During this unusually fine 
the farmers In Meadowlands are all 
hard at work getting their crops In, 
and everv one anticipates a very pros- 
uerouE vear. This will be the 
vear there has been shipm.ents of any 
.»lze sent out of the settlement, biit If 
the season proves good there will be 
plenty to ship out this fall 



Ironwood, Mich.. May 22. — (Special to 
Tlie rieralU.j — -Max btevens has been in 
i-argo, N. U., during the past week, ai- 
tenaing his mother, wao nas been seri- 
ously ill during the past two weeks. 

Dr and Mrs. J. R. Moore, accompa- 
nied by several friends, spent the past 
week at San.-; fcouci outing 
rack lake. 

.vliss .\labert Sampson left 
for Hon River, alter spending 
visiting friends and 

""'mV and Mrs. C. E. Houk have 
turned home from Minneapolis, atlei 
spending several days visiting 
friends and relatives m tliat 

Tiie first baseball game 
this district for tiie season 
Hurley and Bessemer 
Wednesday afternoon. 

The new street railway to 
is well under way and thi.s 
of the Twin City railway 
considerable track walking, 
sidering livery bills. 

Circuit court convened at , „ . 

Monday, and a number of jurors chosen 
from this city were obliged to spend 
several unpleasant days in tliai cit> 

W L Lvon of Antigo spent batui- 
day in Ironwood transacting business 
and visiting "vs-ith friends. ^«,.^„i 

Mrs William Moade spent several 
daV^ the past week visiting with rela- 
tives and friends in Ashiand . , 

W J Findley ol Cleveland transacieo 
business in tliis city Saturday. 

Roniert Mullens has accepted a 
tion In the laboratory 
Iron Mining company 

Mr. and -Mrs. A 



on lama- 
Wednesday 
a weeK 
relatives in tins 

re- 

fter 
with 
city. 

played in 

was by the 

teams at Hurley 

Bessemer 
extension 
win save 
not con- 
Bessemer 



Round Lake, died after an 
few davs with pneumonia. 

McDermott. head woodsman for the 
Hines Lumber company, has been In 
town for a few days. 

Mrs. Searle and daughters have left 
for Superior, where they will reside 
In the future. „ . , , . 

Matthew Locke of Sand Lake and 
Miss Jessie Merceran were married 
here. May 17. 

The wedding of Miss I..aura Skeede 
and C. Brown of St. Paul took place 
Tuesday at high noon, at the home of 
the bride's parents, corner of Dakota 
avenue and Second street. The service 
was T^ad by the Rev. Isaac Tracey. 
Miss Marie Marquette and Miss Pearl 
Schafer were bridesmaids. The brother 
of Mr. Brown was best man. The bride 
was gowned in white satin and pomt 
lace. She carried njrides' roses. Miss 
Marquette and and Miss Shafer wore 
old rose gowns, and carried cream and 
pink roses Mr. and Mrs. Brown left at 
5 o'clock iov the coast. They will be 
home in St. Paul after June 15. 

Will Cavo and family moved to Su- 
perior Monday, where they will make 
their home In the future. George 
Wiegle.s bought tlie house recently oc- 
cujiied by Mr. Cayo. 

Mrs Van Horn sold her farm to 
Harry Rinkin. Mrs. Van Horn will re- 
turn to the East. . 

William Mapes of Cuduray, arrived 
here Monday with Henry Cloud, who 
was convicted of Grand larceny, and 
commuted to the county Jail until the 
June term of court. 

Mrs. Fred Clarke left for Minneapo- 
lis w-here she will be the guest of her 
sister, Mrs Ben Morris. 

T S. Whilten, manager for the Huijon 
Lumber company returned from his 
Eastern trip Tuesday. 



and 
first 



at 



posl- 
of the Oliver 
in this city. 
Bromley of Winches- 
ter spent several days of the past week 
visiting with friends In this city. 

Prof H L Smytiie of Ishpemmg was 
in the city during the fore part of the 
week! visiting wUh friends and attend- 
iuK to various business matters. 
The funeral of Mrs. Louis Kutile took 
Ihe funeral o^.^j^^^^^.^ church Monday 

was a daughter 



from Grantsburg Monday, where ther 
had been visiting relatives. 

Contractor F. J. Mann spent th» 
week with his family in Milwaukee. 

F. W. Clark, secretary of the Den- 
ham Farmers' Mercantile association, 
was a caller in town Monday. The 
companv has rented a building 
expects" to open for business the 

of the week. .„,--.... 

Manager Johnson of the Tri-S^at© 
Telephone company will be here Mon- 
day to meet a delegation of farmers 
residing west of .Moose Lake and will 
sign a contract for the construction of 
a line, which will have about tlnrty- 
five subscribers. The farmers north o£ 
town contemplate the construction ol 
a line In the near future, which wlU 
make three rural lines from Moose 
T ^k£ * 

" Mr. and Mrs. S. SwanP^n, why? were 
visiting relatives In St Paul lasl week, 
returned home Sunt'iay. 

Miss N. E. Barnard of Carlton wa» 
transacting business in town last 

week. -. . o 

Division Engineer Jones of the Soo 
is busv this week staking the plats for 
the depot and coal chute. The depot 
will be 24 bv 88 and the platform 300 
feet long. The coal chute will* be ICO- 
feet long and ol large dimensions, 
it is expected tliat work on hlie 
ings will start in the very nyar 
This same crew has also btiftn 



and 
build- 
future, 
at work 




Win- 
It has 



place from 

morning. ^Mrs. KuUle^^ ^^ ^^^.^ ^^^^,_ 



spent 
sev- 

spent 
Iron- 



in the 
friends 



Frl- 



Tues- 

weather 

> all 

F In, 

jros- 

first 



of -Mrs Susan ,.,, 

She leaves a husband a one child 

J E. Stanley ot Rochester 
Monday in Ironwood attending to 
t-i-Hi business affairs. 
*^ Wll Ham Salmey of Westboro ■ 
several da\ s of the past week ii 
wood looking after his bu.siness inter- 
ests and visiting with friends. 

A .M. Kirby of Asiiland was 
city Wednesday visiting wUh 

anil attending to y^^.'^H^X^'l^^ent 

1 »!• F Correv of Menasha spent. 
daV in Ironwood. visiting with relatues 

'^"j* H*''Brennan spent Saturday and 

Sunday" in Ashland, visitnig w th 

friends and attending to business in- 

lerests. 

in''tiie''cit?"Tulfda; looking after a 

number of business "J-'^tters^ 

William Metbger of Houghton 
several days of the past week 
witii Ironwood friends. 

E Hadler of Antigo paid a _ 
visit to Ironwood Wednesday. 

E B Baldwin of Ashland . 

in Ironwood visiting with 
attending to business mat- 



Winchester "v^'as 
ter a 

spent 
visiting 

businesi* 

spent 



transacted 



Wednesday 
friends and 

^*^c' W Wendt of Chicago 

business in Ironwood Thursday and 

Friday. . ^ , *i, 

E J. Duel of Duluth 
attending to various 

'^'prof*^^! B. Roney and his musical 
bovs aupeared before a large audience 
m the opera house Thursday evening 
and as usual, proved very interesting. 

Joseph Pass of Antigo visited 
Ironwood friends Thursday. 



have 

is In 

build- 



stopping 
were ar- 
costs las't 
near Me- 
nets this 
were seln- 
the game 
them the 



was in 

business 



the city 
matters 



with 



t 



Ffime 

"try 
: Ihe 



AU- 



'.1 n p 

. I. wu.> l.fUi a' 

.1, Fenske T 



■ r ih 



Worn- 



ti\ 

; 
ft 
Of 

ft r 
th. 

Chlra,.. 
N. i 

0)J 

1. 

Tuesu 
Afh 

ii.r 
Ti._ 

I : 

CJir 
1.,,^, ., . 



■ .. . . K 
lire i I, 



Modi rn 



the 
i>ni tl 
Art." 

Tl •■Tlic 



I II'- 
meetlng 

c 



by reading an ex- 

book "Renaissaiue and 

Mrs. A. .'. Fenske luul a 

IJft ami Wirks ol .\rt 

i'iaii.' duels were 

.1 w (Is borne and 



ren- 
.Mr.«. 
Art- 
M;^. 



vlslt- 
■ f: 



. I . r t 

whicli t 



I. "Ra! 

.-sed in 

n. Mr.". Ill' 

Interest ing 

■-'•(irv i.'f Wit- .>!,-.,, 1.. • 

nunlcation from Mrs. 

,., Aitkin wa.»-- read, hi 

cluVi was invited to affll- 



.<! ;t 1 1 ( ii L'a n iza 



ll'vli 




ol 
ih-- 
. ri n 



I 



Tower. Minn.. .May 22 —< Special to 
The Herald.! — Mrs. Knutson of h.ly 
visltetl friends here Thursday. She re- 
turned home Thursday evening. 

T J Walsh of I>uluth lottked after 

business interests in this city Tuesday. 

O W. Akerson was called to his 

home In Lindstroin. Minn., Monday by 

the serious Illness of bis mother, who 

died Tuesday. Mr Akerson was at her 

b. d.«ide at the time death came. She 

\\,xs buried Thursday. , . , . 

Fred Pfeiffer of Virginia, visited at 

. home of Mr. and .Mrs. C. Kieth a 

V or two the first part of the week. 

.Mrs Hunter of Virginia Is visiting 

at the liome of Mrs. J. Rody this week. 

'• W. Whitman of Eveleth looked 

business matters here a day or 

I,,,. ;l:e first part of the week. 

Two baseball teams have been or- 

.rnnb-ed and played tlieir first games 

v. The Tower independent team 

: the Vermilion I^ake Indian b«>ys 

d defeattd them by a score of 6 to 

Tliev also played the city team and 

beat thipm by a score of 11 to 2. 

! Mi.«s Delia Murphy went to Mountain 

lion Wednesday to attend a I.rf» Brosse 

p;iiiy held at that place Thursday 



im 




Zim Minn . May 22.— ^Special to The 
Herald. f-Miss Emma Willner returned 
Friday morning to Duluth after a 
three weeks' visit at her »>ome here 

Nat N.. Naslund returned^^Thiirsday 

first 



from a business trip to 



CV' 



1- 



•nest 
;.l vi 



.Mtrrlll went 
• lied friends 



to 
for 



Duluth 
a few 



the 
In 



first 

the 
look- 



Mr 
.. k 



(.enter 

lori' li 



iron 

has 
.• aft 



1 

a 
ore 



a t;ali 
\U lil- 

last 



.Mrs. I 
Mabel a 
morning 
will run 



M' 



.M: 
.lit 



.-. < ail'. 

will remain 



returned 

omi>anied 

t leatetl 

.- sllght- 

iluM f'lr 



lrt>n 


Ri\ 


ei 


. Wis.. May 22. — ( .'Special 


lo The 


H« 


ra 


l«i. 1 — Tii«" giiicer.v firm of 


Bv,-<"nso 


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A- 


.Moe filttl a petition in 


bank 






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cai'iii; 






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Dlano 








By . 






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Grim; 






a tort t- of men at wt '■ 


.pettli 






••trawberr.v iilants n 


ftl 






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pu.i n 1 






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Lo 






last T . 


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1 






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ri 






:a,--t >ui;(. 



1 l>\ ..tl. I 

I. Ill mi'rt- for treatment. 

.Mrs. .'olHi llabiaii ilied Tiiur>day 

of dr'il'-'. afitr an illiifss t.f st-veral 

months. Services were conducted in 

the Catholic < hurcli and the remains 



T' 



tic 

111 

al 



W 



f 1 



ical cemetery. She 
ami several children, 
.ird is taking steps to 
grounds in shape at 
be tailed for at once 
of siii' '.- and stumps, 
lading of t!.c grtmnds. A 
;ice is to b«- built around 
.d part of the field. 

■ has been suf- 

I many months, 

\\ .IS ourietl from tlie 

><n Sunday, interment 

III. lerv. 

Toal antl her two sons 

" . ek for an extemled 

and relatlxt s at New 

wVit-rt tfif famil.y 



l-er- 
his 

.idm 
Mr. 
the 



will rcnu've i lie re soon. 
removed his family to 



»,.i 



»h 



fends t' 

• , on th' 



.M> 



\\t\< ileltKated 
..; Knights t>f 
them at the state 



* .Morin and children, lone, 
1,1 Everett. left Wednesday 
for Grafton. N. !»., where they 
a hotel In the f uture. Miss 
I'earl Morin will remain for a few 
months as she Is employed as central 
at the depot. Mr. and Mr«. Morin and 
family have resided here for the past 
seven or eight years. 

Mr. Harrison came up from Steven- 
sfm Monday and visited at the home of 
Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Congdim, Sr., a day 
or two the fore part of the week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Cornell returned 
to their home in Virginia Monday 
after spending a few days here with 
his mother. Mrs. P. Burke. 

Miss Alma Swanson came up from 
Virginia Saturday and ."pent Sunday 
here with her parents. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Robertson left 
Wednesday morning for Duluth, where 
thev will "visit for a few days. 

Cameron l>etaigny and B. B. Bro- 
vitk. clerk of Buyuck township were 
in town from Buyuck Wednesday and 
Thursday. 

The citv baseball team will go to 
Winton Sunday, where they will play 
a game Sunday afternoon with the 
Winton team. 

A spark from an engine caused <iUite 
a bia:^e at the depot Wednesday aft- 
ernoon aliout 6 o'clock when the walk 
caught afire near the window. It was 
ntiessarv to break the window panes 
and tear up the platfortn before the 
fire could be extinguished. There was 
no alarm sent in. so the fire depart- 
ment was not called out. 

Algir-.^mith's mill started work Mon- 
day and will run all summer. It will 
work iust the day shift. There are 
employed. The Benson 
Monday for the sum- 



Cass Lake, .Minn.. May 22.— (Special 
to The Herald. I — Tlie ladies' guild met 
at the home of Mrs. -McGlnnis last 
Thursday. 

.Mrs. F. B. Merrll entertained tlie 
Whist club Wednesday evening. 

H N. Harding returned Thursday 
from a business trip to .Minneapolis. 

Mrs. William ONell left Wednesday 
lor a visit with friends and relatives in 
Asiiland, Wis, 

.Mrs. A. E. Winters and daughter 
went to Brainerd Thursday for a visit 
with relatives. 

County Sheriff Delury of \\alker 
was a business visitor here 
of the week. 

County Auditor Byhre was 
village Tuesday and Wednesday 
ing after business interests 

p. J. Keating made 
to Onigum Thursday. 

R M. Funck county attorney, 
been In Bena and Walker the 
the week. , * ., n „i 

E T Bailey, organizer of the Royal 
League has been in the village most of 
the week looking up new members. 

Al Nelson, who is employed 
Hartley Island farm. Is visiting 

Iwtkc friends. ,.ni„„^ 

A special meeting of the village 
council was held last Saturday evening, 
and the council agreed to revoke the 
license of any saloon keeper 
telling iHjuor to Indians. The 
also donated |50 to the 

rhe dance given by Philip 
Friday evening was a moat 
and enjoyable affair. »to.*!^ 

Mrs E l^ Wairen and .Miss Mattie 
Li'ndsiey ' were the guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. Henry Warren at Bena over Sun- 
*i Q y _— ^ 

Tiie funeral of Joseph Wege. who 
wa« fataTlv burned at the Winnlglgosh- 
i-h" Dam fire the first of the week, was 
held Thursday and the remains Interred 
in the village cemetery. 

Dr D F. Itumas has been 
ing Ills father, who lives in 
lis. the most of the week. 

David Turner of Crookston 
friends and transacted business here 
tlie first of tlie week. .». r^ „♦ 

M H Gal v in. detective for the Great 
Northern railroad, was here Wednes- 
day, looking for a thief who stole some 
valuables from a car here recently 

Clarence Carlson, who has 
ploved in the Hough grocery 
tim'f'. resigned 



a business trip 

has 
most of 



at the 
Cass 



caught 
council 
band. 

Raboin 
succesful 



evening 

^^Mr-s O P. Willner spent the 
nart'of the week in Kelsey as 
eue«t of her sister. Mrs. Gust Carlson 
^ Miss Ada Hay of Kelsey returned 
Tuesday morning, t^fter speiiding a 
days here at the home of Mrs. 
Peterson. 

Richard McCue was a business 
here T-uesdav. „ ,. „ 

Mr and Mrs. August Gradine 
turned Thursday evening from 
Duluth after spending the past 
with friends and relatives there. 

Swan Swanson of Payne was 
gu^^t of his brother, olof Swanson 

^P^ri^'terson transacted business 
Duluth Monday and Tuesda 

Mis« Freda Olson left 
morn i n g f or Tu "xior y to 
ter Mrs. (.'harles Norling. 

Mr«! Sam Sullivan spent Tuesday 
Wednesday In Eveleth visiting 

Mrs Hans Lind and M 
Willner spent Saturday in 

The members of the 
class 
Rev K 
Hibbing 



visit 



the 
son. 
ned 
few 
Per 

caller 

re- 
West 
week 

the 
n. 

In 

ednesday 
her sis- 



and 
friends. 
Iss Louise 
Forbes, 
confirmation 
were confirmed Sunday afternoon. 
Akerman came down from 
the afternoon, returning in 
the evening. The church was prettily 
decorafid the members of the class 
were Miss Alma L.nd, Theodore Rask, 
WeinerRask, Manuel Gradine and Ed- 

"^''^J^.V'^l'^tv^o^^ sDtnt the first part of 
friends in W est Du- 



in 



enfertaln- 
Minneapo- 

visited 



the week visiting 

luth. „^ „ 

Bror Peterson was a 

in Virginia Thursday 



business caller 




Park Rapids. Minn., May 22.— (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.)— The general cori- 
ditions are more favorable. Grain is 
all In the ground, small grain Is most 
ly up and making a fine showing 
ter wheat has not done well, 
killed out in spots. The crop prom- 
ised well until the late hard treezing, 
which killed the grain on all the high- 
er spots. Rye is good and promises 
the best stand and yield in yf'')lf- 
Clover wintered well and very little 
was killed. , , ^ 

Park Rapids has taken on a boom. 
There will be more building this sea- 
son than for many years. Irwin Mc- 
Klnlev, William Langguth. T. Myers 
and o'thers are erecting fine dwellings 
The work of demolishing the ol,l 
schoolhouse is nearly completed and 
the contractors will be ready to begin 
the building of the new $30,000 high 
school. Work on the East side pram- 
mar school will soon be commenced. 
This will give Park Rapids two very 
fine school buildings. , ,, ^ . .i , 

There seems to he some hitch In the 
sale of the village bonds that were 
sold In April to improve the water 
works, bridge and lloating Indebted- 
ness of the village. 

A site has been selected for the new 
Carnegie library. Lots have been pur- 
chased north of the old Baptist church 
and work will be commenced at once to 
erect the new library. The nlans 
been accepted and everything 
readiness to begin work on the 
Ing 

The game warden has been quite ac 
tlve of late In arresting and -* 
illegal fishing. Three parties 
rested and fined $10 and 
week and three Finlanders 
nagha were caught using 
week. Parties near Akelev 
Ing the lakes, but eluded 
warden, some one giving 

"tip " 

The Park Rapids firemen are getting 
in shape for the Northern Minnesota 
firemen's tournament to be held at 
Cass Lake In June. Park Rapids holds 
the banner and Is determined to re- 
tain its possession. . >,. /^ « 
Owing to the fact that the Great 
North.ern railway has no night trains 
to the cities on the Cass Lake branch, 
a large number of people going to 
St Paul and Minneapolis take the 
evening train going north and go by 
the way of Walker, tliere taking the 
niglit train and returning the same way. 
thus saving two days' time in going 
and coming from the cities. . 

Mrs T. M. Sharp of Osage is visit- 
ing her daughter. Mrs. Dr. Wlnslilp. 

The Northwestern Telephone com- 
panv Is rebuilding its entire village 
svst'em, refitting the exchange and 
cablelng Its wires. Poles will be 
moved from the streets and placed in 
the allevs. The latest up-to-date sys- 
tem Is "being Installed. Men are at 
work setting poles and stringing cables. 
The exchange will be all metallic 
circuit and the cost will be $12,ouo. 
Mr. Kabcock of Minneapolis Is super- 
intending the construction, assisted by 
E U Harmer. local manager, who has 
by his faithful management made many 
friends in Park Rapld.s 

Dr C. W. Cutler will erect two fine 
cement blocks the coming season. He 
has purchased the Holllnger property 
on Maine street and will remove the 
old buildings to make room for the 
new structures. 

Memorial dav will be fittingly com- 
memorated. The old soldiers have 
turned the exercises over to the citi- 
zens, and appropriate committees liave 
been appointed. 

The liigh school seniors 
their annual program at 
hall Wednesday evening. 

Will Smith is lying dangerously low 
with erip complications at his home on 
Park avenue. The Odd Fellows are 
caring for him. 

Concrete foundations are being lahl 
und.-r the approaches of the new steei 
bridge, and traffic Is cut off .for a few 
davs. When completed it w»l\ lt,''"t 
one of tlie finest bridges in Huhl-ard 
countv The new bridge siians the 
Fishhook river and is 480 feet long. 

John Bouck. late county treasurer, 
has leased the new hotel at Marble. 
Minn. His family has moved to that i 
place to take charge of the new hotel. 

John Mertis received an unexpected ! 
call from two of his brothers residing 
at Oklahoma City. One he 
seen for twenty-five years, 
who Is suffering from an 
stomach disease, came to 
last farewell, as the 
Rochester Informed 
few weeks remained 



locating the Moose Lake-TIiief River 
Falls line, and it is expected tliat con- 
struction work wilLbegin the fore part 
of June. This lia^leaves the Broolen- 
Duluth line J»t.cut 30 feet belovir 
the vards and takes a nortliwesterly 
course, crossing the Northern Pacific 
near McGregor. 

Last Sunday the Willow River ball 
team came up and was defeated by a 
score of 9 to 3. After the Willow 
River game was over the Barnum and 
Moose Lake teams lined up and played 
a good game up to the fifth inning, 
wlien the game was tailed so the Bar- 
num people could catch the train. Tlie 
score was 4 to 4. Sunday the Spald- 
Ings of Duluth will be here. On the 
2uth the colored Gopliers will play Hie 
local team here. 

Miss Marv Weske has accepted the 
jiosition of chief for the Tri-State Tele- 
phone company. 

I. C. Campbell and G. W^ Rydeen 
were transacting business In Duluth 
last Tuesday. 

J. W. Llndmark is erecting a sum- 
mer cottage on his lake shore prop- 
erty and expects to have it ready for 
occupancy soon. (Juite a number of 
citizens wlio have property on the 
lake expect to build this summer. N. 
Berquist is completing his large hiuncli 
and Moose Lake will this summer liave 
about a dozen launches. Tliis ie an 
ideal summer resort and it is just be- 
ing found out. Already several Duluth 
people have purchased property here 
and will eiect summer homes. 



§100 Retford, »100. 

The readers of tlus paper will be 
pleased to learn tliai there is at least 
(..ne dreaded disease tiiat science has 
been able to cure In all its stages, and 
tliat is Catarrh. Halls CataiiJi Cura 
Ifc the onlv positive cure now known to 
the medic'al fraternity. Catarrh being 
a constitutional disease, reijuires a 
constitutional treatment. Hall's Ca- 
tarrh Cure is taken Internally, acting 
directly upon the lilood j;nd niucius 
surfaces of the system, thereby de- 
stroying the foundation of the disease, 
and" giving the patient strength by 
building up the constitution and atsist- 
ing nature in doing its work. The pro- 
prietors have so much faith in its 
powers that they offer One 
Dollars for any case that It 
cure. Send for list of testi- 



eurntlve 
Hundred 
fails to 
menials. 

Address 
Ol'io. . ^ „^ 

Sold bv all Druggists. , Be. 

Take Halls Family Pills for consti- 
pation. 



F. J. CHENEY & CO.. Toledo, 



By the Way 

Wlien buying a cigar call for 

Elcora or 
Mataafa 

Al) Dealers Sell Them. 

DILUTH CIGAR CO., Makers 



WHY ITS 6-5-4 



6-5-4 

iBlAKlUST* 

CTS' 



It's applied like paint 
onQas Stoves and 
Pipe. Shines itself. 
V^■on't wash off. Eats 
up Ru.st. Makes old 
Screen New. Produces 
Ebony Finish on Iron and Wood. 



I 



will present 
the Athletic 



If ;i"ir lit: 
par,}, Dul'Jtlj 

DUlUth 



,leT iiflvn'l 
UareJwart 



It. hff Kt ili> 
Coicrajjj, F. 



nl"an 
W»«ie. 



Cf ra- 
Wtst 



, REXlABUE.-.GOOQa -r.PHtCE.© «IOHT. 

KELLEYHARD>pi£^0: 

'*," YOUR, MONEY BACK if nO^ S'ATiSF-'to 



Namakogan 
Is finished and 



river 
open 

in 



VI r- 



Infant son 
visit at Shell 



1 



\t i r 1 n 



lliis !•«■- 



Mm . 



i*a.s t 
.Superii 



St. 
ek. 



g>.;. 



■ is rangfts iirol 
lyerior national 



, . , . e 
loiest 
forest 



abt.ut 100 men 
mill win open 
mer season. 

Mrs. Charles 
Edna spent a few days 
the week in Duluth. 

Frank Burges* returned 



Schaeffer and daughter 
the fore part of 

heme Mon- 



his 



been em- 
for some 
and de- 



position 
Darted 'tVe'^firVt of the week for Minne- 
apolis, where he expects to make his 
futuie home. , ,, , 

Inul a Japanese orator, delivered an 
address before a large-sized audience 
in the Methodist church Friday even- 
ing. His subject was "The East \ ersus 

* The ^Indian Mission school boys and 
a team representing the local schools 
played a gome of baseball on the mis- 
sion grounds this afternoon. 

The ice In the lake has all vanished 
and 'ht sportsmen are eparing no time 



Havward. Wis., May 22.— (Special 
The Herald.)— The new steel bridge 
which crosses the 
above the sawmill, 

'°MaU ^Sherrard of Stone Lake was 
town Saturday, calling on f«>fnds. 

Mart Vance and wife moved to 
Klnla Minn.. Monday of this week. 

nis'trlct Attorney McNamara has re- 
turned from Mankato, Minn., where he 
was attending legal business. 

Mrs James Helms and 
have left for a short 

^Alfs Oscar Moreland and children of 
Minneapolis are visiting relatives 
S en^s here before leaving for Callfor 
nia where Mrs. Moreland 
In the future. 

Mrs Ole Oleson left the 
week for a three months 
home In Norway. 

Pat Nelson returned to the Odanah 
reservation with a cow, to burn up the 
brush, after their winters work. 

B W Skeede came home from Mr- 
pinia where he is now employed, to 
fnend the wedding of his daughter. 
Miss Laura Skeede. , „ , , ». ^ 

Mls« Btrnlce Gage of Hudson Is the 
euest of Mrs. B. W. Skeede. 

Sheriff Mike Madden returned from 
Huron South Dakota 

Mr. Blomberg, a 



had not 
The other, 
incurable 
bid him a 
Mayo Bros, of 
him that only a 
of life. 
Miss Daisy Slater returned, to her 
home here from Ottumwa. Iowa, wliere 
she has been taking lessons in Instru- 
mental music. She has been absent 
al>out a year. 

A B Ferno was a visitor here last 
week looking up his property here. 
He was pleased to see so many im- 
provements. 

Charles Wilcox and Miss Mary 
Heinkel were married at the home of 
the bride's parents on the East side. 
Justice Leland officiating. 

The Park Rapids high school base- 
ball nine crossed bats with Long 
Prairie high school Saturday and were 
defeated, 4 to 7 In favor of Long 
Prairie. 



Qfe'E. PETIER *0N & CO. 

^ BROKERS 

2IR-1I14 Flrtit National Bank HIiIk- 
Diitutb. -Minn. Old I'liuue HS'-K. 

.Ml kinds of listed and unlisted se- 
furities bought and sold. Give l'» 
n Trial. 




win 

first 
visit 



■and 
Ifor- 
reslde 




of 
at 



the 
her 



Friday, 
farmer 



living at 



Moose Lake. Minn., May 22— <. Spe- 
cial to The Herald.)— Rev Lltchfled 
attended the dedication of the Endion 
M. E. church in Duluth 

George Nevers and 
were Duluth visitors ^ ,.,. , 

Mrs D H. Cooper spent the fore part 
of the week with relatives in Carl- 

'^Mrs William Hughes of Sandstone 
visited with her friend, Mrs. George 
Nevers, this week. ,1-1,1 

Mi«s Josephine Anderson of Willow 
River spent several days of last week 
here with her friend. Miss Lulu An- 
derson. 

Mr. and Mrs. D. 



this week, 
daughter. Edith 
this week. 



O. Olson returned 



ORDER TO EXAMINE FINAL AC- 
COUNT— ^ , 
State of Minnesota, County of St. Louis. 

■ IN PROBATE COl'RT. 
In the Matter of tiie Estate of Joseph 

Muccilli Decedent. 

THE PETITION OF Antonla Muccilli, 
a« representative of Hie above named 
decedent, together with her final ac- 
count of the administration of said 
estate having been filed in this Court, 
representing, among other things, that 
she has fully administered said estate, 
ard pravlng that said final account of 
Bald adininlstratlon be examined, ad- 
iu^ted nd allowed by the «;ourt. and 
that the Court make and enter Its final 
decree of distribution of the residue of 
the estate of said dec<-dent to the per- 
sons entitled thereto, and for the dis- 
cliarge of the representative and the 
sureties on her bond. 

IT IS ORDEREI> That said petition 
tie lieard, and final account examined, 
adiupted and allowed by the Court, at 
tlie Probate Court Rooms In tlie Court- 
house, in the City of Duluth, in said 
Countv, on Tuesday, the 1st day of 
jur.e, '1&09, at 10 o'clock a. m.. and all 
persons interested in said hearing and 
in said matter are hereby cited and 
required at said time and place to show 
cause if anv tliere he, why said peti- 
tion sliould not be granted. 

ORDERED FURTHER. That this or- 
der be served bv publication mi the Du- 
luth Evening Herald according to law. 

Dated at Duluth, Minn., May «, 1909. 

By the Court. 

J. B. MIDDLECOFF. 
Judge of Probate. 
Seal Probate Court, St. Louis County, 

Minn. 





V 



V 



4^ttBSm 



iumtmik 



•iMSin 



^^i^ 




THE DULUtIi evening HERALD: ^ ^SATURDAY, MAY 22. 1909. 





\ 






1 
1 
1 








28 


f^. 


■^ 


i 



L 



THE PLEA 

— OP- 
ARMENIA 



ORPHANAGE, FAMINE AND 
POVERTY THE TOLL OF 
THE TURKISH MASSACRES 
—A NATIVE'S STORY OF 
HIS COUNTRrS TRIALS. 

IV V .V ?{AliKKiy 



torn of my he.ut. Your rtwarfoci mind 
iinl blinded Intellect deserves pity, not 
ceiisuT'^'. Far be it from m«? to oppos*^ 
you; yi>u have begun by liatlnji U3. you 
will end by hattitf; your.selve.s. To 
Miosf* ^vho do not understand me. I 
n-iiiil,! suKMft'nt the rer»«Hding of Etner- 
> >i; H treatise on "Compensation." 



I'endlnj? doflnlte a 
shall keep on pre 
doctrine — for time 
— and a.s misery 
may as well take 
that the additional 




gainst us. w<* 

our economic 

d la time lost 

company, we 

a few recruits 

that we are 



f-n 



\% rlti'T '••f 



A I! 



•rl- 
t uv 



two if th''in th 
til Mr oxuntiy. 



ft/t. 



and it I 
.-,,,■.■,■•! 



•■t>.«» !«n'l 



ni'ist able lany-rs of 
Duritifi the alue 
u the iiarliain*mt:in' ^'easton, 
oinpIaintH in the 

. ^ that the u .cities 

',■•:■• <i-. Willi; w .t.-> rii-- jir-'sident 

■ f Mi- hamber, Ahtiifd Riza, th« 
;,! nt Krand vizhn* to be. put them 
.... -me -•iliie and those who insistMd on 
httviiiR ihetr complaints befof pulia- 

■r-^ thr.'.it»ned with '•""'"'<' 'spirit a week working out the details 

,ut .>f ..in-, for the young ;,jf ^ fortlicoming deal, said tliia we^k 

Turk«i U'- Pau-Islantiles I tlat he thought the camp was look- 

Thei.' ta a^oth^■^ eieni iit m the i nig aa lively a.s ever. 

form party In Turkey, winch, while, •''obalt." said Mr. Catlin. "Is going 

itidins? 



privileged to remain In. civilization may 
bring to us. M<')>i\ilS KAPLAN. 

THE COBALT MERGER LIKELY 

Despite Denials Thaf Consolidafion Is Intended, 

Such Move Is Considered Probable -''Length 

and Lives of the Mines Looking Better. 



St^w York. May 22.— The Mining Age 

s , , , I . ,iiald Catlin. of the Arm of 
llie I'iti.iin-Powell company, who has 
Just returned from Cobalt, where lie 



ernif. 
:irg. 



,,ut for O.nstitutional gov- ihiMiyh a real estate boorn ot oonsK 
„,,.ir*» would leavo **''»^''''- proportion.s. and there Is not 
mpire w< uld eavo vacant house to let either £ 

' -'.■!f-?<'v»>rnnient^,^^^ ^^^^^ ^^ ^^ Halleybury. Propert 



ng it. 1 

-itored 

l>r'».\d- 

dth-ials 



to prevent 
, tr-vriK.n In 

1 ': I, 



Armt 



the 






lUgtiou' 



jnuiiT I iiumi»"r 't 

:uM... ^1. wfU-'-'lucated MosI-mu 

who were exiled by the old regime and 

ho als.» w^re m 'mbers of the Young 

irk party, returned to C-jn.stanthi- 

Th -y noticed that the Com- 

.f T'ni )n itid Progress wa.s try- 

• all powrful in civil matters 

rimlriiitlng against different 

■ ■ ;^,> .>f racial 

■ . , , -, *A\.- !;i.'-;''U3 

I i.C thii pres^'iu Liberal party, held that 

l:f '.no years of tyranny and 

.lonal butchery could not force 

dlfft'^rent proud ild rices to for- 

■tieir nationality, 'h- pre-sent sy3- 

r.d not force th-ni ' • <" -"" lii.i 

.■m ' >ttoman» n - 

they pointed out. 

he Chii.stian element which 

iinc-^d *he coninierce, the in- 

tr anil art 

' Ltb^jral party 

Uroader notion.*! come Into 

; ,arlv In April, than the rea.c- 



real estate boom of oonsld- 

a 
at 
ty 
bought several months ago is being 
sold It an advance of several hundred 
per cent profit. 

"While there is i ^ood deal of talk 
about the Nipls.sing. La Rose. Chum- 
herg-Ferland merger and efforts to 
.j.-ny It ar.3 pretty strong. I am satia- 
fli'1 that the consolidation will go 
through at some later date. It sf^ems 
•!..■ 1 .gleal outcome of the location of 
these properties, 

"At the Nlpissing it begins to look 



as If the western portion of their ter- 
ritory, which was not considered likely 
ground at first, will develop Into the 
best part of their locations." 

•The length and lives of the mines, 
in regard to the permanent and es- 
tablished properties. 1* looking better 
now than at any other period of the 
silver camp's history. Depth is show- 
ing a continuation of the deposits and 
the original theory regarding the lim- 
itations of the rich are within a de- 
fined formation is now all exploded. 
One formation has as good a chance 
to get it as another. 

•The rumor prevails at the camp 
that the Temiskaming mine is not 
looking as well sa^ in the past. The 
underground workings are still In ore. 
but the streaks are Inclined to be ir- 
regular and not constant. This may 
account for the reason why the com- 
pany Is hastening to build its con- 
centrator. The ore is believed to be 
more 'pocketey' than at any other time 
in the history of the property." 



and disintegrate Is on account of this 
cuating of oxides. , „ „ ... 

"I have a letter from Henry Hewitt, 
Jr., of Tacoma. In which he says: I 
believe you are right; we are back to 
an Iron age as soon as we can get the 
Iron. Some twenty years ago. when 
I came to this coast, we had several 
Iron vessel built out of old-fashioned 
wrought Iron plate. They are as good 
today as when built. .Some eight or 
ten years ago we had another lot of 
vessels constructed to haul lumber to 
San Francisco. They were built of 
steel plate. Now they are practically 
In pieces, th? disintegration of tlie 
steel making them worthless. Our first 
mill, covered with ordinary puddled 
sheet iron, painted. Is as good today as 
when put on twenty years ago. Our 
new mill we have covered twice with 
sheet steel. It now looks like a sieve. 
This Is also true of all the pipe we 
have laid." 

"Some thirty years ago there was 
an Iron bridge put over the Shenango 
river at Sharon, which la as good to- 
day as the day It was erected. Fifteen 
years ago there were steel bridges 
erected alongside of It. They have 
rusted until they are wrecks. The 
galvanizing of wire does not prevent 
the rusting of nails. The wire used in 
fences Is not standing over three or 
Cour years. 

"Under the modern practice It costs 
$8.62 to deliver enough ore at Pittsburg 
to make a tone of pig iron. We know 
from our mining practice that we can 
deliver ore at the mouth of our fur- 
nace at 1 cent per unit. We have had 
a number of tests made on these Iron 
ores, and we expect to get into com- 
mercial operation shortly." 




Kitchen Coolness 



SHAnUt'K'S ANNU.4L REPORT S'^'XR^tlL^ic^riT,,? 



(Continueii from page 12.> 



in 







the Ji.-iturij.-i 
rjcal tim • 




■:• sum; 


111. iiu 


tMjl 

Th-' 


LS tli 

fa m 1 


.; ri0t been, < >- 



irleH pr 
b; m Con. 
>ked the 

--;ri4 Turk. 

-s to th'- 

.■., \n.ii 

riLir'-lurik;' 



the tiuUtary upris- 
■ rw.. which p ro- 
ll of the 
.,u.i ...... . i by aulok 

disposition i>f the old 

■ th ■• ■'' ■■"■z Turk-s were 

,ri all no pie. the 

■ ctiug what their 

,1 inland to the Ar- 

',<) iigitate massacre 



that the 
• to come. 
Liiberals 
1 »n an 1 



' r-uggtd 

, ;''T ttie 

.! of the 
Pi -igrcsa 



[liberals 

WMl'.. Ill 



:r I out. The 
■ uu portion of th ■ 
wliich hid k '1 

■ . . = , Wft""ks' I. 1 ' MJ.MC . 

, Hi> means shorn 
.stieiistU An ori'-ntal i> iv 

^ that when two ho: - 

- key th • 



in full operation will be le.<»s than 
any other district 

At the present low price ot copper, 
It has been considered advisable to 
ship our ore to any custom smelter, it 
being thought wiser to direct our ef- 
forts towards vigorously developing 
the mine, which we are doing and put- 
ting It in position to ship to the capac- 
ity ol the plant when the conditions 
of the copper market change and 
prices will yield a more reasonable 
profit to stockholders on the ore mined 
and shipped. There is no advantage 
i:\ t.iking out ore when the price re- 
,U1/-J from sam? does not yield a 
more protilablo margin over the cost 
of production than it does at the pres- 
i»nt time 

Our treasurer's report herewith will, 

I think, be sufficient, but should any 

sto'-kli.iltler wish further information 

ir will be cheerfully given. For the 

n THOM-\S BAUDON. 

President. 



CORDOVA TO HAV_E NEW SHAFT 

(Continued from page li. ) 






1' 



r.n. What 1 

.V the i 'hrist- 

from 



iperty. and it is probable that some 
iMiriiiil ituiouiicements will be the 



.naolldatton of the Eureka 

.iisolidated properties into 

• id-jva Mining company, which is 

' '■ nnplete.l now, an-l which will 

1 within the next few days. 

developments on these prop- 

. be expected within a short 

■ Globe r-onsolidatf-d is look- 

.- ' - i il! Indications 

. rich vein on the 

., . ■ ... I good producer 

: ^ ago. 



inn ■. 
iavor 



. urKi-in 
^oUl!^r. 









oll- 

lUO I . ■ • - 

if he 

' ■!» a i '■> 
<un in ai 

:,i "" ' ist- 
md ' 



\T THE LAKE iWPER MINES 



itiued fnmi ;»«;■■ 1 2.) 



fiv. 
wh 



.1 



For ten 



th: 



. ;is 
oeif '" 
hu-sln 



^.vUy tUij 



■ pMt ir.t, ) prison 

,x revolver ha.H been 

. ,o^ .^ 'A'hic' th** Moa- 

snarket place 

■,..if.. ,.. ■••■na- 

>n- 

I, : ,s o i ■ li k'" 



.vriK 



> f ■ ■ I I • 
tions f 



^h 



■ d a treaty -.^ " 

that slie U" 
H in Turk.-y -sn 
f h•lnd^ of th* 



.noiiiig of one .■< 

...us a helpless child 

•» that It must die 

,,...,.- .,...^ the sul- 
ro,i<i .'on- 
■ -.i tnd 

'■ Mko 

,) 1 : . 

to '.■ !nd-Tstood 

for my mist worthy 
Pr 



Samuel 



s, who 

lfv,,,.d 



or / 



J. Bar 

) n since 

V Yet 

A,v. I) into 

t : ■..,.- . ■ - ■<-i the 
nd Stripes, which 
, .i luses throughout 




SOCIALISM AND WAR 




lOttl "■' 



win not 
accom- 
human 



do 



■I'lt 



L.UttK 



I. ley 

itor 
I in 



pounds mineral per ton of rook 

.mparea with eighteen to 
ounds mineral per ton of 
;r.d from thf older No. 2 
There are occasional 
sirett iio.H of ground particularly In 
the territory tributary to the No. 6 
shaft that will easily average fifty 
pound.s mineral to the ton of rock. 
The company now has two shafts 
equipped with p.-rmanent hoisting 
machinery. an<l a third shaft will V>e 
similarly euuippvJ within the next 
sixty days. The stamp mill is handling 
1 " ■' > • r.s rock daily or slight- 
I p^'r cent of capacity. 
Max-*. 
Mii-!H ha.-» two machine drills en- 
"4>-d ill drifting and one machine 
.ping at the .seventeenth level in the 
so-^allod (Ireen Ij:pidote. The lode 
has been opened at this point by 
about 150 feet oi drifts, and without 
;iMy apparent dlmlnuti-in In values as 
th.; drifts r'>ach .it The ground ex- 
posed is uniformly mineralized from 
end to end of drifts and for the great- 
er pirt of their width. Eight feet of 
this tw. Ivf-foot lodo are exceptional- 
ly w,-ti charg.'d with the mineral. The 
ompanv Is making an accumulation 
of rock from this point of which a 
t.-st will l)»^ made to determine the 
projier method of milling and In- 
rldently show up the copper content 
if the r->ck. which has been variously 
estimated to carry fr(mi 1 per cent to 
4 per cent copper. In. rock is very 
.showy and though sum-- of the richer 
portions of the hxle may without .se- 
lection test as high aa 3 per cent 
fine copper, an average recovery of 
more than 1 per cent Is not generally 
looked for. The thirteenth and fif- 
teenth level crosscuts driving from the 
ol.ler workings >f the mme to tap the 
new lode are in over seventy-five feet 
iind are expected to reach the lode 
early in June. The c.impletlon of this 
work will make p.>s.sible the extrac- 
tion -f upwards of 500 tons of rock 
dally from the r.reen Epidote and 
should and probably will aid very ma- 
f .i,,.y j„ raising the general aver- 
,f th'- r>) k now mined, which 
average for many years past has been 
uncomfortably close to % per cent, or 
-approximat.'iy half that '>f the gen- 
eral average roi k mined hi the en- 
tire Lak'^ Superior distri-n. 

MYSTERY ABOn DAMS-DALY 

(Continued from page 12.) 



of claims, in the 
the district, by 
the Butte-Mllwaukee company, of 
which the Butte & New York Is the 
holding company. The Colonel Sellers 
has a .shaft 600 feet deep, but work on 
the property was stopped by the finan- 
cial panic, "which caused the suspen- 
sion of many concerns. The Colonel 
Sellers lies a considerable distance 
north of the Black Uock and on an- 
other vein series. , 

AmnlKamated Victory. 
The Amalgamated .Copper company 
has won an Imp'Ji'UMt. decision in the 
ff*deral court of ^Vyumlng in a suit 
brought by the g<»ye»iinient to cancel 
patent to several thousand acres of 
coal lands to which the Diamond Coal 
&. Coke company has title. The gov- 
ernment claimed that entry was made 
by several men In collusion with the 
pre.sent owner and under what Is 
known as additional soldiers' .scrip, it 
was claimed that the land was known 
to contain coal deposits and was there- 
fore not open to entry. The court 
hohLs differently and finds that there 
has been no fraud. 

Contradicted Uy Kyan. 
A story in circulation In Montana 
and elsewhere has l>een to the effect 
tliat the International Smelting & Ke- 
Ining company was not acting in good 
faith In moving to build a new smelter 
in ITtali, the story being that there was 
no Intention to complete the smelter. 
John L>. Ryan, before leaving for New 
York took occasion to contradict the 
story. He said the smelter would »>e 
built as raphilv as possible and would 
have an initial capacity of -i.OOit tons 
per day. It is to be so constructed tbat 
it can easily be enlarged or changed to 
meet future needs. He said It was the 
aim of tlie company to make of It Jiie 
most modern and efficient smelting 
plant in the country, and millions of 
dollars wouJd be spent on it. 

A !4nuWMtorui DIvldrnd. 
The Snowstorm .Mining company, 
that concern of uncertain dividends, 
paid another dividend In May. making 
the third this year. The dividend was 
i cents per sliare. Manager Greenougb 
explained that the company paid a 
dividend whenever it had money 
enough. The policy of tbe company is 
to permit no accumulation In tbe treas- 
ury to build up no rt-.serve fund or sur- 
plus. Since the Snowstorm has been 
paying dividends it has distributed a 
total of »1.0»7.100. 

The Ophlr. 
Preparations are being made, at the 
Ophlr mine to resume development 
work. The boilers are being moved 
nearer the shaft and a new one will 
be added to the battery. Supt. Mc- 
<'onnell expects to receive word very 
soon to begi n active operatio ns. 

LAKE SUPERIOR IRON MIXES 

(Continued from page 12.) 



WHEN 



YOU 



GO 



TO 



NEW 



YORK 



on business or pleMur« and 
wsiit Uie most ssUsfirtury hotel 
aoconimodaUoii, for a reason- 
able araiiunt of money, you will 
make no luUUko in trying tfif 

Park Avenue Hotel 

S2nd and 33rd Straeti and Park 
Avenue. 

It U a ma«tiiri<-ent Inilldlnc. 
Willi an open central court anti 
paliu garden, ninety by one 
huiirln-d and ten feet: iiisurUig 
tlie beat Uglit and TenUlaUoii 
of any New York City hotel. 

It U absolutely nrcproof. re- 
plete with c»ery CDiiTeiiifMce and 
luxury, upto-dale In t-very de- 
tail ; til close touch wltli amuse- 
ment and shoiniing center auid 
UaiupurtaUun lines. 

It is famous for the courteous 
nttenUnn given to all guoau 
by etery employe. 

Its dining room, restaurant 
and cafe (KuropcAU plan) ak 
not<Nl for excellence of fare, 
high cUss service and moderate 
price. 

Advance engagement of rooms 
win add greatly to your com- 
fort. 

Write for Illustrated booUot 
and any InfumuiUou dealrail. 

REKU & D.XR.VKTT. 

rrtH>rletor». 



No hot and blistering air 
to sap vitality and make 
cooking intolerable when 
work is done on the safe, 
economical and comfort- 
able New Perfection 
Wick Blue Flame Oil 
Cook-Stove. Using it, 
your kitchen is not a 
room to flv from, but a place where all the 
necessary nousehold work is done in restful coolnes 
iz doesn *t heat the kitchen. The 

NEW PERFECTION 

Wdi Bine Flane 00 Cook-Slove 

is built with a CABINET TOP just like the modem steel ranee. 
Combine* conveniences found in no other oil stove. The perfect stov* 
"^ far summer. Three sJzes. With or without Cabinet Top, ^ 
At your dealer's, or write our nearest agency. 

draft lamp free from th« 
faults of other lamps, A perfect artificial light. 
Handsome and safe. If not with your dealer, 
write our nearest agency. 

STANDARD OIL. COR^RANY 
( lacorporalcd) 





FALLING HAIR Is the lorcrmine» 
of baldness. U you wish to 
prevent It, start In now to use 

Health 

and sec how quickly the neiv 
hairs will begin lo come In; good 
strong healthy ones too. The old 
hairs win stop laUlng out. and 
dandruft. the cause ol baldness, 
will disappear. Then you will 
have a head ot hair to be proud 

ol. 

IS NOT A DYE. 

tl AND SOc BOTTLES, AT DHUGCISTS. 
Hay'* Barlloa Soap cures Eczema, rea, 
rouffb and chapped haudm and all akin diaeasea. t 
K«?p. skin fine and solt. 35c. dru^piats-, Send , 
2c. for free book*. "The Care ot tJio Skin," "Tha 
Care o( Uie Hair.*' _,,«,. 

PHllo H«y Spec Co., Ncwu-k. N. J. 





'*EAST, WEST. HOME IS BEST," IF KEPT 
CLEAN WITH 

SAPOLIO 



W. A, ABBETT. 



;t. 



■!•. ik 



>as 



:st prey up 
jiroviiJe fo 1 
Ho :1a lis m ts iles 

IS it .=5»:'pks t.') n 



1, viiiV-cU 



siituLe 
the 
man. 

If 






■lU 



i 



yti'i. 



of tlie 'undesii 
> the "Indepenilfi 
^■" Is not a defy 
. .»ve nothlnic* — but 
who^'VtT you are au<l 



n')t 



man 

• of 

u.at th ■' ■■■> 

. nor c 

a order 

< f.ir 

us© 
■n»e 

\,.y- •■ \ H\t i>i' the 
!»i" tl;..' .s.)-called 

-btokrtu nioth- 
m:ii!rn><l aii'l 



m.ia continue 

\v hcitter 

'. iiiK Irail- 

■ !n. F'.>r 

<■■"' the 

t of 

■ ■d. 

my 

r of 

vcalliiig 

I s.iy to 

wherever 



Anat.-oii'i.i 
just bi'.'ii 
vein on 
will not 
The ; 
in o- 

* ■ 

th.. 
Of 

(•• • 
f 



t»..' 



^. I you may be, I pity you from the bot- 



,!!i; ro.sdout has 

1 1 ■ ■ i> the Je.ssie 

i. !>ut that vein 
If aome months. 
vol l.s l)i.ln«; exten.led first 
provide drainase for the 
ihove. The Butte & Superior 
ompany. whlrh i« developing- 
I. kruok mine a little way nortli 
HHrlln. has found som-^ good 
md ri'-h zinc ore on the 1.50^- 
•1, whlih ought lo l»; an en- 
l^lllff <?len f'lr the North Butte's 
ern group of claims. 

Butte A- Hnpcrter. 
Thf> Butte & Superior shaft has been 
sunk through the Black Roek v.-in. and 
in drifting west on the 1.400 the vein 
cliaracter changed and a wide .«treak 
of ore. carrying a high percentage of 
copper and about 23 per cent zinc, was 
encountered. The drift Is being ex- 
tended to determine the size of the 
vein and extent of the ropper-bearing 
ore. The shaft, which is 1,400 feet 
deep, will be sunk to the 1,800. and 
work on It will be resumed In a few 
The discovery of good copper 
n the Butte & Superior has been 
eni'ou raging to other companies 
,at section of the district The 
I it;:i,k Rock vein extends thro'igh the 
property of the North Butte Extension 

]i 1 •rnen company. It is exjiected 

t -n the new zinc concentrator 

h; .■ Uutte Reduction works gets In- 
to capacity operations and the Butte & 
Sui>erior company can dispose of about 
ir.» tons of Its zinc ore per day. It 
will be able to more than pay Its 
running expenses and add rapidly to 
the treasury for the payment of the 
company's Indebtedness. 

Celoael Sellem Group. 
It is stated that plans are under way 
for the redumption of operations on tUa 



lime and magnesia.. .It would re<iulre 
in a modern blast fvirnace three tons 
of this ore to make one ton o' PlS 
iron it would require one and one-halt 
tons' of limestone aiul two t<»ns of coke, 
or six and one-haJt tons oi material, 
to manufacture oiki ton of pig lion. 
This is practically '>ut of the question 
as long as the higliev . K^ade ores caji 
be purchased at aJmo»t any pr he. I 
have assumed that.th^ uiilizallou of 
this large body of unmerchantable ore 
will be of the greateat help to man- 
kind. •»>. -' ■ 

•Over 90 per ce»t op tiie iron made 
at the present tlm#( is'fcade with coke 
and wUlle there IS ft n»%-ertient on foot 
to utilize the by-ppo4«4-t coke oven lo 
save the volatile products of coal there 
is an open question as to the final sav- 
ing on account of the immense capital 
needed to put up these plants. One 
hundred pounds of the best coking coal 
will give oft 3« per cent of volatile 
ga.Hes leaving a fixed carbon In the 
iverage ConnellsviHe eoke of about 8i 
per cent The heat units In this 36 
per cent of volatile matter are wasted, 
and do not enter into any calculatioij 
in the manufacture of Iron. The coke 
Is put Into the top of the furnace with 
ore and lime. In this blast furnace 
52 per cent of the lieat units contained 
in the coke are driven off as C. O. The 
reason for this is tlie great speed with 
wrich the gases formed at the tuyeres 
are driven through this mass of coke, 
ore etc the speed where the diameter 
in a modern furnace Is about ten feet 
being about 4.000 feet a minute. This 
does not give time for the ores to 
aVisorb the carbon in the C. O. and the 
result Is that 52 per crnt goes oft at 
th»> tunnel head through the down- 
com»»r. In addltio nto this, the amount 
of carbon required to cause a breaking 
up of tlie limestone makes this process 
utilize onlv 15 to 18 per cent of the 
original heat units In the coal. Tlius 
on 25 000,000 tons of metal, assuming 
that It requires 4.000 poun.ls of coal 
to manufacture a ton of pig Iron (3.600 
pounds of coal being the best prac- 
tice with the best ores), the waste heat 
alone would represent 30.000.000 to 40,- 
000,000 ton.s of coal. 

Explalnn HIh Mrtbod. 
"As to my mc-tlio.l of utilizing the 
low grade ores, together with saving 
a large portion of the heat units now 
iost In modern practice, I have built a 
nearly horizontal kiln, lined wltli fire 
l.rick. 125 feet long and eight feet in 
diameter, similar to a cement kiln. 
The tube has an inclination of one foot 
in twelve. The rotation of the kiln 
brings the ore forward, and as it 
moves forward It gradually loses its 
oxygen, delivering a product In which 
the oxvgen and part of the silica are 
eliminated. 1 ant satisfied that with 
this proce.ss we can utilize, outside of 
the radiation loss, over 50 per cent of 
the heat units that are In the original. 
••I believe we are l>ack to an Iron 
age The present sl^el maker, who 
has only been at tke business fifteen 
■ >r twentv years, does not realize the 
advantages of wrotight Iron over 
liomogen«»ous Iron or steel. In the case 
of steel there 1« practically no fibre. 
A plf*ce of steel will j)ractlcally bend 
one way as well' as another, while 
wrought iron. owiTrg to Its fibrous na- 
ture will bend one way and break the 
other This Is catiscd by a slag coat- 
ing produced In the puddling furnaces, 
each grain of iron being entirely sur- 
rounded with an oxide slag. These 
grains are compacted through squeeji- 
iiig and rolling, anfl the bar of iron 
when finished shows each wire or fibre 
still covered with. '»ti oxide. In other 
words, a bar of wrought Iron Is sim- 
ilar to a bunch of vvry fine wires. The 
rcitsun that wrouglU iron does not rust 



CAPSULES. 



CATARRH 

OF THE 

BLADDER 

ReliBYsd in 



name 4)^ 
rt of CounttrfBlU 



American Exchange National Bank 

OF DULUTH, MlilN. 

GLPim A ND SBUPLUS, $1,400,000 

CHECKING ACCOUNTS INVITED. 

Savings and Time Deposits Draw 395 Interest. 



MoltTOAGK FORECLOSURE SALE — 

Default has been made in the pay- 
ment of the sum of Six Hundred and 
Thirtv-five and 70-100 Dollars, wliicli 
is claimed to be due and Is due at the 
date of this notice upon a certain mort- 
gage duly executed and delivered by 
Katherlne R. Ferry and H. L. Perry, 
her husband, and May O. Reese, un- 
married. Mortgagors, to Joel Colby. 
Mortgagee, bearing date the 27th day 
of February. 1895, and with a power 
of sale therein contained, duly re- 
corded in the office of the Register of 
Deeds in and for the County of SU 
Louis and State of Minnesota, on the 
2nd day of March. 1895, at 3:50 t)'clock 
I'. M.. in Book 93 of Mortgages, on 
page 267. and default has also been 
made in the payment of taxes, and the 
mortgagee has paid taxes levied upon 
said premises since the delivery of said 
mortgage, in the sum of J55.80. 

The said Joel Colby died on the 4lh 
day of May. 1»01, leaving a Last Will 
and Testament wherein and whereby 
he bequeathed to Elizabeth F. Colby, 
his widow, all his Interest in and to 
the above described mortgage and in 
and to the Indebtedness secured there- 
by, which last Will and Testament was 
duly allowed by the Probate Court of 
said St. Louis County. Minnesota, on 
the 12lh day of June. 1901, and a final 
decree was duly rendered by said Pro- 
bate Court on the 3d day of February. 
1902, assigning said interest of said 
Joel Colby in said mortgage and said 
Indebtedness, to said Elizabeth F. 
Colby, and a duly certified copy thereof 
was duly recorded In the office of said 
Register of Deeds on the 3d day of 
February, 1902, at 4 o'clock P. M.. In 
Book 182 of Deeds, on Page 250. and 
no action or proceeding has been 
Instituted at law or otherwise to re- 
cover the debt secured by said mort- 
jraee or any part thereof; 

NOW THEREFORE. NOTICE IS 
HEREBY GIVEN. That by virtue of 
the power of sale contained in said 
mortgage, and pursuant to the statute 
In such case made and provided, the 
said mortgage will be foreclosed by a 
sale of the premises described In and 
conveyed by said mortgage, namely: 
An "undivided 1-12 (one-twelfth) 
the Southeast quarter (SEVi] of 
Northwest quarter (NW^i > of •'Section 
Six (6> in Township Fifty (50). North 
of Range Thirteen (13) West of the 
Fourth Principal MerliHan, according 
to the United States Government sur- 
vey situate in St. Louis County and 
State of Minnesota, with the heredita- 
ments and appurtenances; which sale 
will be made by the Sheriff of said St. 
Louis County at the front door of the 
Court House. In the City of Duluth. in 
said County and State, on the 28th day 
of June. 1909, at ten o'clock A. M., of 
that day. at public vendue to the high- 
est bidder for ca.-^h. to pay said debt of 
s"lx Hundred and Thirty-five and 70-100 
Dollars, and interest, said sum of 
$55 SO paid for taxes, and Twenty-five 
($25 00) Dollars. Attorney's fees, as 
stipulated In and by said mortgage In 
case of foreclo.sure. and the disburse- 
ments allowed by law; subject to re- 
demption at any time witliin one year 
from the day of sale, as provided by 

1ft. W^ 

Dated April 27th. 1909. 

ELIZABETH F. COLBY, 
Assignee of Mortgagee. 
CRASSWELLER & CRASSWEIJ.ER, 

Attorneys for Assignee of Mortgagee 
Duluth Evening Herald. May 15. 22 and 
29; June 6. 12 and 19. 1909. 



WHOLESALE 

JOBBERS AND 
MANUFACTURERS 

OF DULUTH. MINNESOTA. 

Reliable and Up-to-Date Concerns Who Do a Strictly Jobbing 
and Manufacturing Business. 



ASBESTOS. 

A. H. Krieger Co. 



BAKERS AND ICE CREAM 
MANUFACTURERS. 

Crescent Bakery. 



BLAST FURNACE. 
Zenith Furnace Co. 



BREWERS. 

Duluth Brewing & Malting Co. 
Fitger Brewing Co. 



of 

the 



BUTTER AND ICE CREAM 
MANUFACTURERS. 

Bridgeman-Rudsell Co. 

CEMENT AND PLASTER. 

D. G. Culler Co. 



FOUNDERS and MACHINISTS. 
Clyde Iron Works. 
National Iron Co. 



GLASS. PAINTS AND BUILD- 
ING MATERIALS. 

Paine & Nixon Co. 



GROCERS. 

Gowan-Peyton-Twohy Co. 

Stone-Ordean-Well.s Co. 

Wright-CIarkson Mercantile Co. 



HARDWARE. 

Kelley-How-Thomsun Co. 
Marshall- Wells Hdw. Co. 



COMMISSION AND PRODUCE. 

Fitzsimmons-Palmer Co. 
Knudsen Fruit Company. 
Thomas Thompson Co. 



LUMBER. SASH & DOOR MAN- 
UFACTURERS. 

Scott-Graft Lumber Co. 

Woodruff Lumber Co. 



CONFECTIONERY. 

Duluth Candy Co. 

National Candy Co. 
(Duluth Factory.) 

CORNICE MANUFACTURERS. 

Duluth Corrugating & Roofing Co. 

DRUGS. 
L. W. Leithhead Drug Co. 

DRY GOODS. 

F A. Patrick & Co. 



MEN'S FURNISHINGS AND 
MAN'F'RS CLOTHING. 

Chriitcnsen-Mcndenhall- 
Graham Co. 



PAPER. 

Bemis Bag & Paper Co. 

Duluth Paper & Stationery Co. 

McClellan Paper Co. 

Peyton Paper Co. 



FURNITURE. 
DeWitt-Seitz Company. 



PICTURE FRAMES & MOULD- 
ING. 

Decker Manufacturing Co. 

PLUMBING SUPPLIES. 

Crane & Ordway Co. 

SADDLERY, LEATHER AND 
FINDINGS. 

Schulze Brothers Co. 



^ 



SHOE MANUFACTURERS. 

Northern Shoe Co. 



For space under this heading apply to F. H. Green, Secretary Jobbers 
and Manufacturers' Association, Duluth, Minn. 



Ill ■llllllllillllillllllllllllll 



i 













24 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD* SATURDAY, MAY 22, iB09. 



* >».,»/» 



WISE 




BARGAINS IN FARM LANDS. 



8ia 



ifli 



168 



128 



1«0 



S40 acres — c 



40 



640 




acre farm— Carlton Co.. Minn— 3 miles '""om Mahtowa and 6 miles 
from Barn urn on N *P. railroad— SO acrea cleared and fenced— IB 
Teres under Tlo« Cut 60 tonB of clover and timothy hay--6-room 
frlmehouBe frame hay barn, frame granary and wagon shed, frame 
and log barn-lying on one of the prettiest small lakee In the state. 
Wou d make a fine summer home Will trade for good house and lot 
Ktu^h P?lce t2"?i) pe'r acre. Term. 11.000 ca.h down, balance 
% years at « per cent .. * » 

acres Red Lake county. Minn., on Red river, 11 miles southeast of 
Thief River Fans, and 6 miles from Haxel on Soo Ry^ fo"'^ * Im- 
per acre; 1800 cash, balance on time, 6 per cent— 18 to 20 acres im- 
proved — frame house. 

acres. Red Lake county. Minn., on Red river 11 "S"^' "^,'i*^^?fU''i 
Thief River Falls and < miles from Hazel on Boo Ry. Price, $12.60 
per acre: IfeOO cash, balance on time, 6 per cent. 

acres of Iron land on lake shore. In Hubbard county, for 11.300, If 
taken at once. This Is a real snap 

acre«— best located farm In St Louis county. 3 mllee froni ^^"'ver and 
Brook-ton. quarter mile from railroad track-frame an^ Jo* hou»«. 
barn and chicken house; 8 to 10 acres deared and fenced. Price 
11,600; terms. 1500 to 1800 cash down; balance S to 10 years, at • 
per cent. Half mineral reservation. 

acres— one miles from Gordon. Douglas county. Wisconsin; S5 per 
acre; terms to suit. 

40 acres— Three miles from Cloquet. Carlton county; $650, on St. Louis 
river. Call or write for information. 

acres Aitkin county. Minn— 10 acres cleared and fenced; house and 
barn; four miles fn.m Solona on Soo railway; near f-hool and post- 
offlce. Price $B00. Terms. $200 cash down; balance 6 yeais. 6 
per cent. 

acres— Best section of farm land In Douglas county. Wls^ *;^^„!""^2 
east of Poplar, on N. P Ry. ; no improvement; ^^'^Vn^f 11^2 BO^er 
timber; a fine stock and dairy and truck farm. P'"*^*' '12.60 per 
acre one-half cash, balance 5 t'U"**» annual payments 8 per cent 
This will be on the market for a few days only at this price. Call or 
■write for information. 

40 Acres— St. Louis county— A beautiful home 10 miles from city— one 
m^J^I;;^ Adolph station on D.. M. & N railway. 40 rods from school 
Have 20 acres Improved. 16 acres of which Is plowed and ready for 
seeding Wire and post fence— good well— 3-room log house — log 
barn^oot houe^ a snap. Owner going East; mu«t be sold at once^ 
Price $1,700; terms. $1,000 cash down, balance 1 to 8 years. 6 per ceni 

ISAIAH HENRY BRADFORD. 

$18-214 TOHREY BLDO, 



WEEK HAS BEEN ACTIVE 
IN RE AL ESTATE MARKET 

Much Inquiry for Suburban Property for Home 
Building— Demand for Park Point Rock Prop- 
erty a Feature of the Market— Work Is Rush- 
ing on New Buildings. 



M^ $100 ICRE 

40 ACRES 



AT- 



West Duluth 

adjoining two platted additions. 



6E0.R.LAYB0UR}!, 14 Phoenix BIk 




To loan, in amounts to suit. Money 
on hand. No Delay. 

FOR KENT — Modern liouse. East 
end. 

Buy and Sell Real Entate. 



Julius D. Howard & Co. 

210 WeM Superior Street. 
Dl'LlTH, Ml>>. 




HBRB 

ARE SOME PROPERTIES WORTH THE MONEY ! 

ARE 



WE 



HAVE OTHERS. 
IF YOU 



IN THE MARKET. DROP IN AND GET PARTICULARS. 

ti^OORA Two flat<, 5 !-.-.in= (l(ivvn>-t;nr^. 4 r<>.;r- ui-tairs llanl- 
I^JavU vvo.<(l fleers, ga^. cenu'nt vvalk^ ar-uml hi.u>c, fnif let. 
West end. Seriif cash and monthly payivicnts. 

fflfyAA Stven-reem dwrllinK: electric li^rhts j-lenn •.viiui.-w';. etc. 
IP I lUU C< 'flier let 35x100. Second avenue east and Sixth street. 

Seme ca^li .ind niontlily paxnunts. 

01 AAA I~<air-re(ini house, hardweod floors. c< liar and attic, pood 
ipillllU well: let 40x100 Minnesota a\enuii, I'ark Point. Buy 
now and enjoy ycur Sunmur m the new home. 

WE WRITE INSURANCE IN Al COMPANIES ONLY. 

CHAS. P. CRAIG (Sh CO. 

501-504 SELLWOOD BUILDING. 



13650 

flat Ion CO 

S2500 



SNAPS I 



Eleven-room houne, all 
(.onvenieneeii, stone foun- 
dation corner lot. 50x70 feet. 

Elplit-ro«.ni house sewer. 

water and llKht. for two 

families. 

Butij near Lincoln Park. 



B. E. WELLBERO 

30» Twenty-nlJtth Avenue We«t. 
Zenith Pbune 220S-X. 



4 Summary of the \%>*k'« Real BMate 
Situation by N. J. Ipham.) 

The real estate market the past 
week has developed considerable in- 
Qulry for lots for building purposes, 
largely for homes. The most active 
locality for hlg^ residences continues 
to be In the vicinity of Tv^^enty-fourth 
avenue east and up about the normal 
school. 

For very modest homes there Is con- 
siderable demand for property on 
Sixth, Seventh and Elghtli streets be- 
tween Lake avenue and Chester park. 
The proposed improvement of Sixth 
street Is making Sixth street property 
more active and lots sell for Increased 
prices above the cost of the improve- 
ment, freely. There is some talk of 
improving Seventh street also. If 
property owners there realized how 
much more salable their property 
would be, at Increased prices above 
rest of improvement, tliey would get 
the improvement done this year, and 
share in the activity of Sixth street 
property. „. . 

Residence lots In the West end are 
also In denuind and people are in«iulr- 
tng for property that will be benehted 
by the extension of the street car line 
up Pudmont avenue west. 

Central residence property is more 
of an investment proposition and is 
not as active us the localities men- 
tioned. . . 

A distinct Interest Is being show^n 
in low-priced central property on the 
plateau lying between^ .Seventh avenue 
west and Fourteenth avenue west and 
between Third street and the boule- 
vard. This property is accessible from 
the Seventh avenue west car line at 
all streets, and will also get some 
benefit from the Piedmont avenue west 
line. Residents being able to go either 
way and leach all sections of the city. 
At the same time It Is onlf from five 
to ten block* from the business center. 
Lots here are cheaper than In almost 
any part of town, notwithstanding 
their accessibility and general desir- 
abllltv. They are being rapidly picked 
up for homes. Water and gas have 
been put In. . . . . « 

Business property is f|uiet but firm, 
so firm that tt Is hard to buy and yet 
there Is little demand at the present 
time. Investment buying has been 
waiting largely for business conditions 
at large to become settled and for 
congre.«8 to flnls^h the tariff revision. 
Conditions are steadily Improving in 
all business lines, however, and with 
a fair or good crop this summer we 
look for an activity in real estate ex- 



ceeding any movement 
for many years. 



we have had 




One feature of the Duluth market 
that has aroused much talk Is the 
acquiring of large tracts of Park Point 
property by Duiuth people. 

Jack liesmond some time ago ac- 
quired about seven acres which he will 
have improved and turn Into a ball 
park and hockey rink. Little & Nolte 
are handling the property, and they 
expect to let the first contracts for the 
filling in of the water front, some time 
during the month of June. 

Julius H. Barnes has been steadily 
buvlng bay front property and Is said 
to ' liave 130 lots on the water front 
below the boat club. The harbor line 
extends in some places 600 feet from 
the present shore line, leaving plenty 
of room for fllUng in, and making tiie 
best of water frontage. All the other 
dock property in iJuluth Is taken up 
and is held at a stiff figure. Tliis I'ark 
Point frontage is the only dock prop- 
erty left, and it Is being bought up 
very rapidly. It Is at this time held 
very cheaply and is looked upon as a 
very attractive speculation, especially 
in view of the rumors of railroad yards 
to be built there. 

The buving of Park Point property 
for summer homes goes merrily on. 
While a few vears ago a first-class lot 
could be bought for $5:00, tlie price 
now ranges from f700 to $1,000 and 
even more than that for choice loca- 
tions. The rise In both price and 
popularity of this land, has been won- 
derful, and brokers predict as great 
an advance In these lots In the next 
few years as has taken place In the 

past. ., ^ , 

The bright weather of the past few- 
days has brought hundreds of In- 
quiries to. the offices of the real estate 
men In regard to rentals on the point. 
That it Is the most popular summer liv- 
ing place In the city during the sum- 
mer months Is without question. Many 
are on the way and many are clanior- 
ing for anything in tlie shape of a 
house on the point. 

T. W. Wahl has purchased from O. t-. 
Hartman twenty-six lots on Park I oint 
among the pines at Hie end of the 
car line. He will erect a fine summer 
home there. 

Whitney Wall 

dealer is tonight , _ 

ployes al the Commercial club. 

One of the features of the weeks 
business was the announcement that 
M. S. Burrows, f ormerly of this city. 

(Continued on page 25, fourth column.) 



the well-known 

banqueting his em- 



COSY BUNGALOW HOME WHICH 
WOULD COST $3,300 IN DULUTH 



AHTnonY PUCK 
AECniTECT 




\\'e a(lven]>e only, pripenu- 
iiig more tliaii orilinary merit. 



1 K K>('S"^- 



EAST END 



We are «<fferini,^ for a 
(iesiraljie buikliiig hjt 



few (lays, a very 
rii tlie Ic'wer side 
cif Second street, size ot'xUO feet ; all im- 
provements in. just the place ^'rji rcnv' 
c 1 three houses e>r flats. 
Price 



$IJ85 



^,f^'X^>^»^'^>^'i^^'^^X^*0>0>^'^' 



GET ACQUAINTED 

With <»iir I'rnpo-ilion. Talk It Over 

WITH YOUR WIFE 

AiHl We Will Help You l«) Owti a Home 

AT LAKESIDE 



♦ I>ollar». iMild for rent make llie rUh man Hclur and ilic poor man 

' iM)orer. A small « <isli payment will ••secure yiu a New iloiiii', and for the- 
\ baUmre vou can make Mouthlj Pajnu-iits. 

LAKESIDE LAND COMPANY 

H<)Mi:s ON KASY PAYMENTS. 
« II AS. P. C'KAK;. (i« im lal ^**«'i"ai!!l:-Ji!!!L,^^iililiIi^ 





MVST BK SOLD 

A tl_H<!0^| IIOf'iK. !,M-.lv.'H.l fj;::'-'-. 



J, U,, ,..,.,,[, — ^,^ S-ronm h«Mise. nak 

' f, wry fiiie r'-iidiiitui , new. 

I • *;:.47.'is teriiix. 

WK.oT tllLtTII — S-n...ii) (:■ ■ «=■- 

uii-nt f<'iiiidalion. watf-r, ^ ' li, 

fltTirl',; liKht; a l--'; ' jJI-.-h.m*. 

A ^T<»HI<:, for *<■; cry. ice 

, . ■ \ .'ir.s, or ".11 '■•'f siK'p; 

I FAHM— .^ ■-• ■"•■ K'*"*. I*'" thr chni- 

«,.;,t j.i.'.'i '" !■•■ ll'lllKl ;it f!li!ri 

fajn l«» t'.«« per acre; >a.-y I. ii.i><. 

THE SMITH REALTT CO., 

524 MANHATTAN BLDG 



WE ARE SELLING 



' :n lands In I'ine county. Minne- 
^^ tu. I'rop in and «<ee uj? if you art 
ioolting for a farm In a farming 
country. Prices are right. 

We have also a tract <.f .'fio acres 
in Kanabec county, that is a bargain 
at fT.OO |»er were. 

If you are looking for an Im- 
proved farm in tliit-; neighborhood, 
we liave several that would interest 
you. 

No trouble to sliow any of these 
lands. 

Nelson-Stack Land Co. 

!)0>o-1i<)fl Torrey lllilg.. Duluth. Minn. 



- '^ 




.."• ' 


o»- 


















BtP ^QOr\ 




\. 


CiS>i, — _J s- 


ij^l 


-G- J 


iff^j 


^kBBlBkiS 


/ 




~J 




/ 



















riR5T FLOCK PLAM 



5£COnD TLOOR PLAJi 



Contract Bonds ! 

''WILL GO ON 
YOUR BOND" 

American Bonding Company 

eEO.R.LATBOURN, 14 Phosnii BIk 



PV To Exchange 

160 ACRES LAND 

AT $5.00 PER ACRE 

AND $500 CASH 

For Small House and Lot 

GEO.R. LAYBOURN, 14 PhosnixBlk 



$1,950— Will buy new 6-room house 
on Tlilrty-ninth avenue west. 
$400 cash, balance monthly pay- 
ments. 

$750 — Will ^uy lots adjoining the 
above 66x100. 

$.^,500 — Will buy new and attrac- 
tive house, five rooms and bath. 
Twelfth avenue east. 

$3,700 — Will buy frame building 

renting for $45 monthly. $1,400 

cash, balance from rents re- 
c\ ived. 

E. D. FIELD GO. 

203 ExfJiangi- liuikliiiK. 



TWO LOTS i Money to Loan 



loo-Foot Frontage on 



Woodland Avenue 

AT 

HUNTERS PARK 

Adjoining residence of T. W. 
Hoopes, Esq. 

6E0.R. UYBOURN, 14 Phoenix BIk 



CftCfin ^^ ^'*^'" ^^*" looking for a 
vOvUU nice (suburban home. new. 
strictly modern, seven rooms, batli. 
full ba.«=ement and uttic; grounds lOOx 
200 feet; shade trees, slirublicry. 
small fruit; beautifully located; this 
will please you. 

No finer Improved 160-acre farm 
In the Noriiiwest. will sell at just 
about linlf it.*; value. Tliorouphlned 
cattle, farm implements, etc, tlirown 
in; twenty-flve miltg from Duluth, 
on railroad. 

Two 80-acre snaps on the Cuyuna 
range, near the Roger-Brown shaft; 
improved. 

ZENITH REALTY CO. 

401 Prttvidenoe BIdK. 

GE:!VG:I1.41> IXSlItANtE — I.OAXS. 

Both PbuueM. 



,-J 



TWO HOMES 

Within easy walking distance of 
business, with a superb view of the 
lake and harbor, that can never ne 
«;liut off. We are just completing 
two 5-room homes fronting Cascade 
Sduare and they will go quick. See 
us for the full particulars. Rea- 
sonable terms. We will also build 
on vour own lot. furnishing plans. 
just" as you want them. 



Hanford Investment Co., 

SKLI.WOOD Bl ILDINtJ. 



On Duluth Real Estate. 

5%, 5J4% and 6% 

Money on Hand — No 

Delay. 

Mendenhall & Hoopes 

209 First National Bank Building;. 



$800 



PER 
ACRE 



IN 4 MONTHS 

The Florida Home Seeker s.tvp. it 
is a common thing to make from 
1300 to $800 per acre in four to five 
months. To the man living in Im- 
kota, or Minnesota this statement 
will be taken with a grain of allow- 
ance, but the reason is. he has sim- 
ply not been In Florida and seen 
It for liim.velf. Come in and let us 
sliow you. 

FLORIDA FRUIT LAND CO. 

412 FirHt National Bank. 



HOVSES 

AND LrOTS 

$1.900 — $1,500 each — Two homes. 
Central West end. Vei-y good. 

$8,000, $3,500, $6,000, $8,000 and 
$10,000 for real values in East 
and Central homes. 

$25.00 cash and $5.00 per month — 
Buys choice building lots in the 
West end. 

$1,300. $1,600. $1,800 — Choice build- 
ing lots on East Third and 
Fourth streets. 

$1,800 for a choice lot on Jeffer- 
son street. Central East end. 
A large list of houses and build- 
ing lots for sale. Fire Insurance 

In strong companies. 



FARM LAND 
BARGAINS. 

480 ACHES — 1^ mlits from Altera an<l 1 mUt 
fiom Culver; halt fine meadow land. lAlunie 
hsnjwbbd Umber; would make Biilendld ranch 
or fmra. Price, tlO.OO per acre. Ea»y uiaj- 
ment«. 

120 ACRES- -Kear Grand Lake: ftne land; well 
Improved. $1,000.00 rash; balance taiy ttnnt. 

75 ACRES— Nenr Hcv«-fJI : good house, barn and 
oUin linr'ro''e'nent« ; gC'd »oll ; uo ruck, $700 
cash; balance, time l« euit. 
Have nunufctr of choice 5. 10. 20 and 40-axTe 

iracta for »ale on eai<> payments. For par- 

Ucul&r% s»e — 

W. H. LOCKBR, 

310 TORREY BUILDING. 



\ 



Lr. A. LARSGN CO. 

214-lS Providence BIdg. 



Money to Loan 

6, 6^ and 6 per cent. 

Fire Insurance 

Old Reliable Companies, 

Real Estate 

Monthly Payment Plan. 

Cooley & Underbill 

209-10-11 Bxcbanse BaildlnE* 



A Great Snap 

• 4 0nfl Will buy an eight-room 
#20UU house and fine lot at Les- 
ter Park, hardwood floors in all 
rooms on first floor; good bath room 
with porcelain tub and washsland; 
currant. gooseberries and other 
shrubbery; good location. Come In 
and investigate this bargain ijefore 
buying or building. 

INSl RANCE AND LOANS. 

GETTY-SMITH GO. 

201 ManhnKan Bldg. 



Coziness and convenience are fea- 
tures that make a home of the bunga- 
low tvpe attractive. The above i'l»s- 
trt4tiori nhows a design In which these 
IVatures are evident and which is dls- 
linctlv of the bungalow style of buliu- 
ing. *The exterior le made attractive 
by its stucco and half timber finibh, 
and the low roof and wide eaves. 

The plan is compact and a'.l space le 
well utilized, making light. livable 
r.ifins of practical size. Good wall 
St. are and ample floor space arc 
...aimed in the living room. The deep 
bay window and corner fireplace are 



its most attractive features. The din- 
ing room is really more of an alcove 
separated from the living room by 
posts and beams. Connection with the 
kitchen Is made through the china 
pantry and l>oth are well arranged for 
all practical purposes. An exceptlon- 
allv good feature of this plan Is the 
privacv attained for the sleepiijig 
quarters of the house. The bedrooms 
and bathroom are separated by a corri- 
dor from the living rooms. The cor- 
ridor albo provides convenient com- 
munication from kitchen to front en- 
trance. Stairs to the basement descend 



from the kitchen and are connected to 
a grade entrance at the landing. 

The stairway to the second story as- 
cends from the corridor. In the second 
story are arranged two large bedrooms 
v.lth ample closet space. The rooms 
throughout are well lighted and ol 
good relative size. 

With a concrete foundation and pan 
nasement. hot water heat, plumbing 
and a good grade of finish a home as 
above described would cost to build in 
Duluth or vicinity $3,300. 
uuiuwi o ANTHONY PUCK. 

Architect. 



FOR SALE! 

Eight-room dwelhng. All conven- 
iences. Corner lot, Twelfth avenue 
east and Thiru street. $3,500 terms. 



L 



R. P. DOWSE ft CO. 

General Insurance. 
106 Providence Bldg. 



Double Brick Houses 

6 rooms each side, absolutely mod- 
ern and strictly up-to-date; paved 
street; walking distance from town 
East end. of course. Price only — 



REAL*"' 

ESTATE 



LOANS 
INSURANCE 



Main Flour, Pallndlu. 



FOR RENT 

Second Floor, 12 and 14 Second 

Ave. West— Over Edwards. 

For Business or Residence. 

LITTLE & NOLTE 



■tUT^ISfj-.. . 




THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: SATURDAY, MAY 22, 1909. 



25 



, \ \ ^n \MHiur?*. 



American 



Frequtnt SatUnga to 

' iliONooN. PARIS, oi'EEi;!^;!.^-'!^- 

• f.l LIVERPOOL. DOVER ^^]^J^^' 

■«| PLY MOUTH. CHERBOURG. 




«• 

AN 

f SI ' ' SOUTHAMPTON. ITALY I ? J 

•SlFrni- Fl**t of Large Steame n \ j 



Eed Star 



WhHe Star 
Line 



sivMfh Tlilril St- Mlnne- 

...*, ■:.i»ii... **r l-iM-fil Agrrnt*. 



P|orth fi erman fjoyd 



)«.— RKiSMii:N 



Eleven Building Sites 

Already Solil for Improvement. 

Some equally deairable ones left there as follows: 

$2,00a for 1004oot southwest comer on 25th avenue. 
J!{3,500 for 150-foot northeast corner on 25th avenue. 
«1 10« for 75 feet lower side, between 25th and 26th avenues. 
$2.100 for 100 feet upper side, between 26th and 27th avenues. 
$2.300 for 100-foot southeast comer on 27th avenue. 
The above prices being subject to 

Any Assessments for Street improvements. 

On 6th Street With All Improve- 
ments in and Paid for— We Offer: 

100 feet between 23rd and 24th avenues at JS'SSS 

100 feet between 24th and 2Sth avenues, at Sk Afto 

100-toot comer on 25th avenue at • J?nAA 

100 feet inside, between 26th and 27th avenues, at Is ran 

|iO-foot cprnef on 27th avenue at 9»^,4>i»u 

" P .mber. th.s is the RESTRICTED DISTRICT Your future 

su- iigs arc (kternuned m advance. It »s the kind of property that 

mds a preniium It is always in demand if you need to sell. It is 

Uiit U you want sotiic. buy now. 

RicKardson, Day <a Co. 



Handsomest 

Residence Lots 

in th4 City 



In the only RESTRIC 
bulldlngi will b« dnttr 



to diitnet. where all 
BidencM only, on iarfe 



i Ill- 



Apr 



.-. V :•; I'H — CiK>'' ♦ 



ral .ticetit*, 

> MflO. 111.. 



lUILEOAD TIME TABLE8. 

iULlJlO, MISSABE & NORTHERN 
RMIWAY 



Li 




•? 


« »•' 


• J 


» PTl' 



•i.ia'O" 



ArrlfB. 

•■>el»th. 1 1 

:- ' •? 10 iiw 

' J 341 ant 
•?.30«nt 



■ alpeg. 



TIE OWLUTH i IBOi Um RIIL- 
1010 60M}>iNY 

"THK VEHrmiJoN ROUTE." 



SPECIAL BARGAINS 

Practically new modern house. 8 i '■■t water heat, hardwood 

fmish: ^ nd floor, p '— 'v.th. t-;, .. ^x. electricity stone base- 

m^r^f y and 5- 1"'. ""t'l ^'d«= '^* street, bast ena. 

.• home built by owner tor his permanent residence, but 

^, , ^, .: , ite IS absolutely neceisary. and this beautiful home must 

be . ->M Price 

$8500 

Wh: h an be di.cunled Sl.iKM) it st.ld within a few days. 
An elegant, modern Fist cii.! home, large grounds, $10,500. 
A 7-room house; bath, t.-ilot. gas and good level lot east of Ninth 
avenue east. Only $2,500. Easy terms. 

Building lots, all sizes and prices on easiest terms obtainable. 

I WILL WRITE YOUR INSURANCE 
OR BUILD YOU A HOME TO SUIT. 

J. B. McCLrOVD 



310 BURROWS BLDG. 'PHONES. 1045. 



lot! and no houM eoatipj under $5,000 

LOCATION — 8TER4."!0 DIVISION. WIL- 
LAR08 ADDITION^* LONGVIEW ADDI- 
TION Tw«nt>-tl»lrd to Twenty -elohth avenue 
e«»t. ' Don't you want •, dOubU oomor in thit 
dittrlctr 

W« ha»» four on JMrt »»ri«t. five on Fourth 
etreot. throo on Fifth atfeel and five on SUth 
ttreot. ThU prevorty -Ji*rlook» both olty and 
lake. '\ -" 

«4AOO— 50-'o<H lot on Third otroot. near Third 

Iveiiuei w«t. wtlh h..u.«e containing eight roumi 

an.l batlirxjin.— (32U.I 
«'l'»rtft— 8e»et»-P><irn houae w'Ui bath and gii»: 

"2">" bam on prtinl**? Ka*t Superfor street. 

».tTi>o- Seven room hou»* wlUi bath and gas: 
part harvlwoiKi floon, near Portland HQuare. 

AOAn Elahtr acT« of land near Pike Lake. 

.r wlU mU fony irre* tot $180 -(49yi).) 
BTiek itora on Supwfir atroet and Twentieth 

aveaue we»t. for rent: alao several deatrabi* 

houaea and flat*. 

—MONEY TO LOAN— 

Strykcr, Manlcy 
& Buck. 



Hunters Park Home 

$3700 

Brand new modern house, six irood 
roonia and larjfo attic. Hardwood 
flnlsli d.>wn stairs and all hard- 
wood floors. Only «1^00 cash and 
130 per month. 

J. B. GREENFIELD 

SOii Hurrotv.<< BuildioK. 




9ZfrAto — VAf^ht acrfes of fine land hav- 
InK fully 400 ttft »t lake frontage 
and all under cultivation, with 
snmll house (in4 barn for ten head 
of liorses. ThU Ls cheap — reason- 
able ternis. 

«1>M0A — Six lota on Minnesota Point, 
must be sold. Look Into this. 

97,760 — Flat buildJnsr. lot ."iOxHO feet, 
netting 12 per cent on Investment; 
easy terms. 

»7{H>— Lot 50x140 feet; fine location, 
In Ea.st end. 

11 H At'liES on Hermantown road, 
ntar city, under cultivation; will 
trade for improved city property. 

Apply to 

A. H. W. ECKSTEIN, 

301 Hiirrowm llldK. '/.enltli Phone .13.S. 



themselves as satisfied with the con- 
ditions of the local marlteU 

Tlie feature of the week has been the 
great number of transfers in the 
clieaper residence property. * or me 
past six weeks there has been a 
noticeable tendency on the part or 
many to invest in suburljan property. 
Not for investment purposes, but lor 
the purpose of building holies. 
tSurburban property is clieap in Duluin. 
The price is rapidly rising and it is 
claimed tliat the prices that this year 
look large will next year fade into 
insignificance with the rapid rise in 
tiie values of this class of property. 

Tlie real estate situation has beeij 
rapidly improving since the veto of 
the tonnage tax, and while the weater 
conditions this spring have not been or 
the kind to encourage the buying ot 
property, those Interested claim that 
the improvement over former condi- 
tions is great, w„„„ 
Woodland is experiencing a booni. 
It is claimed that there is more buying 
and building of homes in this suburb 
than at any time In years Past. The 
improved street car service is partlaiij 
rtsponslbio for this, and not only in 
Woodland proper is the building going 
on. but between the main part of the 
city and the end of the line many resi- 
dences are being erected. „,v„,,„ 
Lakeside seems to enjoy the whole 
year around a sort of continual house- 
building boom. Much property in this 
end of town Is being bought, and those 
who sell houses on the monthlj pa> - 
ment plan report a brisk week s busl- 

"^The Interest that was ^awakened 
some weeks ago in L>uluth Heights 
property still continues to exibt. 
Property In this hilltop suburi) is 
cheaper" than in any other part of town 
and appeals .strongly to those who aie 
looking for something that calls foi 
the expenditure of only a small sum. 

West Duluth and the West end are 
moving along at a satisfactory rate, 
and the conditions there seem to suit 
those who are located Ih that Pa^ ff 
the city. The western part pi the city 
is being built up very rapldl>. e^pe- 
clallv Third and Fourth streets. 

Tlie announcement some few "weo^s 
ago by the Northern Pacific Railway 
ooinpany that a gasoline car would Ije 
put on the Fond du Lac run has in- 
creased the demand for summer home 
property in this pretty village. The 
train .service was not satisfactory, in 
that the trips were not frequent 
enougli. With the gasoline car, at 
St^slx trips a day will be made .1 is 
said, and the transportation difficultj 
will be overcome. 

« * • 

The building of the new Levlno hotel 
was commenced during the week, and 
while the contract has not as yet been 
let for the now office building to be 
located at .Second avenue west and 
Superior street, it Is und«''^«^"0^,.V'al 
It will be within a few days and actual 
work commenced. The tenants moved 
out during the week and everything is 
ready for the workmen. 
• • • 

The real estate men will, ori June 1. 
at either the Commercial club oi the 
Spalding hotel, sit .-io^n to their an 
nual banquet, the plans for whicii t u 



300 



250 
50 

340 

340 
BOO 



2,000 



New six-room liou,se. with batli; fine 
location. Forty-sixth avenyia west, 
.me block from car line; corner lot 
44x1,50, feet. Price — 

$3000 

$500 casli: balance on terras to suit 
purchaser. 



jJjORf R^ESflRNl JHEl 




PULFORD, HOW & CO. 

309 Exchange Bldg. 



vear are greater than ever. Outside 
men will be invited, so as to get into 
touch with the situation in other cit e;, 
and outside of the exchange '"Oie than 
100 mvilations will be sen to the 
home people. The committees in charge 
of The affair are working hard to make 
the bamiuct the best ever. 

• • • 
J H AK-rioud reports the .sale of the 

Henrv' Guver residence, on the corner 
of Fifteenth avenue east and London 
road to Lena B. Price. The considera- 
tion was |4,S>0U. 

• • • 
The L A. Larsen cjinpany reports 

the Male' of lots 86 and 88. block 4., 
Duluth proper, third division, for the 
First National Bank ol Superior to lo- 
cal parties. The lots are on 1-ourth 
street, between Fifth and Sixth avenuea 
west The consideration was J.i,iuo. 

This firm has also been doing a 
Lakeside business, having sold to Crest 
Porter a lot on McOollough street for 
$700 W W. .Seekins has purchased 
lot 12. block 44, London Addition, for 
$650 This lot is on Kobinson street. 

• • •- 
T. Lewis has sold the 



A' 
A- 
A> 
Ar 

A 



4 1SP» 



•. 0*c« 
Uuluth 



DULUTH. SmiTH SHORE & ATLANTIC 



$300 CASH 

AND S2S A iONTM 



Buys a hU- 
\i)i) House 



So r ; .\o, 3 

V M r \t 



i,t|«io..m{ 



U N 



M lot 2r.\ 

■ r, «*<nvAr 
.4 li.n iii>ii 



»^'.i< •" 



J. B. GREENFIELD 

:MH llurroWH Itailtilnic. 



Three Very Choice Bargains 

|t;;,s04i — .Sixth strf'«-t. n-ar T>Mitl: ave- 
eiit. .Speelrtlly ni-e, almost new 
•'.-room lioust^, oak finish and very 
nr ely l)uilt. 

f4..14>0 — Fourth .<«tr.'et near Twelfth 

!e eaat. Very rholce little 6- 

modern home, oak flni.<»h. 

1 r heat, and specially at- 

t : Rea.sonable term.-*. 

fil.ooi^ — ; ..i East Fourth .street. The 
! ir;e«t new 7-ro()m mo<lern house, 
hit water h^-at, hardwood finish. 
Iiun.lrv iuhs. Full r>()xl50-foot 
I.)t. .I»i3t Rns.shed and ready to 
t'.i »v't> tntv*. 

A larve lint of Iota nnil all klndn of 
houM«>>«. Money on hand for loanM. 

N. J. UPHAM CO. 

V^enuf Went. 



1 *i 



'>Url« 



\i. I 



1 ,1 i' M 
Ar '7 JO i-;/i, i5 
V M V M 




TERMS 

Grand Avenue — ITouse 

rooms, has electric 

ter and sewer connec- 

iplete plumbing. Re- 

at cost of $650. Cor- 



$2000 

R. B. KNOX & GO. 

1 K^chanKe nuildlng. 



THE GREAT NORTHERN 



iTATHJ.N-S 



.VrrUv 



ST PAUL 



11 



no. 15 inn 

•k35 pM 

•6 )0 am 

•«.M am 

•7 l»«ni 

11.30 0in 

• 10-13 am 

,~i;«weiit 



Farm and Timber Lands. 



1 . 



I I 



ili L 



I f •; 



Geo. H. Ebert & Co. 

HI 1-SI."» Torrey IlldK. 
Zenith Phone irt4. Ilell :il I.I 



LINCOI^N HOTEL 



WANTED 

LI\K **TO< K l>SlR.\Xt'E 

SOLICITOR 

A trit- a■^M,^l^t^'d with horse own- 
,1 intereste.l fn horses, can 
.1 Kt>od Income reines«'nting 

.\MKHIi \\ I,I\I-: sT«M K in. 

Dunning & Dunning, 

IIIXTHII T \<.r.M«i. 
-.«»•; Piiltadlo IIUlK. Both Phones. 



A Fine Jlome 

VERY CHEAP 

AACAA will bui- Q neat 5-room 
VCOUU house <snd full lot .^0x140 
I.-.M on Kast Se«enfJi street; has all 
modern (tonveniwaees except heal; 
"iisy terms: walking <llslance from 
'i'l.'.ine.ss center 

^> have sonir fine ho<nt>M at 
Itrtfen from fL^rllOfl to $:!,0U0. 
("ill !ind h-t u.>4 talk it over with 

Lrl STKNSON an CO. 

UOS Kurro^vN Hulldins. 




M< III 



HOTEILr LENOX 



PABST HOTEL 



PABST. P"ra 



LET THE RENT PAY 
FOR YOUR HOME. 

$1400 
SI 800 

$1500 

THE HARRIS REALTY CO. 

.'.t.t Manlintmn HitlldinK. 



Don*t Look Any Farther 

s.i.f., ,t C')rnor, Twenty-fourth 
ist and Third street — 

$6«500 

fi.r...,m, hou.^e. nind-^^rn. Eleventh 
av iM and Third street; $500 

- . , -■, terrn.^ — 

$5,000 

HARRISON & JAMAR 

I»r<»vhicnof lihlft. 



W5U6% 

■ ON DULUTH REAL ESTATC- 1 
f CORPORATION f PRIVATE fUNDS^ 



The Miller 

323-224 W. .iuperior ««t. 

Am«rica» and Europoan Plan 

Fifty Home -like Bo»w«. 

JOIIX W. MIll.KR. Prop. 




HOW'S THIS: 

•.>a-,i)— f?t!i-r'i<>m h(nis«, nearly new; haMwom! 
tl"in. .\wi lianlwo i.l fliiUli d.iwimtalrs: cnrrets 
{..'iiKi.iUi'ti; full I)a4.-me«it; I'll) water; elwirlr 
llSliU: niii? lit. 2r> liy !«'» fe«t; uwxt sUc 

J. D. BERGSTROM & CO. 

4(7 BURROWS BLOG. 



V 



1 impiove- 

$5,500 



n*rr llullillnir. 



\rvr Eiinlpment. 



;ii t. 



RATES* 92.m A.^'IJ «3.5«, 

Hotel McKay 

C*>r. First Street and Fifth Avenua 
West. Duluth. 



S6,000 
C. I^ Rakowsky & Co. 

3111 t^sehauKe Biilliiinic. 



$1 000 Gash 

T;<ke- iiix.lcrn tirsck I>ui!'ling con- 



! . 1 ' ■ ■ i 



:: X- Willi i .!» i <"'tl 

i\140 feet, well 
.2i)<l per year. 

0. H. Graves d Co. 

Suite 200, lit National Bank Bldg. 



WEEK HAS BEEN .\(TIV E 

IN REAL ESTATE MARKET 

^Continued from paRe 24. 



would a?ain enter business here, rep- 
res.^ntinR h (orporation wliich has se- 
cured a lonff lease on the store build- 
ins formerlv occuiMC«d by Mr.'*. Webster 
and H. It- Forward. The huildins? will 
he thoroughly .remodeled in order to 
fit it for its new tt-nant and an addi- 
tional floor will he. added which will 
be occupied l»y Mrs. Webster. 
* ' • .' • 
While there have l»een no sale.« dur- 
the the past w&pk of a startling 
nature, husines.'s QQijdltions have been 
lieulthy and local brokers express 



property on the corner of Foiirth ave- 
nue we.st and Third street to L. Greek. 
Tha consideration was $9,000. 

The Hopkins Realty compaijy has 
sold fortv acres of land lyins directly 
back of .Spirit lake to Charles earlsou. 
The price was $25 an acre. 

• • ♦ 

Th»> Whitney Wall company reports 
the sale of the Henry Fee property, 
at Twenty-third avenue east and riurd 
stieet, to J. H. Heardinj?. This is a 
ninety-foot lot and a modern new 
liome is standing on the property. The 
consideration was $:.T,,000. Mr. Heard- 
ing is the new superintendent of the 
Oliver Iron Mining company and re- 
cently moved to the city. 

• • • 

C I.. Kakowskl & Co. have deals 
pending In their office to the amount of 
$2,100. Thev are not ready yet, how- 
ever, to make the sales public. 
« • • 

The Whitney Wall company will 
.soon put on sale fifteen acres of choice 
residence property in the East end 
which was recently platted. This land 
lies between First and Fifth streets 
and Twenty-seventh and Twenty-ninth 
avenues east. The plot is owned by 
the W. B. Silvey Investment company. 

The land has not ..)een divided into 
residence lots, but has been cut up 
according to the best plan for the 
building of residences. It is under- 
stood that only buildings of over a cer- 
tain value will be constructed in this 

district. 

• * • 

Bray & Nystrom have let to J. A. 
flarry, the contractor, the contract for 
the erection of a new residence to be 
built by T. F Cole on .Second street, 
near fceventeenth avenue east. The 
cost will be $I-'.O00. 

• * « 

.T. J. Wangenstein is taking bi.J.-f for 
a brick schoolhouse to be built at 
Marble. Minn. It %vlll cost $40,000. 

• • « 

Bray & Nystrom are preparing plans 
for a $10,000 brick house to be erected 
on tlie corner of Fifth street and Twen- 
ty-fourth avenue east for H. S. Newell. 

• • * 

The building permits for the past 
week of $1,000 and over follow: 

F^dward Drvke. frame dwelling on 
the north side of Wadena street, be- 
tween Minneapolis and Woodland ave- 
nues, to cost $1,.'>00. 

T. F. Cole, brick dwelling on north 
side of .Second street, between Six- 
teenth and Seventeenth avenues east, 
I to cost $12,000. 

John Germeroth. frame dwelling on 
south side of West Third street, be- 
tween Twenty-seventh and Twenty- 
eighth avenues, to cost $2,000. 

Ootlleh Krause. brick apartment 
house, to cost $IO.0»0. 

Fred Husby, frame dwelling on F^ast 
Fifth street, between Twenty-flist and 
Twenty-second avenues east, to cost 
$2,500. 

Charles .Stanberg. frame dwelling on 
West .Second street, between Twenty- 
.second and Twenty-third avenues, to 
nost $l..''iO0. 

.James Curr.m, brick flat on East 
First street, betweeo Fourth and Fifth 
av»»nues, to cost $.5,000. 

Harrv Merritt. frame dwelling on 
Magellan street, between Forty-sixth 
and Fortv-seventh avenues west, to 
co.«t $3,000. 

S. I. Levlne, hotel basement for new 
hotel of that name, to cost $7,000. 

George Christlanson. frame dwelling 
on on Seventh street, between Thirty- 
eighth and Thirty-ninth aventies west, 
to cost $1,000. 

Stuns Nowak. flat on Fifth street, 
between Lake and First avenues west, 
to cost $5,000. 

• • * 

The transfers for the week follow: 

Joliii Kfpar el ux. t) .t'le Klun. 1)1 11, 
bUx-k 2i. .Setoml acldlUoii. Kveleth 

AiiRiwt Pctprsnn et ux. f« John A. P. Ol- 
son. Ill 7, blrxk 12. Kly 

Jolin A. I'. Ol«ou to CUarlw Almen. lot 7, 
hlfK-k 12. VAy •*■ 

Joli.TJi Kenil.k et ux. to John Sturmaii. lot 
>» block 2*. Clililiolra 

ostpli v. Krvfs el ux. t" lUcliael Waniort. 
1, Interait In eV* of bw%. wV» of %e\i. 
scrii'ui ia-o:-2i 

Kale \V. BiwtTs ot iiiar t" '"Im P. Ualqulst. 
l:>t 3 block 27. Walbaiik'* •d.UUoii 

M.irvini Latr»mb'i|.if to tJeorgc Mi-C;u!Tln, 
(It 21 .Miiine<ot* aTeiiue. Ijiwer Dulutli... 

Wllllani Kmll el ux. to Kinil Kroll. w»t of 

se»4 of se'4. sfction IW-.lit-lG 

UTling Land cfinpany U) Northland company. 
IxglBliK "n iinrtherly Une of alley belwen 
Sei.mtl and Tliini ftreel. at point 120 feet 
wi-sterly from Inlerscctioti with wrsi*rly 
Uiic of Twenty -fourtJi a»enu «Mt. etc.... 



Woodland company to Ernest Salberf. «H 

of swV* of 86*4 of nw. secUon 26-51-14 . 

B F. FLirreaU et ux. to KU Ke». Jame» Mc- 

Oolrlek. loU 15 aud 16. block 66, Eudlon 

dlvUdon - 

M. McManuii et ax. to Michael Scanlon. lot 
'io, block 1, Second adJtUon to Proctor 
Knott •;;••• 

Michael Wanicrt to JoaepB Keyes. wH o 
of se^4, sccUon 13-67-21 

l>a>U Real KaUte ci>mpanj to .\lfrod Landry. 
Ii.ts 78. 80, 81. 82, block 7. Crusley 
Park addlUon ; • • ' i" 

Kale Wftlbank to A. J. Bl'vimqulat, lot 7, 
block 31. Walbank's addlUon 

.Minnie Koucault to M. J. O'Brien, lot 4, 
bUrti 71. Weat Duuth. SUth dlvialon 

Charles Hansen to Marie C. Hansen, north- 
erly 25 feet of southedb" 75 feet of lot^ 
177. 179. block 98. Dultuh Proper, Second 
division • 2,000 

< liarUs V. Uanoen to Charles Hansen, north- 
erly 25 feet of southerly 75 feet of lota 
177 and 179. block »8. Duluth Proper. 
Second division • 

The AtUa Invebliaetit company to SUilmaa H. 
BInghnm, wVi of lot S and easterly 41 feet 
of lot 6. block 8. WiUard addlUon to Du- 
lutli. aud westerly 15 feet of lot 6. and 
all lot 7 and easterly 11 feet of lot 8. 
block 14. Ix)ngview addition to Duluth 

Dudley W. Freeman to N. J. Cobln. loU 
1 and 2. block 22. r.llbert 

Victor Johnson et ux. to Anton Zeleefskl. 
wralcrly ^. land roinmenclng at no comer 
ner of sw^i of ne>4. aertlon 28-51-14. etc.. 

North Toviiislte cmnpany to Lucy SuIUviin. 
lot 13, block 3, Northern addition. Chla- 
liolm 

N'prth Townsltc companj- t) P. F. Harring- 
ton, lot 15, block 1. Northern addition to 
Chlsholm ■■■■ 

Thomas McKinley et ux. to A. G. Mcliln- 
Icy, 1-40 Inttrest In neVi of section 34- 
.5H-18 • 

Nets Anderaon et ux. to Henry King, lot II, 
block 7. Anderson's addlUon to Vlrglida. 

Josla Saudow et. ux. to A. P. Sllllmau, lot 

2. block «. Brooklyn - 

John Francel et ux. to Frank Rozlch. lot 2J, 

block 2». First addition of rearrangement, 

Kreleth 

W. O. I). W?.Ulng ot ux. to J. C. Johnson, 
gotith 2.J feet of north 50 feet of loU 1, 

3, 3, block 97, Portland dlrtsion 

Wpsler Kj-kk.<ion et ux. Ui C. O. Carlson. nv»^4 

of nw^4. seiUon 21-19-15 

«k><irge H MaAli»iti et ux. to Frank O. Segof- 
stnm. *BW% of ne^4 of neVi. section 21- 

jl-20 

ivoiirearge Land company to Rudolf Roblnk. 
lot 23, block 3, Second addition to Cliia- 

holm • 

Andrew A. Ker.- et ux. to Bachel M. Towiie, 
soiitherb S.') feet of lots 7 and S. btock 

47. Kndlon division 

W. H. Kylvester «t al. to T. W. Mi)rrl.«ey. 
nwVi of nw>4. secUon 27. nS4 of neV», 

swV* of neVi. section 28-68-18 •■ 

Patrick .SuHlvan to H. B. Bacon. loU 31 

an.l 22 block 25, Virginia 

A W. Harlman et iix. to W. O. Amuiidson. 
KU 1 to 18 Inclusive and 20 t^) 26 In- 
clusive. Mock 12. Tlilrd Gleu Avon dl- 

vUlon ■•• *'"*'* 

Henn- Hewitt et ux. to J. Thomes: lot 11, 
block 22. Slowell'a addlUon to West Du- 
luth .■ • 

I-: A.. D'.nifield et tix. to H. L. Kraus el al.. 
s>/» of nwV*. nwi» of swVi. »ecUon 28-68- 

jg 

.-^arah J! Fay rt mar. to Minnie Reld. lot 
3 U. tk 101. Second ad>ilUon to Vir- 
ginia ■ 

Ida Barnes to Lars P. Jenvlck. part lot 9, 

block 2i). Endlon division 

A. J. Homes et ux. to L. F. LuUiy. »e^4 

of seiUon 14-61-19 

< harle* A. Hanson el ux. to U. L. Krau* 
et al.. eH of stVi. nw'4 of soVi. na\4 

of s«-'<. section 2«-6«-lS 

L. A. Arboiiasl et ux U> Ueorge H. Oamle. 
lot ». Wock 20, Letter Park Second di- 
vision ■ ■ 

fjost slpoU to Mike HakklU et al.. se^ 

of seU. scrtlon 28-52-12 ■• 

.lostpli it'Learj- et ux. to O. A. Polrter. jw'4 
,.f swVi. section I; tVt of se'4. section 

2-6.-.-12 ,•■■;■.;• 

William r lloblnson to Agawan Iron Min- 
ing aimpany. uwVi of nc'4. "^ of '>*^. 
sei.* of nvvW». sei-tion 2<j-6.1-l3 

Ednv.nd InajUs ft ux. to Fannie Brown. 
nw\4 of se»-i, section 10-52-12 ; • ;,■ ' 

.Tohn L. Brown et ux. U) Edniond IngiilU. 
nw'i of seVi. section 10-52-12 

George W. .Shaw et ux. to .\lfitd Jjiuea 
and T. r. Hudson. % of seV» of se<tlon 
1-48 15 ,. 

.Vddle M. Maaeau l" Onanx-k company, loi 
16. l)locU 34. Loudon addition 

Uuluih Trust comiiany to A. W. Hartman. 
ots 1 U> -6 Inclusive; block 12. Tliirl Glen 
Avon division . '. : ' ,, 

Wllllnm M Prindle et ux. to *"«*'«>« 
PveU« McLennan, lots 9. 10. aud 11, block 
28. Portland division l,!' •« 

J C. Jnhnaon U) Mao' .^. Walling, south « 
feet of north 50 feet of lots 1, 2. and 3, 
block 97. Portland division 

A. L. Agniln et ux. to A. F. Graham, loU 
11. 12, 13. 14. block 1. Duluth ILdght*. 
Fifth division V 

Lake .'Superior Inve<Iment company y> *■ 
W. Hunl. loU X and 2. block t>4. hndlon 

J "^K.^Bowcrs et i«."u)' A. J. liloomauui, lot 
7 block III. Walbank's addition - 

Charles K. ."Oiannon et ux. t^> Diduth feio, 
etcn- a^.H-latlon. lot . block 3. secUon 
D. F> red Hill cemeteo • ; • 

I.Hke Superior Invesuntnt conu>auy to *♦ ">■ 
(•r«bv. lots 1 and 2. block (,4. Lndlou 
division; lots 1 and 2. bl>K-k 10. New h.n- 

dion division .•■.,;.;„,; 

Mamie Mackey Mc.r;.l.y et mar. <•" Hf'"' 

T. Mackey. se^ of nw«4. section 14-:»7-n 
M J Cameron et ux. to Kmmanuol .\>clcty or 
■ the M K. Chun-h of Duluth. lot 80. F.aat 
Duluth Proper, First dl- 



MINNESOTA 
UNIVERSITY 

Decided Hit Was Made By 

the 1910 Gopher 

Annual 



300 



125 



125 



500 
106 



2.355 



1.000 



125 



850 



4.000 
2,000 



150 



350 



350 



00 



1,200 



4.625 



100 



Sixth street. 

01*e*.V Berg el al. to Jolm Novak, lot 12. 
block 3. West Park division ...... . ._ ■ 

VirgiMla Iraprovi'menl company to Jolm 
LalUncii. lot 6. block 48. Virginia. ^^ . .^. 

Virginia Improvement company J" ^^- "^ 
Donnelly, loU 1 and 2. block 41, Mr- 
glnla .'„' "ii> I 

Vliglnii Improvement compaiiy to JV f ^ 
MoUar. lot. 9 and 10. "l''*''' *.' ' . ^J' . 

Jame« W. Uussell et ux t/. Anto.ilo Tetu. 
e>,, of ne^i of se"*. 8e,-rlon ^' f}^ -.^^ 

Jesalo D. Itussell et mar to Aiit.)nla Tetu. 
wH of ne\t of seV.. secUon 2J-"-J« ' v, 

J,., 'campeau to Taylor .V "'J,'""'-"^ '?* 
11. block 4, resurvey of Murray i Uowa » 
a.idltion to DuluUi - ■ ■ • 

Jay W Lyder Jr.. et ux. to Taylor A. 
Hamilton, lot 1 1. block 4. rewrvey of Mur- 
ray A Howe's addlUon to Duluth .... ■- 

(icorge II. Gamble et ux. to *' i. .^ 
(■onrod. lot 33 and 34. block ^ ^'t^ 
pi"; J London Park «"1J'V"\'" 'P^V.^j 

K. W. M»n<1elholm *»,"*•.,»*>. t^ ^^ ^^'^^• 



850 
300 



450 
400 
900 
900 



225 



Utid- 



*.., of ne"*. nwVi of se^. ne 

surUon 8-65 14 ,\','l'v' 

K. W SetUeton et ux. to George F. 
say nwW of seVi. section 13-0-19. .•_. ;^. 

iiloc't 28. First <Jlen Avon division ..... 
Duluth ^ iron Range ll.iln.ad c.r^^'lT- 
F J. Hughes, sw^ of neV*. sccUon U 

I !«' Muloiie to Max Neupirt'. Vi ■|nlerest In 
'-Z 6 and nwH of se% .ecUon 1; lot 

10. ne',i of seV.. ^^-V"" r V ,un«" lots 

C \ Gilbert cl ux. to K. (■ }:»"}'• '"" 

2i and 22. bl=.ck 19. Proctor K>'o"^ - 

''^Jl-'lJX'^'f^i .Horlherfy ^0 

:er'^,rf ,orrWock 22. K-uimn db s.on^ 

n W. Fireman, iriwlce. t-j !»■ .^eppjia. 

\nt ifi block H. Gilbert ' 

„!rton'\'Dulu,h Farm ..and -mpa..y to 

A. BerQulsl, ne»* of ncV*. seiUon i» 



5l-i: 



Iterilg et ux. 



W T. Berlig et ux. to H. F. 
"• ■ -.- •-.. -.» wcstev.,, .- --„, . 

DuluUi Proper. llUM 



Northerly '10 feet of westerty 40 feet_ ^f 



lot 05. block 1"25. 

dlvl-don ..._ j^;;^ 4 iru,,' company t« 

■"{i'^^aco^^'lot'";. Sock 8. Sec-ond di- 



vision. Aurora 

Ge-me H. Cn>»iiy et u» 



to 



X. J. Davis. 



mTi and 2 blj;-k 64. Endlon cHvUlon; 
lotl i .«Id 2. block 10. New l..ndlon dl- 



230 



440 



575 



450 



2,400 



150 



280 



200 



200 



1.CC6 



1.6^6 



vUlon .^ 'p J IKvls 

' . ^'i snd"2 LlXei' Kndlon-'divLlon; 

division ;* ■ ■•!■ 'i ' liavis \4 

",o^'l^r2"b"k^.';..«l*ii'n^ 
lou 1 a"" -• vj,„,k 10 New Kndlon 

V, lots 1 and J. biwK lu, --•'> j g^^ 

.llvision ... -^^-^j- • — - • co„,pany ■ to' N- 



^;^"i-phrir'^:;Vrir'nrfaot-of lot i«. 

bl,vk 01. Kndlon division -••"y^- 

vUlon 

Cariton coUcge V< 

ux . lot 172. block 42, 

Tldrtl di\l8lon •.■■• 
Jessie M P'rier to K- L 



WliUam C. Schueler et 
DuluUi Pripar. 

ILoxle, westerly 



^^%4i orf;:^t.:^>ariot 6 .„oj^ ^ ^ 

loi. Portland ^'\'^';:i,g„v, work P^,ple3 



400 



900 



500 



5.251 



lot 7. 



830 



500 
500 



3oH 



450 
400 
300 



block 17. Vlr- 
10 Fred E. Lewbi. l^t 
to Fred E. Lewla. lot 

Mathe- 



C.GOO 



Jacob Paul et ux. 

Trading (ompany, 

glidJ 

John Heleriec et ux 

21. block 9. nibbing 
L A. Barnt* el ux. t 

■24. block 9. "l'^""«- ,; Tiuie K Ma 

Fr^'-K Lewis' cl-ux. to BcriM Heberiee. 
M. 21, blo.k !t. Hibblug 

ISI^IRKJNSANE? 

Sensational Case to Come Before 
North Dakota Court. 

„ V 1^ Mav 2'^ — (.Special to 

Forman. N.J^. ^],^>.^,Vonal case has 




. "^'"/ we^Uhy^fa?mer "of this section 
V*^^"„^anv vears was ordered com- 
miUed to the lifsane asylum. Shortly 

^^"lt^lre%^^?tr/lpTh%%l^."nfXi 
^'^^^arraiu^adfd into^the instttu- 



floT "rt^e'li'^aHng" promises to be 
somewhat sensational In its nature. 



Plans for Commencement 

Week Have at Last 

Been Completed. 



Minneapolis, Minn., May 22. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — Never before at 
Minnesota universty was there such a 
lineup on "Gopher day" as wa^ seen 
Monday on the campus. Over 700 
copies of the 1910 Annual were sold. 
President Northrop praised the book in 
g-lowlngr terms, and the bunches of 
students gathered under the oaks all 
day testified to the quality of the 
book'. 

The book was divided into sections, 
the first containing; university views; 
section two, the Junior album; .section 
three, the university year; section four, 
organizations; section five, athletics, 
and .section six, the bee hive, consisting 
of campus gossip and slams. The 
quality of the publication as a real 
representation of the university has 
been attested on all hand. The campus 
views were unsurpassed in beauty and 
realism by anything In any previous 
edition. A few peopl.^ were hard hit 
In the bee hive, but the board has 
been condemned for this le.ss than Is 
usually the case. The only complaint 
which has been entered against the 
board has been from the medics, dents 
and pharmacists, who declare that 
they were not granted enough space 
and will next year get out an annual 

of their own. 

* * • 

College players and the Women's 
league gained new laurels Saturday 
afternoon and evening when Sullivan's 
delightful operetta. "The Mikado." 
was presented at the Princess theater. 
Everything conspir*?d to make the per- 
formances a success: the east was the 
strongest ever gotten together for a 
college opera at Minnesota. Arthur 
Allen as the mikado was much ap- 
plauded for his ridiculous portrayal 
of this purely comic opera monarch. 
He responded to numerous encores 
with verses full of local hits which 
delighted the audienco hugely. Mirttj 
culminated when he gave a mock ac- 
count of Roosevelt's African trip with 
a "real" lion. Eugene Bibb as Ko Ko 
delighted the audieivje into enthusiasm 
tic calls for encores. >^ 

* • • ' 
Plans for commencement week ard 

at la.st complete and SOO seniors are 
awaiting their honors. Dr. Cyrus 
Northrop and Mrs. Northrop will give 
their annual reception to the gradu- 
ates Friday evening, June 4. at their 
hotne. The baccalaureate sermon is to 
be delivered by Dr. John E. Bushnell 
of Westminster Presbyterian church in 
the university armor>-. Tuesday is 
class day and will be a busy one for' 
£ieni.»rs. MonJay is the day for the 
presentation of the class play, "The 
Scarlet Arrow." Reheansals have been 
going on daily for this, and. the spe- 
cialties are also being practiced faith- 
fully each noon. Wedne.sday is alumni 
day', and members of previous classes 
are expected to hold reunions and pic- 
nic dinners on the campus knoll. In 
the evening the senior promenade is 
to take place at the Plaza hotel. Amos 
Parker Wilder, United States consul 
general to Hongkong, China, will ad- 
dress the class at the conimencement 
exerci.ses at the university armory 
Thursday morning at 10 oclock, and 
President Northrop will present the 
graduates with their diplomas. 

• • • 
In accordance v\ith the provi.sions of 

the war department, the annual In- 
spection of the university corps of 
cadets will be made by <.'apt. P. D. 
Lockridge general staff, U. 3. A., on 
May 2 4. Preceding the inspection 
there will be a revi-^w. 

• • • 
"The Gray Friars' Is the name of a so- 
ciety which has been .>rganized among 
the ".seniors. It is similar to the senior 
societies at Yale, Wisconsin, Maine, 
California and other universities. This 
society is made up of fifteen seniors 
chosen from the leaders in .student 
activities. It was organized at the 
.suggestion of several members of the 
faculty and the hearty Indorsement of 
President Northrop. Each spring 
junir)rs are to be elected to perpetuate 
the organization. 

• • • 
Following th»' lea.l '»f the academic 

college th"- engineering department 
has decided to excuse from taking the 
final examinations all tho.se seniors 
who have received no conditions or 
failures during their college course. 
This ruling, which goes into effect at 
once, has been received with great fa- 
vor the engineers who have all along 
maintained that tliey .should be treated 
with the same consideration as the 

academics, 

• • • 

The Y W. C. A. May f>t3 is a mat- 
ter now of hi-story, Thursday having 
bei the memorable day of its institu- 
tion The day's festivities opened 
with the crowning of the May <iueen. 
Helen Riheldaffer, which was followed 
by an elaborate May pole dance. The 
expectant multitude was J^u"'<^<l 
thence to the library to see the little 
farce "A Box of Monkeys." The per- 
formance was the snappiest little piece 
giv-n at the university this year. Irene 
O'Connor, as a We.stern girl about to 
enter .society carried the house off its 
feet. Her natural, enthusiastic and 
typically We.stern style in contrast with 
the young English woman's dignity 
brought out one row of applause after 
another. From the chapel the 
"feters" thronged back to the knoll, 
where they w^-re greeted by "Alpha 
Phi rf-d hots only r, cents." or "Theta 
sandwiches and Delta Delta cones, a 
combination fit for the gods," or some 
coy Gamma Phis mercenary. Buy her 
a lemmo and a squaker pig. After 
suuper, festivities continued, the w. 
of M." band starting the evening with 
a concert. The throng had by this 
time developed into a mob. and with ^ 
the appearnce of the May pole dancers, 
a mad rush occurred, in which one 
was reminded of circus day. The 
dance in the flickering glare of the 
great red torches was truly beautiful. 
Starting at the armory, preceded by 
the band the pageant gorgeous marched 
up past PiUsbury and on to the im- 
provi-sed c.tmpus theater Here the 
Tableaux of 'Hiaw^atha s \N ooing^ 
••Th« «'oming of the French' and The 
Treaty of Traverse des Sioux" were 
staged. The great Indian braves, 
bri-stling with feathers, were weirdly 
impressive in their woodland s-^tting. 
The Norwegian. German and Irish 
scenes were effective, especially tho 
"fanciful Norwegian dancers. Frorn 
start to finish the fete was a grand 
success. 



^ 





IM ■■!. ' I H 



■Ol^ftl 



k 



le 



THE DULUTH EVENING HEl^ALD: SATURDAY. MAY 22, 1909. 



DEMAND FOR 
WHEAT FIRM 

Hi 

Closing Prices Show 

Fractional Gains Over 

Previous Day. 

III I 1 

Flax Very Strong and 

Closes More Than 

Point Up. 



I THE MARKETS AT A GLANCE l| 

I — I 

Duluth May wheat closed VqC higher. 
Chicago July wheat closed %c higher. 
Minneapolis wheat closed V^c to Ic higher. 
Liverpool wheat cables, Vgd to %d lower. 
Duluth July flax closed iy2C higher. 
New York stocks, active and strong. 
Boston copper stocks, stronger. 
Duluth curb coppers, steady. 
Chicago live stock, lower. 
Cotton is barely steady. 



An. 



futurt* .-it.iUj . 



-.d. 



p. ■,,:■ 
Bii 1 

fan 

AiTifrit Jin 

'1 ' 

thf' rn; 

Cat 
1,, 

lOWtiJ , 

1 'A C 

T 
L)i. 
Oil- 



Board of Trade, M:i> --■ 
ii!im»-nt prfvailed durinu a 



THE MINNl'^APOLIS MARKET. 

Lijtht Offeiing:s Cause Str('iij;th as 
the \\ eek Closes. 



MlniieapoHs. M:i: 



.-► .i 



Tin. 

d.M 






uet-k 

■ n iiisl 



THE COPPER STOCKS. 

The following art tlie cjosjng quota- 
tions- of copper stocks at Boston today, 
reported by Paine, Webber & CO.. 

Uovr.! A 'rorr.,'y t -uiUlin g: 

I IJid. I Asked. 



STOCKS — 



nntrkftM i*tiuvvm« I'l • 



%vi t-k. I'l'i '>ii«- 



f T 






it tia 
tdn. 



both 

) I i L- 1 , 



May anil 



, rK 



1' 



aKauist. H7. 
W'innipeK -i'-i- 
. d 11.1(1 1< 

-r. fMO-f,. 



1 1 . 1 s w «' f k t U e r (.- 
:.' (HI. Ught oi- 
Jtnmiar and 

',. new 

fairly 
; , ■• .liffll. 
; ; 1. • ill's 

<t 18; 

fill be r 
1 1 ■ vv . 1.10; 



1 



55: 



t 



K>wt?r 
1 .1. ij i ■- 



!■ In 

In N' 



bight ! 

The .1 

1 III 111 I 

w V 



*. Louis !uui 
.ptiou closed 



11 '.!S.' 



J 



ChiiaK'-' • 
Broon>' 
•'Th< 

tf»g*>i' 

frr 

ca 

wi 

Wi„; ■ 

on 1. 1- . 

markets' 

the bettt 

firmly l-* 

llKht ai't! 

the n. 

pririLii 

the r» 
fr. 

lit 

o 1 
I'- 
ll. 
1* 

mfirki t >■-. 
to t!if i: 
When' 

aw«;! 
di 

tl: 

"'>JH't ^■■ 

i/!id lower 

■ t. : ■= i 

i: 

ai 



•■'»c liiKber in 
In M'lineaptilis-, 
,, hlKiier In 
In Kansas 
, in Winnipeg. 
%0\c higher in 
higher. 
in Liverpool : 
ni Asnerica yesterday 
unfavorable rtpi'M" 
rrnany and Hiuigaiw 
opening fn wheat hen, 
■1 to Sd higlur. Ihere 

ring by shorts ear 

. ,1 sU-.-nglh in count, 

*rgo cales ani! 

1 cargoe 

,ti,ji..Ui offerii 

jMiiinK '•»*' 



bigh, 

Julv iipeiud. 
1 :;••'(. ; n.:bi'-%. low. 

!,.>.,. $■ <'iif»li \vh>at wfis in tiiir 

,i. <'.mntry mil!er!« were 
i^ in tise di-iv and alf'o 
, - '.it the loeal mills 
buyers. No. 1 nortliern sold 
3».4fa I'isc over tht July option, and 
2 northern for U^'fi^-i'^c over. ^ 



I. J K< ■ ■ 

fair 

rei-M-v-. i,,.. 

wt-re good 

for 

No. 



1 nortliern Kpol and to arrive. $1.33 'i 

l.:i4; No 2 northern. $1.3V »* f«j l.JJ. spot 
and lo arrive; -No. 3 vvlieat. 
No. 3 yellow corn 73 V^ 
white oat.s, 56% <S} .'•T''*ie: 



|1.3(tru 1.13; 
, i,a73'., >■, N". - 

No. : :>-. ".^■•4 



..« wer« 



Flax — Fiee'-;|'f • 

-hipments. . 

market in;' 

. „ 1 . e as 1 1 . 



fat le.r, made I 
Karly In t ■ 
were s-uld. 



rar.- today, against 
,1 offerings made 
i'l-icrs were about 

■ ..uili .luly option. 

■'T' .'.-.r- today. 

:;g de- 

_ . . ^ f.-edlng 

,«(•{ ativanee about 

-ion ail the offer- 

;ioslng range. «9# 



An.algamated 

Anaeoniia 

Adventure 

Alinu >k 

Allout-z 

.\tlaiiti 
All/oil. - 

I'.O.-^I oil I 'lilLMjiUla It'll 

Ulai k Mouiuain . . 

Butte Coalllion 

Calumet & .\rU>ina. 
Calumet & lU- la . . . 

Centennial 

Cumbt-rland l^y . . . ■ 

lialy We.-t 

Davi." I'alv 

rioinnil'Pii i""iii< I 

Eat=t Buitf 

I"ranklin 

Glroux 

Greene-Cananea . . . 

Keweenaw 

Lakf t'opi'or 

l.a S.ilie 

■ .;ssj t "ons 

.-i. \-5co Mining . , 

Mol .■: W k 

Ne\ ..'Li 1 ■'■:.'- 

N(\<i.l.-t rial, 
.Mi l.i-<;ng . . 
Nort il Butte . - 
Osceola . 



K41* 



43% 
14ii 



:6 

103 

63 5 
31 
8 3-16 









■* 1 


3 


>. 


:'3 

13 
14 





Parrott 
Quincy 

Kfi vf-ii 
Sit 



■22% 



134 

34 »* 

3 5c 



I ..!• 



At 1 

'in yesi' 
111 and 

tilt fi:'M,. 
,.t l.a I'l 

.1 V\ -,.-. 



;» 
-.d 

ilie 
.glier 

Th. 



\Ii;'lst HIT'S — Shipments. 1,307 
I>ernaiid was stronisr and tar In 
of ttie supply. ' ' 
nothing to vv:i 



ton 5 



i. 



it.; 
(•< 
It 



l-'ioUl I'l o • 

todav on a' < 



, rgo'-s 



i> III 111, I'Ut ijui.'t, Ci 



.ictive. 



1 1 , ■ t 



.Aiij-tr.'i'l 1. 



at lit 
a nd 



niiiur it fiirilier advancf 
unt of the liiglier wiieat 
«-- now are at the liighest 
iM-mand was only (air. 
.^ lur small amounts on 
the high prices. Shipments 
:].-, reus,- i,t i:..1<;'.' barrels. 



ars. l'-' 



Tl 

r 
I" 



All 



, n 



ning 
Victoria . . . 
Wolverlni 
AVvandot 
Arizona M.' • 
American Saginaw 
Butte-Alex Scott |U |>aHi 

d«. luH-Tiaid 

Biif te-Ballaklava 

Bui to &■ Superior . . . . . 

Cliiof Cons. . 

Ca* t us , , . . - 

Calud.''; >v >^ 

Cahuiifi ^ -Mfni..i..' 
♦."arman 



51 >4 
1C<' 

il 

IV 

44 

IF. 

90c 

26 '4 
IOoMj 
645 

32 
8 f.-16 
9 
6^^ 

i:!c 

13 S 
l^'/i 

8 
1('^ 

3^ 
23 s^ 
14 

14 H 
6 '4 
6 

23 
2% 

10*4 

60 
135 
3 4 Ml 
90 
37c 

16>b 
40 
70 
14 

i:'"k 

E.O '4 

.^ '4 
14^ 



w -is 

8:^-4 
IOV4 

1 \-i 
H 
IIV2 

4>>< 



1\ 



ADVANCES 
IN^OCKS 

Market Opened Higher 

and Close Vfas Active 

and Buoyant 

Coppers and Southern 

Railway Prominent in 

the Large Dealings. 



New York, Mayy 22. — Opening prices 
of stocks were carried fractionally 
higher on a light demand. There were 
only a few exceptions to the advance, 
and those among.st the less important 
stocks. Western I'nion rose %, Kansas 
City Soutliern \, and United Stale.-s 
Jsteel Us. 

Quiet strength prevailed during the 
first liour. Tliere was no demand of 
consequence for any of tlie leaders, but 
prices rose until a number of impor- 
tant gains were established. St. Paul, 
Minneapolis, St. I'aul & Sault Ste. 
Marie, Norfolk & Western, Southern 
Hallway preferred. Toledo, St. Louis & 
Western. American Smelting. Sloss- 
Sheffleld Steel. Cnited States Rubber 
and Distillers Securities were lifted 1 
to Wi. 

The market closed active and buoy- 
ant. Announcement of the purchase 
of $30,000,000 of Aimour & Co. bonds 
was accepted as evidence of the sus- 
tained investment demand of capital 
and of the abundance of money sup- 
plies. Prices advanced on large deal- 
ings, the copper and Southern Railway 
being prominent. Anaconda and Amal- 
gamated Copper rose l*^. Southern 
Railway S. American Malting l^i-, 
Soutliern Railway preferred. Chicago & 
Alton and Consolidated (Jas 1*4 and 
Union Pacific, Northern Pacific. Great 
Northern preferred, Atlantic Coast 
Line, Chicago Great Western preferred, 
St. Louis & San FranciscoNjecond pre- 
ferred, Peoria & Kastern and Tennes- 
see Copper 1. Long lslan<l shot up 
4»>fe points and Reading second pre- 
ferred 2%. 



ZKMTH I4«4. DI LI TH 1871. 

KEFEREXCESi 

City National Bank. 

Klmt National Bank. 

MARTIN 

ROSENDAHL 
& CO., Inc. 

CapiUI $50,000.00. 

Copper Stock Brokers. 

414 WEiST SI PERIOR STREET. 
10::.103 MANHATTAN BLOG. 



Duluth Copper Curb Market . 

N. S. MITCHELL & CO., 



MANHATTAN BIILDING, 



Our own wire* to the 
country. AImo conneollouu 
eru Market)*. 



Copper 
to EuMt- 



SATIRDAV, MAV 22, ISMW. 
3Ir. HuBO len\eii for Butte today 
to t«ee that the machinery in cor- 
rectly put In place nt the f^cott 
property. AVe can look for»>ard 
bis tblugM happenluK nt 
In the next few luouthw 
ean utop u» now. >\ e 
of money anil plenty 
tthaft win be sunk 
aH last KM money 



Private WIrea. 
City Phonea 1805. 



202-204 

Referenceai 

CITY NATIONAL BANK. 

Duluth. Minn. 

MAY 22, 1900. 



I Bid. I Asll. 



Private Long; Diiitance. 
Phonea 1657-1805. 



I Bid. I Ask. 



at 
to 



In on thlM IkMue 
did on Butte A 



t): 



l-i. 



'"Iil'':ie. 

tar. 

i.. ,; :; ,wu,l flour 

,Mi Wfre. !?.OtH,i 
was quite a I.' I 



tliiiK - 

• r !'■& 

u 1 e - 



American Wheat MarketM. 

liiiliitti Midi.HiPKli* fliicii 



New V.rh. 



Were, 



nit.1 



»• 



il' 



SIH 
:<2 \ 



H. 
1 
1 



1,41 



tl 

11 " 

i 

I 



\\h V wliCat '■! ■ 
\ a need 
- , ■ ■ 1 .1 gain 
.Inly wl.-at I 
f 1 ■:;». fi'l\ .'^ 1^' • ''■ 



*<. 1 



* 


H 




2:1 'i 








■i+'-s 








■n'. 


j:*» 


'*a 




2^\l 


16\ 


"i 




.2* 



t -. • 



■I- 
t»pt 

t< 






li» nil- Arizona 
I lulu til it .M«'. 
Globe Cons 
Lion fiulch 
Live Oak . 
Lake Sup. & 
M •,■ itza . . - 
i, ..> :.ldf l:< 
Rav ConsolUlalt 
Rtd Warrior 
San Antonio 
SavaTina 
Shaiiuck 
^Vari»-n 
\\i l\erliit iv 
Z. I .t h Leaii 



t.-/-. liiiia 





;<i:c 


5«SC 




I'ie 


15c 


t .1 .... 


'1 


2^ 




2 


2 '4 




llli 


1 2 V4 




1*4 

1E>% 


2 




2\ 


3 '4 




7(ic 


85c 




•i\ 


2 



1»* 

3'i 
9 

10 'a 

3 

3'»i 
12 
52 c 

2 

2% 

I'A 

2 

4 

8 

7 



develop 
perior. 



of 



New Tcrk 'tork 
by Pip<r. JuhiisMi 



aui'tjiuciii 
& Cste. 



(umlsheU Tlie Herald 



STOCK.S- 



Open. I High. I l/ow. | Close. 



n 



ti.i. 



\«"»\ \ ork 

• rk .\biv . 

Tiilv. * 
"i.l n- M.i • 



tiraln. 

li-e: \^'beat. 
September 



j;a in 
f flax 



po 1 1 1 1 

flax 



ope- 



ChienicA iMttx. 



< oru 

J111.V. 

UKtS. 

■,"■- 



and Pork. 

.IlllV. 

Com. 



Jilt J. 

1*1 rk. 



tl nl: 

there, • 

Oata 
liighe'" 



\ t. 



tit; 



anil 

^lf■v 



C urn 



nml ^\ h<nl 



. : July, 

Rulletln 

..I » :. in., 



r 8 '*4 c. 



'■at* 



STATIOXa. 



T»mi'Ha- 
tuR. 



Kalc- 

r&ii. 






5 3 

8 a 



lllllllltl * "T ll,N|M-.ll«.ll. 



34. 



t'P- 



III. 



IS 



j«ir. 



12. 



11.1 
her 

r : ■ 



IS: '- 

R. 



r>ii> iim 
1- 



fl.o. 



1 ' .1, .l!ll 

:, $1,1: 'a; 
(Ittruni. 1 1. 1 . -4 

in>(,-. i'ui'x— To 

, 1,,- « ' " V ; , \t fi A- 



arrive, 
»1 TTi.'. 



->.- la! 



HE.\Kl» ON TH \: FLOOR. 

(;ossii» oi the Trailing: Koom and the 
IMt. 



PhtK 



\\ 



111 1 M I I |h . 

Kollin 



liber 
..p , 

K 



n 



■ t ♦■ s t 
Kiirt-as 



niatef» u(>on 
atne out 



thi-s 



.\b.-i., 
Mllii.. 



!■! I I- 



Smith of the Coinm- 
ivt returned from K.i 

. , _ , r mm null I'U is a 



^:..i: 



■,< t 



4H3,i.'Oi' 
l.u: fluN 



CMMb 
lit .It. 1. (' 



Salew 

It N" 1 

^■' ] J- 



•Saturday. 



$1 



1M« 



<, .-. t.:i..il»;. 

Nicollet ot tiu 

places the st;it»- 
65.000.000 bu. 

Le •'«Hint, ' ! • ' 

• • " ' .iMje.'M" 



Kansas City 
■ r.>i« at not 



-xpert, esti- 
on present 




76 
^4 



n 

Tf. 



THE ( Hl( A<;0 MARKET. 

Moderate Demand By Shoi ts ( anses 
Uptnrn in >!ny W heat. 



Ui 111 

niatc^ 

The 
Will b 

cago 



■i-v.l I reight Agent I'lili 
,1 :it about (iO.000,000 bu. 



cstl- 



r. t'\t L 
ir i.ss.i*-il 
time. 



Minneapolif: 
ILrS-^*-* and ca 



.V. ; iillH-Ilt 
! unc hat I 



puts were 
lis $1.32^11 



crop report 
o'clock, Chi- 



IPi.: 

Jst. 1 . -- 

Wlltlil|'4:S 



44 

48 

t,^ 

48 

44 

48 

50 

40 

4C 

.'.n 

56 

4!< 

48 

44 

44 

4f! 

4l> 

48 

S2 

80 

f.fi 

r4 

r* 

n 

it, 

r.< 

50 
48 

94 
48 

42 





c 
c 




.14 
.10 



I) 
.()£ 
.IC 

II 
.l<4 



1; 
.('6 
. -2 

(■ 
.24 
.18 
-22 

T 
{.' 

.14 
(' 
11 

.Cit 


c 



Aiiif riiftiiudu 
(1(1 pfii 

.\niiilRauialnl 

Anierii 111. Sugar 

AiiiirliHJi fur Foundry 
.\in(riru;i lifiiimi live ... 

AinertiMii O'lU'ii OJI 

Amedc.tn Smelters 

Anfti-oriJa 

Atchison 

()o pf'l 

Haliimore A <»!ilo 

Hr.'( klM> Har'ld Tramit. 

tuiirai l.Mtliir 

I'liesapiahe ^t OIUo 

Clih'JVKo-Gt. WeeWni com. 

(li. pf J A 

do ptil B 

<-.. ,«. .<t .'Jt. Paul 

rdonuio Kiwi * Iron.... 

Colf^'adJ ynuUierii 

IVnsoUiiattsl t.ae 

rniiaiUi.ii PiulfU 

Ilfl,iwart> *t HiKlson... 

IHriTfr & Uio GniiKle 

Itivilllc'ra 

D.. S S & A 

Krie 

(1(1 l»l pfil 

(lo 'JlMi pf (1 

Cirtal .Norttiem 

<Jr<at .Vortlieni Ore.. 

Illliid* tVntral 

Iiaer>let 

lo»a rmiral 

l\iui»ai I'Uy «oiiUnrn .. 

I I^MilfTlUf at Na.slmlle 

I Mtxlcaii <"«iitral 

.\li-ouri. Kbiisbs. ti Ti-xa* 

.Vtlstmirl Pixlflc 

NaiidiiAl Ia^m\ 

Ntvr VirK <V:itral 

Nf.ilh Aimriiuii 

X.rtlieni radfic 

Oiilatio & Wfulerti 

Pfiiii'-ylvanitt 

Tcrtilc's Cas 

Proywl St(*l r»r 

Itcpiiiaio steel & 
do lifd 

Hook Islaiiil 

do pM 

JifkdliiV 

Slot*-PiielTi(Ul ... 

Ko. Lli.e 

Siulliini Ilallvvay. 

S(.alli(rn Pndflc . 

TiiiiK^sfe Copper 

TexiK Pad! if -•. 

Third Avtiiue ... 

Twin Clly 

rnlcin Pacific .. 

rtali l"opi*r 

\\ S f«uel 

do pfd ..' 

Wabash 

f'.o pfd 

W<<.tiiieh(Hiaf 

Wo'trrii t'rilon... 
Wisconsin Crjiiral 
do pfd 

Total sharw. W^ :«'" 



821t 

98 

57 H 

4!''s 
10!) Vt 

iu\ 

78 T» 
5 
21' 

:y 
ir.1'* 

41>/« 

1444 

18(1 

!!•«>* 

4!) =4 

"33"', 
50 H 

7S 
147 
16% 



.1 



Iron. 



138\ 
2«'i 
42% 
74 
88 

130^ 

ite' 

41' '4 

i:.4H 

114% 

42 ! 

26 >i 
!U 

32H 

70 Hi 
1^7 % 

82>>» 
135 '4 

»0^ 
122T* 

42 

34 >« 

211 >« 

m 
'eow 
so 

"t7^ 



84 Vs 

55 >» 
57 ^. 

'JI3H 
51 '.4 

no 

114''4 
751 

20 
78% 

5 
29 

5 

IMH 

41S 

" \*!>\ 

180 HI 

lOCVi 

4t'H 

40\ 

"34 
50 <« 

'i47ii 
73 
147 
16H 

"'47H 

lay 
26 *» 
42H 
74 '4 
88 

131 

147^4 
4i'>4 

13514 

115 
42 
284i 
91 '4 
32 S 
70l» 

K.S% 
8.'? 

137 1» 
32 

12r-lH 
42>« 
34 ^i 
2b^ 

"eoH 

12(J 
20% 
• 51 



li^Hb 
5P,*l 

82% 1 84% 
..132^1 



55 
87% 

93' 

49% 

109% 

li4»4 

78H 

29 

78% 

4% 

29 

4S 

I.IO^ 

41% 



77% 
i)l\i 



144% 

180 

106 
40% 
39% 

' 33% 
50% 

i4«% 
72% 

146\ 
1C%. 

■■47--i 
138\ 

21; % I 

42% i 

74_ 

87 %1 
130%! 

lie' 
49 

134's 
IU\ 

42 

28% 

91 

32% 

70% 
157% 

82% 
135% 

30 »4 
122% 

42 

34% 

28% 

189' 

"w" 

11 '.'»4 
U'% 
50% 

"76% 

91% 



.-6 
.'.7% 

e.'>A, 

fi3% 

51% 
110 
104 -^ 
1)4% 

78'i, 

29 

78% 
4\ 

29 

7% 
151% 

41% 

esit 

14.'.\ 

180% 

196 

40% 

40% 

17%l' 

34 

50% 
4:1% l> 
140% 
72% 
14C>4 
16% 
32'V»!> 
47 
1H0% 
2«% 
42% 
74 'i 
88 
ISl 
82b 
147% 
40% 
13.-|% 
114% 
42 
28% 
91 
32% 
70% 
157% 
83 
137 
32 
123% 
42% 
34% 
28% 
104b 
189% 
82 

eo% 

120 
20% 
M 
84 b 

S9b 
91% 



to 
thiM mine 
Nothing 
have plenty 
of ore. The 
400 feet deeper 
eau do It. >est 
winter thl« mine nhoiild be « very 
heavy producer and we Hhould be 
able 'to wait a few month* when we 
know abKolHtely that It I* only n 
«iueHllou of a little time. 

The full paid continue*, to trade 
9IU In Butte. It muHt look good 
thoise Butte people to Hee a few 
t-arlondN of heavy machinery and 
blK tlmbem unlonded at the )»eott. 
They are Htartlnic 
the Name bm they 
Superior. 

MluerN will begin putting their 
waKCH Into thU »t«ek, for Im It not n 
fact that It iM the bent buy In thlj. 
country at the present timef ^^^ch 
(Mie on the board ciMuparen with it r 
I have been In the brokerajfe h""'" 
itevM a long time and ha%e ntudled 
mining, hut no one can Nhow nie 
uuotber Htock that I* «k safe and 
wore a* either of the Butte-Alex 
Seott BtoekM. t>ue mine nuch at* the 
Bnllaklnva and another that naa> 
Into another Butte & Su- 
Buy the two Scottn with 
every dollar you can get hold 
and ?ou will thank Rofeudahl 
Co., later on. 

\o one need lone a dollar and we 
Mhoiild all make big money. It hat. 
Kot to come for the wa>» of the 
Seott mine are an »»et aa those o» 
the < hina wall. 

Butte A Superior hold* strong at 
»2.S"»<: bid. PomHlbllltlex are great 
and if may develop Into one 
IjrrtnteHt mine* 1 nthU country 
llallakl:i\a looki* good and It. 
eomlng more active. It eloped »l<» 
bid t.Klay. t opper tiueen in leettlnK 
Mroneer ever> day. We ean enpeet 
a movement In this l».«ue very j.oon. 
I. eloned »I.S7 bid. ^ mi ad 

Krnilh Lead * /.Inc closed »2.04J 
bid. Here Im a dividend pa>er and 
on any kind of news will advance 

faMt. , „. 

farman holdit utrong around if 
ThiN (.toek It) nlwa^H aetlve. 

The »2 paid Scott eloHcd »« 
Buv It for It Im a clneh at this 

r am eompletluK arrangementH 
for the bandlluK of low priced 
with greater ponKlbllltleH than 
that I know of. \A e have xpent 
«»ver fl.tMH* to find out. Hnve 
thlH one under ••onulderatlon for 
monthN and have now decided 
put It on. Vcni can rent Bi.ttured be 
fore I adxline the purchane that 
Mhall undemtand JuMt what 
expected. t>ne 
out Im that It 



.'\mcrlcan Saginaw.. 

^rl/.-Mlchlgan 

Black Moiuttaln . . . 
B.-Alex Scott full pd 
B.-Alex Scott $2 pd. 
Butte & Superior.., 
Butte-Ballaklava . . . 
Calumet & Arizona. 
Calumet & >lontana. 
Calumet & Sonera . . 
Carman ' ^\ 



2.87 


3.12 


1.37 


1.50 : 


.85 


.90 


8.75 


9.25 


.'i.75 


6.12 


2.75 


2.87 


10.12 


10.25 1 


103.00 


103.50 


AH 


.50 


1 10.87 


11.00 


1 1.87 


2.00 



Chemune . . . . 

Cliff 

Copper Queen. 

Cordova 

Cactus 

Denn-Arlzona 
East Tutte . . 
Globe Cons. . 



14.50 
2.12 
1.75 
2.00 
2.87 
3.50 

13.50 
5.12 



15..->0 
2.25 
1.87 
2.12 
3.(K> 
3.75 

13.tt2 



&.JO 



Greene Cananea ... 

Keweenaw 

I.lve Oak 

Lake Sup. & Sonora 

Mowitza . 

Xlplsslnp: 

National . 

Xorlh Butte 

Jlcil Warrior 

Rawhhle Royal .... 

San Anl-.ilo 

Savanna 

Sup. & Plttsburff. .. 
Superior * Boston. . 
Shatluck-Arlzona . . 
Superior & Globe. .. 

Tuolumne 

Warren 

'Aenltli Load & Zinc. 



10.25 
3.00 

e.oo 

2.00 
•92 
10.50 
.50 
59.50 
2.00 
.12 
10.75 
1.87; 
14.12) 
10.00' 
16.001 
1.06 

o 12; 

2*.87i 
2.00 



10.50 

3.12 

6.50 

2.25 

.95 

10.75 
.52 

60.00 
** 12 
*!l3 

11.25 
2.00 

14.37 

16.25 

16..->0 

l.lii 
2.37 
3.12 



«S&!^^ 




,W. LEE & COMPANY 



RehourceH Over f.I.'SO.OOO. 



INCOItPOKATED. 
Paid up Capital, $50,000. 

BANKERS AND BROKERS 

Private Wires to Iron Range, Copper Country, and all Stock 
Exchanges, both East and West. 

410 W. Superior 



St., Duluth, Minn. 



of the 



be- 



We call xpeclal attention to the 
pany owum the tilobe t ousolldated 
Kroup In thf ^Iluuil eamp. k 
dated needw no recommendatl«»n 
niOMt promlwInK onet* In the 

.Miami and Inspiration In --- - ,, 

Ctrdovn Conner company, cooNlstlng of tue 
^'"' lneludln« the Globe *«'-«''»«•'• '"-"VkvooO 

while the Miami Ih KclllnK •< »»."*'J '*^" , 
fomuiorclnl at ».l.<WMi.oo!», 



Cordova t opper < O"'^^/-,^^. ,,„r,Ka 

Con.>«oll- 



camp, 

(;iobe. Cilobe 

known to be one of 

and the Kureka group ndJoln« 

The .-ntlre propertlew of 



!.O0. 

bid. 

level. 

nentN 

otock 

an> 

tent 

bad 

Mix 

t<» 

e- 

you 

ean be 

tliinK !iou will find 

««III not be a dead 



f>f view. 



Issue from a mine point 

\on can come In and put In your 
order. Money will be held 
until we have abwolute control. 
IbiM one I Ihlnk you will 
tieicant market. nevelopmei.tN at 
tblM propert> should be fa«t tor all 
„re» In thU dlHtrUt arc near the 
Hurfnee. 



here 
«>n 
have an 



Both Phonen 20»3. 

MAY 22, 1009. 

Thin com- 

n the tilobe 
niilcN dlNtant from 
nn the property I* 
tilobe camp, 
the Miami camp 
cooMlNtIng 

Kurcka, 

|;7.'><».«KK». 

$7.0(K>.0U0, and the Arizona 

at »1S.0(K»,000. When <.ne 

ment us any mine In the •••«»«^>;, 'i'l ""^" 

above valuations In of couHl«lcrnhle 

Globe 1« that the wln«e on the t.eiu 

Hulphiile. where the raise hns 

The shaft ba« been started on 

Kood progrcMS bclnR made. 

150 feet per month on thU nhnft. -^« ,"''" .. „, 

.,Z i.T,.l\ In the nest 0« or !»0 davH, and at that 

edTv be'-clllog «« «-'«•- «' ••*^-'' ""'*■•" ""• "'"'"■•" 
will undoubtedly be HclHnB at 
\Vc NtronKly uriee the purchase 
ulatlvc purposes. 

t «.pper tloeeu Is In excellent demand 
cdly be received today or Monday 
the stock will sell at *3 

Butte 
of buying, oflrcrlngs verj scatt« 
above the fT, mark In the next <'" ""^"•. ,„„, Th-re ts no reason why 

^^'^ "^;hlch'drre';'\b;"^VVL^r'"7!:mrr^^.:"should not be se.Ung 

market quotations, and all 
been quletlj absorbed 



the 

the 

the 

<;iobe tonsolldated and the 

selling at a little less than 

and ihe lnsplratl«»u at 

nnC the <»ld IJonilnlon 

the 4 orduvB ha*, ns jfood mnnanc. 

well financed, a comparison of tnc 

Interest The latest Information from 

Is In ore J» feet wide, high uxade 

on Ihe new west chute of ore. 

and Is now 10 feet deep, with 

expects to make from l-'fi to 

the* will reach the Miami 

date t «^rdova will undoulil- 

inarket fiuotatlon, and 

910 per share before the first of the year. 

„f < ordova for Investment as well as spec- 

nnd the report that will nndoiibt- 

wlll be of such a nature that we believe 

duriuK the comlnjr week. 

A superior «-•«-•- ;°,^"^>,.rs"Vssu;"w7.V' 

fr* mark In the next <IO days 

frlendl> toward National 



considers that 



drift 
been started 
the Kurcka. 
I'he compan> 



rate 



(»n a very pood class 
undoubtedly sell well 



this 



property, 

'"'*'m.Ue''-Ballaklava In excellent dem«_nd^...^ „„.... ^^_ ^^^ jevelop- 



stock offered has 



ments on the 
above »l.VOO. 



4]l0-foot level will undoubtedly 



take this Issue well 



Fred H. Merritt & Co. 

314-315-316 Palladlo Building. 

Telephones: Dul., 1108; Zen., 971 

Duluth. Minn. 



MAY 22. ISMMI. 



StaltiU'd sliowirs 
HiKl the llaKotai. 



tih.MAlvKS 
Il i. ■ •• 1 H.( 
II VV 



fl. 

and 



' J1 



p. ihI 



0«i< 

In '.i 



iKi>, 1tl«i' 32 



$i.:;:'4. 

,i«aKo 
,iii<l <h 
tl.l«' 



for 1 

111 



:!<-\viii>r 



ulv up-^ 
1 lioeil I" 
jiu.l $1 
• * 

is til*' 



w t- r 1 

$1 

16'*. 



fl.r- 



oiilt lalley Mat** 
Hlt'HAKPSON. 
Local tor«ea.?Itr. 

T indicate* Inapprwiabie rainfall. "For yeflerdaT. 
tl-VT t«.Tit>four hiur* t^udmi ». .. ni.. T5tb inenman 
Mrne t.Mlniniiim Umf.erat.ire Icr IwKe Lour. »uO- 
tig 8 a m. 75lh nieildli.n Unit. 

>^<iTj.- xiie jiTcrage maxlroaiu and minimum 

, I lire- and Ihe a»trji«e nili.fall are made up 
', center fri>ra the actual iiuri-tier of reiKrU 

ccool. -me nate of •ciiUier ' Is Umt prevaiJliig 
at Uii'i jf olmenatKn. 



ChlcaKO Livestock. 

200 n-arket .te.dy: hee^ea, I'l'-^- f^. [ .rk.rraiTd 

;.V.^~ »xr.fi«»'. 60- cow« and liellirs. |.J.tJ(P 4..Mi . 
feeders.. »..«0(?-.M'. ' e-tlmate.1 at O - 

can*. »''/'^*"J ,,,„Vr- liBht »6.80t..:25; mlied. 

pli[». $5.8(>(«l 

-Receipts t-8- 

IS.OOWG 25; 



|:,.l(Ha7 25; 
sieen. $4.75^6.00; 
cow« and liellirs. 
Hip-— Kecelpts e«tlmate<l 
5c lovver; light. »6.80t..:25; 
heavy, »7.00(.a: 45;^ ro.igh, 
iri.od to <;holce, heavy. r.20to,.4..; 
bulk of »al.-s. »7.15(.i7 35. Kheei,- 
•»oi..- market >.t<«dy; native. 



.42%; 



»6.95<& 

7.20 

6.7.'. 

tima'..e<l 

wfi.ieni. $4.00P«_. . . t« i,(i(iT <i (10 

naUvt. 16.00^8.25; ivcstMi.. th.OOO- .'01. 



at 



vfiirliruB'. |4.tO(a:.25; 



]auil«, 



L.lvestwk. 

Z- — OtUt— He eipl*. 



200; 



tem- 
al 
re- 



st. Paul 

' $3.li0ig7.00; lniid~ t 



fteady 



at 



.50t«0 OU. 



Compaay— 
Butte-Alex Seott. 
Ilutte-llnllak .... 
Butte A Superior. 

Cactus 

fal. * Sonora 

( arman 

(heniunK, $7 pd. . 

Chief 

(ordova, 9'- pd . . . 
nenn-.%rl»ona 
l>uluth-Moct . . . • 

Kleultn, 1M» pd 

(ilroux 

(ireeae-t anaaea • 
I.. S. A: S., »2"'>0 pd 
Mou tiulch. m pd. 
Mve Oak, 92 pd . . 

Mowltxa 

Haw hide Hoyal . . 
Ked >\ arrlor . . • • 
S. .Antonio. 91 P<I ■ 
Savanna, S2 pd . 
Shattuek-.VriB . . • 

Sup. * I'ittn 

/.eulth . . 



1 Shares 
] Issued. 

. I KlU.tKKl; 
I •.;44.7.'»0| 
l.(KK).tMK>i 

raiu.oooj 

<tO,<HM»| 

tM»*.:.oaol 
a2r..ooo; 

3.'VO.OOO| 
30,0tK»i 
20,000 

JW<l,O0o| 

2.r.tMM»ooi 

40,(KIO| 

»o,ooo 
no,oool 

110,0(M»| 
J,Ot»0,<MM>| 
200,0O(»| 
200,0<Ht| 
100,0001 
:t50,O00; 
l,500,tM»0| 
47,0<H>1 



I.nst 
Sales. 

9U . OOli 

10.37B 
2. SIB 
2.870 

12.00\ 
l.OS.V 

I (t. 00 11 



•t 



.1011 

K7B 

7.%B 

00 O 

OUA 

OOA 

10 . .^OB 

a 12B 

(K)ll 

:£:SH 

93 A 

.13A 

2 12 A 

12. 00 -A 

1.7.'.U 

lU.OOB 

I4.04>ll 

2.04111 



1 . 
1. 
3. 

7 . 
9. 

8. 



«. 
«. 



Piper, Johnson 4 Case 






Members New York and Boston Stock Exchanges, 
and All Principal Exchanges. 



Beg to announce that they are 
now located at 

328 West Superior Street 



Bell 'Phone 739. 



Zenith 'Phone 729. 



Wf 



.th«^r f..re.-n^t 



'I'l't-r 



•i.ii>iii 1 ■ 
miuli «1)J<' 
■' nnd Ii>« 
; .'<uiul.i>', 



MicliiKii". 
:i.i<l Siin- 



lufl iiniv 



lant;*' 



k« t 



tl' 



w 



■A ..; M 
.1 Smith 
.i.iKltt ami Sii' ■ 
X.l.iaskJi I 

- toiiiK'ii "1 ■>.'■•■ 
s- Tart il«.'uily 



V fair in east- 
in western por- 

iilav 
liak.'t.i >;:.•«'. 1 -- 



The Cotton Market. 

■ ik. .May :;: — Tht lutlun imu- 

y. iii-.l steady at unclianged prices 

.ulvaace of 6 in'lnt*.. t'Ut qukkly 

."ier llqiiUIation, July declining 

rid December to 10.79. Week- 

liiiures wci. -idered bullish. 

there wa.s > 

in central 

prospevlh- 



THE PRODUCE MARKET. 



Price* are untl.anped tcdaj 

foUovlng Quotaucns were 
of the produce rxchang* 
BUTTER. 



; V. 

tonlplit 



hat. It 
nml 



. 11.1 

aiul 

rHln 

crop 

Mippi"»»'il to 

\v>if api'relien»U»ns 

ish June bureau was 



Ml- 



t; 



1 1! 



ti'iiiK'"' 

— » 



Treasury 



llnlnnceM. 

r. ,i,... '•- «ti<,'. 



k of too nuu'li 
se> iii.:i> of the belt, but 
in the Southwest are 
have improved. There 
al»=n that a bull- 
being over dis- 
countfl hltiuidation ( anie largfly 
;.,,m Wall street sources. I-utures 
. .^,,1 barely steady; closing 
11.1:6; June. 11.0a: July. 



.\!ay, 



bidti: 
11.02; 
: Oc- 



iitti 

m 

Jiii . 



ri- 

VVi 



t..i 

i • I 



10 
11.6 



Marc 

point}! 

iiiiii- 



In Ihe 

g urie 



M eekl." 

ll.t vMkk ^luw^ lt>»' 

the re*|ii!" 
-p.!' 1? 



Hank Statement. 

■ - 'llic cU'jirliig i,..-'-. '■- 
l«iik» hold |: 



the 



lilt'/. 1' 



SO In tlie iiro- 
«iUi la it nteli. 



2.<0; 111. 



AiiKiis<t. 10.90: .September. .10.81 

r 10.76; November. 10.74; Decem- 
10. Si'; December. 10.82; 
]i ; Spot closed tiuiet 

lower middling uplands, 
dling gulf. 11. 90. No sa les. 

Midway Horse Market 

Milll.iMlii Tr.inffer. f't Paul J,^ *'',, 
■ relt fc ZImmeriuMii rri>i r, .M.irKii 

, mioeti arllvlur. A number >f ord«i> 

■Mimiet.t u. Wr»t«-m potiit* 

In i-ngrrt* The lil(!ti»»t 

ta the »"rei 4'«ri>et 

who bought thirty 



The 
tecretary 

Creamery rrint* 

Tuba 

lienovate 

Ladle* • • • • 

Packing atccli . 



fur.-'lshed fay tba 



80 
28 
24 
22 
17 9 )> 



E»G8. 
CBI^Esii. 



LATEST l^EWS— The y'"** . «" 
the twelfth level of the tilobe t ou- 
Holidated exposes the \eln 
tvldth of nine feet of clean 

ei»pp«'>' ««■♦■ *»* «""•' K'"'""' 
ns a rule, steady, 
OfferlngN are not 
mand Is e«iual 
Kuppiv. We 
ket with 



for a 
sulphide 
Market 
with Kood tone, 
heavy and de- 
if not better, than 
<iok for a steady niar- 
posslble sharp advances 
<m receipts of extraordinary news 
"ron^ the properties, otber^.lse ma- 
lerlal chaniEcs are Improbable. 



^lK■»t In- 

were lUled for 

wheiv^ rallr.'inl work iv 

i.nhr of tht day was 1111"! 

>'(>iu[.uiiy of New York 

head to U .i»e<l 



Freab ta» 

KuU cream twin* 

Wisconsin flat.* 

Blc«k and "Ueel cbeete 

Umburftr, fuU mam 

*^'°>**» HONrii: 

New fancy wUte clover. t*t lb 

40. pw "•••••■•jj^pji sVrl'p' 

lb 

10 lb c»n» 

Ntmj. 

I Fllberu. per lt> 

I Ccccanuta. per doi 

iBri/lls. per doz 

I Mixed iiuta per lb 

Peaoau. per lb.. 

tb-uiuf. p«»» yi^^in. 



9 

9 

m 



Vermont, ter 
Uapla tyrup. 



per lb 



Mliin 



: f ot a* 

!;iv "H* 



*■■ 
fl- 

.1'. 
Ill 
I.' 

(M 
J. 
PI ' 
v^ ^ 

^:. 

il 



WJ 




niar!-hes near Wyondiig 
liig itr.ii«*i» were «<llve buyer? 
.. iil.h tli»> re<iulre to meet 
.v> U'lldlhg ..iHrati(n» 
ite light. «ell hroke 

rhlh'.r.ii meet nlUi eii^y < 
,. niude to Uleiidlie, Mont.. 
II. Kails Idalii . 
.if.en. extra 
.ftett. chj.lce 
'.iftrni. common to gt'<.<l 

, mi uvv*« i^h'' *>■ ""• '^""" 
K.irtu marea and l«ir>v«, . hnVc. 
Km nil mnrea, coinnioii to g><ni 

IH-Uvtry 

Prtun iind •addler- 



ity. 

( n their hay 

IxK-al retail lamler- 

i.t big draft hor»e^, 

the deraand* c*u»mi l>> 

Mules wtre «julel. ile- 

fumil> ilrtters 



leiimixf. 
MoLdaii, 



Mule- a«"C<.|.lli)g Vt. »1 



uod pol.l»-> 

Sldpl»rtit!< 

N. 1). and 

JlTi .'ii4.'. 

i..'.ui . :.' 

140<p 175 
liO(n 140 

t('>r 110 
;;n)(j«2no 

\2Sv I'Mt 
145i<i24.'. 



IT 
17 
17 
IS 
10 

IT 

SO 

18 



1« 

IS 

18 
50 
50 
12H 
8 
18 



18 
18 
18 
*• 



m 8H 



Dom 

lO'ibL 
bus 



bom. 



bos. 



iratt.. 



I.iv <-riio«>! tirnla- 



,.ULil 



Randall, Gee & Mitchell 

Grain Merchants 

Duluth " Minneapolis Winnipeg 



V. 



iiH : I 

ling 
nets* 
4.86.30 
4 >'7.7.'i 



>>w York Money. 

w York. May -.•— Close: Prime 
anltle paper. 3»t^i4 per cent Mei- 
exchange ea^y. with actual busi- 
in bankers' bills at f^^^^■;^' 
for 60-.lav bills and at $4.8...0(&i 
for demand: commertial bills. 
86- bar silver, .'.2>«jc; Mtxi- 



Br.nan.i*. per Ib^ 
Datei. bard. Hlb. 
patt». augar walnuts. 
Kl«i. Smynia. 10-lb. 
Klga. Calif cnil* • • • 
Orange* . • • ■ • • 

Leniiiir CaUfomlg 
Lime*, per i*g- 
Grape fruit, per 

\Pt.les ■•■■ 

Cranberrtea. P«r I'bl... 
Florida plnt.ippict, per 

Siru«b.me6, -* <l"»^. 
GREK.N 

Wo beans, per b»««ei. 
pic iiliiiit, per "3 
CucuBiUni. hothouse. 

Kancj Golden Hud! celerj -- 

Kndltea, per bu 

Lettuce, btthouse. per 
Uadlshet. per dot...-- 
1.1 iig r^dlf'.*''- ttr do». 
Spring, per lo. 
Tomatoes, six 



4 

1 16 
1 10 
1 8S 

89 
3 00 
S 75 
1 00 

e 00 

T O'J 
IS 59 
3 SO 
a 83 
VEGETABLES. 
8 



d 



1 83 

3 50 



Have 



Lewis H. Weppitt and 
Lucien Meppitt 

Opened 



a Brokerage 
Firm Name 



Offioe 
of 



under the 



Lewis H. Merritt & Co. 

104 Provitlence Builtling, 
Duluth, Minn 

LISTED AND UNLISTED SECURITIES. 

DULUTH. BOSTON AND NEW YORK CURB 

STOCKS A SPECIALTY. 

PRIVATE WIRES TO ALL MARKETS. 

MEMBERS DULUTH STOCK EXCHANGE. 

avVOUR PATRONAGE IS SOLICITED. '^C 

TKLEPIIONKS— Duluth 1230; Zenith 767. 



With our own prlvnlc wire 
conncttlons witli N^'W \ork, 
Boeton and the copper coun- 
tries of Michigan, ^lontana, 
Xovatla, t'tah, Arl/ona and 
Mexico, wc arc the best ctjulp- 
Dttl to Rive you quick execu 
tions on all tlic leading 
stocks of any brokerage 
in the city. 



local 
house 



PAINE, WEBBER & CO., 

v\t:st svpkrior st. 

Torrey Building. 



316 





0. A. HOFFMANN, 



oa: 



HIHIKKIl. 
Manhattan llldg., 

Corb Mining Slocks a Specially. 

« orrespondence Solicited. 

DuUUl), 2L'ii2. 



Zenith. 4C7. 



Money to loan on 

Real Estate Security. 

Building Loans. 



W. M. Prindle & Co. 



L.ON8DAI.E 




doa. 



bu. 



(?i 4. 



can dollars. 44c; governnu nt bondt 
steady; railroad bonds irregular. 



tiaskcte 

VtXtUTABLES. 

Piimpkini. f^T dot 

Hubbard squa*:!. per dot 

CaLUige*. l* r '-'"^ 

Onions. Spanish, per ciauf... 

Uorse-.adlsh. per bbl... 
Ilea likbe oLloiis. new, per 
PtlBtoe* per lu 

Bro«n biar.s ••',_■■ 

Sweet tx>tatv«e. pu HU- 



SO 
S 

00 
33 



xe 

TS 

so 

17 

75 



@ 7 00 
8 79 



9 4S 



Beets, per bu 

N>w carrots, per bu 

Turnips, per bu 

Bagas, per bu 

Parsley. p<>r do» 

U7St«r piarii, per ac» 

k;:w cider. 

New apple elder, per keg 

Black raspberry juice 

orange. Cherry or pear^.^..^.^^.^.... 

Choice, per lb 

Rica com. sLelled 

DRESSED POLT-TBY. 

Springs, per lb 

Hens, per lb 

rurktys. per lb 

Ducks, per lb 

Gecsc. per Id 



00 
00 
00 
00 
40 
75 



3 50 
5 BO 
8 50 

4 

fi 



TRIANON DAIRY 

no 




Is now available for a few custom- 
ers. Phone 1672 Bell, or write 

TRIANON DAIRY 

401 Lonsdale Bldg. 



:a 



100 Iba. 



1 u 

1 90 

8 23 

a 00 

S 90 

1 75 
1 00 
S 00 

a 00 



■*"* 



pike, per lb 

Ptrch. per lb 

Pre^h salmcn. uet ID.. 

Pickerel, per lb 

White per lb 

Kresh l.Jte trout, per 
UerriJiS P« "* 



FISU. 



lb.. 



BAT. 



nmothy. i*r ton 

rpland. Ko. 1, P" ton. 

Siiorts. per ton 

firmu. per W" 



FKEU. 



IS 
17 
25 
18 
14 

9 

7 
11 

T 

S 

10 

3 

10 00 
» 50 

25 00 
25 00 



9 

9 

9 

9 

9 

9 



20 

la 
i> 

IS 

10 

8 

II 

10 

11 

4 




ROOM 



Both 



rH«?KMX BLOCK. 



J. H. ROBBERS, 

Copper Stocks and Bonds 

Curh Stoekii a Specialty. 
l.lMted Securities. 



Oats, per bu... 

Bc«f . per lb 

MutU'h. pel lb- 
Lard, per lb. . 
Piik l.iliis, per 
Veal, per ob... 
lAXubs, per lb.. 



MEATS. 



lb. 



8 

13 
12 

n%@ 

7 9 
15 9 



@ 11 



13 
10 

16 



pipe:Rs 

JOHNSON 
est CASE 

BROKERS 

Members: 

Boston Stock Exchange. 
New York Stock Exchange. 
New York Produce Exchange. 
Chicago Stock Exchange. 
Chicago Board ol Trade. 
Mpls. Chamber o! Commerce. 
Dninth Board ol Trade. 
Winnipeg Grain Exchange. 



400.411 Chaniher of Tommerce 
Xev» Vork l.lfe Arcade, 
MInneapoIlN. 



and 



102 Pioneer rre».« BIdK 

GralM Exchange. Winnipeg 



St Paul. 



DULUTH: 
328 West Superior St 

R. G. HDbbali. Manager. 

phone T3». Zenith 'phone 



Bell 







THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD; SATURDAY. MAY 22. 1909. 




wmj 







i: 



HELP WANTED— FEMALE. 
iCantinued.) 



• r. 



BUSINESS CHANCES. 

s of the (Itoss Mining comimny 

a Ciiviinn raiiKC property; ore 

I up; barKalji If t^ikcn at once. 

.. .! iirit*. M. F. Kalmbach. 630 

,\i Hi; liUiiiiK. iMiluth. Mlnii. 



m » l! i n p r ' 



■ st HUi'';':s.'< - 

ta In IHJ- 

w-A'T with full 

lo F jT«». iMiliith 



M LANDS. 



CHANi'KH — IlEADKRS- 
write for free booklet of 

,iii,' i'nr,l Prlntlntr IToss. 



RENT— STORES, OFFICES. ETC. 

von KENT— OFFICKS. * 

IN KLilKOWS BUILDING, 
r. It HIT OFFK'E.S, 

m:vvi.v decoratkd. 

! FiK.sr i-I. \S.S K(-i;VATOR 

SEHVK'I':. 

' FIKST-lU.A.SS .tAMTi»R 

SEIiVlt'E. 

'. liF.ST REASONWRLK 



»1M 



M 



N, 1> 



Bl> 



fll VN' 



;lU- 

lon; 

. ulh 

auiliig:. 

I. ni.il SHOP 
ti on the main 
• opportunity. 
h will retiuira 

!!:is up f, li 



H.VN'CE 

fjolderi 

ami In good 

(abti. must 

\\ . H., care 



W, 



FOR 



HOUSES. 




;!N';>S CHAN 






ro tr.o 

ul I tiers, 

;iff out- 

■ Mi,->, |iiM .--."fS ; niir- 

geueraior. inside 

meet ion; lifelong 

John M. Crook. 

(in 111. 

!TH IN'VEST- 

II Mart 

.liill> . 



.S.vl-E. A 
>»tore; fine 

. .Mr ■-« <■•'•' : 
.ulh I-.' 



M. P KINDLE & CO. 

■::■-. ■^**?*:*^*^**:**^'*-*^ 

[•(.lit iu..N 1 ^-GOOD STOHEIIOO.M. CEN- 
trally located; possession about .lunt- 
1. Apply Kental department. John A. 
StephcnBon, Wolvln huildlnK. 



FOR RENT 
Htaud. J. 
Minn. 



.STORE ROOM; GOOD 
Kellehtr. Deer Klver. 



FOR 
First 



,.,,...,, sTORB:S, 321 



WEST 



FOR RENT— A STORE; GRAND Op- 
portunity for barber shop and cigar 
.•»tor<' or candy and lee cream stand, 
or both combined; very cheap rent; 
none in th** neighborhood. The Smith 
Really company. 528 Manhatt an Bld g. 

Folt RJ<:iNT^LARGE~FRONT OFFICE 
in Christie building. Apply Christie 
Lithograph company. 



FOR SALE — NBW EIGHT-ROOM 
brick and slu«.'o house tor sale by 
owner. Threifroc*n basement, hot 
water heat, ga.s. electricity, laundry; 
water, gas and.^ewor connections, 
cement walks.Mmacadamlzed street. 
Built on honor Tty day labor. Best 
arranged and built house and located 
In swellest part of Lakeside; $5,300; 
any terms. Call owner, Zenith 
phone BOS». 

FOR SALIT'oR RENT— a PARTLY 
finished six-room cottage on Park 
Point. Inquire 2iz-i Minnesota, ave- 
nue. ^ 

FOR SALE — GOOD TWO-STORY 
frame dwelling. West end, city wat- 
er, good condition. $1,600. Terms to 
suit customer. Cooley & Underbill, 
Excliange building. 



FOR SALE— $2.100— A SEVEN ROOM 
house Willi water, gas and sewer, 
some hardwood floors; well built and 
conveniently arranged, and in good 
condition. To close out quickly have 
made ibis close figure, and at such a 
price tills is undoubtedly the biggest 
snap on tlie market. H. 3. Merry, 
7:ia East Sixth street. 



FOR SALE— MAY 10. 1909. COMFORT- 
able Bix-room dwelling In excellent 
condition; good neigh. borliood; nice 
yard; large barn; city water in 
street; easy term.s. Cooley & Uuder- 
hlll. 209 Exchange building. 



FOR SALE— FIVE-ROOM COTTAGE, 
on corner lot, 33 by 145 feet. $1,200; 
imrt on monthly payments. Call 231 
Ea.st Eighth street. 




FOR RENT — TWO NICELY 
ni.shed rooms, with alcove. 
Second avenue west. 



FUR- 
at 415 



FOR RENT — FURNISHED ROOMS, 
all conveniences; sultabla for two. 
503 East Third street. 

AT 424 
modern 



FOR RENT— FOUR ROOMS 
East Seventh street. All 
conveniences. 



FOR RENT— TWO ROOMS NICELY 
furnished; sitting room and bed- 
room 111 East Fifth street. 



FOR RENT- ROOM 25 BY 80 SUIT- 

able for light inatiufacturlng, with 
or witliout power. Apply Christie 
Lithograph company. 



. Fi'li SALE— 

• 111 li-teeii -room 

.latidii in tlie 

lillfii with Kood pay- 

. .S!iU--iuii & Co.. 3ii3 



Burr 



SALE. A 
111 on; new- 
■ >oklng for 

til is Du- 
.nce bulld- 



IV 



'W 





tllOW 


—LOAN OF 




ii's at 


« per cent. 

ritv. no 

• 1 . 1 1 . f. 


1 ■. 


- 1 


\V\XT O-Nl". 

Join 


■< 


lit': 


s^ of 

1 .ii Box 




'iARBER SH«)P 




M,. 


^1 tlistrlct of 






V term.'* to 






■IlldH, i>t;.fr 






■•('. >:av' 111 



HORSES. VEHICLES. ETC. 

I<'OR SALE. 

horses: horses: horses; 

We are leaders in our line and cannot 
be undiMsoId. Our motto. "(Juick 
sales' and small prottt." We liave from 
400 to 600 liead of hor.'ies on hand, 
consisting of draft horses, farm 
mares, delivery horses and muUs. 
We can sell you one horse or a car- 
load. Auction every Wednesday at 
l::;o p. m. Private naie.s dally. Part 
time Kiven if desired. Take interur- 
ban cars from eltlier city. Barrett & 
/linnierman. Midway Horse Market, 
St. Paul. 



FuR SALE— SIX-ROOM HOUSE AND 
lot. Will sell cheap if taken at once. 
Easv lerni.>>. with security for bal- 
ance. 320 South Sixteenth avenue 
east. 



FOR SALE— NEW SIX- ROOM HOUSE, 
811 Twenty-fourtli avenue west, on 
easy terms. Inquire 3926 West Flftli 
street. 



lOR .SALE— SEVEN-ROO.M. MODERN 
hou.se and lot, 612 Twentieth avenue 
*ast: call evenings; no agents apply. 



FOR SALE— CORNER ON FIFTY- 
elghth avenue west; nine-room 
liouse; stone foundation, water, 
sewer, gas. et-r.; price $2.>*00; make 
term.-*. D. W* Scott, IS Mesaba 
block. ' 



FOR SALE— HOUSE AND LOT, TAKE 
a look at it. 6i ; Tweiily-tliird ave- 
nue west. 



NtjTlCE— THE PURE BRED .MORGAN 

stallion "Cato," will stand at Jolin 
Fords livery barn on East Flr«t 
street each Monday morning during 
l>alance of breeding .leason. Service 
for $20. Jean Du Lutli company. _ 

FOR sTv LE— «JN E^GOOD DRIVER OR 
delivery horse. 42.') 

Hdt'i't . 



DRIVER 

East Fourth 



F( ) R S A LE - FI V E Ho USES, 

lnjise waKon. bargain. 2113 
Fir.st .'-•I reel. 



ONE- 
West 



(-!»lt .SALE 



FOR .^ALE — TWO TEAMS. WEIGHT 
about H.MOO noiinds each; good work- 
ers 432 Norlli Slxty-flrst avenue 
west. 3122-A Zenltii phone, after 6 
p. m. 



FOR SALE — DRAFT. DELIVERY, 
farm mares and drivers always on 
liand at our new stables, 308 East 
Fii.si sln>t. Also wagons of all 
kiml,'-;. 1.. Hainniel company. 



ii \ 
• tin, 



-^- FOtt SALE — 



N e vv ark. 



PICTURE FRAMING. 

^<irn"iri^Trr'ErsL'i". .st. 



in Lilt) o< 

.>f St Lo' 



r 



\ ' > !■; 1 N 

M.-!tv- 



ilale 
..| re- 

i. yi-ster of 
.vilnnesota, 
y. R»')>i. at 

to Unites P. 

> -;■ *.; 



ORDEli FOR HEARING ON CLAIM.S— 
Smte of Minnesota, County of .St. Louis 
■ ■ <f Court 

!er of 111.- .slati' of H. C. 

(;,.,...,., 1 lecflleril, 

I.tn'TKllS Te.xiani'iil uy this day 
having been granted lo ilary E. Green. 
IT IS ORDERED. That the time 
within which all creditors of the 
above named decedent may present 
claiin.s against his estate In this Court 
he. and the same heieby Is, limited to 
three months from and after the date 
hereof; and that Monday, the 23rd day 
of August. \V>')9. al ten o'clock A. M.. 
In tlie Pnthate Court Ro<ims, at the 
Court Houye at Duluth in said County, 
be and the same hereby Is. fixed and 
appointed as the tttne and place for 
hearing upon the examination, adjust- 
ment and allowance of sucli claims as 
.iliail he pri'sentod within the lime 
aforesaid. 

Let notice l>e given by the publlci- 
tion of this order In The Dulutli Even- 
ing n.Tald as provided bv law. 

Dat. 1 at IHiluth. .Minn.. May 22nd. 
190y J. B. MIDDLECOFF. 

Ju<lge of Probate. 
• Seal, Probate Court, St, Louis County. 

Minn. > 
Duluth i:\.Milng Herald. May 22. 29 

and .1 ' 1909. 



FOR SALE— HEK'ES A SNAP. NEW 
10-rooin liouse, near Thirty-ninth 
avenue west; a t>argain. For inforina- 
tior, call at 417 B urrows buildi n g. 

FOR SALE— 6-ROO.M HOUSE. ONEOTA. 
on West Fifth street, $1,100; easy 
terms. Scolt-Kreidler company. 315 
Central avenue. Both 'phones. 



FOR RENT— ROOMS SINGLE 
Buite, with board. The 
318 West Second street. 



OR EN 
Melrose, 



FOR RENT — THREE-ROOM BASB- 
ment; electric light, water, iiard- 
wood doors. 720 East Third street. 



FOR RENT— SUITE OF TWO UNFUR- 
nished rooms, suitable for two. Old 
•phone 1297 -R. 410 West Fourth 
street. 



FOR RENT— THREE ROOMS. FUR- 
nlshed for liglit housekeeping; mod-- 
ern convenienijes, no cliildren. 626 
West Third street. 

FC)R RENT— VERY DB-SIRABLE NEW- 
ly furnished rooms. 201 West Tliird 
street. 



-DULUTH'S-^I 
PROGRESSIVE 

FIRMS 7 — 

Something is AKvajp^AVanted. 
Just what it is, whojs^kes it, sells it, or 
does it, and wher/^it may be obtained. 



ATTORNEYS. 



r 



FURNITURE AND STOVES. 



WMlIiam Marx. Attorney 
Burrows bldg Zenith 



it Law, 400 
'phone 384-A. 



L. U. C. 
selor. 



Titus, LL.B. 
510 Torrey 



. attorney and ooun- 
bldg Zen. 1349-D. 



ASSAYS AND CHEMICAL 
ANALYSES. 

Assays and chemical analyses. C. A. 
Graves, 502 Burrows Bldg.. Zenith 
1736-X. Duluth Testing Laboratory. 



BLACKSMITHS AND WAGON 
MAKERS. 

Horseshoeing and repairing— Davaney 
& Jordan. 20-22 First avenue west. 



All Icinds at 

First Ave. west. 



I 



enlth 



Shapiro. I'. 
•phone 1032. 



HAT MFR. AND CLEANER. 

George G. Moosehrugger. successor to G. 
Volland. 24 First avenue E. 'Phones 



IMPROVED SHOE REPAIRING. 

<X)PHErrSHOE'wORKS— Shops. 10 1st 

avenue wfrft and 12 4th avenue west. 



KODAKS AND CAMERAS. 

EonpsTVlevPco.. Inc.. 30 4th Ave. W. 
Develops and finishes for amateurs. 



FOR RENT— LARGE. 

nlshed room, cheap 
Main entrance ilrst 
Flats, fiat F. 



NICELY 
to right 
floor. St. 



FUR- 
party. 
Marco 



FOR RENT— TWO ROOMS EN SUITE, 
newly furnished. 201 West Third 
street. 



FOR RENT— FURNISHED ROOM, 
West Second street. Zenith 1274- 



126 



FOR SALE— HOUSE. JUST COMPl.ET- 
ed, 125 North Sixty-third avenue 
west. .se\tn rooms, water and light, 
hardwood floors; price, $1,900. Lucien 
A. Banies Co., West Duluth. 



FOR fcALE — COTTAGE, ON EASY 
terms; good condition. 91* East Sev- 
enth street. 



FO Ii SAL i:— T V\' I ) - ST t » R V F R A M E 

house, suitable tor two lamilies, ciast 
end, $1,600. City water, sewer. 
Terms to suit. Cooley & Underliili. 
Exehaiige building. 



MONEY TO LOAN. 



SPECIAL SPRING R.\'i'ES 

on your salary or chattels. 

You gel — 

$10 Return 40c weekly, 

s::o Return .SOc weekly, 

$30 Return $1.20 weekly. 

This pays both inleresl 

Uthei amounts same 

All tran.saciions strictly private. 

DULUTH FINANCE CO.. 

301 Pall'adlo Bunding. 



FOR RfciNT— TWO PLEASANT FUR- 
nlshed rooms, modern, very reason- 
able. 130 West Third street. 



FOR RENT— ROOM NO. 3 OVER THE 

Big Duluth, for office or business 
purposes. Inquire at the Big D uluth. 



FOR RENT— FURNISHED ROOM AND 
board. 1222 East Fourth stre et. 



BOATS AND LAUNCHES. 

All kinds built to order and for sale: 
al-^io gas engines. H. S. Patters. .n. 
Railroad .street and Sixth Ave. west. 



CARRIAGE & AUTO PAINTING. 



Also sign 
East Fir.st 



painting 
street. 



M. H. Smith. 26 
BeU 'phone. 26S8. 



CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

Duluth Engineering Co., W. B Patton. 
Mgr., 613 Pallddio bldg Speclflcatlons 
prepared and construction .superin- 
tended for waterworks, sewerage, etc. 



LAND FOR SALE. 

We always have bargains in wild and 
improved land. List with us. E. H. 
Hobe Land & L'ber Co.. 10 5th av. W. 



LAUNDRY. 

Model Laundry. 126 E. 1st St. "We do 
the work." Old, 2749-L. New. 1302 



MUSICAL MERCHANDISE. 



Boston Music Co. 
ty. 121 W. Ist. 



Mail orders 
Old 27!>7-M. 



a ai>eclal- 
New 673 



DENTIST. 

Dr. W'. H. Olson. 222 New Jersey bldg. 
All work guaranteed. Both phones. 



FOR RENT— A LARGE FURNISHED 

front room with alcove, suitable lor 
two gentlemen. 503 West Third 
street. 



FOR RENT— THREE FURNISHED 

rooms, one single room, modern, cen- 
tral, 420 Firsi avenue west^ 

FOR RENT— ONE NICELY FUR- 
nlshed room, electric lights and use 
of plione, $1.50 per week. 709 West 
Tliird street. 



$1.60 monthly. 
$3.20 monthly. 
$4.80 monthly, 
and principal, 
proportion. 



ipal 
the 

■ < . , 1 . 



.ely, and one for 
ira due on the l.nt 



1. 



all oi 

. r:(1.' 



!• 



i TED. 



.4rt!d notes 

.It" t,-ii per 

iiinu- 

auil 

: h.' smuie 
if. 11 



a ;:; a I 
a lid 



.line liuo 

: ihriiarj , 

pay the in- 

upon all of 

of August, 

pay ilie in- 

11 all of isaid 

• t' February. 

itg 

g 



. 1 M ! 1 « 1 s '.t V 1 



leclares 

-.-I I by 



the 
j^aid 



ORDER IMi: HEARING ON CLAIM.s*. 
.State of .Minnesota. County of i?t. 
l.iMii.H - 

In Probate Court. 
In tl.i* -Matter of the Estate of David 
Wlieeliliaii. I)e(Odent. 

LETTERS testamentary thh-^ day 
having been granted to .lohn Irving. 
John D, VVlieellhan and Wellington D. 
Carglll. 

IT l.-i oRI»ERi:i». That the time 
vvltliln which all creditors of tlie above 
named decedent may present claims 
tiNt his estate In this Court, be. 
the same hereby is, limited to six 
from and after the date hereof: 
It .Monday, the 23rd dav of 
isi, U»09, at ten o'clock A. M.. in 
Probate (!'ourt Rooms, at the Court 
at Duluth in said County, be. 
same hereby i.s fixed and ap- 
1..,,.. .,i as the time and place for hear- 
ing upon the examination, adjustment 
and alIowanc*> of such <lalms as shall 
be presented within the time afore- 
sa hi. 

Let notlc^ liereof be given bv the 
publication of iliis order In The Duluth 
Evening Herald, as provided bv law. 

a( Duluth. Minn.. May 22nd. 



DO YOU NEED MONEY? 
Money loaned in Duiulli or Superior to 
salaried people without security, al- 
so on pianos, furniture, horses, wag- 
ons, etc. Busine.-S3 absolutely confid- 
ential. Call and gel our rates and 
terms. Monthly or weekly payments 
us desired. No good applicant re- 
fused. WESTEl'vN LOAN CO., 

521 Manhattan Building. 
New phone 936. yid phone 1036. 

mone7"^to Loan on furniture, 

horses, wagons, or any personal se- 
curity al the lowest rates of any 
place in the city. Our large clientage 
and twonty-tive years' experience 
sliould be suiticlent proof thai we do 
business right. Call and see us be- 
f.>re closing deal elsewhere. Duluth 
Mortgage L.oan Co.. 430 Manliattan 
Bldg. Wm. Horkun. Mgr. Zen. 1598-D 



MO.NEY TO LOAN ON PIANOS. FUR- 

nliure, horses, wagons and fixtures 
ai low rales and on small payments. 
A liberal discount If paid before due. 
business confidential. 

YOU CAN GET IT TODAY. 

Security Mortgage Loan Company, 

401 FIRST NATlii.N-VL B-\NK BLDOr., 

Zenith ^hone 612. 



FOR RENT— THREE UNFURNISHED 
rooms for light housekeeping, all 
conveniences, except heal. 118 rnird 

avenue west. 

ROOM.S. $6 AND 
J. Anderson, 711 



DRAYING. 

O. L JOHNSON 
General draylng 1324 W. 2nd St Zen. 
1S24 stand 20th Ave. west & Sup. St. 



DECORATING AND WALL 
PAPERING. 



PLUMBING AND HEATING. 



Geo. McGurrin 
Old. 816. 



Co., 329 E. 
JOBBING. 



Superior St. 
New. 98». 



PAINTING & PAPER HANGING. 



We do all kinds. Estimates 
given. Call Zenith 'phone 



cheerfully 
2150-Y. 



PAINTS, OILS AND GLASS. 



Let us do vour work. 
Quist. 231 E. Sup 



Arthur & 
St. Zen. 



Strom - 

2287-Y. 



EMPLOYMENT OFFICE. 



FOR RENT— TWO 

$7 per month. E. 
West Third slreeL 



Nai'l Em p. ;: 
1S82. "We 



o.. . 
get 



i -S. ut'a.Ave. W. Esfh 
the m«:i " 'Phones 376. 



FOR ItENT — FURNISHED RoOM FOR 
one or two gentlemen. 228 First 
avenue west. 



FOR RENT— FURNISHED FRONT 
room, suitable for one or two. gas, 
bath and 'phone service. $8 per 
month, 817 Ea st Fourth street. 

FOR RENT— TWO NICELY FL R- 
nished rooms for light iiousekeepuig, 
one nicely furnished front room. 119 
Mesaha avenue, Bellview Terrace, 
apartment 19. Ring lower bell. 



FOR RENT— FURNISHED 
106 First avenue east. 



ROOMS. 



FOR RENT— THREE PLEASANT UN- 
furnished rooms for light housekeep- 
ing, water and light; $12 per month. 
S<)i East Third street. ^ 



FOUR 
east. 



ROOMS. 623 



FOR RENT — 

Fourll' avenue 

FOR RENT— TWO ROOMS, UNFUR- 
nished; water, sewer and gaa. 515 
Ninth avenue east. ^ 



FLORIST. 

W. W. Seekins, 302 E. Sup. St. Cut 
flowers and floral emblems, ill kinds. 



FAMILY THEATER. 

SAVOY— CONTINUOUS VAUDEVILLE, 
singing, talking and dancing acts. 
Admission. IJc. 



FURS STORED AND REPAIRED. 

Fur garments made t> jrder a special- 
ty. Duluth Fur Co. 327 W^ Plrat St. 



FURNACE AND SHEET METAL. 

Work linne on short notice Burrell & 
Harmon, 318 E. Superior St. 'Phones 



FURNITURE RECOVERED. 

L^T^FNirseTPdo'^^r'TTpirOL.ST E R I N G. 
334 E. Superior St. Zenith 'phone 949. 



MONEY LOANED ON FURNITURE, 
pianos, live stack and other personal 
property without delay and at the 
lowest possible rates. When you 
need money. Call on the largest, 
longest established and most reliable 
loan comi>any doing business al the 
Head of the La.kes. Minnesota Loan 
company. 205 Palludlo building. 
Zenith 883. 



MONET TO LOAN ON DIAMONDS, 
watches, furs, rifles, etc., and all 
goods of value. |1 lo $1,500. Keystone 
Loan & Mercantile Co.. 16 W. Sup. St. 



Dated 
1909. 



lifo 



ai ttiu date 
iif live h un- 
do liars and 



•ntv-rtvt 



sani 



iollar.H 
ruorl- 

-■• lias 
ry of 

ige or 

^ said 
III or t- 



Vl :^\' 



Tiit'Fu-:r< ii:k 



»•-) 



..■•lij 1 -I '.lll'l: ;.. si 



FOR RENT 

Offices Ground 
Floor, Rear 

NORTHERN NAT'L BANK 

Possession Immediately. 
Inquire at Bank 



.NOTICE IS 
y virtue of the 

In -said -Mort- 

tl .■ .statute in 

'■; 1 ■■! ti;.- ?.aid 

a sale 

1 con - 



'.ill.'. London 

.'C'lrdlng to the 

I of record in the 

' ' ' . of St. 

real 

■ind 

; ,1- 

........ .■..,.... ...tie 

.Slseriff of said .St. 

ftMtir ,!,-.. ir iif llie 

ith. in 

sixth 

lo o'clock in the 

at :»uh!ic vendue. 

-h. to pay 

f Five Hii Sixty-four 

Dollars, an.l inierest. and 

any. on sai-l premises, and 

Dollars, .A tti>!-ne.\'s fees. 

.1 In and by -sai.) .Mortgage 

; ■ i.sure, and the dts- 

1 by law. subject to 

; r-HU'tupf ion .11 »uv lime within one year 

from the <lay of sale, a.-* provided by 

law. 

Dated May 20. A. D. 1909. 

N- F HUGO. 
.Mutgagee. 
XT :-..[!:. .V HUNT. 

for Mortgagee, 
-.rrey bldg, Duluth. .Minn. 
Duluth Evening Herald. May 22-29 and 
June 5-12-19-2«. 



.- the 

I,,.,...-:. ;..,^.i.l.r. -it the 

Court House, in tl 
«al.l Countv and > ■ 

1 IV -^f J'.i'.y. ln"ii. at 

r' .r-r\o)n of that .law 

le highest bidder 



It. 



I .~^t ,1 1 I'r.diato 
Minn I 

Dulntl: KV'Miing 
2i». June .'i. 



J. B. MIDDLECOFF. 
Judge of Probate. 
Court. St. Louis Co.. 

Herald. .May 22 and 



( ►RDEH rit EXAMINE FINAL AC- 
COUNT— 
State < f Minnesota, County of St. Louis 

— sa. 

In Probate Court. 
In th(» matter of the Kstat« of Mar- 

araret Oriffln. Decedent. 

THE PETITION OF William Griffin 
as representative of the above named 
decedent, together with his final ac- 
count of the administration of said 
estate, having been filed In this court, 
representing among other things, thot 
he has fully admini.«<tered said estate, 
ami praving that said final account of 
v.ibl administration be examined, adjust- 
ed and allowed by the Court, and that 
the Court make and enter its final de- 
tree of distribution of the residue of 
the estate of said decedent to the per- 
son* entitled thereto, and for the dis- 
charge of tiio representative and the 
ai retlcB on lils bond. 

IT 1.*^ ORDERED. That said petition 
he heard, and said final account ex- 
amined, adjusted and allowed by 
Court, at the Probate Court 
the Court House, in the City 
in said County, on Monday 
day of June. 1909. at ten o'c 
and all persons interested 
Ing and In said matter 
cited and required at said time and 
place to show cause. If any ther-.i be, 
whv said petition should not be grant- 
ed ■ 

ORl»ERED FURTHER. That this or- 
der be served by publication In The 
Duluth Evening Herald, according to 

law. 

Dated at Duluth. Minn.. May 2 1st, 

1909. 

By the Court. 

J. B. MIDDLECOF}". 
Judge of Probata Court. 
(Seal Probate Court, St. Louis Co., 

Minn. J 
Duluth Evening Herald. May 22 and 29. 
June 5. 



Money supplied to salaried people and 
others upon their own names, with- 
out security. Easy payments. Offices 
In 66 cities. Tolman's. 509 Palladio. 



FOR RENT— FURNISHED ROOM, 702 
West .Second street. 



FOR RENT — NICELY FURNISHED 
front room, suitable for two, board 
if desired. Old 'phone 2496-M. 



FOR RENT 
room. 201 



—MODERN 
East Third 



FURNISHED 
street. 



FOR RENT— THREE FURNISHED 
rooms for housekeeping; $12 per 
month. 2S05 West Railroad street. 

310 EAST 



FOR RENT— FOUR ROOMS. 

Nin th SlreeL 

^^ RENT — TWO FU RN IS H E D 
rooms for light liousekeeplng; no 
children. Inquire 17 Seventh ave- 
nue west, basement flat. 



FOR RENT— TWO Rt30MS tLR- 
nlshed for light housekei^ping to 
party without children. 431 East Su- 
perior street. 



FURNITURE AND PIANOS. 

Polished and repaired. Thomp.son 
Hill. 336 E. Sup. St. Old 'phone 282S 



& 



The Little Paint Man says: 

.Sh'-rwin-Williams is the best. 

NORTHWESTERN PAINT CO 

323 Wesi First street. 



PRINTERS AND BOOKBINDERS. 



Merrltt dt He<jloi 
cial printing. 



. Railway and 
112 W. 1st St. 



commer- 
'Phones. 



PLASTERING AND BRICKWORK 

Esfimates furnhshed. W. J. Darby, Now 
'phone, 12l'4-.V; old 'plione. 424-M. 



PROFESSIONAL. 

DR. MITCHELL, ELECTRtT- MAGNET- 
IC apecialiat, has positive cure for 
kidney, liver, heart, all stomach 
troubles, nervousness. paralysis, 
deafness, blindness and piles. 326 
West First street, upstairs. 



ROOFING AND SHEET METAL. 

Work executed promptly. Burroll & 
Harmon, 303 E. Superior St. 'Phones. 



SIGN PAINTERS. 

DULUTH ADVl ^SIGN'^ca. 
kinds of signs. 207 West 



I>aint 
First 



all 
St. 



TURKISH BATH PARLORS. 

1 cure colds and all rheumatie ailments 
S. Kasmlr. under Hotel McKay. 



VETERINARY SURGEON. 

O. FORSYTH. Lyceum .Sale & Board- 
ing stable. 14-16 West First street. 
Zenith. 691. 



UPHOLSTERING. 

When Cameron does your upholstering 
It's right. Both 'phones, 123 Ist Av. \V. 



ED OTT. 112 1st Ave. W. Both 'phones. 



TENTS AND AWNINGS. 

POIRIER & CO.. 108 E Superior St. 



PIANO TUNING. 

C7 A. "G"REGrmvr^E'NTTH''1^0NB 606. 



Furniture and salaried loans by Union 
Loan compan y. 302 Palladio building. 

MOrTEY TO ^LOAN— ANY AMOUNT 

from $500 to $5,000 on Improved real 
estate. No delay. J. B. Greenfield. 
306 Burrows building. 



MONEY TO LOAN— LOANS MADE ON 
farms and timber claims. Guaranty 
Farm Land company, 416 Lyceum. 



MONEY TO LOA>{— LOANS M.VDE ON 
collateral security; reasonable rates; 
commercial paper bought. 607 Pal- 
ladio building. 



Money to loan — Any amount, low rates. 
Cooley & Underhlll, 209 Exchange. 



PHOTOGRAPHER. 



FOR 
go 



LATEST AND 
to Chrlslensen's, 



BEST PHOTOS. 
25 W. Sup. street. 



FOR RENT— FIVE-ROOM FLAT; MOD- 
ern, exoept heat. Inquire upstairs, 
417, Twenty-sevent h avenue wesL 

FURNISHED 
; rent reason- 
avenue west. 



FOR RENT— NICELY 
rooms, all conveniences 
able. Call 215 Second 



FXJR RE.NT— LARGE. NICELY FUR- 
nlshetT room, modern; private fam- 
ily, lake view. 412 West Fourth 
street. Old 'phone 1297-L. 

FOR RENT —FIVE ROOMS T^'R- 
nlshed complete for housekeeping. 
Including water. $30 per montli. Old 
'phone 1067 -L. 



FOR RENT— FURNISHED ROOMS, 
per week and up. The Dakota. 
West Second street. 

FOR RENT— TWO 
nlshed rooms for 
all conveniences, 
street. 



12 
119 



OR THREE FUR- 

light housekeeping, 

706 West Second 



LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT. 



the 
Rooms in 
of Duluth 
... the 14th 
"clock A. M.. 
In said near- 
are hereb.v 



TREES. 
Henry 



SHRUBS, 
Cleveland 



VINES- 
211 E. 



-PLANTING. 
Superior St. 



FOR RENT— FURNISHED ROOM. $2 
per week. Call 640 Garfield avenue, 
flat 4. 



WANTED TO RENT. 

WANTED TO RENT— BOARD AND 
rooms for students, summer term, 
stale normal school; give prices and 
accommodations. Address President 
State Normal School. Duluth, Minn. 



WANTED TO RKN'T— ONE FURNISH- 
ed room and boaid for two children. 
Call Zenith 'phone 1705-A. 



WANTED TO RENT— AN INCUBATOR 
for three weeks; small one preferred, 
state price. Address W 614, Herald. 

WANTED TORRENT— AFTER JUNeT 
four or five-room flat; state price. 
F l>^S. Herald. 



STOVE REPAIRS. 

WE CARRY IN STOCK REPAIRS 
for 10,000 different stoves and ranges. 
C. F. Wlggerts « Son, 410 Eaat Su- 
perior street. Both telephones. 



-^r 



FOR RENT— ONE LARGE. NICELY 
furnished front room, with or with- 
out board. S19 Eaat Superior street, 
upstairs. 

FOR RENT — ONE NICELY FUR- 
nlahed front room, also five rooms 
with board, all modern conveniences. 
320 We st Third street. 

FOR RENT— FURNISHED THREE- 
rooms for light housekeeping, cltjf 
water electric light, use of bath. $18 
per month. 609 West Third street. 

FOR RENT— DESIRABLE FURNISHED 
front room; modern conveniences, $8 
per month. 312 West Fourth street. 



GARDENING, 



SODDING, 
ING. 



SEED- 



BLACK DIRT AND SANDY LO.A.M 

delivered in large or small quantities. 
Grading and sodding and gardening. 
James Wllger. Call evenings, old 
'phong S7-M. 



PRIVATE HOSPITAL. 

PROSPECTIVE MOTHERS WILL FIND 
pleasant home during confinement at 
Astiland Maternity Home; best of doc- 
tors; confidential; may board or adopt 
infants. Mrs. K. Hess, 923 Second 
avenue cast. Ashland, W^is. 

MRs! Hanson] graduate mid- 

wife; female complaints. 413 .Seventh 
avenue east. Old 'phone 1594; Zenith 
1225. y 

Mrs. H. Ols.m, graduate midwife; pri- 
vate hospital. 329 North Fifty-eighth 
avenue west. Zenith 3173. 

HOSPITAL FOR LADIES DURING 
confinement. Mrs. W. K- Cody. 508 
East Lake street, Minneapolis. 



MEDICAL. 

LAI>IB.S — $1,006 reward! I positively 
guarantee 'ray great successful 
"Monthly" remedy. Safely relieves 
son<e of the longest, most obstinate, 
abnormal cases In three to five days. 
No harm, pain or interference with 
work. Mail, $1.50. Double strength, 
S2. Dr. L. M Southlngton R Co., 
Kansas City. Mo. 



LADIES — Dr. LA FRANCO'S COM- 
pound, safe; speedy regulat'^r; 25c. 
Druggist or mall. B.>okTei free. Dr. 
La Franco. Phlhidelphla. Pa 



FOR RENT— LARGE FRONT ROOM. 
216 West Third street. 



FOR RENT— FURNISHED AND UN- 
furnished rooms; also room and board 
for lady, at 211 Eighteenth avenue 
west. 



FOR RENT — THREE ROOMS FOR 
rent at Forty-second avenue east and 
Superior street, on car line. Stryker. 
Manley & Buck. 



FOR RE.VT— TWO UNFURNISHED 
rooms. steam-heated. Minnesota 

building. Inquire J. B. Erd. 29 East 
Superior street 



(No. 9374.; 
TREASURY DEPARTMENT. OFFICE 
OF COMPTROLLER OF THE CUR- 
RENCY. 

Washington. D. C. April 3, 1909. 
WHEREAS, By satisfactory evidence 
presented to .tne undersigned. It has 
been made to.* appear that the "Ameri- 
can Exchange National Bank of Du- 
luth," In the City of Duluth. In the 
County of St. Louis aad State of Min- 
nesota, has compiied with all the pro- 
visions of the Statutes of the United 
States required to be complied with 
before an association shall be author- 
ized to commence the business of 
Banking; 

NOW, THEREFORE, I, Lawrence O. 
Murray, Comptroller of the Currency, 
do hereby certify that the "American 
Exchange National Bank of Duluth," 
In the City of Duluth. In the County of 
St. Louis and State of Minnesota. U 
authorized to commence the business 
of Banking, as provided in Section 
Fifty-one hundred and sixty-nine of 
the Revised Statutes of the United 
States. 

Conversion of The American Ex- 
change Bank of Duluth. 

IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF witness 
my hand and Seal of office this Third 
day of AprlL 1909. 

LAURENCE O. MURRAY. 
Comptroller of the Currency. 
(Seal of the Comptroller of the Cur- 
rency. Currency Bureau. Treasury 
DeparlmeaUj 



MR.S. ANNA RONGE— 
wife. 2018 W. Sup. St. 



Jraduate mid- 
Zenith 1594-D. 



OPTICIANS. 



C. C. .qTAAt'KK. 106 WCST SUPtJlIOR STUEKT. 
Opeii Wedneiilay aiiJ Saturday evt-iiliis*. 



WANTED TO BUY. 

WANTED TO BUY— A 6 OR 7 
office counter. Call either 
1045. 



FOOT 
phone 



WANTED TO BUY— WE BUY FURNI- 
ture and stoves. West End Furniture 
house. 2012 W. Sup. St. Zen. 1330-A. 



WANTED TO BUY — A SINGLE 

horse second-hand wagon. Kon- 
stant Kykyrl. 19 Phoenix Block, Du- 
luth. Minn. 



W.-VNTED TO BUY XT ONCE — TWO 
or three burner gas plate; cheap. A 
60 0. Herald. 

WANTED TO BUY— OLD CLOTH fiJS 
and shoes at 719 West Superior 
street. Zenith 'phone 1687-X. 

WANTED TO BUY — 1» YOU WANT 
to sell or buy property, any kind, 
anywhere, write the Northwestern 
Business Agency, Minneapolis. Minn. 



Highest 
M. Stone, 



price paid 
213 



W. 



for cast-off clothingr. 
1st St. Bell 1834-L. 



WANTED TO BUY — A LARGE OH 
small tract of land for Investment. 
I 69, Herald. 



ARCHITECTS. 

Frank U Young & Co.. 33-34 Mesaba. 



PUBLIC STENOGRAPHER. 



E. J. 

old 



FARRELL. 
phone 2380. 



LYCEUM BUILDING 



PATENTS. 



PATENriT- ALL 
See Stevens. 610 



ABOUT 
Sellwood 



PATENTS, 
building. 




• ■• 




^_ 





DULUTH EVENING HERALD. satu.d.y, »ay 



22, 1909. 




CLASSIFIED, Your Ad. In The Herald of a Furnished 

Room Meets the Probable Tenant Half Way 



n 



One Oat a Word Each Insertion. 
No Aavrrllscmenl Less llian 15 Cents. 

'^ '^lOFPlNG 

BY TELEPHONE. 



One Cent a Word l'::aeh Insertion. 
X«» Advertlsenienl Less nian ''•\^^'^ 

FOrTaLE^ MISCELLANEOUS. 







New 
'FliOiie. 


MEAT M4nKKTS— 

B. J 
Mork 


. 22 
.1591' 


22 
1«9 


i.ArM»Hii:»— 

1 


■1-fi 


479 




- 


lJRU«a,iISTS — 

Eiltlie J«?rfiilinus. 

Boyce - • - - • 


.1243 

. 163 


1027 
163 


The Eion Ten 




1128 


W. S. Ki. •,.■-]. 




1730-i 



One Cent a Wortl I-^aeh Insertion. 
X«» .\»lvertl«^'nunt I-evs Than 15 Cent*. 

HElITwANTED— FEMALK 





P( >IJ ^ .VI f- « rN* K 



Thiril avt'iiijt 

ture, ar< r. 

f41e», t>i>f . 
lay Co., 4( 



1 t.WIS 

J 1 4*- 



A BnP!*elt, 

. ... i . f . 



",'1 



i; 1 1 T»ril I -- *i J. M. 

'lones. 



,.\i 



Ijouu:. .N'o 



: i; ( 1 



F* 



REAL ESTATE, EIRE 

INSURANCE AND 
RENTAL AGENCIES. 



repalr wcrk; 

SI^ Croix ; = 



.!, riA.NOS NOW 

, raiturv lo your 

^ no Rg^ents'. no 

iU to pay. 

i'lj.. the Kl' 

■ '^Mi-f rtf-r > ' . . 

, ,vh.M!-iHl.v<-. NEW 
tu unler. all kinds 
d€>livfTv and 



Come 
-> buy. 

'lory 



—WANTED— * 

C;iii U< lake care of ofTice in our 
Fuuiili avenue .shop; must be 
pumtunl and reliaMe. 



THK (iOI-lIER SHOE \V*tUK.s. 
I'liuith Avenue Shop. 
See N. 1". Tuinbladh. 



if- 

■if- 
* 



y> 



laundry 

■r-aiiU'bell. 318 



lOR 

Jrff 



> .-X 1 



$^>^.• .\K>iri\;A»;i: iM- 

itrty; bearss «'■ fer • t-nt 

,ail\ and runs four -..urs: 

fee fi»r examinii.i-- pai-tis 



****^*;'i?^lf**i^-*^^^ ****** 

WANTErWA COMi'ETENT, REFINED. 
OianHK'nK luiusekeeper of middle 
age, willu>ut ehildren. who is look- 
ing for a good home and permanent 
position about .lune iTi; must come 
well recommended, know how to 
coik. purchase feupplies econoi>»icaiiy, 
muiiRye two kitchen K'rls and work 
w;..ii iK-cssary. .Mr.-. M. M. Brooks. 
Uuod liospllal. Hlbblng, Minn. 



One Cent a Word Eaeh Insertion. 
No Advertisement Less llian 15 Cents. 



One Cent a Word I-Jach Insertion. 
No Advertisement Less Tlian 15 C<?ute. | 



One Cent a Wortl Each Insertion. 
No Advertisement Less Tlian 15 Cent*. 




WANTED— 100 MEN TO Bl Y 
at Esterly's Spalding Hotel 



Watches 

Jeweler. 



WANTED — STOCK SALESMAN OF 
ahilitv; commission basis; references 
required. Addiees F. L.. #16 Torrey 
building, imluth, Minn. 



SITUATIONS WANTED— 
FEMALE. 

SITFATION WANTED— I'USITIU.N .\^4 
Menographer; have had office experi- 
ence; can furnish reference if nec- 
essary. W 609, Herald. 



John A, Step 
M. IX Fie 111 •' 
J* A. LaTi-:> 
Pulford. H>'vv 



lienFon, Wilvin 



building. 



FOR RENT— FLATS. 

I-X) R K J£ N 1 i ' E S 1 K A 1 ; L F. C EN - 

traUy located new apart menls, wttl. 

Bteani heal, i.oi and c'-' '■•■'•»'■ >••!,.! 
Januoi servoA furnis) 
m«ni hu» SIX rooiJif "■•■ -■ 
gaa range, laundry luus aim 
hardwood Moors iuid ruceiy 
reuuonuule rcia, Apply Corp' 
vestment coiripaDj, Torrey i. . 
Duluth Minn. . 



allowed. X 4t»r. II' la'ii! 
'*' Ff.K SALE <"HF.M' 

Si Vcri - l":'il - 

good rum. 
10 put in 



■jf. 



.dy 



* 



JOHN J 



:-^jm-}(- 



MCE 

West 



& S(»N^ 

end 



FOR RENT— TWO SIX I 
modern, steani lieat, y 
tor service, moderate it 
Craig & Co. &01 to 
building. 



■ ^1 F 



biii 



\TS. 

c» F 

Seilwood 



-MC 



POK H ENT— N E W 
Call iiiMut \\ • 
Jth ptioue ; _ 

'^'- FO L' H - 1 ii » t... > M 

ciri t ! ui .1 ;.' I '■ 



DEHN FLATS. 
■ t-'l. Zen- 
:2-K. 





SALi' 






^^I) 


endld cuudi 


iitit 


111 


* (-nfY: 


and 


f7 


& 


1 






Fl 









* 

it- 
EVEUI '!!■ 1-lANO. 



WANTED— OIRL FOR GENERAL 

lioustework. O.'ill at 108 South Sixty- 
flrst avenue weet. 



WANTED— NEAT. COMPETENT SEC- 
ond girl; no other nee»l apply; house 
cleaning all done. Call mornings, 
2401 East Fifth street. 



WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 

houeework; good wages to neat, ex- 
perienced girl. 501 Woodland avenue. 
corner of Fifth street. 



WANTED — GIRLS. 

employment office. 



MRS. SOMERS* 
17 Second ave. E. 



Srri'ATlON WANTED — YOUNG GIRL 
attending Business college evenings 
wishes place with nice family, sma 
salarv. Address G 600. Herald. 



li 



SITUATION W.^NTED— AS HOUSE- 
kceper, hotel preferred. F 5&a, Uer- 
aid. 



SITUATID.N 
wants work 
i:;45 K old. 



WANTED — 
by the aay. 



WOMAN 

Call phone 



SITUATION WANTED — DAY 
of any kind. G 604, Herald. « 



WORK 



WANTED— RAILWAY MAIL CLERKS, 
carriers, poelofflce clerks. Examin- 
ations in Duiuih eoon. Preparation 
free. Write for schedule. Fi-ankiln 
institute, lioohester, N . Y. 

WANTED — EXPERIENCED JOB 

press feeders. Apply by letter to B 
577. Herald. 



WANTED AT ONCK— MEN TO FILE 
their application with us if you are 
looking for employment or care to 
better vour present position. Y'ou 
will find it profital>le to call or write 
Metropolitan BusineKS Service com- 
pany, room 1, Mesaba block, Duluth. 



FOR RENT— EIGHT-RUOM HOUSE. 1 
West Fifth street; all conveniences; 
J30 per month. R. P. Dowse & Co., 
106 Providence building. 



FOR RENT — EIGHT-ROOM FUR- 

nished house. 616 East Fourth 
street; $4f> per month. Dowse ^fS: Co., 
106 Providence building^ 

FOR RENT — NINE IIOOM HOUSE, 
centrally located; thoroughly mod- 
ern: hot water heat. Apply Jolin A. 
Steplienson. Wolvin building. 



WANTEL>— OFFICE BOY FOR WHOLE- 
sale house between 16 and 18 years 
of age. Permanent position. Must 
be bright and intelligent and live 
with his parents. Address B 661. 
Herald. 



WANTE1>— TWO HUSTLING SALES- 
men that can give good relerences. 
Jewel Tea company, 109 West Fourth 
street. 



1, a 



I.; 



t 

w est 



1200. 
•ench 
and 



FOR S. 
twent \ 
ditl> 1. . 

6trr.-r 

1 



•A 1 ' 



•.\1. 



n: 



NDRED AND 

i(.x; good con- 

:'S i-:ast Fourth 



COMPLETE MOV- 
. ^fv cheap. Room 



FOR 

flf ^■ 
a 

I 

phone 



RENT 



.V 



w 



Nort lic: u 



<>U SALE. 

1 rrlceu: elevator on 

tJ.l'vvav Farmrr'*^- 



WANT EI 

you UK 
woi k. 

W A 

r 



L'O.MPETENT 

girl to assist 
IblO East Fifth 



GIRL, ALSO 
with house- 
street. 



TED — GIRIJS 
invnienl call at 
r<-i i%mp.oym«-nl 



WISHING 

Minnesota 
liureau, 22 



EM- 

Strtte 
North 



Fitlh 



■!1:JC WtBt. 



WANTEl' 
general 
and cor 
M- \\ 

t- 1 : fct. 



A IlliST-CLA.^S (URL FOR 

housework, nisist be neat 

ipeicnt: no washing. Apply 

I'. .Mars. 1627 East Third 



W ANT 1 . 1 • 
Appl;- )'■ 



I'l 






,\N'0 I 
.Second 



lOUSEMAlD. 
street. 



torin>any Ma 



1. 



\' ; I 



WANTKI- 

K '■>.•• fa 1 



I Hit 



FOR RENT 
West Thir 



, I I \ I,,:.. l-vi„K..jM 

a sttt-rt. 



FLAl. 






•M 



FOR I 
flat, 
'plioii 



FURNIS 1 

street. Z 



FCI- ' '■' 

FcT 

i 

A. '^ 

FOR i 
fiat 

m<'Cl<'rTi 
el^ct I !c 



Al.T.FY 1 I'ol; S, 



r.ih 

.tu 



MC- 
-ong 
Em- 

'. ' 6." 



A. Mi:. 

f ami 

. free 



CC'MPETENT GIRL FOR 

housework at once; no wash- 

12 Norlli Nineteculh avenue 



SITU.VTIO.V W.\NTED — HOUSE- 
cleaning, day work wanted. Inciuire 
118 First avenue west, upstairs. 



SITIATION W.ANTED— PLAIN 
Ing by' the day. Call 208 
Fourth street. 



SEW- 
Mast 



SITUATION WANTED— YOUNG LA1>Y 
desires office position; has good ed- 
ucation; experienced and can furnisli 
the best of refer enees. G 51* 2. Herald. 

sItUATION~V\' ANTED — YOUNG GIRL 
witii little office experience wishes 
place in doctor's office; can operate 
tvpewrlter. A 557. Herald. 



WA.NTED— CIVIL SERVICE Posi- 
tions are very desirable for young 
people Full information and ques- 
tions recently used by the commi.«- 
slon free. Columbian Correspondence 
college, Washington, D. C. 



WA.NTED— FIRST-CLASS CLOTHING 
and shoe salesman at once. 618 
Tower avenue, Superior. 



FOR RENT— 7-ROO.M IDEAL SUMMER 
home, Sidrit Lake; $10 per month. 
Scott-Kreldler company, ai5 Central 
avenue. Both 'phones. 

FOR RENT— SIX^OO.MS, 1307 WEST 
Superior street, city water and sewer; 
111.50; water paid. W. -M. Prindle & 
Co., Eoiisdale build ing. 

FOR RENT— 1006 EA.ST SUPERIOR 
street 12-room house, in good con- 
dition, fine hot water heating plant. 
|65. D. W. Scott. 18 Mesaba block. 

FOR RENT— FIVE ROOMS. INCLUD- 
Ing city water; $12.50 per month. 
1112 West Third street. ^ 



One Cent a Word Each Ijiserllon. 
No .\dvertls<'ment LessTluin 15 Ceuts. 

SECRET SOCIETIES. 



MASONH'. 
I'ALESTINE LODGE. NO 7^ 
A F. & A. M. — Regular meet- 
ings first and third Monday 
ovejilngs of each niontli, at 
fl o'clock. Next meeting 
Mav 31. I<t09. Work — Third 
degree. Andrew C. Voik, W. 
Nesbltt. secretary. 




M. H. 



FOR RENT— FOUR- ROOM COTTAGE; 
hardwood floors, electric lights, 
pump; can be occupied year round, 
l'&12 Minnesota avenue. Dowse 
Co., 106 I'rovidence building. 



IONIC LODGE. N€. 1*«. A. F. 
& A. M.— Regular meeting 
second and fourtli Monday 
evenings of each month at 
f o clock. Next meeting 
May 24. l&OO. Work— Third 
degree. Clarenc* B. Miller, 
Hugo Burgo, secretary. 




W. M 




derhill, 
retary. 



KEYSTONE CHAlTiCR, .NO. 
20, R. A. M. — Stated convoca- 
tions second and fourth 
Wednesdav evenings ot each 
month at 8 (iclock. Next 
meeting Mmv 26. ISOJr W.nk 
M M. Degree. William D. Vn- 
H. 1 , Alfred Lt Rlcheux, sec- 



& 



FOR RENT- 
ed cottage 
quire 3602 



-SEVEN-ROOM FURNISH- 
on Thirty-sixth street. In- 
Mlnneeota avenue. 



WA.NTED — 
housework; 

Secot: ■' ■■• •■'■ 

vTan'i 



GIRL FiiR 

experii In c<l. 
■t 



GENERAL 
ol'o West 



igan 



OVERALL 

street. 



iH'll^ 



I.I ' C.i i . 1. 

work, one 

■ I 111 



iti 



Mi^ 



GENERAL 

■All go home 
I II Murphy, 



IVE-R" 

-. lilv ni' 



< it 'I 1 1 '^ 
a. etc. 



Wo man 



<iii SAl.E 



.■( ITS, 



lhn.'»it- 
liplit^ 



n in bed lift I 

nisi.'-' 
RaU 

t' 'i 



Liuj 



■TV W'-Vl 



IVB-ROOM, 



FI 



uud . 
The 

rrii-" 

a. I i t^ «- 



Torrey 



*kiis and 
'!■■■ east. 



hund 



P'CR 



^:A^ 



FOR 

sfi. 



SALE — 

!- . I ■ ( > u i: ' I" 



FOt; 



iiiit 

W1-. 

at ■ 

d€i 

L<'< 



FIVE 



I'LAT, MOD- 



F 


( >I 

lei 

easy 


.' 


1 . V . t 

tcrt 


tA 

; 




fldir 


K 


ft I 


i r 




\\ . :• . 


t 


1 1 


W 



AND IRON- 
■vtnills, edgers. 
.s. .-iurfacers. 

.Machinery com- 

^HdEs i-:TRjLD G001.IS, 



V-FIVE HAR- 
111 for sale, 

f,.tir ways; 

;.ii'riiy of local 

>oo. For itartieu- 

n McF^ni-hran, 43.'> 



\VANTi:i'- ^UUi>. URIGIIT BUSINESS 
over 22 years, one who can 
. sttioigra'phy work preferred; 
tilt position to right i>arty; 
perience if any. age and low-- 
irv expected to start. Ad- 
\\ iiOO. Herald. 



SITUATIONS WANTED — MALE, 

STE.\DV .lOU 



SITUATION W.\.NTE: 

for young man; prefers doing gener- 
al work around residence. E 567, 
Herald. 

.SIIUATION WANTED — AS B A N D 
best of relerences. Send all 



eawytr. . 

replies to me at once. L. O. 

lare Mechanics hotel. Cloquet, Minn. 



I^rson. 



SITUATION WANTED— SALES.MAN OF 

highest abilltv and character and 
approved habits, desires connection 
wLli well established house; will 
travel aavwhere; references the best. 
F. E. i'hiillps, 767 N. East street. Os- 
kaloosa. Iowa. 



WANTED — SALESMAN, EXPERI- 

enced in any line, to sell general 
Minnesota; an unexcelled 
proposition. Commissions 
weekly advance for ex- 
The Continental Jewelry 
Cleveland, Ohio. 



trade in 
specialty 
with $35 
penses. 
Company. 



WANTED - STENOGRAPHERS AND 

bookkeepers wanting positions should 
register at the National Accountants 
and Stenographers' Bureau. Minne- 
sota office at the Duluth Business 
University, 600 Christie Buildi ng. 

ONE 



FOR RENT— EIGHT- ROOM HOUSE; 

all conveniences; 1202 East Third 
street. Dowse & Co., 106 Providence 

buiiding^^ 

FOR RENT — GOOD EIGHT- ROOM 
liouse; furnace heat, gas and electric 
lights. 811 East F^irst street; $3k50 
per month. R. B. Knox & Co. 



1>ULUTH COl'N("IL. NO. 6 R. 
F, T.— Regular meetings first 
and third Friday evenings of 
each month at 8 o clock. 
Next meeting May 21, 1909. 
AVork — Royal and Select 
Master degree. Andaila W Torrence, 
T. 1. M . Alfred Le Rlcheux, recorder. 






DULUTH COMMANDERY NO. 
18, K. T. — Stated conclave 
first Tuesday of ea< h month 
at 8 o'clock. Next conclave 
will be held Tuesday. May 
18. at 7:30 p. m.. lor work. 

C. E. ieasiee. E. C. ; Alfred Le Richeux, 

recorder. 




FDR RENT — FiVE-ROO.M HOUSE, 
inquire at 324 East Fifth street. 



FOR RENT — HANDSOMELY FLR- 

nished seven-room house, all modern, 
m the East end, from June 1 till 
Sept. 15. 20S» South Sixteenth ave- 
nue tast. 



WANTED— S.4LESM AN ; 

qualnted with grocery trade 
perior. Good opportunity. 
413 Spalding hotel. 



AC- 

in Su- 
Room 



SITUA'riON WANTED 
wants garden work. 



WANTED — CO-MPETENT 

general housework; g 
i'KU .lefferson street. 

\s A.vr. 1' CJOOD «il!;l- 
I isework. Mrs. R. 

i urth street. 



(.11. 



. FOR 

wages. 



I«)R GE.N- 
A. Kerr, 627 



- El' 



iV .Itrdoii, 



; .\.V- 
First 



«, - V - - -J - 



W 
1 1 hi i 



M. JfTll't.. 



liii 



._^ j^^ Vl< »S !"' '\''. I'l ( 'I iiN<; 



I i:i> -COMPETENT OICL 
.. ral housework. M^^;. A. 11 
:U25 East First street. 



IC'R 
Dan- 



— GOOD MAN 
B 578. Herald. 

SITUATION WANTED— POSITION AS 
bookkeeper by man having six years 



experience 
558. Herald 



best of references. 



FOR GENERAL 
.U-fferson street. 



WAN"ri:r« — ciui. 

1. >. ,,si \' ■■! k. ■■ 

w A N T 1 : 1 > t : I K 1, F uli "boa rdi ng 

liouse. 537 Garfield avenue. 



SITUATION WANTED AT ONCE— BY 

married man. as Janitor, watchman 
or anv other inside work; sober and 
steady. Uans^en, ia26Vi West Su- 
perior street.^ 

. S ITU .^TION" W ANTED— .MA N IS FIRST- 
dass washer in steam laundry; best 
references. H 6 o6. Herald. 

NIGHT 
recom- 
Herald. 



WANTED— CAPABLE SALES.MAN TO 

cover Minnesota with staple line; 
higli commissions, with $H'0 monthly 
in advance; permanent position to 
right man. Jess 11. Smith company. 
I>etroit, .Mich. . 



FOR RENT— 1712 V.EST THIRD 
street, i*-room house: bath and fur- 
nace; $25 per montli. Stryker Man- 
lev & Buc.v, Torrey building^ 




SCOTTISH RITE— REGUL.^R 
meetings every Tliursday 
evening at 8. No meetinff 
until further notice. 
Cocdey secretary. 



J. E. 




FOR RENT— EIGHT- ROOM HOUSE 
at 15 South Seventeenth avenue east; 
modern, Stiyker, Manley & Buck, 
Torrey building. ^^ 



WANTED AT ONCE— CO.VTMAKER, A, 
Olson, Box 84, Evelttli, Minn, 



FOR SALE— FIVE-ROOM 
on corner lot. 33 by H" 
on monthly paymentfc. 
Eiglitli street. 



COTTAGE 

$1,200: l>ait 

Call 231 East 



WANTED — LUMBER PI]L.ERS 20 
cents per 1.000 or by the day. West 
Labor iz Supply company. 

WANTED— FoTCLlVE STOCK INSUR- 
ance. a good solicitor. A man ac- 
quainted with horse owners and In- 
terestpd in horses can establish a 
fine business. tall on Dunning & 
Dunning, 506 PaUadio. 



WANTED- 

fi.r I'. It. 
^1 I 



COOD COMPETENT GIRL 

jti h.i.i,'-. ■.\ fik 580:; ELnor 
''all mornings. 



vxm 



WAN 1 

g»-'" 
mei 



FOR 
Far- 






ilF.rENT GIRL 
work. Mrs. F. L. 

Ill I ..M l''iO li '^tr«<-t. 

,i:NERAL 



SITUATION WA.NTED— AS 

watchman or Janitor; best 
mendations. Address G 603. 



!!• 



.T I F(,»R SALE'^'^'LAl 



w» ■ 



thri:k A I 

■ tic dill nig 
I w o He t s 



l( -CR- 
1 *<»st. 
v\als 

.MOST 

room 

bedroom 



NTEl' v;iRL 

sework. App 
Jth sir.fi 



'li 



East 



WANTED CIRL 

hcKJSOwork at 5 
Ee.'^ter I 'ark. 



13 



FOR GENERAL 
(•('iorado street. 



FOR 
flat 
cej ■ 

nii' 



-1 



■^tit ^-t 



.V Tm.k 



\\ 



t't'AL 
I iiriUUIon. 



\M1LY 

, FUif- 

Call 

■ < > \v e 1 1 , 



WANTED 

Mi-n.!i. * 



Ml 



HOUSKMAID. AI 
s A E Gilbert. 1 



PLY 

, St. 



WA.N'l 1.1 ' 



A . ...MIETENT «;IRL. 
small family. go(.d wages. Mrs Gall. 
417 Twenty-third avenue cast. 



TIMBER LANDS. 

inTi^.TMj>rMATTTEi^^ 

First National B ank b ld g. Phon es. 

TIMBER XniT^'UT - OVER LANDS 
bought; mortgage loans made, -lohn 
Q. A. C rosby. 305 Palladio building. 

1 buv standing Umber; also cut-over 
lands Goo RupleV, 322 Lyceum bldg. 



WANTED— YOUNG MEN TO LEARN 
automobile business by mall and pre- 
rare for positions as chauffeurs and 
renalr men. We make you expert in 
ten weeks: assist you to secure posi- 
tion; pay big: work pleasant; demand 
for men" Rreat ; reasonable; 
particular."- and sample 
lire Automobile 

Y. 

WANTED — BOY F«JR PRESSROOM. 
Ai ply printing department. Marshall- 
Wells company 



r 



write for 

lesson. Em- 

Instltute. Rochester, 



FOR RENT— PARK POINT COTTAGE; 
I'etcr i'an on Twenty-ninth street, 
partially furnished: $60 for season. 
R. P. Dowse 6c Co., 106 Providence 
building. 



ZENITH CHAPTER NO. 26, 
Cuder of Eastern Star. Regu- 
lar meetings second ana 
fourth Friday evenings of 
each month, at 8 oclc.c-k. 
Next meeting May 28. 1?09. 
Work— Regular business. Gertrude 
Bates, W M., Ella F. Gearliari. secre- 
tary. 

FUCLII* LODGE. NO. 198, A. 
F & A. M. — Regular meet- 
i-.t:^ second afid fourth 
Wednesday evenings of each 
month at 7:80 o'clock. Next 
meeting May 26. ll«o<) Work 

Second degree. Martin J Murray. v\ . 

M.; A. Dunleuv y. secretary. 

CHAPTER. NO. F». 
-Meets at West Ini- 




FOR RENT— FIVE-ROOM COTTAGE, 
at 1210 West Supericr street, .iity 
water: reasonable rent. W. M. Prindle 
& Co., Lonsdale bu ilding. 

FOR RENT — SIX -ROOM HOUSE, 709 
West Fourth street, well water, or- 
chard: $16 per month. Inquire 1031 
West Mlcliigan street. __^ 




DULUTH 

;,itli first and third Wcdnts- 
davs of ea( h month at .30 
p "m Next meeting May 1». 
^Vork— Royal Arch degree. 
W. B. Getchell. H. P.. A. L'unleavy, 
I secretary. _^___ 

U-IJOF, >0 26 I O .J r--MKKTH 
tren I^r..tn> tt.ninp Bt CM FrL< « f !.alJ- 
it I.t.l<f avmii. north N«-»t bu* li.«-- 
Mnv 21 Work SfMri.i uit.ni w h. 
iM.nkur. i.fUt Brand: Ixiviu litrii»tr.m. 
A. H Pt'Ji fliisridni rtrntktj. 



FOR RENT— EIGHT-KOOM HOUSE, 
lurnislied complete; modern; from 
June 1 to Nov. 1; walking uisianc-e. 
W M Prindle & Co.. Lonsdale buila- 



DllLL'TH 



rceorcli!:? s«-n-'«ir 



ASHES AND GARBAGE. 



GARBAGE AND MANURE 
Dick Barrett, Zenith phone. 



ASHi:S. 
hauled. 
1274-Y. . 

ASHES AND GARBAGE REMOVED. 
John Larson, 1711 London road, oUl 
1390-K; Zenith phone 1488-X. 



'phone 



-.WA. 

r' lis! i< 



.Now 

I • : 1 t > r 



•R- 



•jihoi 



u i> .1 ' ' 



' ii: i:xciiA.v«;E— 



WANTED— COMPETENT GIRL loR 

general housework; tliree In family, 
no children. -Mrs. C. E. De W Itl, 

15 Fifteenth "^^"J^J^!!!: 

WANTED— LA dT ES TO .SEN D T H EI R 
-i!lM riptiims or renewals for the 
D/uli.-' Homo Journal 
K\ ■ I'ost to MisM 

H. : : ttce. 

WHO 



or Saturday 
D. Kluge, 



:;;!H;ii 



T. 



It 

(■ti 



It hint In 

r<l*-r, 
Tro.v, 

SIK'W - 

Its ( Iini 
• ft. 



w 



wri M LAU.NDRESS, WHO CA.N 
,,,',. k ,^l'ldy 6 St Elmo apartments. 

:2\ l.-iM First i-iM.t 



REMOVED— GUST HOLMGREN. 
London road. Old 'phone. 3J1-M 



1906 



' FOR SALE— REAL ESTATE. 

"P^yfC^fiAl^E^^^yj^ BUYS^ A NICE 
building lot. Twenty-fourth avenue 
west; v*"""^ graded. J. W. Sliellen- 
- 706 Palladio. 



WANTED— ALL YOT'NG MEN TO 
send their subscriptions or r^nf^als 
for the Saturday Evening Post to 
Miss L. Kluge. Herald office, 

WANTED— MAN: MUST BE WILLING 
to learn and capable of acting as our 
representative; no canvassing or 
soliciting; good income assured. Ad- 
dress National Co-Operative Really 
company, 1060 Marden Bldg., 
ington. D. C. 



Wash- 



WANTED — EDGERMAN. WRITE 

Leech Lake Lumber company, 

Walker, Minn., fta»"'e ^;|'»* *:''2t''rf'; 

vou have had. Will pay $3.50 

hours for first-class 



ence 

r>er night of ten . 

^ Leech Lake Lumber corn- 



man, 
pany. 



ing. 



FOR RENT— A VERY DESIR.ABLE 
eiKht-room house with large lot, In 
desirable East end location; a cozy 
home-like place; reasonable 
B. McLeod. 310 Burrows 
Both phones 1045. 




K. O T M. 

PT-LVTH ti:nt no 1 Mrrrs kvert 

\\e<U.t»<lhT e^«T.il.s fcl M<tr«.t*«- ImU. iil4 
w«n KiJ>t ftreei. VlMUi.g menil*re wH- 
I..I1H- A .' Ai.a«rfu. n'ti>m»mler bOl 

h««n«r otn<f m 

ZtlllU. 'l>lK.U» Ufil 



.1 

hn.l. 
X 



Hi'urs. 



lU • m. 



rent. J. 
building. 



p;r;]fl^ENT— FIVE-ROOM HOUSE AT 
Lakeside: cellar and woodshed; city 
water; all newly papered; rent $lo 
per montli. 4807 East Superior 
Inquire 511S East Peabody 



street, 
street. 



FOIi RENT— SIX-ROOM HOUSE, WITH 
bath and electric lights; 5C9 East 
Fourth street; $25 per month. E. V. 
ineld company. 203 Exchange ij i"g^_ 

FOR RENT— SIX- ROOM HOUSE. MOD- 
ern except heat, water paid, shades 
furnished; very reasonable 
family. Inquire 517 West 
street. 




A. o. V w. 

FIDEblTV bODGE 

in PC 



to small 
Second 



WANTEL- — SALESMEN— BEST COM- 
inlBsion offer on earth; new; a 1 re- 
tailers; samples, coat pocket. Bos- 
ton," Iowa City, lovvva^ 



herger. 



DYE WORKS. 



WANTED BRKiHT O 
etressmaking- Room 
> I reel. 



KL TO LEARN 
. 214 West First 



\\ 



ANTED — GIRL 

houi-cwurk; must 
,uu .Mrs. W. A. 



FOR GENERAL 
utulerstand cook- 
Hunt, 1113 London 



It 



S.N!. F. 



( 'Ni: 

T 

III h. 



1 

i. 


J 1 ; 


,., L.t- 


Fii'H 


t 


if *..'''■ 


r. . 






('\ 






Foi 
t 





rsi:D 

1 lii.- of 

French 



I THi; m:w srvi-i. 

,\ «'i noine brand-ntw 



Kc< '>: 



tt. 



V ic- 

Vlc- 

a nd 

<>rds. 

All 

ririsi. 



\\ A.N i i:D— GiM>D « 



..;. FOR HOUSE- 



work. 

ft re -t. 



small 
Mat 



family. 614 East First 



\\A.\ri>i' A .\i 
field avenue. 



■ i: ( 



lUL. 838 GAR- 



WANTED — 
housework. 
East First 



GIItL FOR 

for family of 
street. 



GENERAL 
two. 1616 



1NTER.STATE CLEANING & D\EIN«^ 
Co., 217 E. Sup. St. The best and 
most efficient plant in the citv. Our 
motto is: "We do it rlght-and ready 
when promised." Zenith, thirty; Du- 
luth, twcnty-five-thlrjy. 

ZENITiTcTtY TiYE WORKS— LA RG- 

est and most reliable. All work done 
in r>uluth. Work called for and de- 
livered. Phones: Old, 1154-R; new, 
1888. 232 East Superior streeU 



WANTED— ORGANIZERS: GOOD COM- 
missions; fraternal, social t)rder of 
John Talbot, supreme presl- 



mt 

Owls. - ^ , , , 

dent South Bend. Ind. 



REPRESENT US 

We pay every 

money 



WANTED— MEN TO 

in the Northwest. 
Thursdav: advance $25 expen.^e 
weekly; no capital needed; no sell- 
tni! collecting or carrying samples. 
Otfr men make $250 and $300 per 
month. You can. too. Small per- 
sonal bond reriuired. Write jiromptly. 
C. C. Eccles, B-408. Dayton. 



FC)R RENT— FOUR-ROOM COTTAGE. 
Inquire 1124 EastJSixth street. 



FOR RENT — EIGHT- ROOM HOUSE, 
Forty-second avenue east. Lakeside, 
modern in every respect, all fur- 
nished; clieap for the summer. Har- 
ris 633 Manhattan building. 



Ohio. 



Duluth Dye Works— French dry clean- 
Ing; fancy dyeing. Old phone, 
2828-R; new, 1191-A. 330 E. Sup. St. 



FC i . 

€-1 



1 y 1 



tl. cx- 

(. on 
I ellt 



^^lijTElV— GIRL FOR BEARDING 

I,, .use, 537 Garfield avenue^ 



>:iT Kt'C.ISTERS 



il 



\v 



tf>r 
w- 



lels. 



. ic new 



FLAT; 



THE NATIC^AI. C.\SK KKOISTER 

< •( iMT' ■ ^"'' 



I . 

H : 



i: 



7- I. Ill 



• i' 



-Vfrcnt 
Street. 
Bell. 2585. 



\V ANTED— FIRST-CLASS GIRL; 

niMi or Norwegian preferred. 
ply to_m West Fourth street. 

WANTED ■ 

gill. 420 



GER- 
Ap- 



_ COMPETENT SEWING 
Lake avenue no rth. 

^NTl^D=i^MPI?TENT "AIRDREfcS- 

ci- and apprentice g'-rl at 17 East &u- 
jicrior street. . 

WANTED- V or NG GIRL TO KEEP 
around house. 314 East 
street. 



Northwestern Dyeing & Cleaning Co., 
oldest reliable dyers and French dry 
cleaners in Northwest. 15 Lake Ave. 
north. 'Phones: New, lol6; old. 15 37. 

BURKE BROS.— Most up-to-date dry 
cleaning establishment in the city. 




Iv Sells to every man and 
Wged 16 to 65. Policy free, 
nith Registry company 



woman, 
The Ze- 

Duluth. Minn. 



22 East 



Sup, .^t. Poih phones 257. 



PAPERING AND PAINTING. 

f^ENC^^BROS^l^A7N?i^^ 

hanging and tinting; storm window 

work; estimates given. Zenith 

•phone l:i:41-D. 



WANTED— Men to learn ,^ar*'«^' *'*^^' 
illus. catalogue free. Moler Bai ber 
college 27 E. Nic. Ave.. Minneapolis. 



CLAIRVOYANTS^ 

Madame Sterling, palm reading, . 
Card reading fOc. 114 E. Superior 



FOR RENT— EIGHT-ROOM DW ELL- 
injr Fortv-flfth avenue west and 
Rene street; water, etc.; rent reason- 
able. Dickerman Investment com- 
panv, Lonsdale building. 



NO lor— ME1.T9 
hull 224 West Flr«t ftret, 
ITiurhiltj at t> p m Vi|.lli:,(( mrm- 
U-jt vtUcuit. OuKt l>tii.l:i.. .M w : 
A E PuriiiE rw crdit . (> J. Mur^olJ, 
nnai.Vifr 217 l*»t Fifth unti. 



Ull.tm IX>l>(iF. NO lf> A. O I 
— Mfcti, hi I'll" KpUcwi' 1»«'11 J* 



w. 

Laka 
mmii* i.crti, r>rr> TutsilW evwilns »» 
(■ .MKk. VUiUuK IrotluTf weJroiD*. 
Nirnii.ii Jil.neon uihytti wortmai. . K O. 
r<.«.u rti(nl«r T 3 St «ariiitt.i.. fluun- 
<l«-r 121 l'"ii»< avci.iit w«-st 




I. O. F 
rfium rOMMKHrE NO. 3263, INDB- 
|,4Ti(l<iit Onin if F(ir.«ur5, mtext tint 
nriu thlnl KrIdH.v pvn.ii.gs^ at ^ t vUiU 
;,l l«.«lo f liall N<. 112 W«Bt Fltit 
nrvcl NfXt re*iilar oueUus. FrUlay. 
luiii 4 C A CarlMi.. C M. W.| 
W ll(«t«*. B. ." 



,^-r-^ Al.rA > Ol i^' i'' 

.'^^-jk N F(ix»l<n.' I'cll •'"'"" 

.'»/t-A,V\u»<mi< wett fvcTV TI 

f/Mf) 1<. Clerk BenHUf-i.t 




Nplwn. 
T. A. 



FOR RENT — SIX ROOMS AND 
cove brick house; all modern 
veniences: desirable house; 21 o 
Fiftb street. Hartrnan-O Donnell 
205 Lonsdale building. 



AL- 

con- 
East 



MOPEIIN SAMAUITANS 
AlPA COfNCll. NO 1-MEKTS AT 

"IT I ttrt-ft iii.ii Kcurth 

tiiirkil«i> fxmli.g m 8 

(Imrec, flf^t and 

iWril Tliui^Uay. Kamaritan u«*i<«. »ec- 

(tid tinrt fcurtli TtiurKilayp 

<; s : Liuj M. Puniy I O^ S 

Ing; Wallaro P. WtlU.arita, «rlbe. All SaiiiariUn* 

tliVlt«l. . 

tT.MTFK OHPKIt OF FOUESTEftS— 

N.iili Star >N" 4!' rai:<iKi vwm second 

,.,; fi.urtJi Mcii.layf at V. O. F. hall, 

.riifr i'tiurlli mHiU*- ^e*! bii<i nr»t 

tri-it. M K. ball. C H 2 Oslxirn* 

lc(k E M SU-wtrt tMrrUin, 

n.irti .'.THiiif «e»t, H P y<.iii.g 

■L Wtfl Tliiiii Plnct; 1732-K <W j-inue. 




222 
IresK- 



ag%ify- 



PERSONAL. 

PERSONAl^- YOUNG BUSINES.-^ MAN 
in citv would like companionship of 
Eome "young lady, between 18 and 
30 no objections to nice working 
girl Give all particulars and 
dress B 51'3. Herald. 



ad- 



:5c. 
St. 



Second 



i-: 



F(jH h^ 
Wesi, 
lieaL 



I- 1 V b-ll(.-'(-' 

street; a. 



F' 



but 



FOR 

fl. 



F< 



Ft'i 
1 

J: 



FOR ' 
flat 

Purl 
In 

t, 1 

'Lin 

FOR i- 
bIx-h 

kins. 



• .M BRICK 

it first -(.■la.^■.«' 



UPHOLSTERING & 

RF PA I RED 



STOVES 
lure up 

n 



T, 



V 



istcred and 
-us 1(1 'J X'ernon 



REPAIRING. 

'''ANTri^RNr 

rcpiured. W. 
street. Zenith 



WANTED — CO-MPETENT tJIRL FOR 
general housework. 160C East Supe- 
rlo r street. _..^ ^ 

WaIcTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
liousework; owit who can go home 
nights preferred. 107 South Nine- 
teenth avenue east. 



WANTED — GIRL FOR 
liousework; small family, 
ferson street. 



GENERAL 

2026 Jef- 



MUSIC. 



MfSlC 



\\1> MbSlCAL INbTJlL'.MENTS OF EVEBT 

- dt». rlpUcn. Edlsoii plii'iio 
graiilu, bttiiU a"J c''" 
c h e I t r a instniaicnts. 
llaiu* and organs.. Im- 
»»ld WESTXJAAHP. 7 
and 9 Flml Arenue W«L 




I FTiXiH t'VFR 



riit^c. Lune 



CARPET CLEANING. 



■fCN- 
t-'.My 



i.SlElvSTATK 
Co.. S; ■ ■ ' • 

presBt-t 
Both ■;•■■•.. 



■ARPET CLEANING 

• ..;i Norinan, com- 

,ind rug weavers. 

i.'^i. vv. M!o!i. street. 



i' 



FCTl-. i> cLEANINu ii'.MPANY— 

cs agents and operators .if t»»e Ij»- 

,_,}!, If. HiMiovator. Carpets, rugs. 

".ire. mattresses, 

. t suction. Tlilrd 

.,u ,'-ui ■-;. L. O. Bradley, 

,d phon*; 121it-K; Zenith 



et< 



Caii Zcnitii 



.iC FIVL AM 
>,.,■ ;:iM,uTii flat.-. Burg .v 
I'uiiadlo building; 



FOR SALE— COWS. 



SWEDISH MASSAGE^ 

• .ivvwi.^v MASSEUR. 400 NEW 
phone 1826-K. 

Mrs. H. Wiklng. '^V'"*!? "»K^?f«i n*^ 
2. 2018 W^ Sup. St. Zenith 1894-D. 



WANTED— GOOD GIRL FOR GENER- 
al housework, liouse cleaning done. 
124 Eig hth avenue east. 

WANl'ED — EXPERIENCED ^SKIR-T 
and walstmaker. La Ferte's. 24 West 
Superior street^ ^ 

WANTED^GD^I. TO GO TO PIKE 
Lake to do housework for the sum- 
mer. Inquire Astoria hote l. ^ 

WANTED - EXPERIENCED 
ress. Parlor restaurant. 5- 
Superior stre et. 

WANTED — G 1 R L 
housework. Apply 
street. 



WAIT- 
: West 



SEND TO US FOR CATALOGUE O''^ 
all the late popular songs , two-steps 
and ragl1mej)leces. Bradbury Music 
company, 6 East SupejMor 8jtreet___ 

iin?SK^^TALKING MACHINES; ALL 
makes repaired. J. P. Bates. 18 
Third avenue west. 



BOARD OFFERED. 

BOARD AND ROOM OFFERED- 
rent— Nicely furnished front 
suitable for two, with good 
board and all «:n^'*".'?^""^^*' ,,^" 
Second street. Zenith 1640-1>. 



FOR 

room. 

table 

West 



BOARD COFFERED— W^ANTEDY'OUNG 
married couple to room and board in 
prUate famfly. large front room; a 
conveniences: central Itication and 
reasonable rates to permanent party, 
references. E 668, jlerald ^ 
WITH 



PERSONAL — WO.MAN S CROWNING 
trlorv is her hair. Let us tell you 
how' to keep yours fluffy and beau- 
tiful send no money, .lust a stamp 
for repiv. Woeppel company 
819, Buffalo, N. Y. 



Box 



R WIL- 

t(j Jennie. 

Duluth, im- 



PERSONAI^— WANTEIV L. 
son of Duluth. send address 
130 West Second 
medial el y^_ ^ 

PKRSONAL— Foot specialist; corns ex- 
tracted, :'5c; inverted nails and bun- 
lon^^ured / Scott, 17 E. Sup, street. 

Personal— WANTED— sEW-iNG to 

1LRSCI>AL>— ^^ I7:'8i/fe West First 



do at 
street. 



flat 5. Zenith 'phone 1376-Y. 



Personal— Manicuring, massage, 
treatment. 813 Torrey; phone 



scalp 
946-X. 




VMTHi OKKElt Ol FORI.STERS— 

(■(nirt hJiMtni Star Nc. 86 niW-.6 cttry 

nii.l tiiird Tiit»«l*>> «t l'- O. F. 

itriifr Fiurth avtime wett and 

flrwl. A. 1. Fifi«-r C II. lOT 

Mr.tli str<H, r E I'aui twnlary. 



Sut^riur street. 
WliJthrc.|i tihitk. 



Harry 

Zeiatti 



Mimes. 

'pliOU* 



\V A. 
CAJar NO 2J'«'f — MEETS 
O F. tiall, Fourtli h»*iiue ««» 
Klist stitet." ceciii.cj »i.tl toarlh 
■I^H»lla)^ <f e;Kl. u.'iiU.. 
F E. tXrrcriuis. rnn»ul. 
C P Eftrl. clerk. B'-x *iL 




STAR LOIKJE 



Kfi sr. K. of P. 

tven. Tutiday eieiilnp at K of 
lis West sm«ri<r ftreei Next 
Mi.5 2fi. Vl»lUiig KiiigM> w«sl- 

Lt.uit. Pworshak. C C" , I- I. 
K of U * ti 



STIAVAUT NO 5f O S. 

llr*t i.ii(l llJnl WednendaJ't 

8 p If a* I' *' •" ■'*" 
viist ai.iJ First 



aveiuie 



C — 
kUeet. 



A FEW ROOMS WITH BOARD AT 
Colonial, 16 West Second street. 



the 

BOARD OFFERED - 
board and room at 
ond street. 



FIRST-CLASS 
314 East Sec- 



LOST AND FOUND^ 

^^l^^^Z::^;^^(^^'c^v?''^By^yro^ WITH 

letter "O.'" Finder idease leave at 
Herald office. 



FOR GENERAL 
1902 East First 



LOST— SILVER ENAMELLED BELT 
pin with Canadian emblem, between 
Lake avenue car and Booth s docK. 
Leave at Bootli e office for reward. 

POCKET BOOK 



FOR RENT — 
Zenith phone 



ROOM 
1140-X. 



AND BOARD. 



Room 



and Board— 301 East Third St 



CLOTHES CLEANED^^RESSED 

Ladles' 



t;iiit<! tiressed. 50c; pants, 15c. 

Suits Pre^s^J^^. _^ ^^^ pressed. 50c. Zen. 

J. Oreckovsky, 10 4th Av. W. 



PERSONAL — LEARN HYPNOTISM. 
Fre« lessons and particulars. Box 
152 Estherville, Iowa. 



PFR«;ONAl^OLD MIRRORS RESIL- 

^.Vred sToermaln Bros., 121 First 

avenue west. 



PERSONAL— LADIES ONLY. SECRET 
worth $t. mailed any woman for only 
25c I will help sisters in trouble. 
Mrs. Stella J. Sargent, Winner 
tlon. St. Louis. Mo. 



Sla- 




^"=^31' Mxt rie.ilar iiiWUi.g. J""^..^, '^'"'"I'i!' 
e^^i, M<Kr.Jflit chief; bo.. Mrl.e..i,aii »ec- 

tary, 312 Tt rrey ttuildiiig- 

BOYAL LEAtU'E. 
ZKMTII roiN< IL ^■<» 161' Kf'YAI, 
I'eaguf- Mr. th \u Elfa. hall fin! ."iiKl 
tiaril M< riilay .v.riirig.- at 8 c ctKk. 
I, HartThtes. sirllie, care 
Shot ciimpJiny : W- W. 
care ot .\Ii.rBli»ll-W»U!. 




of 
Booth 



<1. 

Northern 
archuo. 



WOODMEN OF THE WORLD 
ZENITH ( ITY CAMP NO T -MEETS 
ev«.rv *«ond ar.d fourth We«li.i*(tar? tiX 
the "(Id Masonic umple, flfUi floor Mac- 
Aultv c' C 102 ^'e*» MlcMgiiii glrtet: 
J H LarkUi hanker 122 Eiwt Supwiol 
nrret; Hohert ForsyUi, clerk. 817 Em» 
Second itrcct. 




skirt? 
1852-X. 



FOR .-am: Fi 
West ij'ourtik 



:i>H .MILCH 

HU'ttfct. 



.w 



\ 



I A lilt 

Irum 



O; 

t»t 



.\(V liUAl'fATKK MASSEISE, 

. • hiiUlul*, Bwwien. Zeallh 814 



WANTEL»— GOOD COOK AT W^EST- 
ern hotel. Twenty-eighth avenue 
west and Superior street. 

WANTED— A GIRL FOR GENERAL 

housework. 1509 Jefferson street. 



(Continued on page 27.) 



LOST- SMALL I^ADY'S 

on Superior street or Third avenue 

west. 

street 



Minnesota Tailoring S«_««^'^« .^'^"^^ 
for. 118 Ist A v. W\ Zenith 1284-D. 

JOHN MUELER. 208 West First St. 



Finder call at 310 Wes^ Third 
for reward. 



E^St^SAFETY RAZOR WITHOUT 
case return to 4l3i,i West Superior 
street. Cres cent Jewelry company. 

Lost- RED and white English 

setter dog. Answers » \ ^-^l". ». tr" 
turn to 420 W *»t fiupeiior strrset F. 

E. Berry. 



■naL. 



able oeople. some rlcli. J. 

414 Mclntyre block, Winnipeg, Man 



PATENT LAWYERS. 

MASON FENuTCK & LAWRF-.-CE, 
patent .awyers. Washington. D. C. 
Established 47 years. Best i;eferences. 
work. Terms moderate, li- 



Careful 

lustrated booklet free. 
In selecting an attorney. 
Depl. A. C. 



Ee caerful 
Write us. 



STENOGRAPHERS. 

^^^p^WRirTNGr^TElJnjGR^^ 
copying. Lenox hote l notary. 

SUBSTITUTE WORK, 
'phone. 



1643-K OLD 




ZENITH 

Klllgt.'.E (f 



CITY 

the M>; 



Flrft street. 



TENT. NO. 1044, 
rterr. Maccat^-ef- Meet* 
r,tr\ ietoiiil aiiU tourtl. Frlrtay *',«''J''P 
,f ,.a<li month li; Miif-cal-e h-H. 2** 
Wt«1 Kim .tren C H. VWit com- 
.aaii.ler. <' H L.;< adb H li . U'^'J ««•» 
aciiUh 'phofje 224i-V 



GRACE BARNETT. FIRST NAT. BLDG. 



M. A. COX. 330 



MILLINERY. 

EAST FOURTH 



ST. 



MRS. B^ndt. 114 WEST FOURTH ST. 




JohriBon, aecre- 



tary. 



_^ 

I 



■ 



TTTTy'm AUrANlM. Puluth rouiirtl. No. 
i4f.V Meet* fmt and Uilru hYl<iay eten- 
,.\rs Kta' hall. Clinton Hrooks. «*«- 
^eli.r^ 401 burr.iWB liiilldirig. 

iillaha (•o.in.U No. 1M3-Meetj flrtl 
i,ml llilid Wcdnc!.aa> evmlngt; O.umbU 
Lall. West n.d A. M 
u: .North TwenUrth imnue we»t. 



WATCHES REPAIRED. 



Guaranteed Main Spring, 
cleaned. $1 Garon Bros. 



$1.00 
. 213 



watch 
W. Ist. 



J 




i MINNESOTA ^ 

'HiSTORlCAll 



3 DULUTH EVENING HERALD:gg 



TWENTY-SEVENTH YEAR. 

cMMMmine 

STRIKE FINALLY 
DECLARED ENDED 

Three Months' Stragglelj^LL TALES 



LAST EDITION. 



MONDAY, MAY 24, 1909. 



TWO CENTS. 



Conciliation. 

Miners Yield on Conten- 
tion Over the Open 
Shop. 

Operators Yield as to 

Discrimination Against 

Union Men. 



Survivors of the lii-Fated 

Columbia Are Heard 

From. 



MAYOR SHOT 
BY BURGLAR 

■■ ■ ■ ■• 

Thief in Cedar Rapids 

First Loots Home 

of Priest. 

Series of Sensational Rob- 
beries Readies Climax 
—Dangerous Wound. 




WILL ATTEMPT TO 

SETTLE ROAD STRIKE 



kf 



dl 



• veriim' 



Only One Woman Pas- 
senger Was With the 
Party. 



-li , May :■■( '''If 'T"- 

r'i.st-lnt'v ' r I'rtrm 

.i\ s til*? mail st*'aTiier 

\f.| ilu:if wiih 191 Bur- 

„j.,.,!^,-,i siiii' <'t>lumttia. 

■ .le of s-uff' vii)>^ 

... :...... .-v.>.Ih-.l. 

iwlng the fCTO:. •■ Mirul- 

,,w SI.I'' ■ • i^i'f nmt.-.s triist of 
ku I"; 18'^ ■' nl.ir!it of Vpnl :'.n. 

t I iif ' "^ "'■■'' '■ ■' • ' ' ...-.-- ^\ I'lfe 

no wiiKl at t1i« lime, but 

r;ipiris !r..ni 



Cfdar Rapiil?, Iowa. May 24. 
i<f « iifsfitionfil bnr{?lari€>'-- 

i'] ii ■ '■.: \ • :., I i y t I'tia \ . 

Mayer .fi-im T 

FrevUms :■■ tnHritJK 

|,..i,v... f ! . I, >[,,-.; r..l,l 
'I' ' 






« 'arnii'iiy 



A .series 
crime to a 

> V, 1-1 eluded 



M'Ml 



w.i: 

liandlt i-ni. .■■! t;.. <'.-!'■■ 
Mctki' (itsiMnl. 'ihf 
With Xh*' iiitniiff Bn<i 



S,ll'\'l 

<■{" llt-i 



F.. 



a stnnil on 



;(Han 
tlu- 



Ir.i :.; , 

I Mill i.( I he 
e.M,-n [rid. 



StilTli-K, VVllilf 111 



Carrnody'p 

athi-r J. J. 

ti.<^ jii-itpt 

• iue Wfrt- 

...ffair. the 

1. 1. 1110. two 

r frrapplfd 

-i ct ill t!:<- 

: . i.ot- 




COLLISION 
imTAL 

Two, Perhaps Three Lives 
Are Lost at Buf- 
falo. 



Steamer Western States 
and Tug Prince- 
tan Crash. 



TRAIN ROBBERS 
STILL AT LARGE; 
ALL CLUES FAIL 



RAIN 




THE CROPS 



YOUTH OF TEN 
KILLS A BRIDE 

Young Hunter Sees Hand- 

kercliief Flutter and 

Fires. 



CHARLES P. NEILL. 

\\ai-i.inpton. May 24.— A^ thf result 
of appf-als to liie federal board or 
mediation to use its effoits to settle 
tlie strikt of firemen on t!ie Gecrgia 
railroad, rommis^ioner o* Labor NeiU, 
a member of tht ooard, will leave for 
Atlanta tonight. 

■ ■ 
Propoxed lly <iiovcm<ir. 

Atlanta. Oa . .Ma\ 24.— \rlitratlon to 
settle the <.;eorKla railroad strike was 
proposed bv Governor Hoke Sinith to- 
dav The governor sngtre.«:ted a com- 
miBslon of six resident? of Georpia. 
three to repre-sent eaci. side 'n the con- 
trover.= y. The Georgia railroad lies cn- 
lirelv within this state. Involving a 
tace" Is.«tie. as to whether wliite or 
negro firemen s^hall "oe employed, the 
strike hafc become ef importance Jul 
over the .South. 




Buffalo. N. Y.. May 24.— Two, and 
perhaps three lives were los=t today in 
collision between the steamer Western 
States of the Detroit & Buffalo Navi- 
gation company and the tug Prince- 
ton in the liarbor off the United Stales 
life saving station. The two men 
drowned were firemen on the I'cince- 
ton. The tugs engineer is missing. 

Capt. James .Sullivan of the Trince- 
ton escaped t y swimming to the iJle 
saving dock. 

Tie Princeton had crossed the how 
ci*" the Western t^latt^ In order to tow 
the steamer to a dock. The tug \ale 
had taken the line off tlie \\ ei^U-rn 
Stales and was swinging around to 
Load up the river. The W^estern SiairS. 
iiowever. had greater headway than 
the captain ol the Yale calculated, for 
the steamer struck the Princeton amid- 
ships The Princeton turned over and 
the crew were precipitated into the 

^^I'assengers on board the Western 
States saw one ot the tug s men come 
to the surface and make a struggle lor 
life. Before help reaciied him, 
ever, the tailor sank Irom view. 



Heaviest Pali in 

Does Damage 

Oklahoma. 



how- 



Growing Grain in 
sas Is Beaten Into 
the Ground. 



Men Who He'd Up Over- 
land Limited Cover 
Tracks. 

Believed They Drove to 
South Omaha in 

Wagon. 

J. Theory That They Had 
^^^' an Automobile Is 

Discarded. 



Years 
in 



III, 



til 



IlKlHrATEATEMPli:. 



Al TO THINS TliniK: 

FIVE I'KltSilNS IN.Il UEO. 



iiiF 

side 



.\l, 



.if lilt' strea 



^uttel- 

.o.iwitf 



t 1 Id 



I'll r dii 'i I 
W, II, 
. .1 t 



iO<l V, 



Mc- 

i-rel\\ 

il I lu- 
ll I i no 



^liiin«*»>c,ta I'tuKlmlHiretw- 



I'tUT.ViOfc 



'iu«i fr 



■ Ul t 111' .-ili: 



•li her 

iiiutes. 

' vsSfh 



I. at 
•i;e 



t.im 



.iiroil 

from I 



IMTAIUAXS* A\M AL 

MEETI\(i IN BOSTON. 



B<i^ t en 



I;. 

c. 



OWEN HITS 

AT OCTOPUS AMERICANS 

RELEASED 



Majis.. May 24 

■ '» Mit the d.T V : 
. the All 

l.eiit tin 



— AVith meet- 

md a I ereptlon 

litarian 

ilay of 



NO LIQUOR 
I AT WEDDING 

Muskegon, Mich., Min- 
isters Declare They Will 
Not Officiate. 

Action Results From the 
Scandals Due to Drink- 
ing at Marriages. 



>ma Senator At- 
tacks Sugar Trust, Blam- 
ing the Tariff. 

Has Newspaper Assault 

Read to Get It 

In Record. 



11. 

on 



annual aniiiveisary w >* k observ- 

. t.idav. Tlie annual meeting of 

Isterial association was held In 

iig hall wiien I'rof. Wiillam 

(*.iii-ulh of l.jiwif''-. K:.'. sj-cke 

■•The HeliKi'.ii <■(" .\' ^v 



Were Sentenced in Mex- 
ico on a Charge ef 
Murder. 



Tuft (ioluK l<> IMtHhiirK- 

r'itlJJhurji. P« '^'"■^ :;4.— I're.'-i.ient 

Tiifi wliu will attend tlie fifth aniuial 

• ..... ..f the A.-'S"' '; "d Yaihl 

airday. ha- ..cepted 

t.i ;i t tiiol . . t'P next 
lirs-t rnitarja^. 
! ::.i.nriu' .Mr. Taft 
.•1 .Ml. a !iil M v- 
Mvy. Li.u»;j 
:,.-. Taft. 



.it. 



Muskegon. Mich.. May 24— (Special 
to The Herald.) — In llie six Holland- 
American churches is tliU city, where 
there is a large population of former 
Hollanders, the mii.lsiterfc announced 
yesterday an agreement not to officiate 
at weddings unless a pledge is made 
that thtre will le no linuor served 
either during or after the cereiriony. 
Tlie combined action of the minnsters 
follow several scandals which have 
{rrown out of drinking at weddings 

announced 

]\:\ s wliich 

\ ... 1 e cut 



BRITISH FLAG 
MUCH SALUTED 

Empire Day Observed 

More Generally Than 

Since Inauguration. 

London, May L4.— Eir.p.rt dav. \^ hi- h 
comes on the anniversary ol ti.t i .ril. 
of Queen A'ictoria, was more generally 
observed today than since its inaug- 
uration. The day has been selected as 
the occasion upon wh.cli the children 
ot the empire siiall lionor the Hag, 
and It was celebrated in every part of 
Great Britain. It is estimated that 
15 (ifiu uo'i )»e»sons saluted the national 
emblem, and in the United Kingdom 
alone close to 4, 000, 000 tlii'idren look 
part in the demonstration. Foi- the 
frsl time London had an organizec; 
celebration. Five thousand unilormed 
school b«>vs marched throiigh the main 
Ftreets ol the caidtal to Hyde park, 
where all the children gatliered and 
saluted the national flag- as well as? 
the emblems of fifty-six dominions arid 
coit'iiies. 



Vinita. Okla.. May 1'4.— One of the 
heaviest rain falls in years has swollen 
Grand rlvei and other streams to Ih-od 
stage, lausing much damage to rail- 
road property and farms, and partially 
submerging the town of Afton. At 
Catale a portion of the trestle work 
of the St. Louis & .San Francisco rail- 
wav bridge has been carried away. 

Ill Muskogee the streets and many 
liouses here were flooded by last 
nights rainfall, which amounted al- 
most to a ckiudburst. 
■ 
Grain In Uulnrtl. 

WcHlnglon Kan., May 24. — .Six in- 
,i,v of rain fell in ihree hours last 
fi^ht in a territory fifteen miles long, 
extending from Soutli Haven a few 
miles south of Wellington, into Okla- 
lioma The rain was accompanied h\ 
sheets of hall that heat the grain into 
the grounfi. 



TO COMPETE AT 



Omaha, Neb., May 24. — In spite of 
vigorous search for four masked ban- 
dits, who held up and robbed I'nlon 
Pacific train No. 2, known as the Over- 
land Limited, a mile west of the city 
limits, just before midnight Saturday, 
and obtained seven registered mall 
pouches, the authorities have as yet 
secured no tangible clew. 

.lohn P. Maurer of New Yoik city, a 
passenger, had not retired when the 
train was stopped. Expecting that tha 
rolltiers would go through the cars and 
rob the passengers. Maurer Jumped to 
the ground and hid in the weeds by the 
side of the track. He witnessed the 
robbery of the mail car. He remained 
in the weeds until a sheriffs posse 
readied the place after daylight. 



« Continued tm page 12 seventh column) 

BULL REPORTS 
BOOST PRICES 



MUSIC FESTIVAL New High Records on 

Chicago Board of 
Trade. 



i . ministers furtlier 
n.'.t men affiliated with 
' ■-. 1 \ I d iUiuor on Sunday 

1 1. If ! r' I., tl '■ churches. 




■*»]K » »iti *) >» ♦»**-»***** ■» ^»^** iMHMt 



ARE PESSIMISTIC AS TO 

REMOVINCi DEBKIS MASS. 

Leadviiie. Colo., M.-iy 24.— Those in 
charge of the work at the Tennessee 
Pass on the Denver & Ri(. Grande, take 
a verv discouraging view of the jk-s- 
siliilities of ever being able to move 
tlie immense mass of debris that h.is 
accumulated as a result ot tl.e recent 
cavein. There is a large force at 
work, but i.racticaily t.o r.rrgress Is 
being made, mater:. ■ '■ ■•!- 

fast as it is taken « 



^ y»»»»)K»»ir»»* * ***»******* * * 



Supreme Court Reverses 

Verdict and Dismisses 

the Charges. 



HRVING fl GOOD TIME— FISHING. 



»-»*»»»»*^-?le * » ** ** * » -»»*-** 



^^,r^,.^*^**^-^*-^fr^'^^^**^ 



FEET ARE 



Chit 1 



M 



iii.l 



! I IK 



I t 



Km hcrfonl. iIk- 



.M. .■*! 



u.i and 



K ui I.. 

:, of Fur 
. iin iirio-r 



.1 



w'f! e 

*Mil- 

.11:/ 

' 1 1- r 
1>\ 



i Ih 



..'laii ).:• 




SPLIT, TWO AGAINST TWO. 
OVER TERMINAL RAILROAD CASE 



Ot 



lilt 



.ill colli 




'4) P/iH ALL NEXT V^y — 



l3) QfT HIS H6ElS /all 
BL.STEPei) — 



New York, May 24 —The names of 
the five societies whieh compete for 
the Kaiser prize at the great music 
festival to be held In Madison .Square 
Garden from June 19 to 22. by the 
United Singing Societies of America, 
are annoutued today. They are the 
Kreutzer Quartet < lub of New ^ ork 
tl e Concorllia of Wir.cesbarre. present 
holders of the prize: Iho Junger Maen- 
ne chor ol Philadelphia; the Germania 
of Newark and the Arion society of 

Baltimore. „.,.». •«„..«.- 

The ludges are Prof. Max Mayer- 
Olbersleben. director of the ^^'>'^J 
School of Mns-ic In Wurzburg: Prof. 
Gustav Wohlgemutl). director of the 
Leispic Choral socieliej»: Max Spicker, 
the composer and conductor; Arthur 
Mess and Prof. Cornelius Kiibner, head 
of the music department of Columbia 
university. 

turnTgun 

on himself 

Lawyer Who Killed Wom- 
an Tries Suicide When 
Caught. 

John W. Beam Is Finally 

Brought to Bay by 

Bloodhounds. 



Lima. Ohio. May 24.— .lohn W P.. am, 
a well-known lawyer and real e^tatf; 
dealer, who was sought by the police 
on' charge of murdering Mrs. P.siella 
M r>lltz. a voung wii'.ow, who was 
tliOt ami instantly killed in her door- 
way last night, attempted to end lils 
own life toelay. and is in a serious 
conditU>n in a hospital. 

Immediately following the shooting 
the police sought Beam. Tlie chase 
continued throughout the night anjJ 
early today bloodhounds were used. 
They led the officers to the Beam 

home. . ■ , I. „ 1 

The man was found in his barn anu 
upon being ordered to surrender fired, 
but the shot did not take effect upon 
any of his pursuers. Beam then ran 
l.fhlnd the barn and turned the re- 
vedver up<m liimself. 

The killing of Mrs. Diltz Is said to 
have been the lesult of litigation be- 
tween the widow and the attorney "to 
recover property belonging to the 
widow. 



Chicago. May 24. — New high record* 

on tlie board of trade were established 

today, largely on bullish reports from 

j Kansas, predicting crop shortage In 

that state. May wheat early sold at 

iil.S3'*. 1» cents over Saturday. 

September contrncte brought $1.10, 




cent, ol its previous top price. 

Iiecember wheat. which touched 
$1 07%. showed evidence of inJluenllal 
bullish support 

JURY FIXING 
IS ALLEGED 

Reports of Attempted 

Crooked Work in 

Madden Case. 

Witnesses Attack Honesty 

of the State's Chief 

Witness. 



Chicago, May 24. — Itumors of an at- 
tempt unduly to innuence the Jury In 
the trial of M. B. Madden, F. A. Pou- 
chot and M. J. Boyle, labor leaders 
charged with extortion In connection 
with fake strikes were the subject of 
private conferences today between 
States Attorney Wayman and his staff. 

Time In court was largely taken up 
with hearing witnesses, who attacked 
the reputation for honesty ot George 
S Andres, the states chief wltnese. 
Andres testified that he persor.ally paid 
Madden ?1.000 to settle a strike on 
the plant of the Joseph Kllcka com- 

^"^in connection with the Jury hiHuenc- 
ing reports, the slates attorney Itjter- 
vlev.ed four men, one of whom Is Lrn- 
c-t Krulevitcli. a Ninth ward politician, 
•tald to be an intimate friend of Mad- 
den Krulevitcli was among those In- 
dicted V v a special grand jury Impan- 
elled some months ago to Investigate 
alleged frauds committed at the prim- 
aries of last August. 



-^ B€ i./* iX' UP POR A COuPL^ 
^Cif- vAjEP'^'w »A/iTH ^ORB PgET- 



IM I 



III? nsclf 



. !u*ed 



1 I » - 
cf>m- 



llook 



■ ith: 

:iie 



d tl 

con I 

lU-t 



lill lilt- 
■ t trioh 



lied li.V 
at two 

cionli I 
and , 



'I'l'i • 
but 

. ,.,1 ■ 



ol' 

-led. 
the 

111 i;ti- 
V n n I to 



-Imit *• 



4<Iii»iiM iCx|j!niiiM. 

:'4 --Juuge Ad 



I i! >.■ 



• did ) 
voteel 
voted 




UTS Q-o S 



/^^'X) JuSTAV. Coon 



A5»- 








THE 2AME. 
THiMCr Ovee 
AG AIM? 



FATHER TRIES TO KIDNAP ST. PAUL 
GIRL BUT IS FORCED TO YIELD HER 



St. Paul, Minn.. May 24.— (Special to 
the Herald.)— West Seventh street was 
the scene of another sensation last 
night, when an -attempt was made on 
the crowded street to kidnap little .M- 
tierta Hirst, aged 2 years, from her 
aunt Mrs. Leviei. when the latter 
stepped off a street car with the child 
in her arms. Hrs. May H'^^ "lother 
of the little girl, who Hves at -.16 W e-st 
Seventh street, said today tnat slie 
would swear out a warsant against 
wTlliam H. Hirst, the chileVs tather. 

from whom >he has V^*" *'fJ,'«';^.V,n;' /,^'' 
three months, charging him with the 
attempted abduction of Hie cnild. Mis. 
Loviei recognized him when he 
sriatched the child from her. and the 
mTn made no denial when taken to his 
wife's home by the police a short time 
Jitter the trouble. 

T^fe child was rescued from the arms 

the would-be kidnaper by -^ames 

Malloy of South St. Paul, after the lu- 



ll. 



I of 
Ma 



tie orie had been placed In a carnage 
and driven at great speed five blocks. 
Malleiv saw the man. who had evidently 
been waiting for a chance to get th« 
child, jerk the little one from .Mrs. 
Loviers liands and jumped Into a car- 
riage with it. Malloy gave chase IH. 
ills own buggy and, liy crowding the 
other man's team to Hie curb, succeeded 
in bringing the horses to a stop. 

Bv this time the police and a crowd 
of s'everal hundred nad iteen attracted 
bv the exciting chase, cauglt up wltl^ 
the two carriages, and little .Mheri^ 
wa« taken from lier fathers handd 
after a brief struggle, one of the first 
to reach the place was Mrs. Loviei, wha 
had run all the way behind the car- 
riage, and who recovered the child wltn 
a long breath of relief. 

The police questioned the man who 
had seized the child, but upon receiv- 
ing satisfactory assurance from him 
that lie was the father they allowed, 
him to go, much to the displeasure oC" 
the crowd which had grown threaten- 
ing. 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALP: MONDAY, MAY 24. 1909. 







Blues, 
Greys 
and pencil 
stripes are 
here ii\ over 
twenty dif- 
ferent styles 

— Priced 



$15 to $35 

MEET YOUR FRIENDS HERE. 
Superior St. at 4th Ave. W. 



HITS TRAIL 
FORCHINA 

Chin Ong Lee Goes BacK 

to Yellow Love and 

Happiness. 

She Waits for Him at 

Backdoor in Hong 

Kong. 



Chin OiiK L»-- 1^ "1 lov^. There ta 
„,, ,i.,ul.t abi.ut l!.:it ra-'. Kvpn the 

, ,, ,..t. TI-- ■'■ ■'. oi ----- -■* 

-i,,. .•.,mH\K' .>;, .-e, aiKl t»'»ia morn- 

■1 into the 

: (ilroait and 

.-I tor tht) 

I : a- ■ -.i.ipanled ''v 

;,>. : ,.uii''Ti. tiie p' 

Hi. kii'-'W lesH '>: 

A ,!;■ ,■ t . ■ ■ ' ■ -■• 

■.i..'.--l i.'-.iiiy ui 
!■ ■ ■" T.. 



: H 



"rni:iiE'~'T DRES.^ FOR trOMB^T* 



Dnluth 



IT. ii.iOltJ>J»tng ^ Olff. 



Cincinnati 







III*' I I )' i» 111 Wll'-> v\ »■-' 
1 : H , 



Exclusive Street Frqcks^reJ'^owan 

_ — > '■ I ~ — • ' ' " 

Important Fart of theRebuU^igSale 

Therano-e of garments now included in this sale covers wearables suit- 
able tor anv occasion— simple and elaborate styles appropriate for street, 
driving, motoring, cards, receptions and other occasions. 

_« Tk. O •>. PRINCESS OOWNS WITH 

Exquisite Three-Ptece Suits coats to «atc,. 

fine Prunellas, Tropical Worsteds and Imported Serges in the newest 
shades as saddle brown, burnt rose, pistache, and exquisite, but indetinite, 
shades of grey and tan. 

Regular $92.50 values at . . $79.50 Regular $62.50 values^t^,$55^ 
Regular $69lol^es at. .$59.50 Regular $59.50 values at. .$49.50 



Strictly Tailored Street Suits in Both the 

Higher and Popular- Priced Classes Show 

Very Liberal Reductions— For Instance: 




■I 

. all 
man 

,;ii III 

iHig 1)1 ack 



COPPER FROM 
ALASKA SOON 

Mines There Will Ship 

in Fourteen Months, 

Says L C Dillman. 

L. ' .■.::iua::. ;jr---i'l '•!! t an.l general 
n anafjer of the AUi-ska I'liited Copper 
Kxpl oration couuiany. la at the Spald- 
ing. 

Pi-psi,).,.. Hi 1. ■' is of th« opinion 

l^lmi It.. , ,i .; Alaska will be 

I,ja - market wilhii. foiir- 

an.l that tlic "■•:- -^ uul 

..|i roppHi- wil ■ d l*t 



,. -|ir 



tai" in. 'I"'- 
l(,r 4-iimPdy ■ 

dt-r p 

liKltt 

k 

t.l 

am! ciiuiit lii: 



K 
\\ 

iiiKi;- 
aii.i 



pie. 

! ■. . 1 1 I » ■ ', -■ I . 



m 

If 



llial I. 
, .-.■lici 



-.\V"-l I j 

■ ten- 

■si' i.iiii, the 

■ . Ml 

•1 III tllr* 

id 

1 ' i * 

■■■ie 



;.- piitk an<l \\-I.Ija car 



; IS tilli-d ■.\ 



■ •..•.Hi 

ti>-at- 
1 long- 






i 111 



..■!!■) 



1 !■■ 



II 

ai 

or 
III 
ft i 
P 



iiii't 



VV Ii.' ."I '.»t 




Hat Styles that are Smart 

Uncommon 

and 
Distinctive 

Perhap.s you now ' 
and then meet natty- 
Hats, that leave their 
Impress In even a 
fleeting glance. You 
^ wonder how the 

owner captures such treasures. J^e secret 
is yours If you want It. She .sook.s i'V" ''J- 
uality of style and goe.s where »t/.s found. 
You win find .styles, as clever as the cle%er- 
eat. if you visit our Millinery Department. 
Prices are .sensibly moderate S-}J{JJ' 
$6.75. $7:50. $8..->0, $10.00 and up to SI-o.O«. 
l»utU'ni Hate itMliicetl oiie-quarnr and 
one-third. 



Waists On Sale 

Imported Princes se Lace Waists $8.75 

KeouUir PrliM's $10.00, $11.50 and $ri.'>0. 

French models, trimmed u^th '••;^'' *;';'">:„^",^ 
Irish rrochet Laces. Also French Net Waists 
\vith solid Iri.^^h Crochet T^immin^s. 

Beautiful Lingerie Waists at S5.00 

Fine White Waists in Dutch neck or hlffh- 

collared styles— trimmed with tJ^'^^^^," ^^'^^^ Jf^ter 
and Hun-Embroidered— Long or Thjee-Quarter 

Sleeves. Regular prices $u..5 to »b..o. 



$55.00 values at $45^ $35^0values_at 

^Sm^^^^uI^ TT7$35.00 $25,00j^lues^ 



■. r n. 



■ h l-« t.H oil' 



t 111' 



> I L n I! - 

-talen 



t. 

t 

!'■ 

I 

t 



V. 




$25.00 

jj^qo 

ii^^^^l^K^Vlt^O^ ^ Fe^^^^liTthe Lot-Formerly $45.00 to 
$55.00— at $17.50. 

Choice Styles in Silk and Wool Afternoon 
Dresses Have Joined the Sale 

These are some of our htgher-class dresses in fine i-P-^^^;\ ^-ges, 
Prunellas Shintun-s and Pongees. Some are prettily fashioned with col- 
r"d n ;ot "rieeves; others show complete over-waists of embroi- 
dered or lou^ached net. The styles are distinctively of the h'^l^-lass type^ 
Regular $55.00 values at ^^37^ RegtUaL$35^values^t^^ 
^^^;;^^r%^^^Q^^.^^^^^ Regular:^2^values^^ 

- ' ^e ^^ $42.50 and $45.0 0j^alues_at $3i^50 

Regular $25.0 0^ndj 29.50 values a t $19.50 

Our sale of Gossard Corsets is a Big Corset Event. 
These amous front-laced corsets at ridiculous y low prices- 
and our experet corsetiere will fit you as you should be fitted. 



Gossard and L* Irresistible 
Corsets oti Special Sale this 

week-^$3.50, $5 and $8! 

Regular Prices $5.03 to $40.00 

It is a Big Corset Event. We 
have never conducted anything 
like it before, and do not believe 
Duluth has ever seen its like— 
(See ad. on society page.) 



Dainty Undermuslins 

Separate Pieces and Combinations 



Princesse Dress 
Slips 

Full length Dres.-^ 
Slips, lace or embroi- 
dery trimmed. Prices 
$3.00 and np. 

I nil and <-<.nipleto 
Hne.si in t'or>ct Cover-v 
and I>n»\ver?» al 50c and 
up. Chemise-* and 
Guwns at $100 and up 

Brassiers 

Corset - cover - and - Dr. DetmePs Mesh 

drawers or corset-cov- Brassiers — somethim; 

er^^ndskirt combina- i entirely new and hy- 

t^tn^nl^Se of wide gienic and n p.-r .-ct 

llouncing. embroideries support and ;;«- ^ 

or lace and embroidery reducer f.n^ ^*'' . V,!: 

trimmed. Prices $1-75 Price $»••»<»• *>"'•; 

to $18.00. ' Bi-assicrs at .,0c and $1. 



Skirts 

Many styles at many 
prices, simple, fancy 
and elaborate. Prices 
$1.25 to $60.00 each. 
Very effective styles at 
$U..>0, $1.'»0. $5.00 to 
$7..50. 

Combination 
Garments 



11 



[.. li.-- iMrlli* 



• vvn. 



C'l.i ■■ 



NATIVES WANT 
ARITHMETICS 

I III 1,1 It 

Board of Presbyterian 
Foreign Missions Re- 
quests More Funds. 



i>- 



t 

and 

tie!- 

l>y .t>« 
York 

ass- 
ii,"i - 

!■ 




part oi I'' 



T'l- rirr 



t.llvi-Il ov 



LOSES A FINE 
! EMG ROD 

H. H. Turner's Outfit, 

Worth $25, Stolen Near 

Colbyville. 



,l.:i iii.l made the recipient of a 

heauiifui cut glass dish. ., .^,,,„_, v 

Those pre:»ei.t wer.?. Mesdames N. 

Ol.ii.n. Berley. WoJlutn. C. ^7-^*''^%/; 'l 
,on. A Anderson. O. T J^^rnstad. Stpnn 
I- And^r-.on. N. N.?l3on. .r ^ •^']'^";: 
■ ,.„l.s..r.. R.MU!;-rss^n. Tarald.son. Han- 
soil H*»ndt{ ks-.n. Nelson. .1. <>. \'?'VV 
iZon. A. Sl.v.tson' Alice Mo^n, M-f«h^- 

H.>n. Whal**i. *>l:»en. B'.'^f,'^!;^,' 
n. M:-<.s Paa'.ine Solum ana iie%. 
v. Bjerke 
i i.^: 'la,rk>?<'. 

HIS NICE CIRLS 
WERE CLIPPED 



r M > 1 . 



I 111 I'j our 



church 



• k ba 






, is diSt J 




. 


>t bru.^h Ii 

th'' flsluv 




.'ime 

. be 

1 disip- 

la s«in\e 

mi) the 






,'. .■:! a dc- 



Clt--: 
Ne. • 

11,. liMl.l.i 



Lcstei* I'ai'k. 



lOai:-'.- iMiiiur. 



n ! i<Vi t. 



ATr\('HMKNT Til ISSUE 

IM.YNCHlXd ( .\SE. 



.\i:iv ;M- 



Til' 



;;liton 

irged 



ti. 

tl.' 
J • ■ ' 



u 
Gi 

ti- 



'. No 
.rma 



<i. 1 1, i: s ^^ ■ • " 



■ ! ISlli 



ArSTUIA\-J.\FANKSE 

TllEATY RKPOHTKI) MADb. 



{;: 

t' 



f 
1. 

(-•■ 

A 
<■ 

( 

6' 



,: foreiKii office 

iittrdinK the re- 

litary treat;.- ; 

;il: 1 .lapai;, 

■ ■■ ijvent 

. ,;i.j en- 

I iii.s.iht. 



.> Lake ■'"- 

, -,. .n- 

ke 

and 

lit to 
The 




SPENT NIGHT 
ONJHE RIVER 

Another West Duluthian 

Has Sad Experience 

on Sand Bar. 



1 ,. ( 



iti ' 'm tiiui li, ■"! 
have a total 
i/r.>y and an *u 



J, .1 a trjfii.i m '■'•' ' ■ ' 

i.;s predleament. 

'I'hi.j affern»>on * ooat w •:. , _ 

wlam for t'he purpose of pulling -The 

lii/el P ■• from tfie Bhallow spot. Mi. 

•Hn ]>r let' late yesterday naernoon 

' 'rip up the river, but his P easure 

Vame to a sudden termination 

ti the boat stU'-k. .. i -..~ 

•1 .water In the river la yerv low 

, ; .,.'mg aee.>rdlnK to the boat inen 

shlfmm aanda have i hanged 

iricls. making U neees.iary for 

men -o learr ' ^P^;'-'f,!'f ."^ 

, g.j in order ' ' tli^" '"«" 



Ball Player Gets Revenge 

on Over Zealous 
' Youngster. 

s-v^ 't reveri^" f>>i )ne n;e:nhor of the 
>ik Hall baseoair ai^'gregatlon of West 
iMiluth for treatment received at the 
handj of the Clipper fans Immediately 
following the game played at the East 
end tn Superior yesterday, caused some 
over-zeaiuus Superior boj-s hair to be 
clipped this morning. 

The aftermath of the CUpper3-Oak 
Hal Ig *me wa.* anything but a pleas- 
irt one for the West Duluthians. It 
was found necessary to almost run the 
gauntlet after the x^'"^ l'\f**Vu?/''? 
.-.ir and become targets of mud or 
aavtbnig else that came handj The 
fhiowlnl was especially Indulged m by 
ft numher of young boys. 

one of thp voungsters came a littie 
hi- "oo nearone of the. Oak Halt men. 
Theodora Fredell. The lad had long 
Tirly hair and appeared to be some- 
wliVt of a ringleader In the affait. 
rvdell removed a Urge piece of gum 
tr.rm his moutl; and at an opportune 
m,.m.MU ilapp-d It down and rubbed It 

"VhVs ^Siu|"th;%;:^""had his l^lr 
ruTioei Miifger Ja-k Oram of tne 
:, 1^^ Halls- stVr^d today t'^at a return 

g.me with the ^"^t'*''' -ThP r Ino^rs 

nl.ived In two weeks. The (..Uppers 

M. P.alUps '^ijf get a square. deal. If nothing more. 

^'Vlfe Oak Halla.were defeated by a 

'■'rn t"o ?he"last Inning the exciting 
KaV^> stood 3 to 2 in fav,r of the 
IC^^t Duluthlans. But with the aid of 
r n-lple sii^al aided by two pa-^^«- 
IP the fhe Clippei-s^^ran ''i,,i^"^k hTus 
— tiirr>vd the trick on the Oak H.aus. 

Seors- Culien was in especially good 
firm yesterday anJ threw a tine game 
•or the Oak Halls He only allowed 
hr^ehl's during the entire game and 
Ltruok out twelve m-n. Cadotte. w-ho 
Massed for tliri B«<»t enders Is credited 
wmi Ave strikeouts and allowed eig'ht 

hitdl. 



t.pciallv on upper Central av.-.iui- =in.i 
on North Fift y-eighth a venue we.-t 

ARBOR DAY IN 
WESTJ)UL11TH 

The Children of the Ely 

School Plant Many 

Trees. 

Thirty-seven tre^-s were i.lanted 
around' the Ely sehool this aft.rnoon 
bv the primary grades and tlu- children 
of tlio school at their own in.Hvidual 
homes planted thi-s year 10s upple 

Today was Arl...i l.iy at the lAy 
school and It was observed wlih the 
s.ime spirit as if the governor had 
named it In a .slate-wide proclamatyoi. 
\viVpn the trees were planted this ali- 
en oon the following . prognun was 

»..., in the school, the weatlo-i out- 
^.'d:"beVng too cold to permit of the 

'•''^lom'l-Recitatlon. ^TX.e Seeds.'; 
.vong. -The Trees;" recitation. The 



nanf." recitation, -Merry.. Sunshine: 

;or.kr "Snowbirds Message. 

■ I loom ::— "Flower Song. 

Koom 3-Song. -Ilobins Keturn. 
Room 4— S.mg. 'May S?.onS j 

Room 5— Recitation— -W hull i " t- i'' 

Ytoom 6— Song ''i5""3ef .. 

Room 7— Song, Summer ^^ '"'^'^- ^...,_- 
Room 8— Song, "Woodsman. -Spare 

^'^,',oT.r'9-Song, -NOW to Own a 

"itoom 10-Reading, -Famous Trees. 

■ 

Will Oppose License. 

Tr is understood tliat opposition will 
arise it the council tonight at ts re^'u- 
lar^sslon to the granting of the liquor 
uJensc to Nicholas Buffer, al the old 
TPtler stand StJ^'J Grand avenue. 
^*^rwo \-ears ago the "cense was re- 
voked "Twice before residents In tht 
dlstrfct have defeated attempts to le- 
...peii the place. ^ 



rows also a number of horses. Applj 
to .John Winners. Ramsey street and 
Coniral avenue. West Duluth. 

Rev J. a. l.eitch will leave this we-^^ 
lor a three months' tour of .sootlanO. 
%vhere he will visit his old lioine. 

"The Passion Play" was -shown last 
eveniue at the St. .lames Catliolic 
rhur.li by P. J. Drummond .with motion 

'"waiter Tiiexton of Minneapolis, for- 
merly cashier of the Merchants Bank 
of West Puluth. was a business visitor 
in West. Duluth tliis morning. 

William Nolan, whose hand was in- 
jured last week wliile al work at the 
Rieekhoff box factory at New Duluth. 
was today reported as *"JV"\ "«•.,_ ,,,,, 

Th.- funeral of Ida tlu ":>"r^i^- ' 
daughter of Mr. and Mr.s. f liarle.s Dion 
of 211 North Fifty-first avenue west 
who died Saturday afternoon, took j.Iare 
yester.lay with interment at i.al\ai> 

cemetery. , r-rmt 

Wanterl— Boy 17 years old. Oieat 

^■^ The'T.adles' Guild of the Hoi;:. "^P^f 
tlp Episcopal church will meet \\ ednes- 
day evening with Mrs. Mooney al the 

''"w'kVch repairing. Hurst, W. Duluth. 

■* 

THE PECULIAR XATlt)XAL MEAL. 
Lond.di Chronicle; It is not only i" 
Scotland that breakfast is the charac- 
teristic national meal. Travel where 
vou mav. the first meal of the day i-s 
the one that strikes the foreign note, 
lun. heon and dinner having gradually 
absorbed cosmopolitan qualities that 
ar.- n.it even confined to hotels. But 
you never feel so much of an Englisii- 
man as when Switzerland gives you 
rolls and butter and honey, and noth- 
ing more, with your coffee; or when 



France makes this into one exriui-»Ue 
crumbling "croissant," with an inch or 
two from a yard Dug loaf, or when 
Denmark adds »reani instead of milk 
to the coffee ami a dangerous piecJ 
of pastry to the black bread and r .e-,!.? 

white roll. , , - . 1 

Yet our English breaktasl iieratao 
an institution only in the eighteen cen- 
tury, liefore that only royalty bieak- 
fasted oft- meat, bread and cheese and 
ale The commoner, t-iieh as i eP>w, 
took merely a morning draught ot but- 
tered ule. 

NEARLY KIL|'e1> MKNEI.TK. 

The report spread last November that 

King Menellk of Abyssinia had nai -v.- 

iv escaped electrocution, .says th- New 

York Sun. Detaisl are now supplied 

in Dr Vitalien, a Frenchman, who has 

l.een for some lime King Menehk s prl- 

yatf physician i, .,-,i 

In- king lias always been a h.u 1 

work.-r. (Vrtain adverlis.-menUs pnnl'^^ 

n fore go newspapers and telling how 

outh lui.1 been restored ]>y 'lY'^^'^lt'^i 
electricitv, attracted his attention at a 
Un-^e when he was sufrering «»•"'" '^V'^^f- 
work. He told Dr. Vitalien t at he 
wished to take a cour.se "'/''",,[» 
thiM-anv The doctor dissuaded him. 

ASvrian doctor, who possessed some 
electric apiiaratus of a primitive order 
an! in a .somewhat dilapidated condi- 
tion, manag^-d during a t^"'l»oi-ary ab- 
sence of Dr. Vitalien to p.-rsua-ie King 
Menelik to try his machinery. Ti « 
Svrian doctor, who kn-w ver> little 
about how to use .-lectric ai.paratus. 
nearv electrocuted th-- king. Dr \ ita- 
lipii was summoned and succei-iiea in 
saving his life. 



West Duluth Briefs. 



. •, ■ wad-J"! 
ts morn- 
■ .lling 



Citv, 
Plul- 



West 

is in 
mis- 
yes 



Fare'.vell .Surprise. 



QUEEN MARGHERITA. 

The Mother of King Manuel of Italy, 
Is Seriously III. This Picture Is 
,^,j i From a Recent Photograph of Her 
Majesty. 



Mrs L J Nordhein >£ 7)1) -. .i ith 

su'et, who will leav^ on June ., tor 

1 itter Root vall^v. Mont., where she 

Win make her home with ^,^er^ husband 

who Is super ntendrfnt of ,i laige tract 

V lami for the Summerdale Improve- 

n.nr Vompanv. was pleasantly sur- 

ris.-d by a number of the women ot 

Oui Savior'j Norwegian Lutheran 



New Cement Walks. 



Contracts were, let today for the 
.^ ^natr-n th.n of a number of new ce- 
,.?ilft walks aU)ng,lhe main thorough- 
?Ir" in wVsttialulh., Those that have 
btVr aiven oii Central avenue are. The 
rlflev i>rop-rty fOf fifty feel and on 
3!i adjoin nk L'-'*'! property for fifty 
feet The c.Tril'-aS" '^^'■'^ ^^^ ^"^ ^^'^ 
* T^e '"KUton ronjtructlon company is 
T'so doing -.-msi.trable cement side- 
walk work in. We.^t Duluth at the pres- 
ent lime la Ihe rtsident dUtrlola. ea- 



Mrs. J. B. Jones V^. *^V ,V i ht 
Utah, was today registered at the 
llns hotel at West Duluth. 

F O'Brien of Virginia was a 
Duluth visitor over •";i''yif>i. ., 

A Fox of Devils Lake >• i'-. 
West Duluth on a short 1 usiness 

**' Mis^'**Rowena Olson of Superior . 
teSav visUed West Duluth friends and 

'■"Nelson Utman and wife of 7'm"/,[.- 
land, Wis. are the^ guests ,^' .,^l\..f "^,^ 
\frs Andrew Carl Carlson of o-8 Noiin 
FifTy-tird avenue west f..r a few days^ 
The ladles of Westminster Presbyterian 
churcii are planning on an entertain- 
ment for Tiuirsday evening at Great 

^'''v^.?'""RenV— Nicely furnished room. 
wRh board. ' lu' Sorih Fifty-ninth 

^"^Uss Lufu rraliegh of 626 North 
Fiftv-ninth avenue west has returned 
from Louis Minn., where she has been 

'"^^leod^ore Fr'edell returned this morn- 
ing to riiisholm, where he is employed 

^^^Emlnler^'l^^urkrieft this morning 
f.,r Minot N. D.. where he wiU b« 
employed 'by the' Stone-Ordean-Weli- 

•"'wednesday night is past masters- 
night for the West Duluth Masons, and 
wH be observed at^ ^l^'' "VT\i 
Km'lld Lodge. No. 19S. A. F. & A. M. 
^ Rev S A Jamleson, pastor-at-large 
forthe Duluth Presbytery, will conduct 
nraver meeting tomorrow evening at 
Th^ Wpsimlnster Pre-sbyterlan church 
at West Duluth. Sunday he will preach 
lai the communion service. ^11,1, 

I For sale— A carload of new mllcU 




ii..—iiir -■"•>—■ 



Wife of 
tercsts 
But as 



MRS CHARLES W. MORSE, 
the Convicted New York Banker Has ^een Devoted to Htsn^ 
Since His Conviction. She Recently Secured $135,000 Bail lor tlim. 
Yet the Court Has Not Accepted It. 



\ 









THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: MONDAY, MAY 24, 1909. 



8 




May Readjusted Price Sale 

Afur llll^ neck ihis May tw..i .... havt- iHCnnu a ihin^' "f t!.< i-ast. It has truly been 

.1 mat >a]e — Immght us lot- <f bn?-i)U'^> — made uv many luw fmiMls— ami n. -w i« r tlie 

i finale — many goml cl t<T -aft ni\«-tuiMH- arc _\ 1 1 left — hut dout wait — cumc 



The Garment Section "^'fdf^ 

le the lu.. u : < IniK •'•.trui- thf -alt— and n. v < iider. l^et t u- never of- 

at a 1 luu most X* te a fev .1 ilie readir.-ic*i jik^- and rt-nieniber 

* <uii- ' a-ht f. r >i . ,..: -.dc }mriH.sc-. but taken right out frMincnn le^-aiar Inu- : 

^>^ to $45.00 SUITS FO R ^31.50 

$35.00 to $37^0 SUITS FO R $37.50 

$27.50 to $32~50 SUITS FOR • • • • $24.50 

$22.50 to $25^0 SUITS FOR $ 18.50 

$16 .00 to $18.50 SUITS FO R $12.50 

$22.50 LONG COVER T COATS FOR $17.50 

(52-inch length semi-fitted half satin lined.) 



SAYS THEY 
MUST 




Senator Hcyburn Warns 

Republicans of Another 

Election Day. 

Demands to Know IF 

Lumber Wages Are 

to Be Cut. 



Two Bargain Tables 

} .:.i N't':^ ..f Mii.vt'.n . . Shlrtwuins. 

wrappers aiid kiiiiona.M, r.riKinoi'y 
, -li $4, divldid into tuc lots, at 

25c and 50c 

•■!. r.!.-ns< . iKt-. c.'> •■T.'K-in.'r fir* '-irrif ..f if.t n-j 

frorii ; g and ..m 

• s. l:iu: ■--- .- :; all waj-n 

times what we a^k fr.r 

infcy take up better than 



A Snap in Leather Goods 

<iur fiitin- me vt i-Htln r l .i>:s, p< . ket 
books and lursi h f< r this u'«k 

One-Third Off 

h\-tnu HeKitlur Prh es. 



Hosiery 

Fifty <]>'^:' r, i^aUes' Fas^t Black IJ'^U l^ace 
Ankle H<i'^< regular i>rice 50c and 7 0c — 
this week, f .» i pair 

39c 

Handkerchiefs 

Fiftv .iiz' -r riiee to lOc each — 

42 teiit-- a I.. < • ■■ 

3V2C Each 




Was h Suits 
and Coats 

^rr l,.lif npU'il- 
tllil mIkim t n ■' • 

*.|ill^ aitl t • :i t- 
In »» >'*'( »v ill- 
lit "It . 



I 




/CLCTJl 



srPEIilOR, 

Toaer und Uroudivdi/. 



Wash Suits 
and Coats 

*'>e th«> uplen- 
tU«l khotr I n n Cl 
of n»*w Wa»sh 
Siiitii and ( or.(i> 
III Tie*! wlu- 
duiv. 



PICKED QUARREL 
VflTH STEPSON 

Edward Davis Arrested 

as Result of Visit to 

Wife's Home. 



away ''\'- 



; l^reai ' iifi'i 



, >■ 1-, . t 



■F!<iw.'ir«1 ! 



■■.irr.'t S;,t 



f , 



tt I LJ iltl 

ii tlfteen 

■■11 



SHEBOIJTH TO 
BE OBSERVED 

The Jewish "Feast of 
Weeks" Will Begin 



G. A. R. PLANTS A 
MEmiAL ELM 

Richmond Booker Buried 

With Military 

Hsnors. 



Tuesday. 



Tl'n .'♦■n (-1. 






A. H fc». ■ 

in«-rii«.i-jai t . 

in herior cf 1; 

rfiiut.Jis Wert 

tf.e vault aiiti i'i;.rt ('; 

( , : ■ ,ij(r ot ;.!!■. 



..: lei iiu«>ii jilai.led a 

l'..rttit Hill ctmetery, 

r: . .,. 1- l>. ■ K< ; . whose 

..Niiiia;. leiii'v'Vfd from 

II, ft ftrave. The 

- .1 ! ,. I ; '1 t>ie 

V' t ! (_ . l.at jre 



iiieii 
,.,..1 At. 
lU-iitii 



■- V''. aijd at iliC 

t.ldest vei- 

I'uliitt). The 

i>. rrgt Satiuday 

ri-.e tiring *(iund 

I A li.t local 



The T 



I 



FOIK LIVKSKKlMHiTKn 

LOST. lUETd WA'^HOITS. 



\"t ; t I 

on I 
eai U. 



. 'i su'ldlers 

I if' St arid 

irienn.>iiai tree, i.resenteil 

Henry Cleveland. The 

. •'• \: ;. rirt le. and each 

< :. Hl.ovelful ol 

i . ,.!-<» tl.e trte. 



Washington. May 24. — Senator Hey- 
lurn resumed his speech on the luniher 
schedule in the senate today and sub- 
mitted a large amount of evidence con- 
cerning the co.st of producing fini-shed 
lumber and the need of a differential 
duty. 

.Senator Heyburn inquired how much 
it was proposed by the advocates of 
reduced lumber rates to cut wages of 
laborers in the lumber camps. He 
wanted to know whether it was the 
uiilhs in the West or South that it was 
proposed to close. 

Only a dozen senators were on the 
ih'or. ' "The circulation of the Congres- 
Hlonal Record iy so limited and tiie in- 
terest of the pres.s on thig question so 
t^uiall. that 1 prefer to speak to those 
who must vote on this question." the 
Idalio senator .said. H^> then questioned 
the presence of a (luorum and tlie roll 
was called. A quorum responded and 
•Mr. Heyburn repeated his question. 
Tiie silence which followed was broken 
hy the senator declaring, "if you don't 
answer these questions here you Mill 
.inswer them wlien election day comes 
around and vou want to hold up to the 
peciple the 'fruits of the Republican 
party." 

Ill the meantime so many senators 
had again left the cliamber that a 
quoruni had to be brought in by an- 
other roll call. 

A clash between i^enators Heyburn 
and Clapp followed the former's asser- 
iK.n that the promised tariff revision 
was made by the Jew Republicans at 
tlie Chicago convtntitm in the hour of 
their fright. 

.^^enator Clapp asked if the Idaho 
.•■cnator did not want to withdraw that 
f^latement. 

"No. I am not afraid of ghosls. 
wherever I meet them," replied Mr. 
Hevburn. "The people knew the Re- 
publican party could be trusted to do 
the right thing, although inadvert- 
ently a bad promise crept into the 
platform." 

Senator Burkett followed Senator 
Heyburn by defending a reduction of 
the lumber rates. 

CASHIER GIVEN 
FIVE-YEAR TERM 

Frank Lepisic Convicted 

of Embezzlement From 

Prentice Bank, 

Phillips. Wi.«=., May 24.— oSpeclal to 
The Herald.) — Frank Lepisic. former 
cashier of the Prentice State bank, was 
found guilty on Saturday of the charge 
of embezzlement of T-.t'OO and was sen- 
tenced to prison for a term of Mve 
vears at hard labor. Lepisic is a 
vuung married man and had a nrft- 
class reputation until this trouble. The 
cause of his downfall \\as living too 
fast a life fur his income. 

In pronouncing sentence. Judge Par- 
i.-^h read him a lecture and incider.tally 
gave some pertinent advice to young 
men who hold nsponsUde position.s and 
handle other peoples money to remem- 
ber that all that belonged to an em- 
ploye was his salary, and that only on 
pay day — not before. 



glorious weather. The match between 
K. A. Lasseen. the holder of the title, 
and C. A. Palmer, naturally attracted 
a large gallery, but the principal in- 
terest of the day focused on the play 
cf the American champion. Jerome D. 
TraverS of Mount Claire, N. J., who was 
opposed bv W. A. Henderson, one of 
the hardest match figrhters of the Royal 
and Ancient Golf cluli. 

WOULD INCREASB 
CARRIERS' PAY 

Steenerson Introduces Bill 

for the Rural Mail 

Men. 

Washington, May 24. — An increase In 
the rates of pay for rural free de- 
livery mail carriers is provided for in 
a bill introduced by Representative 
Steenerson of Minnesota. It 'provides 
tliat after Julv 1. 191L letter carriers 
or the rural d'elivery upon routes ex- 
ceeding twentv-four miles in length 
shall be paid at the rate of $37.50 
per mile per annum for the first twen- 
ty-four miles and $18.75 per mile per 
annum for each additional mile of 
ruute over twent>'-four miles. 



Gifts for Graduates 

Desirable as well as practical; gifts that Vv-ill be appreciated. 
We mention a few and there are numberless other eqtially good 
suggestions. 

New Directoire parasols in silk, from $2.00 to $9.00; in linen, 
all colors, from $1.50 to $5.00. 

Pretty Handbags, in all leathers and sizes, prices from $5.00 

to $16.50. 

Fans with pearl handles at $1.50, $2.50, $3.00 and up to $12.00. 

In jewelry the variety of dainty gifts i> Itgnn. 

La Vallieres with coral, jiearl, topj.z and other settings. $1.0© 
to $8.00. 

New designs in Hatpins from 75c to $3.00. 

Bracelets in plain gold or with richly set effects— $1.00 to $7.00. 

Dutch C'llar Pini in m:.ny new ideas lr<.n:i 75c to $3.00. 

Pretty Brooches and Belt Pins— ^1.00 to $6.50. 

Earrings, latest novelties — 75c to $5.C0. ~ », 

Latest novelties in Jet Jewelry, Hat i'ms. Collar Pnis, Combs, 
Barrettes— 75c to $6.50. 

RitLons for Graduation 

Novelties in pink .-.nd white taffeta with moire edges eight 
inches wide— 65c to 8£c a yard. 

Blue Taffeta Sash Ribbon with hair bow to match m b.'W-knot 
design six to eight inches wide. Prices from 75c to $1.0C a yard. 



Sh'a*<res"fn Wool DrCSS 



Fab 



rics 



1((IL. LOINSBEHKVTO 

( OMPLKTE HISTOllY. 



, II. 



N 



-1 



- ii ii y 



to 
ot 



POLICE LAND 
A LID LIFTER 

Bartender Pleads Guilty 

to Violation of the 

Liquor Laws. 



oti.er • 
are r^i 



Pa » 
Ml. !i. 



1 1 



.^r«l!t MUImI lyws 

X!a\ 11^ 

Km iw ti 



ll.lel p r 

i, n Apr:. 
was ll.< 



.. ■ 'Ihc pt't 

•-tarted ^' i... ;• ■ .. is ago 

' ijtif^ lierr.v I.- 1(1 it- eom- 

• :<i The colonel has 

ilai !- In Fargo and is 

.- t.. \\ :. -l.iiigton to resume I 

Ii ti.t (i« jiartmcnt of the 

Ik will resign that position] 

lid return to llilb state. H.j 

pioneer editor tf the stale 



Miss Fitzpatrick 

Left last night for the Ki\^.t to select 
an entire new stock of Mid-summer 
Millinery. Watch for announcement on 
her return. 



ij 



Hrid If. « xci ptionaliy well i)ual:.1ed foi 




■ I-. 



1-: 



ll.« 



.l.na u:. 



Notice to Tax Payers 

The time allowed by law for the payment of the first 
half of the 1908 taxes without penalty, will expire en May 
31st. But as May Slst this year falls on a legal holiday, 
taxes will be received as late as Tuesday, June 1st, without 
penalty. 

W. A. HOIGATE, County Treasurer. 



THE BABY ('(IMKST. 



ThiTe Fhotupraplui s .Vie Kept K 
Biisj Taking the Fieture^. 



l.ttWSUll 



A!\Y KIVKH FAUMEU IS 
SHOT l\ LEiJ BY OFFK ER. 



-leruay 

atei pa 
.|iiet 1- 








1 N ( . . 


.-•I 1 t (■ 


k 


. 1 V\ J i 1 


1 .g ! tl 




voyed 


the 




mill of the 




The engine 




• ('.BrnaKe.l. 






♦ a s 1 






. 'lies, 






\ 






I...,. I 






who 



MINE ACTIVITY 
IS NOW RENEWED 



Chinese Colliery WorK 

Was Suspended, Due 

to Royalties. 

' ■ ' '' I: i. Mav .i -^.\'.:.ve de- 

: ■ . Awt'vv li.'j. mines, 

I. i.v north west oj Tsuaii Tslu has 



L'l n ;■. t 



r.f- Wf-.l. 



1 



t!.. 



l.-lPt 



<i|{EI:K V\ H(I f\lLLEl» 

PailtFMAMSTUIEB. 



'■" irlSura^H;^ 



aii'l 

at-..' 



T'l . t \:\y, • K..::- .M.I :: . >':. . 



1" Ii 



1 

\' 

(. 

tl 



i' 



ten 

. \i.r- 

Ui ..e per lent 

the government, 

apanese protest 
' III of other liian 

BoUi difficulties 

Hiitish or Amer- 

„. ii. If employed and 

.ent of r"valtie.>* have been sus- 

Accordlng to an English ex- 

magnttic iron ore at these 

S(' per <ent pure and is suf- 

Mipply the world for four 

Tlie Awtow district Is rich 

i.ii limestf.ne and is orily fifty 

I ni tidewbui. 



DLRICH OFF FOR 
PHILADELPHIA 

Will Meet Two Quaker 

City Scrappers While 

Tliere. 

Curley Clrich left last night f.'r 
Philadelphia where he will mix with 
some of the Eastern scrappers who 
think they have the goods. 

While In the Quaker City he will meet 
Young Loekrey and Adam Uyan at the 
Nonpareil club. Both these men are 
fast, but Curley thinks he can get 
awav with them. , , 

George Gunther is In that city and 
he and Curlev will train together 
Gunther has several fights on. and 
after they are over, according to a 
letter received in the city from him, 
he intends coming back to the Head 
of the Lakes country In an endeavor 
to get on again with Walter White- 
head. ^ ^ , 

Curley intends to be gone about six 
weeks and will bring Guntlier back 
with him. Tlie black scrapper is sure 
that if given another opportunity he 
can get safely away with Whitehead, 
m 

Plaver \\ ill Reeover. 

Racine. Wis., May 24— Karl Burwell. 
a member of the Oslikosh. Wisconsin- 
llllnoise league team, who yesterday 
was struck by a thrown ball while 
running to first base, suffering a con- 
cussion of the brain, regained con- 
sciousness shortly after 12 o'clock last 
night. Physicians at the hospital be- 
lieve he will recover. 
m 

Golf Tournament Begins. 

Edinburgh. May S'l — Play in the first 
round of the British Amateur Golf 
chainpionBhlp tourniunent, over the 
.Mulr field course, opened today in 



ADANA SITUATION 
MUCIHMPROVED 

Hundred and Fifty Mos- 
lems and 95 Non-Mos- 
lems in Custody. 

Mersina, Asiatic Turkey, May 24. — 
The situation al Adana. the scene of 
fatal rioting during the recent antl- 
Chrlstiun outbreaks in Asiatic Turkey, 
shows definite improvement in the last 
four days. Tiie commission of Inves- 
tigation' is busily occupied, but no 
judgment has been given nor have 
any nunlshmeuts been executed. A 
considerable number of Moslems are 
In prison, but not men of Imporiaiit 
positions. 

Hev. Herbert Adams Gihbons of 
Hartford, Conn., a missionary of the 
American Board of Commissioners for 
Foreign Missions, has testified l.-efore 
the commission as to the killing of 
Armenians at government headquar- 
ters. No other foreigners have yet 
been called upon for evidence. 

The official re<ords show that 150 
Moslems and ninety-five anti-Moslems 
were taken into custody in connection 
with the disorders. 

ISLAND TARIFF 
BILL IS PASSED 

Goes Through the House 

After Several Futile 

Efforts. 

Washington, May 24. — The Philippine 
tariff bill was finally passed by ilie 
house today, after several previous ef- 
forts had been made to put it through, 
but wliieh failed because of the lack 
of a quorum. 

Immediatelv after the house met to- 
day Mr. Macon of Arkansas continued 
his demand for a quorum. The clerk 
began to read the journal, but was in- 
terrupted bv tlie Arkansas member 
with a statement that so important a 
state document could not be considered 
in the absence ot a majority. 

.Speaker e'annfm counted 175 mem- 
bers present, twenty-one less than a 
ijuorum, whereupon a call of the house 
was ordered. The sergeant-at-arm-s 
was directed to bring in the absentees. 

FOUND IMMORAL WOMEN 

AT HISBAND'S HOTEL. 

In the divorce action of Iiavid Chris- 
topher the defendant has filed her 
answt'i- in v.hich she < barges the 
plaintiff with Improper conduct and 
with keeping immoral women at the 
LaKc Avenue hotel. 228 Lnke avenue 
north .... 

She states that she has visited the 
hotel but six times during the past 
two years, and on one of these visits 
she found there a girl who has since 
been compelhd to leave by the po- 
lice. She says aiiv comiilaints she made 
lo her luisliand were not heeded. 

The affidavit of Matt Kangas ,a 
former b.irtender at the Chi Istoi.iier 
.«aloon was, filed. 1( tends to substan- 
tiate the 'iefendants answer in so far 
as it alleges that immoral women wer? 
accustomed to frequent the hotel and 
saloon with Chrisi. phers knowledge. 

APPLICATION CHAIUiES 

HKiH FINANCE METHODS. 

Chicago, .May 24. — MetViods employed 
py W. S. Quinby of Boston In an al- 
leged attempt to secure control of the 
H. \V. Dudley Coffee company, a $500.- 
000 corporation of Chicago, savor of 



Imported silk and wool Voiles in plain and fancy effects 44 
inches wide — $1.75 a yard. 

Silk and wool Eolienne in the dainty cvenmg and afternoon 
tints, pastel shades, etc., 44 inches wide — $1.35 the yard. 

Silk and wool Poplins, an exclusive imported fabric in the 
wanted shades for dressy gowns. 44 inches wide — $2.25 the yard. 

Read's Lansdowne, silk and wool we.ive of rare merit, every 
wanted shade^ 41 inches wide — $1.35 the yard. 

Imported French Marquisettes, a beautiful weave in silk and 
■wool, plain and novelty effects, 44 inches wide— $1.75 the yard. 



summer 



Dress Cottons 



Style is as essential in choosing Summer dress fabrics as in 
other lines. Be sure to select the 1909 weaves; choose from th« 
prettiest and most desirable patterns. Choose while the lines ar* 

at their best. ■ , , 

New arrivals in dainty crepes, white ground effects with col- 
ored dots and floral effects, 30 inchse wide— 18c the yard. 

Pretty batistes and lawns in a magnificent assortment of th« 
latest Summer designs, 30 inches wide— I2i4c the yard. 

All linen Suitings in a complete line of colorings, 36 inchea 
wide — 45c the yard. 

New silk and cotton mixtures in firm weaves for .-iiits. has a 
rich silky sheen, all the latest shades, 24 inches wide— 50c the yard. 



"high finance," according to an 
application for a receivership, filed 
In the superior court heer today by 
three stockholders. Misconduct of offi- 
cers is charged in the bill. 

SAILORS HAVE M TCH 

LUNCHEON ON HILLTOP. 



Natchez. Minn., May 24. — Though to- 
day was Intensely hot, a battalion of 
bluejackets from the battleship Mis- 
sissippi was sent ashore for parade. 



After the parade the sailors were given 
a Dutch luncheon on top of a hill over- 
looking the river. Meamtime the offi- 
cers were guests of the Elks' club at a 
similar luncheon. A reception to th» 
officers tonight and a dance wil". cloa* 
the ves-^els stay here. 



The more you know about tea th« 
more you will appreciate the deliea.le 
fraj^rance and delicious flavor ot 
•Salada" Tea. Ask your grocer for a 
jiaoket. 



D. E. H.. 6-24-'09. 

Weather — Show- 
ers and cool tem- 
pe r a t u r e , with 

probably fog, to- 
night and Tues- 
day. 



■ , , ki' . I , <. 
. It ritnc 

ineers a 




Constipation 

more f-'frious troul.los. 
ant (unrtli>n'i of tlie 
formed. The. Lfst me 
mild. gC'Btle and purely mjk«-i«u>o '-•' 

Hood's Pills 



Should not 
bu neglected. 
It leads to 
It shows that the Import- 
ant (unrtli>n'i of tlie liver are iniperfectly pei- 
fornied. The l>fbt medicine to take for it is the 
mild, gentle and purely vegf table cathartic 

Prepared by 
C. 1. Hood Co.. 
Lowell, Mass. 
6oM by all dmujjists and sent by mail. Price, 23c. 
If Made by Uood It's GooU. 



PRINCESS VICTORIA LOUISE, 
Daughter of the German Emperor, 
Who, It Is Said, Is to Wed Arch- 
duke Carl of Austria, Heir Pre- 
sumptive to the Imperial Throne of 
Austria. Thus, the Two Great Ger- 
man Empires May Be Brought 
Closer Together. 




Last Arrivals: 
Heid caps for 

boys. 

Flannel ffhirts 

tor outing days. 

•Madeweir; Un- 
derwear. 
Suit Cast's. 
Lightweight 
Rub be rti. 



Some people don't favor athletic un- 
derwear, but it's here for those who 
want it, and all the other good kinds 
also. The good old kind and union suits 
of every sort and description. 

Kneipp Linen Mesh Underwear is 

the only pure Irh^h linen garment in the market. 
Union and two-piece suits, also in the athletic st: it 
\Niih quarter sleeves and knee length drawers. $4 ".0 
to <6.00 per suit. 

B. \'. D. Underwear in two-piece 

union and athletic style. $1 to 12 per suit. 

Porosknit Underwear also in union 

and two-piece style. Light, comfortable garments 
at J 1.00 per suit. 

Munsing Union Suits with either 

long or short sleeves. A fine spring needle garment 
In regular and stout sizes $1 per suit. 

Cooper Spring Needle Underwear — 

Union suits in lisles and light weight woolens — just 
right for spring wear. Stout and regular sizes. 
I'rlces $1 to $4 a .suit. 

Light weight wool underwear for 

Fpring and summer wear. Two-pleee ."^tyit at $1 to 
|1.'.50 a garment. 

"Madewell"' Taunton L'nderwear 

Suits, spring needle ribbed garments made from mer- 
cerized and pure Egyptian yarns. Exceptional values 
at $1 to $3 per suit. 

Vassar Union Suits — the celebrated 

Swiss ribbed garments of light weight in flesh and 
blue colors. Prices %1 to $5. 

Iron Crown Underwear in light and 

medium weight woolens — guaranteed to be absolutely' 
non-shrlnkable. $4.50 to J5.50 per suit. 

Gotham Athletic Underwear of nain- 
sook and .nilk materials in blue, white and fle-h 
colors — knee- length and quarter sleeves. Prices 
$1 to $2.50 a garment. 

We have a score of cheaper .styles of Spring Un- 
derwear selling at 25c. 60c and $1 per garment, 
among them an extra quality Balbriggan for 50c. 



s 



$d.65 

FECIAL 
ALE OF 
INCERITY 

urrs 




$d.65 

PECLVL 
ALE OF 
INCERITY 
UITS 



'.ill 



1 



-h 




THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: MONDAY, MAY 24, 1909. 

-a 



HCONCERNlNe 





T' ■ 






A Mini 


. 1 < 1 1 ! ' ■ : 






1 at St . 


cal ni. 






;,ii-'' in'.':'l 


tib- 








ial' 








«i.i" 








U..i' 








•ei. *«.. 








Mrs. MiiM 


*y 


\\ 





i,,vit.-.l to attend. 
»ck. 

-.1 intpn-fiting 

in tti*! ili.st-rict 

iiii.l h«- will i«n 

1 uf the K>)vern- 




I9c for 25c and 30c Cmghams. 

for 

19c 



Just for one day— Tues.lay only —we will sell our 
just ror «;;«j;» j?rpj,^^ and Scotch Ginghams a^9c th- 

- - -■ ■ heifer, 



vard. The Froncl* Gingliams are 
count fln^r than the iniitathtna of D 
John Anderson Ginghams on sale elsewh.ere a 




Always Send Your MaU Orders to 



^ii'i 

I* Snl 



i«35^ yd. 

Tlir KcnulDf I>«vlil and John Anderson OinsJ^ jj 

bama — llir bc»t of all — are lirre In »t^i'>JW 
patt^rrna. at f"'*" ♦'"* '*'"**5» 



^^nfo^SatloECd 



11T-1I9 Went iSup^rlor Street. Duluth, Minn. 
FOB titlICK, SATISFACTORV SEKVICBJ. 



Tomorrow 15c for 25c Stocks. 



Tliis is surely the banner bargain of the seaj-on- 

of new and stylish storks of all fashionable sorts 

of nat.MMals and all the wanted colorings— som- 

of t rem nlain white— some of thein in colors— 

sJn'e in combinations of col.>rs-some af th.^m embroidered. 

Not one «oiil.l reRfilarly «ell for Whh «»»"«•,, -J?;;-: 
are Identieal wUb Hlylew yonll find priced 
>l(M>«vbere. tomorrow on i»ale bere at i.>o cacn. 




Church Meetings. 

,t '!;•• i:iilt"t! M''tll0dist 

• > I .'-1.11-1 iw aflTrKMin 

,• ..r .Mfr. b'.-paik 



Linens Are Going Up! The Infamous Tarif i Bill Increasesjhe Duty! 



,,f I1m-» Firat 

tMiii:'ftained 

\!'-. H. C. 

- Park. 

y Will 

\lr«. < 1. 

in the 

1 in 1 

; ; • > t i 

ar- 

The 

-'!i . ; 'lay 



R 



,:, ,i ,-,. , "lay .ni full luw-ly of all linens that nugln be nee.led for a year or so to come. 
Even our rteular prices would show a grand saving over the prices that we must charge 
!nder the ^ew tariff! But this sale offers many Specials at deep cuts m our regular pr.ces! 
Read on! 



Mornino[ Wedding. 

ihtu lity 



■ ii'i'iitiik' at 



TBe Last Two Hundred Cloths Out of a 
Half Thousand Co On Sale Tomorrow! 

AprW. 
cli'lhs — 

$1.38 



$1 



1 ttnisn '11 HI- 

$1.59 



\ R, 



i by 

fol- 
ia.- !.■-;:!■• <>t 



111 

M 






^ , Jewish Chautauqua. 



.M ' ^.^ -*" 



Engagement 



1 .. i: ■■ 



w 

I'-t. 

11:1 



sold ai' 'ut thi>-- hundred in 1j days duringr 
Note this i'scription w.dl — heinstiich^'d table 
■ very thr;id puf-' linen— fin^ satin tini^h iim- 
ask — wc guarant-f th^m 
t . : ; ! : with a nio>- 
l,,st.>'--th-vre ^'xr^'ih-ni !"f l.r.-akfast cloths— but are 
r...i!tv nl(.''.-nou»?h for luncii or Jinn^r— they will not 
w:ur rougt> ' - "■ ■""fony. " Rein-mb.., 

all Unt'o! 

Two -lA > on -.ah- ;tt price's \vh«>lc,al«r-< would 
l.av.- to fuy. IKNUU.O uv s;ol 500 of «»"••" '"'^ 
H\>iH oi-h from a mukor who uffU.d m«»m'> I 

%'2 flotlis. H-l si/e. »1.:W— $:i.:J.-. t I-hJi^. 8-10 size. $l.r>9. 



$1.75 D.VMASK AT $1.35 YARD. 

.juality. Ti-lnch double Damask _table linen, 
pattern cloth ilesigns, at **•*•*•_,_ ^,.,_ 
nire«»-quarter size Napkins to match— res $5.»0. $I.-j 

$3.^0 \A1>14IN>*. $2.J5 DOZEN. 

- I a.,/.,n fi-S-sizt! sn .XV white satin Damask Table 

, ..ty vM.ough to give «x- 
t.-llrnt wear— alway.^ So.r>0 anywhere— dozen $2.15. 
$S.50 lAXCH XAIMvlNS. $2.75. 
Fine quality satin Damask Lunch Napkins. 
I.ixl6-inch .size-hcmstitchcd-a->^sorted_ design. - 
^ood value at |3. 5")— special, dozen S-.*o. 
$1.75 lAXCH CLOTHS. $1.25. 
3fi-inch e.scalloped embroidered Lunch Cloths— 
pni- linen— German sllv.r bleached— made to s.ll 
at $1.75— a real sp-cial. $1.25 each. 



llri»j w 



III.' rii uiii A 



wr ' 



UNSUPPORTED ART 



Cn Duluth Again Disappoints ^ ^' 
Musicians. 



To Be Graduated. 



11 



19c Huck Towels 
for 15c. 



Oil.' •■.IS.-' 
ol,i fasiiion. 
riliitig, iiiiJd.i 



,h-m.stie Hu.k Towels — 

,i v..'av-. weighty, no 

i.) fc;iv.. tho heat of w^ar- 



— now pr-.dU't this y ir — 
Hizc inches — good i»- 

diviilMti .^iz- — Rood values at 1.^ 
introduce, ir.c — [ml up In boxes 



15c 



-to 



BUY YOl R SI MMKR WHITK CiOODS HKRK. 

Buy -your -sheer White Goods and M**'^'.^.!^}^,''!^.''/^ 
for shirt waists and dresse.s now— warm w^-athei is 
soLn her., and you will want them tiien when choice 

'"Wu ^[ll fln.V Uu. newest and most desired, and moat 
oriilUialJn our stock of white goods. 

46-lnoh' French Lina -." 

:i4-inch Koononiy Linen .'.^^ 

;i«-inch Near Linen ioe to 4r,e 

Poplins • • • • • ; 35o 

.36-lnch President s Percale . . . * « 

Stl-lnch Lotus ;ind Ki.smet Cloths »g^ 

3G-lnch Ramony Percales 



V\E HAVE BATTSTES 
>L\TC1I YOl'K EMBROI 
DERED fronts: 

Match your waist fronts at 
our white good dept. — we 
have three grades that will 
match anj'thing you may 
have embroidered on batiste 
— 48-lnch batiste. 39c. 4'n- and 
50c the yard! 



I. 



li 



li 
It 
I' 
t 

!» 

( 
I, 

1. 

I 

t 

U 

t 



Auxiliary Meetings. 



•f t'l. 




th.:J 

Fall.- 
M 



\\^ 



■„ .Tr... 



Mrs. G. A. St. flair 

,,,.,-i.,i ^tf'-l fs rat>l'"^ 



ill F.a.'it 
■A'eek for 

nt .Su- 
4 t'r.>m 



1.1 I 1- It ;t I 



Delegates From Club. 



1^ .11.1 Mrs, 
i'r«»m 

filial 
.1 



lilt!; w : ■ 
l.iolh.-r. •vvi,.) I 



!ti.iiir-'- !. 

1 ;,* I.,..!.- ..t West Du- 
:i<nv lor Ballard, 
home with her 
.-■ i , , moved lliere. 



I k e 



S^urnrise Party. 



: .; the 

, prise 



PEACE VIEWS 

Of Women Are Forcibly Pre- 
sented at Meeting. 

,,, i.iilKant, perhaps. • •■ 



N 



p'.>int of 

,in<-nlMfits as the meeting held 
v.. Ik uiia.r ih • patronage of 

..nd Nati.Jiial Pnace cimM^ss. which 



il 



in <■' 

w ■ 



Km 



pi.- ace 



VV. .1.1. -.luv evening, 
ii.itahle in 
, :, I lie prac- 

,1 i.v uom- 
\\ N.iil.mal 



.•.! 1 



1 1 . - 1 1 . ■ . 
!!■' 







1 :■■:■• 1 ! . •' 1 
1 ..11 1 iv\ .11 •^> l;ak 
i: i,.>, I-'r.-.h-rifk 






■ 1 1 Tl, .mps.iii 






, 1 . ' 1 n , ! . ■ X . ■ 1 s . « 1 1 


ihirn 




i.-i- 



. 1 1 1 .- 1 .s . 



Hally. 

.Hiat.-smen. 
and pldluiithr 
s»oiliUt->n of 

p.-;i: 
tha . 

pi-ul>l>'ni. '-Uii 
p»>nilous tiKures i 
u-ui, JinO tin- full... 
j.t i.iii.it i\ !■ «>r wurM ; 
liit-nl ill li.i' arnuni.-i 
tl,,- woinrn illsrusse.i 



I., .us, pl.dosophers 
Willi a lull r.fprc- 
nihassa'l'O-rt iruui Kiji>- 
• ntril-uU'd lo a pr.>i;rani 
verv iduis.- of I he pea<'e 
al 



and by buttering the bread the moist- 
ure cannot pen-nrate It. making t 
soggy M<dte'l l» lUer can he used. If t 

is not sof ::.;h to spread. A sal- 

in.n sand a tempting article of 

f...j.1 an.i .,i.-:u he halt inixe>l with 
a chopped t.oile-l egg and very tain 
s!!C-s iif olives an'l piekU-s. Tiie wise 
hostess Will make two dliferent kinds 
ni sandwiciies, some with the mixture 
moistened \iUh vinegar or l*»nion juice 
olliers williout. for many persons can- 
not eat acids. Practically all meat 
sandwiches are extremely rlcli ana 
sti-Hig condiments are noileeahle in t.i.j 
tilling t'sppciallv mustard and catsup. 
While white meat makes a delicate 
.sandwich, vet the dark.>r meats, mixed 
with may.uinais.- and other relishes, 
are more appetizing in every way. 
When liot sandwiches are served at a 
noondav luncheon at home, the contents 
of th.- riandwiches are placed between 
t!ie lavers of brea.i and fried, or tiie 
hrpad is t.iasted and covered with 
cooked meat flliing. then covered with 
hutti'red toast and served hot. Peanuts 
mixed wUl: mav .nnal.s* and sliced egg 
make a good sandwich. They make a 
fruit sandwich which is well liked hy 
th...se who ir.' v-ry fond ot fruit and 
bread. Th-i flUin* o^nsists of chopped 
dHl^s. flgs, lem-jn Juice and ground 
nut.s. lighllv uUiWJd w'tl;^,'-«'"\„,|*',Vy,- 
Th..- hr»>ad is hutteivl for this. • andled 
fruits ari' oft.'n used, hut ofi.Mi the 
.sin.lwleh Is a hread-cake, more of the 
aug.d fo.>d variety, rtlled with fruits 
and moistened with cherry Juice or the 
ll<luor from pri»served piaeapple or 
peaches. 



Don't Let These Catches Get Away From You! 

T- . ;i..,>.. K-.f -,„M v-r.n'll hnnd thee barcrains as fast as you 



• .\l.-< '1 nil..;. 
II.>v.-\, ■*■■: 



Personal Mention. 



FREE LECTURE. 



Returned Missionary to " 
Speak at Baptist Church. 



\i; .- ! ^^r 



) (,, ..,., It ... ..1 ;. w\in 



., ,..s ,,f til 

, W.'Ul 1 
1 , , ,'. _, .1 \s i 1 . I : 1 
was In C'vi'l.-ii'--- 
'iive speakti 1 

iiial<< 1." she ■'^'*''' 
wall I a II 'W g'fvvn 
lion m.vseir ai 
maker it" her 
thf .same priti'ipi 



Slu- 

. ost of 

oent as 

I)rom- 

■d. and 

fl, iinercial 

,it..sti.>n ' .iiiilurly 

,- Ui'- .-ty!e of a 

I..- lemliiine simile 

• 111 111'- statement of 

,[,, ii.it nslc ni>- ilress- 

.1- not I 

It »1UMS- 

...iis'in i .ie dress- 

tire needf-d. On 

It is folly to ask a 



Tact. 




U^e silver bait and you'll land tlic^e bargains as fast as you can 

nick them out. . , , . , ^ 

When we find muuc snaps in men's goods— wc buy them and save 

them for a .special .sale like this! 

And with them we place our own regular stock— nothmg 
reserved— at such reductions as these mentioned below I 



MEN'S FOUR-IN-HANDS. 
The newest shapes and colorings 
in men's four-in-hand ties — rich 
silks, great values at regular prices. 

22< for 25c and 35c lines. 

390 for 50c lines. 
44f for 75c and $1 Tics. 

These Reductions on Suspenders: 

.Most of tboso are the Uinoai Lincoln luake-diiJ ar.- ;.jt up unt- p..lr In i box ! 

$1.19 »9c 59c 22c 

Fur »..00 .Su- For _,1.2.'. «.ul ^^-J^IZ^J^- '"'•sJX-der, 



MEN'S HALF HOSE. 
All our plain and fancy half hose 
— in cotton, lisle and mercerized — 
in plain colors, fancy stripes and 
checks, figured and embroidered — 
reduced a.s follows: 
220 pair for 25c and 35c Socks. 
440 the pair for the 75c lines. 



peutlcrw. 

IIT-IIU W. 

Su|icrior St. 

nuliith, 

Miau. 



For 9i.2't aiul 
$1.50 SuMpeuders. 



»Sv 



1I7-11» W. 

SiiperUtr St. 

Duluth, 

Miuu. 



(,. i,.-,.T.!. <'*:;i.'!v, .1 ri-tnrn.-.f rnl-t- 



I'll-.- .1 1 r 



.11 

'ilti 



■r- '..- r.'turm'd 
r hl-iil h«'l . 



er 



31. ii 



gUiittng 

Are Holding 



tilt' .name priii* ip'' ■ " *•' ' •-•• -- - 
:,^,,...-yn!auw.i.tiier^>rnotwen.^^ 

Mi. he i-s "' 

. ,. , , .. ,,,- V. .Ill IS a larg'- ' ■■ ■ , ; ,, 

I M. views of women on ihi- ui^t--"'"" 

,.1 world I>»*-" 

fill I v in that 



Tact is the eiderdown that cushions 
against nfe-« h.ud knocks Where It 
i-4 lacking there is endless fricth>n and 
gtneral misery. 

S.>nie ar« "»>orn' with tact — and more 
bi-'ssed are th.'v tlian the traditional 
silver-spooned indl vhluals. 

It may also l>.- "achieved." But here 
th>' likeness hr-tween tact and "great- 
lu'sa" cea.seH — th>» former is never 
"tl-.rust upon" anybody. 

There is no ushi denying that the roan 
to •achlev.'inent" is a hard one to 
cllm1>. hut It certainly is worth the 
wlille of every w.nuaii to clitnb it. 




•tr 



i'\ V 



A Special 
Demonstration 

Sale of 
L 'Irresistible 

and the 

Gossard 

Corsets 

The Lace in Front 

Every Gossard wearer will want to 
take advantage of this Sale, and those 
who have never worn a Gossard Corset 
should take this opportunity to try 
them. 

'.' u c . .ill upMii'ls. iiu-In<l 
ncv\»-Ni cxliciiu' l-'ii'^ 

I iiu- ■ ■ '.» "t vvi»rkni.msliii» 

:.l >,cl! known for ii.lKiinty •>[ Iiiu. cHiiii.rt ami (|ii.ility. 




iiii.i. 

..r 

«'a. 

itiiii 

pr« 

«•( ; 
Tl. 

iMn!..- !. 1 ■ '■ ■ 

iwi-l I I '^ • - -■■' 
M.- 
tl.. 

,,1, MIC 1.. •-.,.•.. ■■ 

, ..nvvntion. t*> n<- 
Clio. The Nalioi 



were 

.11 I' 

of ni 



prestnte.l mosi j 



il 



., . ■ 1 : ' i I 1 1 

,niK Ih.- i"-.>' 
Federation 



II 



.1 



.il < 



[ii-ogf am 

.-ntatlvfs 

aggr*-- 

11 1.00'),- 
'.• \ e\- 

s.>.-l- 

.... uiL^nt. 

Women's 

. ntathin. 

•hillp N. 

■nt. tliat 

a place 

hh-nniil 

iiiiLiti In 

,. .lewisli 

Mjiiiers, th 



of 



THE EVENING STORY 



I'llon.s 

,1 th>^ 

that 

pulpii and 

nt none are 

mothers 

' .'•■•n war 



;:;.\",.':.r,r',l""i.I'l"''"""™"> '■'"■'= •'■•• 

'i ■«.?,,,. iV--. '"at has a regu- 

;:;;';v ^Mufpi.^a department m 

'Ph.- '"« point of 

,,„,.sth)n .' war or pea.^ 
more often .-xploltid in 
despite {'■■ '"'■' •' 
tally inter- 

i',',"i,,~.t- i i!"llfe lor WMioei.. h.>twe»>n 
.»,- Vl • decrea.Mng hlrth rate in 

;; n^'and .>>rmany. was P-' jj^- ..^^j^ 
vt l' unerring arrura.v '•>., ^"; '' ^^''b'^,^ 
. rs IS Mrs. l.n-ia Ames Mead or «os 
flu ^ .1 >■ lor of the AmerU^an Peace 
* Vnd the moving Spirit in thi.s 

Miss Jane Addams oi hull 
ihh-ugo, whose name is synunv- 
wHIi movem.-nts tor world .>.t- 

,,.,, ,, Miss Mnry McDowell ot the 

*■, v.-sitv oi .-hi.ttgo .Settlement. 

' "i^*"'">- j^ j^ahi to have «>een 

factor In the xftty- 

;)t .sto.kyards strike; 

ll.nroth ot" the Chi- 

who presided over 



ON THE BACK 
PORCH 

Bv Rozelle P. Handy. 



.1 1 

war 



<■'• 
II 

III. 



wlio«e Infliiencf 
tli»- det<>niilnlnK 



111. 'lit of th 
and Mr.s. HI 

.■iigo \V.. 111.1 

"'vi' 1,1, ention to the 

,a:.i ,h,.i i-w>J^-m,.s are ma.le ^. 

woman's part in U'^. *'>"., ^. *',:., ^':,V, 
,.nr national .-emererles. sh.- «aul. ami 
■ !. at w.u m.ant to the ^^omen of 

,t,at day. The heat m.-n ^^\'^^^'^: 
mid llu'lr loss "l*"*! "»>•> '"•■^' . *^ , 

,1 r d...adenre In art. l"><^t«V « "^ 
,.Vi'',r pro.imtioiis of the men of idea.. 

t"Ut 

lie*' 



it 

as 






Regular *3.0(> and $H.(M> 

at 



$3.50 

In-hor pruc.l r..i .Hs— ^ Si dfi 



r.o-.e<l women into industrial 

bread wlnn.-r.s. The Wotneu o 

and (iernuniy. knowing that 

, ,„s are do.)med to conscript on. 

,„ ♦Midure I lie pang.s of chlld- 

, ,,„ nn ,ni otTeriOK to the god ot war^ 

■• . , ..re ...leingen. Women »'«;<;'^"^ 

,', . ,„,,,•.. hiiolerHMl they will be of the 

"• "• ' .'.krtng .s.ms for the .anno,, s 

Vmirnan women will gUdl> 

i, -oils for the uplift of hu- 

l,.,t ii.o toi- the . arnage oi 



1 . 1 < ■ H o t 
IIIOUI 11 
ir, Is.' Ill 

III.HM > V 

" -n,.. .l....id.ii.e ..1 Ui.- Liiin nations 

„,,' "hi d s a r^.%ult oi war. The ».e.,t 

i.ii.. re picked for mlltary service; 

e w ftkl n«. remain at home to ho- 



lltt< 



1llt< 

loll. 



p,ii.»nlM of the .Muceedlng 



Rt'i^ular $22 
al . . • 



Th. 

iii.ikl 

titled 



Household Helps. 

i:.,„s..wil.' uh.. U-;i,ns li.e art ,^{ 

,,• .--aii.lwhhes is always well for- 

-»K.»lnsl prohlems when serving 

,u. infor.nal luncheon to "^^^^-^^f^^f ^^-^.tr' 
irraliied bread should be "S'^a '''^ 
."^^larse bread will crumble. And bread 
baked in round tins Is preferable to 
hat cut into slices and cut with a bis- 
•ult cutter, since the baked edges pre- 
serve the shape. Very moist flllings 
should be laid between lettuce leaves. 



f( >t>yriglitf<!. \l\ lijiiM r^prv-!.! t 

The Marlbijrough and the Rlclimond 
apartment buildings stood side by si.le 
with a narrow, spa.-e between. rne 
windows of the' Mats in one w-re di- 
rectly opposite the windows of the flats 
ill tli^ other and the people in each 
building often overheard what wa.s 
g.)lng on in th'' other. In the third 
flat fn llie Marlborough lived Dorothy 
Malvern with her aunt and uncle. Mr. 
and Mrs. Herbert Jenks. Dorothy was 
an exce.'^slvely proi)er young woman 
who was so afraid that her oppo.'^ite 
neighbors would see and hear w- hat 
was Koing on in bar aunt s tlat that 
she kept all the ■•'Ide shades draw-n 
most of the time and encouraged the 
laniily to talk in whispers. F;'/ U.n- 
ately tlie shade.s were a pale yellow, 
and a good de.il of light came through 
them, and Mr. and Mrs. Jenks were 
aaturally unlet. Otherwise, lite might 
!:ave been a burden to them and Dor- 

Tlielr oppo.site neighbors were not so 
narticular. These were two young 
ha-'helors who laughed and Joked and 
sane with supreme disregard of a pos- 
-Ible andien -e » Tiiey left up their win- 
dow shades, even when the gas was 
burning at full tilt, an.l Dorothy might 
h"ve seon nianv a midnight card party 
„r stag supp-r, but «')<? "r'^'- PrPr,'^ 
from behind h'->r own bllrids. \ et tlie 
wo young men fancied that they had 
a fair neighbor, for Dorothy sang 1 ke 
?n angel. Fred Pritchard and Stanley 
Green enjoved the frequent songs and 
..ften speculated about the singer. 

••She must be the tall young girl, 
with golden hair and dark brown eyes, 
sai. Fred one day. "Flat No. 1 next 
door is ^aoant; tlat No. 'J s occupied 
bv that voutig married couple with the 
babv that 'squalls all night; tlat N.x .. 
bv the fafr unknown and her people, 
ind flat No. 4 by an old maid and lier 
ni r." Ha ha. how droll, ha ha. how 
d,o P^ny lioll, pretty poir-the 

.•reature is alv^-nys shrieking when I 
wint to sleep. You see. Green, there 
Ts no voung Iddy in the building ex^ 

ept the .-.ingei^ I have .seen •«<'dde'i 
bair- come and go frequently— some- 

'nies with' an elderly lady or an old 



require much less ia quantity. 



gentleman, sometimes with both of 
tliem, often alone. .She must live In 
tlat No. i. and tlie old people must b.^ 
her father and mother." 

Fred's curiosity carried him so far 
as to take him up the stei.s of the 
Marlborough and into the ve.slihu e, 
where he inspected the card under tlie 
bell belonging to flat 3. 

•Jenks." he read. 'I d-ni tliink 
much of that name. She doesn t look 
tike a girl who would bo named 

' Odd'l'y enough there was already but 
nne -she' In the world for Fred. Ho 
was in love with Dorothys voice and 
with her lialr and eyes. 

••Bv jove,- he exclaimed to hlm-»elf. 
•if they sliL.uld iielong to two different 
people it would be cruel. 1 ion I know 
which is most bewitching. 

Fred and .Stanley lived In the Rich- 
mond from October to I'l? '?:"1 ."//'\': 
following May before Hed J f '\ _i 
chance of becoming acuualnled with tlie 
object of his admiration. The weather 
then was a.s warm us .lune. Fred was 
alone one evening, for Stanley was out 
of town. He sought the back porch 
of their Hat with his after dinner cigar. 
Hy started as lie came out of the dooi. 
on the j.J.ioinlng porch was a llttl-J 
rockint; chair and in the chair sat the 
girl with the golden hatr and the browii 
*yes. Her back was turned to the 
Richmond porches and she did not see 
the newcomer. Her lap was full of 
sewing things and she was »'«''"«^ ^c^v 
Ing dainty ruflfle.s. Fred tii\-toed -softly 
ba-k into t!ie kitchen and »»«-V"?''.i™ 
a chair and sat down throwing aw a> 
his cigar. Pre.sently Dorotliy began t.) 
slug Fred was delighted. Here was 
pt'oof p.isitiva that he golden hain 
l.rown eyes, and exquisite voice were 
united in the same person. He longed 
for an opportunity to address the beau- 
tiful gli I. although It would have 
seemed almost .sacriligiou.s to him to | 
have interrupted the song. ^ sudden 
ntiff of wind was more Irreverent catch- 
ing a tl Jffv bit of mull, the breeze blew 
it out of Dorothy's lap. over the porch 

railine and down into t''^, '^'i^^^/tlm-a 
The song ceased abruptly and Doto- 
ihv gave a little scream. ,.„,„, 

•Pardon me." said a nianly voice 
from tho other side of the d'vis on, rail- 
ing III get It for you. if I ma> . 

iWothy turned, gathered up her sew- 
ing materials m her little white apron 

^=^-5'."thank^*^you. It isn't worth while^ 
I cant think of troubling you.' and she 
arose from her seat. „ , . 

"No trouble at all." -said Fred, as he 
disappeared through his back doorway, 
in a few minutes Dorothy saw him in 
te Marlborough yard picking up the 
rtjffle He glanved uv at the porch 
wltl a bright smile and ral.sed his hat^ 
.So.Vn the ruffle was in its. owner s hands 
and Fred was on Dorothy's porch Hear- 
ing voices Mra. Jenks came to the kit- 
chen door and looked inquiringly 

^'••Xuntle." said Dorothy, ''this . is 
Mr — ." She paused witli a charming 
blush as it occurred to iier that she had 
begun to introduce one whose name she 

'^*'S'rUclmnr' supplied Fred, quickly. 
Mrs Jenks. did not grasp the -situa- 
tion hut to Fred's Joy she did not at- 
temnt to do so at that time. 
'*" ?.>.jd evening, Mr. Pritchard.' she 
murmured "Dorothy, it is too l-oo1 for 
^ou out liere. You an;l Mr. Pritchard 
ii!i.i bAtter come Inside, 
'""rred^/uld not resist the unexpected 
Invitation He followed the ladies 

throug ihelr back door. Mr.s. Jenks 
wa7 a notable housewife and her kit- 
^t en was as Immaculate as her draw- 
ing room, so she did not flinch a.s she 
conducted the guest across »\ay^d dow-n 
the entire length of the "«rr'>^^ '^'' ^ 
the front of her pretty little flat, ine 
drawMng room reached, she and Dorothy 
and Mr Pritcliard were soon engaged 
fn nleasant conversation. Fre.t».stayed 
as h'ng as he dared. Mrs. Jenks who 
^ad found bhn remarkably entertain- 
iuE: asked him to call agaim 
1 "Why auntie." exclaimed I>orothy. as 
l.oon aV he waa gone. "Do you know 



that Mr. Pritchard is an entire stranger 
to me?" , ^., 

"What on earth were you chatting 
together on the back porch for. tiien . 
inquired the aunt. "To be sure 1 don t 
see how he got there.' she added le- 
ilectively 

"i'ou funny auntie." said Dorothy, 
"you acted as though his being there 
were a matter of course. Did I ever 
take a young man out to the back 
porch— even Mr. Foster?" ,.. , , 

•Well, how dUl he get tliere? asked 
.Mrs Jenks. "I didn't show surprise 
when I saw him; of course not. It is 
never well bred to show surprise." 

Dorothy laughed and related her Ut- 
ile adventure. 

"Well, no harm is done, comment- 
ed her aunt. "The young man is cer- 



gentleman and is very enter 



of |3 and the second prize went to 
Joseph Drew of 410 East Fourth atreet 

Alexander Koefod of All Twenty- 
seventh avenue west drew the best 
cow and will receive a prize of $Z and 
Annie Pelletier of Bovey, Minn., won 
the second prize of $1. 

Children on the range and even 
Hway over in Michigan are gelling In- 
to the contest. 

DIFFERENTIAL 
DUTY IS URGED 



t a 1 n I >■ a 

tainlng.' , , „, ^,. 

Each day during the ensuing week 
Fred asked himself if he might call on 
hi.s new aciuaintances and prudence 
answered no. Twice he met Miss Mal- 
vern on the street near her doorsteps 
and received a smile and a bow each 
time, but he saw nothing more of her 
during his period of waiting. Exact y 
,>ne week after the affair of the '''^^^^, 
he tiresenled himselt at the Jenks 
front door .Mrs Jenks and Miss Mal- 
vern were not at home. Fred waltefl 
tliree long davs before calling again. 
Happily, the la. lies were receuMng^ 
The evening passed plea.santly. Fred 
dared to ask for a song and Miss Mal- 
vern graciously granted his request. 
Mrs Jenks skilfully drew out the 
young man and discovered that he was 
a lawyer and the nephew of one of the 
leading busine.ss men of the city. S>he 
,iid not he.sltate to Invite lilm to com.^ 
again Fred Jovfully availed himself 
of the invitation. Before long he was 
a regular visitor al the house. He he- 
came a great favorite of Mr. and Mrs. 
Jenks. and he knew It. Of Dorothy he 
was not sure. One evening, when he 
and she were alone in the drawing 
room, he found courage to tell lier how 
'ong lie had worshiped her from afar 
and to ask her to l)e his wife. 

"Oh Mr. Pritchard!" cried the girl 
in genuine consternation. "I am so 
,orrv — I never dreamed of this. I liave 
been engaged for nearly a year to Mr. 
Foster, whom I have known from 
childhood." .... J 

"I have never seen him." stammered 
Fred awkwardly. 

"No." answered Dorothy. "He went 
to .St Paul last December. He is a 
railroad man and he is ordered about 
like an armv officer or a Methodist 
minister We shall probably live in 
St. Paul. We are to be married In 
September." 

Fred sorrowfullv took his leave. 
He did not die of a broken heart, but 
U was six years before he married. 
His bride was neither young nor pretty 
nor could she sing. She was a widow 
with two children. But she had $.iOO,- 
000. 

FORGET THE RILES. 

Many Children Do Not Comply With 
Regulations in Picture Contest. 



If every boy or girl who enters the 
Borden prize money centest would read 
the conditions carefully there would 
perhaps be few disappointed ones. 
Many are still sending In their letters 
or the pictures of cows which they 
drew, without tlie label or the coupon 

The conditions are going to be told 
again. Read them carefully. For the 
voung people between 12 and 21 years 
tliere is the letter contest ^ rH» a 
letter about Borden's Peerless Evap- 
orated milk, send it with a label from 
the can and coupon cut fnmi The Her- 
ild to the Contest editor. Ju.st the 
same conditions apply to the P'*^*"'"^ 
contest, only Instead of writing a let- 
ter draw a picture of a cow. 

The prize winners Saturday were 
Miss Ida Ol-son of 2309 West Seventh 
street, who won the llr^t letter prize I 



Senator Root Pleads for 

Protection Tariff for 

Lnmber. 

^^'ashington. May 2 1.— An exten.led 
plea for a differential duty on dressed 
lumber was made In the senate today 
in connection with the consideration 
of the tarilf bill by Senator Root, who 
cited the various lumber interests along 
the Canadian border, and grave reasons 
why they should be accorded a proloc- 

tivc tariff. _ 

"Canaad." he said, "offers to every 
planing mill which will move across 
tho bord'?r a remission of taxes for 
from rtfteen to twenty-live years. So 
that dutv which we are imposing. If wo 
adopt the committee report on dressed 
lumber, merely balances the lax that 
is Imposed upon the properly of our 
mills for the support of our slate and 
municipal governments. 

■ ♦ 

Lestei' Park. 

The work of remodeling t!.- i>avi.iori 
is now completed. Ice cream an.J 
lunches will be served tomorrow. Thera 
will be a dance next Tuesday night. 
ihe first one of the season. Monday. 
May 31st, will be grand opening, rain 
.)r shine. 

POSTOFFICE DEP.\RTME\T 

AFTER TRAIN ROBBERS. 

Washington. May 24.— Stirre.l as It 
has not been over a train holdup in 
year.s. Uie ofTicials of the postofflce de- 
partment have taken prompt and vigor- 
ous steps to capture the robbers and 
secure the booty taken from the Over- 
land Limited at Omaha Saturday night. 
The office of Chief Inspector McMillan 
of the postoffice department is today 
one of unusual activity over tlie darinjf 
robbersv and the greatest interest la 
being manifested In the case. A force 
of postal inspectors picked for their 
bravery are on the scene. working in 
co-operation with the Union Pacittc In- 
spectors and authorities. 

This force will be increased by to- 
morrow by several men. in whom the 
chief inspector has every confidence. 



RUSTY STOVES 
tVIAOE NEW 



6-5-4 

vBUK-LUSTA. 

25 



IS EASILY APPLIED 

If v-xir ,l?Rler hn*.-.t It. sw Kellpy H^Hwaro (>»m- 
pan,, Duluth Hardware Compaa,. F. H. Wade. W«l 
Uuluib. 




*•' 



JlililJIIUI 





THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: MONDAY, MAY 24, 1909. 



WANT CLOSER 
RELATIONSHIP 

Railroad Unions Invited 

To Send Delegates To 

Labor Convention. 



it 
I" 



1 1.1 ■ 

lit 

r* 



I! 

It' 
t, 



:u;f!l Vt,i ruil- 




1. 

fi';. 
I" I ;, 






ti.i: 



FREE CONCERT BY 
YOiJNG PEOPLE 

Zenith Juvenile Orchestra 
Gives Delightful Pro- 
gram at Temple. 



If at- 






>ki 



In 



.-!• 



ri: 



A 



Besi Values 



The cause of our business increase, 

''Values''— that's the reason. ''Values'' 

such as we tell you about in this adver- 
tisement, and thousands more just as 
strong, but not advertised, are the true 
facts of this store's great success. Pin 
your faith to Bayha's merchandise val- 
ues and you'll save money. 







We are associated with L. & J. T. Stickley, Inc , the makers of 
Handcraft Furniture, and are their representatives for this city. 



Second Floor 

Rugs, Draperies, Shades, 
Linoleums, Etc. 

This is a .le[>.innieiu ileser\iiig oi y.-ur atuniion. Why; Be- 
cause It is full el want filkrs— things that are very issrntial to your 
home. The stock i- wtil chustn by a competent l)n\cr— a man who 
lias been \im^ in<.iit;h in Duluth to nndcrstaiKl your \\ants and supply 
'hem ill -<■( (is at small cr.st. hut wliich carry all the style and snap 
.f i^Mfil-'oi to(:a\. Kr..!-:"'- lr<'m t!ie \'ery cluap i" the exclusive copies 
of fine Piisiaiis^ sint^ for window.-, uj)-to-date and priced right — 
floor coverinK^s in Cari)ets. Linoleums and Mattings, He<lding and 
such like. "G('Od things at the right price"— that is our motto. Come 
in and look them over, and incidentally here are four bargains worth 
considering : 

9x12 Wilton W^lvet Riiirs ii<>t the connnon sale article, but a 
real standard grade in iimu] cidnrs and stnnninj^^ designs. A 
nig V»iiih foir good ser\ ice and well finislied; comes in all tl.e 
r. U T-v m demand todi.y . This rng is cheap at $f 87 

j^ < »iir special ^f K ^ •s^ 

Bed Pillows, large si: e, filled with good clean feathers, tick- 
ing of best grade, soft and easy — you have paid $1.75 for 
this pillow manv a tune. On sale this week at tf 4 -f A 

—per |>:iir . . . . ] *<^ i . i T 

Scotch Madrasses, in all tlie heautifid color Cfmibinations, 
which these goods arc noted for. Copies . t stained glass 
Colonials, Baronials, etc.. the acme of good taste. 7Xr 
Regular $1 per yd. Priced for this week at— yd I */ V 

Japanese Matting Rugs, 6x9 size, beantifttl Oriental designs, 
clean, serv!(:cal;1e rngs for small bedrooms. They tf ^ AC 
are well wurili $3.25. Special for this week *r * •• */ 







-K <.',-*r^,.,vi>-vxw-<-yti;' 



''Old Hickory" 
Furniture 

\Vc have just rccLivcil a large sbip- 
nunt t«( I he geninnc "Old Hickory" fur- 

]utur<' Fur the porch. Suiniiicr licmc or 
I'.vnif. .i nothiii,e is fiu rt .(i-pr.-priate 

tliaii ;!i - III-; ■t;'*'* I*' ve 

it^ ^iirii'iii .t> , .11. ii UK tircath ni luiiure 
tli;:t It 1111(1;.:!- •.'■ ;h. iiornc 

t "in.: ri ami >tr tlic Lest a^stirtnicnt 
e\ rr shi >\\ n ni this city. 



Cut Glass 
Specials 

\ n K '!,,■' I'., • • . I )jj,h, gcnii- 

!lul design 

auU cita: r.«...vy -ii'v'k «.i-.ly 

worth $4; spe- tf -f QO 

Crcaiiur ami Sugar, gtiuniic 

cut ghif-s. lie. ivy stock, very 
neat design; worth $4ii0; 
special 

at 



Close Out Prices 

On a few hij^^h-grade sample Sewing Ma- 
chines. Your best opi)ortunity is now at 
hand to purchase a strictly hij^^h -parade Sew- 
ing Machine at a very low price. These 
machines are fully covered by both our per- 
sonal guarantee and bv guarantee of the 
factory for TEN YEARS. These arc the 
drop-head patterns, have finely finished 
solid oak cases and five drawers. A full ,^ct 
of best tool steel foot attachments go with 
every machine. Note the prices: 

$it6.00 Standards . . $27.75 
$1*5.00 Siandards . . $26.75 
$^7.00 New Home. $2g. 75 

EflSy JIRMS OF PAYMENT 



The 20th Century Mattress 



— — In Our ==— 

Crockery and Hoase- 
furnishing Dept. 

The news from this department is always interesting to the eco- 
nomical housewife. The little things one most always needs can be 
found here at money-saving prices. Note the values: 

STEEL LIPPED SAUCE PANS IN DOUBLE COATED BLUE 

AND WHITE ENAMEL. 

1-Qnart Size— worth 30c— at 21^ 

1 i/o-Ouart Size— worth 35c — at 24f^ 

2-Oiiart Size — worth 4r)C — at 36^ 

:-;-Quart Size — worth 55c — at 38^ 

4-0iiart Size — worth 6()c — at 49< 

.'3-Ouart Size— worth 70c— at 52< 

SEAMLESS MIXING BOWLS IN BLUE AND WHITE EN- 

AMELWARE. 

6-Quart Size — worth 60c — at 49c 

8-Quart Size— worth 70c— at^ 52^ 

WASH BASINS— BLUE AND WHITE ENAMELWARE. 

4-Quart Size— worth 30c— at 21^ 

5-Quart Size — worth 40c — at ^*^^ 

EXTRA HEAVY RETINNED WATER PAILS. 

10-Quart Size— worth 30c— at 19^ 

12-Quart Size— worth 35c— at -^2-< 

MOP STICKS— worth 15c— at 9c. 

MOP HEAD— extra fine cotton— worth 25c— at 16^. 

HOME COMFORT BREAD AND CAKE CABINETS. 

1-Shelf Size— regular price !^1.50— at 'a,^^t 

2-Shelf Size— regular price $3.00— at ^l.y» 




Hew many hours of sleep do you require? Well, it doesn't make 
any particular difference in thi? case. If it's one hour or ten ynu 
should have a mattress that will give you the most comfort. Ihis 
mattress does that because it's built right and will do it for years. 
Filled with genuine elastic cotton felt and built in such a manner that 
it will not get lumpy or mat down. Come in and see them. 



Fine Mahogany and Quartered 
Oak Parlor Tables 

Our showing of Parlor Tables in fine ma- 
hf^gany and selected quarter-^awed oak is. wc- 
firmiy believe, the best in assortment, in style, 
H. r:ii..l:ty and fmish that has ever been shown 
( ', *- ir. tl o, -n ;' : city. We arc showing in a 

f;reat variety the newest productions from the 
oremost factories in the country. \Vc beheve 
we can suit any taste and any purse. Note the 
values: 




COMPLETE HOUSEFURNISHERS 



$h98 




DULUTH. MINNESOTA 




A selected quarter oak Table (like picture) 
a Colonial reproduction of highest J.'r_ade c^'U- 
struction; easily worth $16.00; ' '^ " 

our price, only 

The same as above in genuine C 'I -^ 7^ 
mahogany, dull finish ; at 4* * *^* ■ *^ 



$12.75 




Special Bargain in Couches 



A full size Couch, with heavy 

oak frame, guaranteed spring 

construction and covered in best 

grade velour; worth $]6.(t<, 

special 

at 



$10.75 





liij 



THINK H.\Rl». 
It Pais* to Think Xhmit F»kk1- 



THE SACREDNESS 
OF PERSONALITY 

Rights of Children Should 

Be Observed, Says 

Paster. 

• ' ' ; . is }>•■( .v( ri;i i ■ ! » 
.•.IK- i:. I ;> l'.> '.> r 
: l L'i,nariari clui ■ 

■.-tr-fterday. "^'^ ■" ''* 



III older ihi. 

. . I . ( ; ♦ 



'^ Til and 8 respect.' 

r» < iigriitidii (if 

i.d thfii rijrhts 

ri-t !y exjiressed, 

1 Kt tilUt r (ines 

Old provoke 

1 .ith in ttie 

!. i"liittJit-r» iio not vant 

,. . .ike llttk petK ti.ey want 

I., t.. iKoBi.J2€il as itu iiffsprii.K of the 

• i.idfitJtd. The fsciil alwavh tt-clf itself 

HI I ftT itself, 

On the whole. 

,.i HI i-wii T i : '' cften 

u 1 1. If ri t- Tuey 

r.-iis.'!^al-it . : 'he 



<n> 



fai. •• 
prott'.-^l 



1 1. 



« XI .pi 



thoH* Kranlec! tv tturn I'.v thilr elder«. 
- : ; i ' . ' I ve. Only too olitn 
rightf! are elasetd 

,,,. ... i.i..i;,.'-, .cit and tlu' ft>x ter- 

to I he Gfntile.s. 



r ifi . 



The 



apoKtlf 

,1 •. ,1 .-, 1 



.III, til up ii. 

smritual 



!.f .111 . wlio is t^ap- 
: le ahout child 
'vord: Tatlieis 

,1 ' i iKtii n tc wrath. 
, i;.--t a ii- think or.ly of 
;i v.ked to wialli' hy 



'III ii<)« 

lit in apteil t>> 

...i, And it 1^ 

-Mui has ol iti**ii 

.f> of ll« right!-; it 

. in its ivvt, 

'ii<n. and i»p- 



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r-t r :<:i;.:. 



I L" 1 1 *-\ ; I . . 11.1 

iM.jnds, Htay 



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..,,:: i 



A new [ 

OiiK- ..i. f"""* lr<>iii lliiir t€i tiiii^. Thry > 
nrr s't-r.tiliu-. (rue au<l full wl huuuira | 



I .a _ 

t,.r.,l.' 1 ' ('. •' , tl,. H ap- 

: , ,v 1 . -,iUl taik. I 

• iiiuialUv. Even 

^ V, 1 at" a suul, an 



"From the Old WorliT* 

IRISH LINIMENT 

Le Richeux'.-- Drug Store has it 
f.T salt and will give you back 
v.>.ir nil riey if it fails in any of 
tt . !■ Tewing ailments: Hheu- 
it.. ; .^M .ind Eczema first, tht-n 
Laini'.i^". Gidtre or Neuralgia. 
Fcr hum or jiprain it has no 
fi) i;il. it will take soreness out 
arid riuuc. swtlling over night. 
I^rescrlbed I'y f'r Dt- Coursey. 
bent known man in all Ireland. 
For sale by Le Richeux Drug 
!«tore. 



«.ur children, but here we eee the thing 
reversed, and we n»ust admit that 
there is. a great deal of truth in it. 
Even the btet of parents are at tlme.s 
thoughtless and will do things that 
deeplv hurt the little soul.« given in 
their tare. They often fail to consider 
the natural rights of their children in 
their decisions, and then they wonder 
whv these littie souls ttash up in anger 
and indignation. Slioiild the child not 
find as much considt ration from the 
parent as the parent expeel.s from the 
cMld' t»h, a only we would think of 
our own childhood, and renieinher how 
we were luirt in our «leepest sell by 
the thoughtletiKness of our elders. It ifi 
this disregard of the personality of the 
clilld which In return ejills forth dis- 
respect for th* rights of otheis as long 
as these rigliis are not properly guard- 
ed. 1 think the beet way to teach chil- 
dren pjoper respect tor elders Is to 
meet their <'»;n inalienable rights with 
pr.'T'ci regard.' 

• ' 

TrainiuK C'oUn to the IlarnrHM. 
BreakiiiK the colt." as the perform- 
ance IS i;,».ually carritd on, is littie 
tetter than a relic of barbarism. The 
well-bred, properly trained colt is 
never "broken." It never needs break- 
ing Its tducalion should begin when 
It is atde to stand on its feet. Let the 
trainer's hand be the most alluring 
thing in the range of hiu knowledge. 
Rub Its head, stroke its ears and gently 
massage its little body. After a few 
days it will press against the hand 
that caresses it and seem to ask for 
more attention. Everybody should 
have a case of golden grain belt beer 
In their cellar. It le unsurpassed as « 
summer beverage. Order of your near- 
est dealer or be supplied by Duluth 
branch Minneapolis Brewing company. 

T^o Men Dpswne* 

Minneapolis. Minn.. May 24. — Thoniat- 
Dunn, saloon keeper, and Roy "VN'agner, 
carpenter, both of tiiis city, were 
drowned In Turtle L«ke, near here, 
early yesterday by the capsizing of 
their boat while fishing. 



STEEL BUSINESS 
IS INCREASING 

■III ■ ■ a^ 

Steady Swelling in Opera- 
tions Is Reflected in 
Buying. 

New York, May ;;•!.— The steady in- 
crease in operations at steel works Is 
reflected in the larger buying of steel 
making and steel scrap, as well as in 
larger output of coke ovens and the 
heavier shipment of fuel to blast fur- 
naces. Contracts calling for about 
4U.000 tons of heavy steel melting 
scrap as well as 40,000 tuns of basic 
pig iron, were placed by Eastern Penn- 
sylvania steel works last week. 

" Fewer large contracts for foundry 
Iron have been developed, but numer- 
ous small orders, aggregating more 
than 50.000 tons, have been placed In 
the territory east of the Alleghany 
mountains, and the tone of the market 



CASTOR I A 

For Infants and Children. 

The Kind You Have Always Bought 

Bears the 
Biguatnre oi 




iB Slightly firmer. although higlier 
prices have been realized only on small 
lots. , , , 

Interest in finished steel products 
has continued to be centered mainly 
in wire, nails and fabricated steel. 
Contracts for wire products have been 
recorded during May. Amei ican steel 
and wire tkaing contracts for 250,000 
tons during the first two weeks, aud 
one single day readied 36,000 tons. 
Since the advance of ?2 per ton, effec- 
tive last Mondav. contracts have been 
less excessive, ijut stin abnormally 
heavy. Another advance in prices is 
announced for the first of the montli. 
A host of small contracts for fabricated 
steel for buildings and bridges has 
come out resulting in adding ab.-ut 
50,000 tons to the order for May. and 
the prospects are tliat 45.0(0 tons ad- 
ditional wT.l be placed this week. Ten- 
ders have been made on 120,000 tons by 
the tliree divisions of tlic American 
Bridge company, but only half of this 
is expected to develop into actual busi- 
ness. 

More orders for cars, locomotives, 
lake and coastwise vessels are develop- 
ing, which will call for a large ton- 
nage of plates and shapes, about 60- 
000 tons, in the pear future. The 
Gould lines have ordered 100 locomo- 
tives and the Chicago & Northwestern 
ewenty from the American Locomotivt 
company. 

DEDICATE (HI RCH 

WINDOW TO ROOSEVELT. 



culminating in the dedication of the 
Lincoln memorial window on Sunday 
next. 



SPOiLNER TO ( ELEBRATE 

THE FOIRTH OF JULY. 



Bemidji, Minn.. May 24, — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The farmers livih^east 
<.f Bemid.il, in tlie township of B^nidjt 
and Frohn. will V>e given rural f< ee de- 
livery of mail in the very near/future, 
judging from the very favor;/b;e ex- 
jiiession made by W. J. Munr<^ of LJu- 
luth. postoffice Inspector, wLo has 
made a thorough examination of the 

territory. 

• 

What About Your Spring O.v^reoat? 

Or an up-to-date cravtnette You will 
find some smart coats at $10, $15 and 
520. C W. Ericson, the Clotlyer, 219 
West Superior street. 



New York. May 24. — Oscar S. Straus 
former secretary of commerce and la- 
bor, and recently appointed ambassa- 
dor to Turkey, was the principal 
speaker last night at the dedicatfon 
of a window In honor of the Roosevelt 
administration at the Metropolitan 
ttmpie in this city. 

Mr. Straus' speech was principally a 
review of the administration of Presi- 
dent Roosevelt. 

The service began In the morning 
and will be held every night this week, 



If you want to enjoy a pleasat/t 

evening bring your friends 

to the 

ST. LOUIS 
CAFE 

Music by LaBiosse Orchestra 
6 to 8, 10 to 12 

Table b'Bote Dinner 75c. indadina Wlae 

After Theater Parties Catered To. 



\ 




THE DULUTH .EVENING HERALD: MONDAY, MAY 24, 1909. 



THE EVENING HERALD 



their 



Pub! Is: 



Tele pi I 



i;,.i^- i'.'-r St.. oppoalte P. O. .S<iuare 
THE HERALD COMPANY. 

r . :-,-tr.C R.M'^r- ■*■>* K.I It 



.rial Booms. 1126. 



/ 



-I 



OFFICIAL PAPER FOR THE CITY OF DUIUTB 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. 

IJiiMed State- -nJ Cao.dii. Po-t.^e Prepaid. ^^^ 

Daily, per year, in advance • ' .^'qq 

Dally. BiJt months. In advance j*^,^ 

Dally, three months, In advance 

DaiJy. one month In adv?inc»» ■ _ \:,,„.. Mat- 

Entered at Duluth P.Mt,,irt.e a« Second-Clana Mai 



.as 







DULUTH W 


Per 


ye 


'ir. In adv^aiii-'. ■ • . 


9lK 


Hi 


in a<U -1 • 


Thref 


-; , in H • 1 ". > : 






iluth !• 






- 'V (Sec. 


the 


I" 


'tt© mu.-' '" 


are 


a 


for renewal 


mi ' 


' 


fied. 



.•M 



,-.- M-ittrr 



but a fur tlial time 



iiuilled at 
oe mkjntti.-( 

the pai. ■:• 



ornm; 
less its or)i;;inizati'>n 
recreant to its duty 
organization is TIk- 
Democratic hvaaior^ 



usinig mctn 

But tll.ll (1 'L'S! 

Miirty 1.5 CKiTUjit hec.iu--»c 
•]].>[ the !>cni'>crau..- I'TI.} 
', '114 ' '11- "' p< 'vver. It <^1*' 
I'-.akmt^ f'f tariff 



BY CARRIER. IN THE CITY, TEN CEI^TS A WEEK 

KVERY BJVK.M.\« — OELl% KRUU. 

dally 



Slnsrlo copy. 
One monrli 
Three - ' s 
Six :■ 
One 



TO SUBSCRIBERS: 

It Is important when deslrln^r the addreiis of your paper 
changt*!. to give both the old and new addreaaea. 



ur 



DEAL FAIRLY, PLEASE. 

Ni'!.i. m1)' eaii criticise lU'Jic advocates of the ti..)i:i; 
tax who .tppruach the inquiry lioneslly aud with a 
determimt;.)!} to ktinw the right of it and to decide ui>oii 
and Stat: ihat which they believe to l>o true, even 

though they may be mistaken in their judgments There 
is no fault to be found with .^uch agitators a? the^e. 
cause sooner or later, in their hoacit searc'u i^c 
truth, they will find it 

But *i.'M-:.'- 

ieverel> 

CCived opinnHri 

opinions, 
erately m 

less ope 



I of special privilege who are most noti-partisan m 
motives and actions They care nothmg for any party 
except insofar as it can be made to serve their purposes. 
They arc as willing to get special privileges to plunder 
the pee. pie from Democrats as they are to get them from 
Republicans They contribttte to both campaign funds, 
and they u>e lawmakers wherever they are useful, no 
matter what their narty labels may be. There arc 
\ldriches and Hales and Lodges in the Democratic 
l,:>rty. ju.: a^ t!u.r • ,ue H .llivers and Bevcndgcs and 
Cumminses in the Democratic party. 

Had the Democratic party been in control of the gov- 
ent as long as the Republican party has been, doubt- 
would now be as corrupt and as 
t.. the people as the Republican 
powers of plutocracy have found 
and congressmen useful at times. 
••'•!!!1 ami""tht^y have had no .erui.le. in u>ing them, as they are 
now in the makn.^ of the Aldnch tarilT bill. 
n't alTect the fact that the Republican 
it has hceii 1 >iig in power, and 
;,n;er because it has been 
n't a!i.>t the fact that the 
in full and absolute control of 
nid tliat the taritt" law that is 

produccfl wi 

and will t>c <i<ne 

are gray wolves m the ra 

I, shameful, bat it i- more s 

izalion of the Republican party i 

by the Rei-ubHcan k'riy vvolve-., .i 

ding "f special [.rivilege with conien 

even likely that i: '.ae Deiiiocraiie i 

full control, it would shortly 1"- 

the interests as the Reix-.l.Iiean !' 

•1... R.publican con^f ^^is -' '^^'f' nieasure that is 

hah -.v.iy lu>ne..t with the people. l)eyond any .luestion 

1- will be a -,11011^ ie!ni)tation for 

change, ju-^t tor the experiment. 



Ranier, 
or that 



I: 



Re|>uV)l!can pat ly, 

be til..- itroduci of a R.. I'Ulilican congress 



.02- 

A't ■ 

i.srt 

5.0O 



til..- 1 
! i>y a 
in 



That there 



Rei'iiMican pr';-ilent 

nk^ .-i D-nu'Ciaiic lawmakers 

hanieful -\VA that the organ- 

ali^ .Intely contr.jUed 

1 ,';;., I u .l..e^ I lie bid- 

1th coiuenipiil'le alacrity. It is 

uty were placed in 

iinl a tool of 

tv I! u !^ But unless 



a> ->m;>i>i 



the natioii to try 



th< 



be- 

the 



err 



■ n to ciiiirisc, and to 

,. ti the subject with \>r\:- ■>n- 
u..,to,-t all the facts to tit • hv.se 
and who. when the facts won't stretch, delib-| 
.aniifacturc alleged t.icts that w Hardly' 

borrow these dis- 



.e: 



ai'>;v:.. 



a: e 



torted 
ment w 
If a 
one or 
thei • 
for f 

of Vy..;'. 

wheat 

A 1 
from tile i 
a to- 

that :: 

Johnson !:■ 
got th;v ' 
wc tliV 
ntanuf.ii., ui^ 

As a matter 
the other 
on the M 
lieve t! 

of the 

factuT' ' ^' 

tax 

that o 

by th.. 

is a -■ 

SUli 

to Duluili f' a- 

I. 1 M 

of 

tureil in "' ' 
in th- 
the s; 
thri I 

pr 

V.' ' 
Ot 
lo 



same tit 

ta.x.. Tl 
not he 

against 



•;.ich of 



them on as argu- 

aivestigatiiiE: them. 
'.ax wh '.v 

.;t were elinn: 

' 'he a git 
,, ..L -, •: the inj:, .. . ^ 
tax on 



by the 1 



>ushel 



the 



folio win _, 
. ! he toiiii iKe 
• >tetl mill 

. tiiat 110 
int<» iron 



.:iK 



I .'I, c a quotation 
. :r which favors 
ei tax on grain, 
• It Governor I bdl whicl: 

bill we might have ' '"•*•'•' ^ '^ 

;,_ It dete.Uevi 



THAT SPECL4L SESSION. 

The f .t-king C-.--.-:>ior .^ .ai--- ■!■, to call a spe- 

■,ai ,e,..on of the legislate e to take up reapportionment 
tas met with some favor in the northern part of the 
.tate, but wc fear that lh..,e who h.^v- approved it have 
leaped rather hastily to their concluv,.,n., A little con- 
A-iU ->it..u tli.it this i.- not tlte way to get re- 
, u.nient. and that the idea :A getting it that way 
should not be considered for a inonieiit 

In the first place, the present legislature ha^ gone on 
record on this que.ti .n very defnutely It wa,, shown 
!)eyond question, at the regular session which closed a 
month ago. that if Xorthern Minnesota 1. ever to get a 
,-,;,- ,le,I in the matter of legislative representation, it 
m the :■ ^^.;.t legislature. The senate 
■linms'ly. tw.> different reapportionment 
&s met the needs of North 

ern Minnesota, and fr. 
drawn it was clear thai i. 
pte-eiU. will never concede a just re 1 



HO^L . GOSSIP. 

Paul PerM ns, ex-niayor"of 
and who will thi flr^t citizen 
little city to hold the office ot mayor, 
was at theTit. T.oula yesterday. Mr. 
Perkins I3 etithuSiastlc over the pros- 
pects that ll«> la store for Hanler as a | 
summer resort. /He believes that the 
little town, with its great scenery and 
splendid hualin£>nd ftshiiiK. will some 
day be one of the most i:anious summer 
resoits In the Northwest. 

About 390 IsJ^uds ave been sold 
only reeentl.^ by Hie Canadian govern- 
ment to pMvOla citizens. Many of 
thdse peopl<4er(i;Yrom St. Paul and Min- 
neapolis, a^oi^lng to Mr. Perkins. 
Many of them are the class of people 
who have decided to come to the 
resorts In the vicinity of Ranier, be- 
eause of the magniHoent scenery and 
etiier attractions that can be found at 
no otlier spot in the state. 

Ranier at tlie present time ha.s a 
oopulation of about 400. The town is 
growing, says Mr. Perkins, and with 
i-'ort Frances and international I' aii.i. 
will form tlie Triangle Cities of the 
Canadian border Since tlie eompletion 
of the Canadian N.uthorn railway. Mr. 
Perkins says that Fort !• rances lias 
grown wonderfully, and that tlif^e 
is a great future aiiead of all of lue 
three towns. , ^ ... . 

The ele'iric power plant tiiat is 
being con.strueted at . A"ternational 
Kall.s will be completed sime time dm - 
ing the present y-ar, according to >ir. 
Perkins. The Backus- Bro.;^ks oompan>. 
which is largely interested l" } 'f ^■;;';; 
struetion of the power plant 
promised the people oi Kaniei 
they will be furnished 
liglit some limu in July 
mean tliat tl 

enough toward It.s eompletion to manu- 
facture electric light. 

But returning onee again to tlie lu 
tuPe of Uanler^nd all that %unto- In 
the vicinity of International I'al''*. »« 
a summer resort. Mr. P'-^«kln^, ^^^ 
that many cottages were ""^f/. ^'{'"f 
oi construction at the Present tlnu, 
and tliat many more would be erected 
during the present summer. T e 
islands that have been sold by the 
government vary in size from an acie 
to many times that size. Some ot l e 
islands are just big enough f "» '^.^ ^j* 
tHtre or two. »-h le others ate lai ge 
Lnough fol^ a little settlement ot col- 

'*fhe Walkers of Minneapolis will 
suend the summer at Kanler. us will 
manv oUk^ promlrtent Minneapolis 
pel, .\e, aecordlng to Mr. Perkin.s. There 
will be manv -sttam launches there. 
\V lis wlik^-, ap.t of T B.. VlUer the 
lumberman. Siaa 'shipped »ii« l^u oh o 
Pointer. Mr. Perkins is of the opinion 
a within a few years It will be not 
onty the grfeatit-st summer resort In 
this' state. %«t one of the most tamous 
in the entire •oountry. It is onl> a 
.Question of time before a large sum- 
m,^r hotel will be constructed^ in the 
vicinity of Ranier. aecordlng to 
Perkins. 



THE WEATHER 

Yesterday was 
bright and fair, al- 
though there was 
still a chill in the 
air. This morning 
a northeaster was 
trving desperately 
hard to get action, 
but the sun seemed 
to be about hold- 
ing Its own. To- 
night the weather 
man — cheerful op- 
timist that he Is — 
hands out a package that reads 'fog. 
rain and cool temperatures. That 
weather man has a rare disposition. 

A year ago today conditions were 
much the same as they are today. 

The sun rose this morning at 4:^1 
and win set at 7:47. making fifteen 
hours and twenty-six minutes of sun- 
light 




has 

tlial 

with electric 

This does not 



lie plant will be compleud 
t-. but that it will be far 



Mr. Richardson makes the following 
comment on weather conditions: 

"The barometer continues high over 
the province of Ontario and the upper 
lake rt'gion and low over the South- 
western states. Durlny; the past twen- 
ty-four hours the di.sturbanee In the 
.Southwest caused liglit to lieavy rams 
there and throughout the Mississippi 
and Missouri valleys, the Rocky moun- 
tains and Northwt'stern stat.-s. A rise 
in pressure over the Far Northwest is 
attended by coo'er weather in Eastern 
Montana, the l>akotas anl .Saskate le- 
wan. The easterly movement of the 
low pressure area in the Southwest 
favors showers at the Head ot the 
Lakes tonight and Tuesday." 



.iSi 



^OYAL 

Baking Powder 

Absolutely Ture 



The only baklna powder made 
from Royal Grape Cream of Tartar 
—made Irom grapes- 
Royal Baking Powder convey, to food the most healthful of fruit 
propertie. and render, it superior in flavor and whoicomene... 



I 



^^i^^^fa^i-^^-"^^^^ 



I 



i 




.' 



Following were 
temperatures: 

Ahll.Mie 



last night's lowest 



V.'.:iovllle 

AtUuU 

Billli>r.:rd ... 
niiiin.ir'k . . . . 

B.iKt 11 

KiilT<ilo 

t'alro 

Calfffirj 

Cli:irlftit"n . . . 
I'lilr**.) 

Cliu-liinHU . 
Ciiru'irilla . . . 
r>.ivrtiipoit . . . 

I>.»4iver 

OrtiroU 

DvlU l.iiko . 

r>.>.l(?e 

Duliitli 

i;acu"iiii.i>n ... 
vx r»s'> 

Ks<-aiial>M . . . . 
0.vlro^t'>ii . . . 
(lr.||i<l llavoii 
On^.ji Bay . .. 

H.ivrc 

Helfiii 

li..iii;litj)n ... 

ll>ir II 

.1 K'k^.iiK'llla . 
K Hill '.>l>s 
IvaiiUdi* f'lty 
Kiii'X'llte . . . 
l.,i CroMS .. 

Ui iuUt 

l.itUn RiK-k . 
I.- i .Viitfoleg 
.MiPjiirtU' .. 



Mr 

to 



..58 Meil^-lne Hat 

r,o M>'m:iiiU 

..60 Miles City 

..44 Mll«»ukfe 

. .41* Miriu.lJSa 

. .5') M'Vl.'iia 

.48 Mitegimeo' 

(14 Mn.Tlit'ail 

.41; Nrtt Orleaiia . ■ ■ 

. .(jil ' New V:>rk 

. 4S , .N'lrf.ilh 

. .fi* ; N.irl.lifttflil 

.5*1 N >nll Platto 

. Tii iikUlioma 

. ..40 : ouii!i« 

. .Ml l'l;.miilx 

. 44 ri. I re 

. .5(5 ■ Pltlibiirg 

. .42 P'ln Aitliur .... 
, . .48 Portl.iii 1. Or . . 
, . .5(1 Prince .\ll)eit 

. . .40 (Ji: .Vpiiatlc 

. ..T6 lliipUl Cily 

. . .41 SI. I..>uU 

.48 St- INul 

. . .4* I Smi Aiitoiilo . . . 
. . .42 i S*ii Fr»n.l3'-i> . 

40 I .S*iua Ke 
...52 j.'Siiult Sto Mirto 
. . .64 I Shri'vn>"rt . . . 
. ..4i» S;)'ikMnd 
. . .00 I Swlfl. Curiwiil . . 

. ..54 I WHAllilllftOll . . - 

. . .,52 tVl.hIti 

...42 ] WllUsl.^n 

. . .60 IWliiiiemutvi . . . 

...48 iwiiiiiipsg 

. ..40 Vell.iwiit.jn,? . . . . 



.5. 

. .(Hi 
. . .'lO 
.44 
. 40 
..■Xi 
Ai 
. 4fi 
..70 
..50 
. . 50 
.42 
. . 52 
. . ti.) 
. .CD 
. . 52 
..52 
..48 
. .4i 
...41 
,. .12 
...M 
, . 4'i 
...02 
...52 
...74 
. . 48 

. :ai 
.. .4) 
. ..T« 
. , .51 
.44 
. 48 

. . :><^ 

...42 
...28 
...44 
. .40 



TWENTY YEARS AGO 

Taken From the Columns of The Herald of This Date. 1889. 



•••The proposition to l«'>nd -St. Louis 
county for a new courthouse was 
snowed under on a very 1 g > \ ote_ 
The vote in the city wrts I'?].*" favor 
M.i.t .S4- aeainst. In the rest ot tlie 
county "tife vote was solidly against the 
proposition. 

♦ ♦•The Manufacturers' Bank of West 
Duluth began busine-ss yesterday iri 
& Boyd's off ice. where 't^^Yid! 



memorial fund than did all the prand 
.\rmy posts in the whol,- state of New 
.Jersey, and mort 



th.in ai: the other 
of Minnesota 



posts In the state 

•♦♦Rev E .M. N'oves has returned 
from a weeK s camping in the Un- 
dine region near the Mi.ssissippl 



Mallory _ , ,. „., 

be located until its '?r<'^;''-tone 

Ing is completed. W. H. H. btoweii 

is president and Harvey I 

cashier. The Bank of 

buslnes.-; on Juno i 



Smith is 
West Duluth 



will start 



started for 
Sinotte lias 



Department of Agriculture. W.-ather 
Bureau. Duluth. May 24. — t oreca.sts 
f.)r twenty-four hours ending at i p. 



promi.sed long ago, as j ^'^ 
tax would be collected on ore j 
.n I ^tcel within the 5»ate " 

of fact. arse, the situation is just' 

From the nature of mining operations 
there is strong reason to be- 
,, i^e tax .ould not apidy to that portion 

ii ^hii>pcd out of the state to be inatui- 

-I in othet -' i!':^ V ^ i^- -annot lev;, 

.te commerce, and many lawyers l>eltcve 

' ui of the ground and dropped 

i car healed for another state 

lorr not a 
namt the mines 



■ It t: 
defeate'!. • '-''-V'-: 
bills Neither ot these measure 

ni the inanrcr in which they were 

as constituted at 

,. .rti'-nitncnt. The 

1 in the senate coniiuittee on reap- 

.sehberately framed with a view to 

and Senator Clai^ue. the chairman of 

that committee, while .penly :,r -i, .MUg friendship for 

cut, secretly worked to concoct a bill which 

The other bill, which orig- 

a miserable substitute for real 

reapportionment ""■ ""• '"'^''^^ ^'^ 

Northern Minnesota. 

The only way Northern Minn-,otn can get reappor- 
,nment is to ^.x to.;ether. elect a delegation to both 



Touri.^ts are tteglnning to come to 
that section of the country so tie- 
ciuently that it -will be necessary to 
have a large suiftmer hotel. 

• • • 

will see the price of lumber 
.. ^ and the 



advancing in. t»^« J-'.^VlU ""be'-a steady 

H. .\. Hus- 
kln. a i'J^nl^'^r operator of Ciiippewa 
Falls. Wis., who was at the Lenox 
yesterday 



advance In ihe price 

one." was the statement^ ot_ 



and 
ami 
and 
fog. 



reapportion m I. 

he knew could not pass 

mated in the house, was 

and would have given no relief 




Tuea- 

and 



edM'e^nmrk't with lumber which they 
sold at T price far below that offered 

'"-'.'4heVVsJ(f'of'this was to reduce the 
price of lumber not only lnt»to south, 
but all over the country. It has had 

ts effect upon the l"'"^^'- ^'^"^'^'i".^" 

of the country. I am of the 

- • ~ steady 

^avance .... .u«.- w- .^" ^x, "beVter shape 

time than they were 

holding on 



m Tue-sdav— Duluth, Superior 
vicinity. Including the Me-salia 
Vermilion iron ranges: .^bowers 
cool temperature, with probably 
tonight and -^.--^ri^'RICHARDSON. 

Local Forecaster. 
Chicago, May 21. — Forecast for twen- 
ty-four hours ending at 7 p. m. 

"^i;pper Michigan— Fair tonight 
Tuesday; not much change In tempeia- 

w'isconsln — Increasingly cloudiness 
witii po.ssi!)lv sliowers Tuesday a:id 
In southwest' p.»rtion tonight, not much 
cliange in temperature. 

Minnosota— Unsettled tonight and 
Tu.'slav with showers . , . . .^ 

North Dakota— Partly cloud v tonight 
and Tuesday; colder In west portion 
tonight. 

EFFECTIVE OPPOSITION NEEDED 



♦ ♦•L. .Sinotte and wife 
on Kastf-rii trip today. Mr 
sold his news and .confectionery store 
at .'i26 West Superior street to Cullen 
& Buckley, a Minneapolis hrm. 

♦♦♦Deputv Sheriff H. K. Glllon of 
Two Harbors wa.s married to Miss 
Annie Ro.ss of Duluth at the residence 
of Court Officer Glllon on May IZ- 

♦♦•The steamer Barker took an ex- 
-urslon party to iron river y-stet'day. 
It consisted of E. L. Fisher. ^'^Perm- 
tiendeiil of the Ohio Coal e.jmpany. and 
a number of visiting triends 

••♦Mrs H H. Hanford has returned 
from Kansas, leavir.g her hustiand 
there. He will return soon. 

•♦•WllHs A. Gorman Post of Duluth 
contributed more money to the Grant 



MINNESOTA OPINIONS. 



••♦Miss Mamie Peyton, who accom- 
panied her parents to Florida, Is on 
her way back and is stopping with 
friends in St. L ouis. 

♦♦♦Mr and Mrs. E L- Bradley and 
children left yesterday for a months 
trip on th-3 lakes, after which tliey in- 
tend to go to the Pacific coast for two 
months- They have rented their hous« 
to A. H. Truex. 

♦ ♦♦Col. Loun.sberry of the land de- 
partment has been ordered from Devili 
l.,ake. N. D.. to Washi ngton 

♦ ♦♦President Harrison has appointed 
Chark-s H. Maull siiecial agent for the 
Duluth land office to tak.- the pl.ice 
of .1 W. Crockett. Mr. Mauh has ar- 
rived from Delaware and will bring hia 
faintly here later. 

♦ ••Corp.iral Thomas Moore of Com- 
t>aiiv K has been pr otnoied to he sec- 
'.nd" sergeant. Corporal George Watts 
to be ftilh sergeant. an,l Priealeh Bel- 
mger and Lounsberry to be corporaia. 



♦♦♦Mrs Kdwln Burllngame has 
turned from a two montl-.s' visit 
Green Bay. Wis., and t.Miicago. 



MEANT TO BE FINNY. 



re- 
to 



; -{ He ■-"■ 
■ t 1 X itt..in 

iitaiiuf.u:ti.ire 



in>nii-i 



Mielies of the legislature pled^red to .,tand for reap- 

aii 1 to use Its power 

.f t'.'.at en.l 

. -',,.,;,i' session Wl.'Uld 
!: ■ !( <i.slature. who 
ii: ' V, 'all have to 



here. 



incnt before aiiythii 
las a unit in the accomplishnien 
1 Tlie only possible excuse •' 

' be a,^ a joke u:)on the momh 
: c'dlected all their pay in ad 

-.erve .at their outi e\i'eri-.e 



opmlon''\hat- there will l\f^^^^^^:^'^^Z 
advance in the price of l."n\hei . ^^l ht 
Southern dealers are 
at tiie present 

l^U^nf^fhe 11;^ kn^l Of lutiiber 
that 



i.d create :•■ 
; lies Ota. could 

a^riinm '■■V" 
1 1 r o h 1 1 n ! 1 V e 



a ail 



d VV 



',; UK 

Mlltl 



pl.'.m 

' iT 1 . • 



t . a ■ 



divious 'a't^'.-t 
■ iiianufac- ' 
• to labor 

f-n tite firm 

■ t ixed. Thai 

>ion of the 

. >n against 



;..:, ,'1 a ton- 

.ken Th.' 

a (.he tonn.ige 

- cTtainly can 

which diserHUinal>-.> 

(lier states. 



In 



^t^ '11 



1 n -: 1 



cl 'Sely 
The - 

meet wi'. 

s^h'^uld V»e 



M 



;oii 1-, 
-id:-r,-tble 



IS 



■ l. 



.f its lertility ju^t 



\^^\\^,• ten 



;.l 



1e:v 



pen 



Ttic . 
tV 
t! 
w 

I 
ti 
c 
ci-.-l- ' ^ 

fact tha' 
c 

nial ' 
in a 
in t! 
ing day 



CLEANING DAYS NOT OVER. 

.ipart by Mayor Haven fo- 
, , ., .1; ;..,,';' ■'■■ ' ^ iturday night, an^ 



ii;>> >t! 
this 
pnolic auth. 



■!y 



■\ri 



It 
.t t.inn- 
hliing the soil 
/iiljnients from 



xertion of the 
rnment. 

, il.jcetie.n that this 
,111 er>itl'et tliat has 



much good work^^^^^^^^^^^ ,,j- 



eviaei!' 



't thmg 



; jn every 

. ( T-l,.. 



hand 



;nmunity. every 



•:. pci tii- 
;ark that 

I take pride 
i, . Ican- 

c done. 



STATE CONTROL OF FARM LANDS. 

, :...,,,■ .,f a tcelmical journal Iv W. I' itz- 

_,. ,i. but t^rnierly .1 1 laaith, makes 
t farm land^ ougl;t to be 
;iy controlled, by the -^tate. 
1: ,^i startling, and will naturally 
hostility. y-M it is not mic that 
lioU! proper eonsi,! 
i upon the knowledge that present laeth 
t- .are, in altogether too many v-;i- 

'y as i-ontll 

sj; b'lt "a h>)!e in the .^r -nnd." 
welfare, and -v-n its existence, de- 
nial, a. lining the productiveness of the sod. 

oper subject for th.- 
.-J, aroiigh the agcncn-- 
Fitzpatrick anticipate, t!ie 
. ■■,., (..T!,,, but that i 

\nything u laatcrnali-stic if Jt | 

,. ertiment for the control of 

tr,,- inter-st-, of the pople. 

).it ern-iii-t 1 ' b'.it -oeialistic. 

,,;,k. whi.-Ii everybody wants but 

,,o,t which nearly everybody wants 

ihc expr. >s ,-omi>ani<'s. ^^t.ite Irain- 

fcder:il devel M>i"^'"t '' water- 

1 ;r--fs. supervision of 

•rn.ia>tic, loo. quite as 

s most 

a 



verv low 

This will 

tVinrnradvance the pncc'upon lun\'>«r, 

"Business Is slowly getting better. 

"As to lumber tariff, many of the 
lumbermen are of the opinion that free 
entry of lumber trum ♦'anada would 
not hurt the lum»>er business of this 
country 
Pi 

coimii.rdlty' I "anr~peV.sonally ;^f .t»»« 
opinion that free entrance of lumber 
from Canada will have to come in the 
near future, ami that the removal of 
the tariff upon lumber would not have 



thev were selling at 
prices less than a year ago 



......... They have very little white 

ne in Canada, and there would not be 
great deal of competiti.m in this 



a gr.-at effect upon the price ol" lumber 
In this country I am inclined to be- 



luni- 
than 
lumber de- 



1 ,^r much ■ 
111 VI »l\'es the 

stry 
The ;)o 

po 



The 



, 1 , .. ; 



e -K e r ' ' : .1 1 • 
1, ny choM-, 
.. is mtt 

- I V a ! ; i; - 



■r 11! 
•nly 



coll 



ai! 



bank>— 



irngation, 

iti.'ii of - 

things 
„.. ..-.(..n if farm lands would be. It 1 

and therefore 



IS v 



It 

organ!. •' ■■ 
pe.'">:^!.' 

r 

pre 
Dim 

D- 



DEMOCRATS AND THE TARIFF. 

o.. , .. .,,...■',., , ,, t ' . Republic:.! ,. 

rayal of the 
tariff : . '!''ii i» likely t.. ari.,e to 

the ne ■• '-..:; ■■■ 



,i.,., , .X r.vutei tor 

iiiatter for pulilic acti ;i. 
s.'ta. f'.>r instance, -.a'"! 
than twenty-iv ;els 

• ' to twe;>- ;< ..hcls 



public concern. 

I'aat the w'.icat yield in Minne- 

■ oped from better 



Id 
to 
to 



^.u- ... . '. 1:: !'-■'■' than a gen- 
the acre, and r,hould be still 



'.V n 



; '. I v 



tn 



mal and 

make the 



pa 



t.; 



trick, 






;;.jse ..-erTain ! u .oilo have 
■r ^-at'' 



seem 
■ ,,ivonng 
Bm ■ ■ 
kind 

tl.> gl"! 

.•' mtri il 



T h.'. } s e De m o c ra t ic sc n a 



as : 

kc, 

tha' 
Repul) 



to frai: 
publican parly 

ever : - ' 



■ ■tiotT has made 

'■' ■ ■• - ill a turn 

done the 

I'neit 



vidti il ' 

trip ^" 
explo^i ■ 

a ri^lu 
:iiii.ises 



ai*;. 



:ron-. 



il->mellnu 



1^ 



*roi of 
party 

■i.t! in ! 



were ' 
■ little V' 

con. 



lie 



,t ate. the 



i(f hill 



:i ^ 1 



Re- I tht. 



that may 

^' aa.- th:in 
;hat c:in 



r-^ who are as taiih 
any Republicans in 

■ about 



y\v.\l r.- 



ultra-paternali^'i' ." -iv^ Mr. Fi^7- 
.f usurpation, an invasion of pri- 
ibsolutely necessary that sottie- 
. c ,,1 1 that at once The people 
■o it as they have done to 
.V AS 1 time when the indi- 
. Miild ju:,t a^ suited him. a fire- 
structure; manufacturers of 
pi'dnets felt that they have 
., ;, .v ak :iny Endless 

in tlie name ot priv.ite rights. 
la- ilized that their rights, tho 
- a whole, were best conserved 
;• :!;ve authority oi the whole. 
iliat you may not do 
■ ■•■c«mvenience the 
* permit you to 
much 
.{ defend the land 
ity, the very life of 
;ig the state." 



lleve that the price >f Canadian 
her would advance some, rather 
the price upon American 
crease. . , 

".Many of the lumber operators be- 
lieve that the lumber of this country 
cannot last much l.)nger. and that wo 
will have to Import lumber from the 
other side within a very sh.>rt time. 
These men are of the opinion that we 
might as well have free trade In lum- 
ber now as at a later date." 
• • • 
At the .Spalding: C. F- decker SL 
Paul M. B. King, Boston: A. h.. HI'*'';''. 
Milwaukee, K. W. Lord B()stoti; < . M. 
Bacon. Chieago: W. L. Krw n, C hicago, 
Albert Oppenheimer St 1 aul. J- v\. 
Korefny. Chicago; W. Stallmann. Mil- 
waukee I M. Freeman and wife. Urand 
Korks;'George Lee Brown .St. I*a"l-,A. 
Kngle. Milwaukee; J. .S. .Sulllyan. Chl- 
eai.> A i. DavU, Butte; .1. H. Clark, 
sf.fenecfady: W. M. White. PHUadel- 
uhia H. tjooilspee.l. Chicago; F. fc.. 
Ge'ts Chieago; G. R. Sawyer. New 
York;" J. F. Kelly, St. Paul, H G orde- 
rnann. Minneapolis: George F.Adatns. 
Chieago c B. Smith. Washingt.>n; 
iohn 1>. Forbes. Minneapolis; H. Young. 
.•hleago. C. K. Dale. Boston, Albert C. 
A la ml Chieago, C C. Mathews. New 
York; Max Jaeobs. Chicago; F. H. Judd. 
Chicago. 

At the Lenox: Ctiarles H Curley. fit. 
Paul C F Tucker, St Paul; tJordon 
L.mg Chicago; A. Epicstein. .Minne- 
apolis; R. A. Briggs. Minneapolis; James 
R Weldon. St Paul: W A Jamisotj. 
St Paul, G. A. Gilmour, Delr.)il. !• . J. 
Giflos. Detroit; W A. Cable Two Hir- 
•, >rs- C L Ege. Chicago; (>eorge .Mul- 
••.rd" Two Harbors; Charles Kbason. 
Two Harbors; W. N. Mot.lton. Two 
Harbors; J. C. Towne. Two Harbors: .. 
K Roper. .St. Panl; H. J. Osterlund. St. 
pauT Parke B Howard. Omaha; Miss 
r>ollie D'Dell. Gran.l Forks; C J. An- 
derson. St. Paul; H. A Ade.;. Sl^P^^uI: 
H Cro.s.-». .Springfield, A. L^ Brookt.. 
.Marshflel.l: M. K- .M»rKan C-olera ne; 
W l.Ars.»n. Coleram.'; W . A. Tiully. 
\ it kin; W. A. Fleming. Bra 1 nerd, J. 
B .;ill)ert. Sterling. 111.; R. H. Macau- 
ley. Minneapolis 

At the St. l»uls: H. O. Kock, .St. 
Paul Matt Haves, .St. Paul; Mell H. 
Her-^^y St Paul. L. B. Ring. Chicago; 
.\lwred Anderson, Minneapolis 
Norden. ChUago; 
3 m, Minneapolis 
apolls; Mrs W 
McMahon. St 



Minneapolis Tribune: With the Re- 
publican i)arty. under the control of 
leaders inherited from Its worst perio.i. 
striving to defeat the will of the people 
and break the pledges It made them 
hefor«» election, a vigorous and uniled 
opposition might render a patriotic 
service to the country. 

If it fould not bring about immediate 
legislative results by uniting with tha 
belter Republican part to aid a Repub- 
lUan president to k'-ei> the party 
pledges it could at least afford a rally- 
ing point for the effort to get such re- 
sults In the future. Perhaps it Is too 
much to expeet the Demof-rats to help 
a Repiibliean administration, but why 
should not they accept the he p of Ro- 
publlcans to make a Democratic admin- 
istration? - , .1 „, 

The Tribune believes fiim y that 
enough Hepubllcans in the Middle West 
would vote with the Democrats to^ put 
tliat partv in p..wer, if It could be 
trusted to revise the lorift downward 
In the sole interest of the mass ol the 
people Thev could have the next 
honso for the" asking, if the senate r.'- 
and the president 



North Branch Review: Governor John- 
son voiees the sentiment of the people 
of the Northwest at least when he says 
that the AUlrlch tariff bill Is not what 
the people expected and hoped for. and 
that it will go bad with the Republican 
I arty is some improvement is not 
made before the bill goes through. 

Kveleth News: Governor Johnson 
is the coming figure in the P^rty which 
claims Jeffer.son as its progenitor and 
tariff will be the issue. One year ago 
we said John A. Johnson was not lieavy 
enough for the presidential class, but 
men gr.>w with years, the ton.iage tax 
veto shows a mature mind and obed - 
ence to what is right, and we will sup- 
port him even though a Democrat. 

Virginia Virginian: Every time 
governor Johnson goes East the peop e 
realize that Minnesota Is in the Lnion. 
A pro!spective candidate for tlie presi- 
dency Isn't a bad advertisement. 

Anoka rn Ion : He not «!'ri;«. \=^''';' ..^^ 

oiutlier party formed 'f the P o- 

lh,iir demands at the 

The 



he 

re- 



Cl-.icago News: FJthel — "Wasn't 
grand? He said my eomplexion 
mm. led him of peaches.' . 

Milton — "Ho should have said ciuniea 
pea.hes." 

El hel— "Canned peaches? 

Milton— "Yes; preserved by chera- 
Icahs." 

Judge; Generous Lady— Here, my 
little boy. I know you are hungry for 
a box .it these animal crackers. 

Boy-^u.h obliged, lady; but my 
folks l.f vegetarians. 

• 

Plf'tsliurg Post: 'If you agree with 
everytl-.ing a person says tliat person 
will think you have good Judgment. 

"I dunno. I've tried that unsuceess- 
fuUy on my wif e." 

Life The Doctor— Y'oung man. It 
will not do for you to sll<;k in an .jlhee 
You must get out doors — mu.st 
air. By tlie way. what Is your 
pation? 

Patient — I am 



have 

oi.:.-a- 



an aeronaut. 



"A poet 



see ai 

pie fail to get 

hands of tlie Republnan I'f/ty. 

ma.sses will not trust the I »'••'"''" tic 

n^rtv as they realr/.e that that party 

rs^'no' better. 'and Is even worse, than 

the party n )W in power. 

Albert Lea Standard: What a farce 
U ii at VVas!iin«t..n-and worse-wha 
a eheat and fraud it is' And the ev.l 



ceispols t'.at are 



-lietating further tax 



xa.-tions from the 



L. A 
Mrs. .\lfred .Vnder- 
H. A. Cooper, Minne- 
Bovd. Rosebud, Or ; B. 
Paul: F. B. Myers. Bl- 
wibik M U Fox. Racine: J. H. Dalton. 
-;t" Paul G S. Mendenthal. Rosebud; C 
d' Collins. St. Paul: O. -V Walker, 
Floodwood: Fred Kalsley. Minneapolis; 
.\. Torinins, Stillwater; Thomas >ul 



matned stulihorn 

proved Impotent to ke.^p the party s 
pledges, thev eould have tlie next pres- 
idential elee-tlon as easily. 

.So far the necessary condition has 
not been fulfliled. The people do not 
trust the Democrats to reiorm the 
tariff because so many of their repre- 
sentatives In congress line up behind 
Vldrleh and Cannon to perpetuate and 
increase the protlts of privileged mon- 
oDolv. 11 Is not needful to go back to 
the burking of the Wll.-=..n hill, which 
■lid more than Cleveland s stand for 
sound monev to ruin the iiartv. Demo- 
,rats In the present congress gave 
Cannon his rules and defeate,! amend- 
ments revising the tariff d..wiiward In 
l..Uh ho.ise..^. Nearly hal.f of it serves 
uii.ler the banner of privilege. 

The lecture field Is a sater reliance 
for Governor Johnson, so hing as he 
and men like him are attacked by sen- 
ators smirched !>y this servbe and lack 
nerve to assert ti.em.selves in reply. 
Wiiether or n.it Governor John.son said 
It Demoitats who vote for raising tha 
tariff betrav their constituents. 

So long as this rondltion exists 
neither party as such can command 
publie confidence; nor will the people 
take the trouble to do more than to 
divide the government between them. 
The beneflelarles of protection ask 
nothing better. That is the ideal of 
standpattery. 



Indrprudent JuurnHlinm. 

Boston Herald: Journal Istn has two 
functions, mainly — the publication of 
news and the publication of comment 
on the news. In many papers the com- 
ment is usually favorable to a party 
or cln.ss. But the old-style party or- 
gans are. throughout the country, di- 
minishing In numt)ers and In Intluen-e. 
Iji some sections they retain their rigid 
partl.Haiiship. but the greatest Ameri- 
can neATspapers ate they that are iiot 
b..und to any parly, to any class or In- 
t.-resi and which, printing the news 
without fear and without favor, com- 
ment upon it In their editorial pages 

without reganl to any interest save the 
public welfare. They are papers of 

opinion, as well as purveyors of news. 

out their opinion Is not party opinion, 

nor class opinion, nor is It tiie opinMii 

of individuals employed for or engaged 

in nrouaganda. 

A great newspaper is an institution 

P )t less than an enterprise. It.s voiee 

Is not tiie voice ot 

merely that 

It is a living 

.. ..liitTient is: UOin:v i; 

fo 



pe.jpl." 

They 



will be tlie 
assume that 



ti;""''arrl;:^tmig"ihe"tarl.rrtght.,atid 

t at with the pas.^age of their reient- 
tnat witn i-" ^'^^.y ^^^j, ,,uell agitation 




Louisville Courier-Journal: 
has Inst starved to death." 

•Let us send htm a wreath of ilnw- 

^'"Let us rather wait for his cMile- 
nary. collect a numl)er of wreaths and 
have publh- speaking." 



Cl*»veland Lefi.ler: 
thing you put In my 
the patient. 

"A rubber dam 
"Why?" 

•'H-verse the vvna 
the victim. 



What was that 
mouth?" gasjied 



sootlied the d. nn.'.^i 



-i.t;i 



.1 



(at 

Mar- 
tha 

how 



^rs^u:dmUint 'is settled right. 

Austin Transcript: The tnass of the 



r3^n"^ideVy of Hepublleanisn. 
Roosevelt policies suit them to d 



The Republican.'^ in 



'^^,.^'':" ar^e''X\ermlned ' to commit 
eongre.-,s areoeierj ^^^^ ^.„untry over 

■ater orpors lions 
more to 



Boston TrMUseript •^"' 'V.T 

lu,^Pl,)_Yes. darling, these little 
dines are sometimes eaten ny 
larger fish. 

Mabel taged .5)— But. mamma, 
do they get the cans open? 

The Tatter: Bootmaker (to .Vrctic 
explorer just returned)— How dhl you 

like those boots 1 niide VV"' ,?"'r^^, t 
.\rctic explorer— .'excellent: Best 1 

ever tasted. 

Fliegende Bh4etter: "Have you for- 
gotten that you owe me $7''" 

• De:ir dear. I hi.l forgoften. My 
nn-morv" is miserable— but wa.sn t 
only $6..19?" 



it 



the . rime of turninis 
to the trusts and gt-e 




the people can 
the Lteniocrats. 



turn 



You keep right 



M 



Walker. Two 



h^fure'su?,, 1: ,»rty 'w... l.« overthrown 
and disaster foll ows. 

rhlsholm Trilyine^ H tl-^«-:thern 

^"^dU;^^n;;i^S^'^treouldcome 



Harper's Ba/.ar: Knirker— Did your 
futl'er trlve you an atito' 

Boeker— Ye.s, hut he didn't endow It. 

Baltimore Amerh^an: "There goes a 
man who has made a great deal of 
monev dealing in futures. 

•' \ wheat speculator? 

"No; a fortune teller' 

London Opinion: ^I^-^^'TI"^ «/ , .V.'.t 
Board— You. dr. are the btirgest Idiot 

I h.ave ever met' 
Cthairman 



to for- 



pa 



body 



lo Chlsholm 'V..l.'-'„-,'^ the disastrous 



has been done hen 



and 
le 
all 



see 



what 

rous 

lay with 



I, as "•-^'';"- ■ I arould be a 1 'lay WHO 

fire last fall, 't W'^-'^"-'^ , enacted 

„,^. They would liave a aw ^,^_.j^ 

Hi the next se.sslon taxing ^^.^^^,^^,..t,.,„. 



_^^^ ^.. Order' You seem 

get'that'Tam in the room ' 

Chicaeo News— Wli-n a man's money 
is tie.1 up there is n.. thing like a wife 
to untie it for bin: 



a Unobetor. 

Tlie noblest thing 
that she isn't a 



an individual, not 

of associated individuals; 

entity, as the chur.h is. 

as a parliament is: J.0II.V IS iiot^iM^por- 



^ Hi an 



er 



t:.. 



only h.u 
:, protc. 



I a 



ai 



iUl.^tltUtUlg 



■"M" • 



thai. Til 
•od tV. 



, , . ater that will bear thinking about. There 
.../be no private right that is greater than a public need. 



I ere 1.3 



livan. Stillwater: Frank 
Harbors; Charles A Lawrence, Still- 
water; James Downey Chisholm. J_\V . 
Van Riper Mlnneai)oll8; John Hill. 
Tronwood- J Williams, St. Paul: Louis 
Blair Marquette^ John T. Ca.ssln. Bo- 
Iveltve. Mar.iuette: Stephen O. 
HIbbIng; c. W, Carney, Big 
M Davis. Long Prairie. 
• • • 

A» the McKay; C L. Goodell. Bar- 
rum George F. Goodell. Mankato; 
Frank J Wegd. Minneapolis; A. .V 
iJoodrieh. Minneapolis; W. H. Kulil- 
lin 'Vllnneapolis. A. J. McGuire. Grand 
Viknids E F. Orlswold, Minneapolis; 
P W kuack Bav City; A. Y. Wllleut-s. 
E. ^^•>-%'^',';.la Kremer. Grand Rap- 



vey; ft>. 
Gelser. 
Lake; L 



„a- 



1 It 



tlu 



- :in- 



ladcpendcncc m i 



^ ,, day like ye.->lerday m 

la these same agents ^ of fouI weather. 



akes up for a week 




tunism. n or its work 01. iy fo r 

IMarr'n l.l«tle Hob. 

Mary had a Uttle hen 

Upon her little farm. 
Against the wolf before the door 

It proved to be a charm. 

Each day it laid a Uttle egg. 

Which Mary sold at town. 
And thus she bought her groceries. 

And now and then a gown. 

The years passed, and Mary paid 

The little mortgage due 
And .sent her girl to Imardlng school. 

Her boy to college, too. 

She has a nest egg in the bank. 

And even keeps a cook. 
And evervthlng about her has 

A thrifty, well-kept look 



aecordlng to the ^--- ^^^^.^ ^,^ ^^^^ 

'"'"' I I'ln of th^ s ate tax. And the 
nearly ^1' "^ ^ne ^^^^^^ not always 

.'"Jve a governor with backbone 
.lave <*■ o ,...1,1 1111 wer 

enough to use tl.e v^eto p^v^er . 

., , .r^N^e^s" .rt"r.nan"m;y be Jus- 
tltSedrn'^bb^win^ hls^wn horn, but not 
'^f•a"n^.an^elU a woman .she's all the 

world to ... 
wanting the earth 

Manv a 
own game . _ 

'"M^Mie/ miv ^maiTthe mare go but It 
aione> iii».' .iftemots to Start a 

folia down when It aiieiiipi" 

Subi>or.T mule down the/'^-,, ^.^es 
The girl ^^^^,'^1,'of'he? hair. She 

f.a^'rd"e1=ldT"to%£ny^he color of It 



lU'fltMtionH •»' 

New y.nk Pres.s: 
about a mother is 

"^Mnst of a man's edueation 
quir-d by unteachlng liimself what ha 
learned ^t si-hool. . 

A man gets so nervous waiting to 
learn -.vhether It's a boy or a girl that 
he an'1 be much wor.se If It turns out 
to iie twins. 

If there's no other %vav to 

!;;i„r \.;an of th- ..."- "«■>■« """■ '• 

famous. _^ . 



IS ac- 



have one 
over 
»ak 



■■him," "she can forgive him for 

'ma^n^h^s been caught at his 
brpeople wholet him think 



of tlio 
ringu 



Mr. jMwti*'*' O'Hrtf'n. 

•■ Justice Thoma. \> d Brlen 
svoreme court of Minnesota. 
f.'.Vr We lielieve Governor Johnson 
b,i made no mlsttUe In th s appolnt- 
, .,t jrd there will be little partisan 
T.vlsi.m in' Ui7 public approval^ which 
will come as an e^ho. Mr. OBilen. 



hes de living rendered the state good 
service in more than one rapacity and 



may dec! 
later. 

When a 



^ fT-wats his Wire with 
„,an treats^ nu^^^^ ^^^^ ,^^_ 



more consideration t^.an u. 
gins to wonder If ne 
siiuare hi mself. ^ 

The Kasjest Way. 



Wife 
il si 
t trying to 



thereby eirned the recognition tiow 
srlven Is well equipped by learnltig 
femperament and experience for the 
seTt on the state's high -st tribunal. 
We believe also that the p.^ople of 
Minnesota will look upon his a^^J" 
incc af this ofTlcp. under all of the 
condith'n.s and with its always d .ubt- 
f-^r milill-al tenure, as someth ng of a 
dAv If the «'^te may be the loser 



Siv^"'j. V Gray and wife^ Balsom 
ake J. C: cole. Lake Nediagoman; 
.'* W Cross, at. Louis, C. D Olman. 
CloQuet; H. Johnson, Minneapolis. 



fall 



Savs she to those who daily 
With needle, brush and pen: 

"If vou %vould do as well as I. 
jtist keep a little J^e^i^^^^ ^^^^^ 




hipless 

poeketbooK 

fully at it 

ahpd ever pick it 

^Ueet came a bright young 

down on your hamU and^kn. 

can pick It up. 

he passed on. 



She stood gazing mourn 

wondering how on earth 

UP when down the 

'• m:in. "Get 

ees and you 

Gwendolyn." he said, as 



('■udldate. 

Wliat Senator 



Ko Standard Oil 

Ba^ler3ay.rin' denunciation of (govern- 

?,^ Johnson of Minnesota "i,^^,:.\'^ -^'tpS 
that Mr Johns.jn is not Standard Oil ■ 
eandidate for the Democratic presiden- 
tial nomination In 1912. 




.lillllV^^^^^^^ 



lllliiiflli|ii|lllliilii mil umi 





THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: MONDAY, MAY 24, 1909. 



iiiiiii»iiiAi |[ \ 



\^C 




^ Love is Life 



Without love this world would be a good 
place to emigrate from. Without it the hu- 
man race would die— and be glad of it. Love 
is but the hght in the east that leads to mater- 
nity. Love of husband is the steppmg-stone to 
love of child. 

There ^re thouMndt of women who live weB 
into middle-life without knowing the bliss of 
• first-horn's caress, but who are happy 
mothers to-day and heap hlessioCs on Dr. 
Piercers Favorite Prescription. 





OF TME iOBTIHIW 




Many thousands of 

marvelous remedy. 
life ■■■■giving organism 
healthy where she 
weakness and disease 
nates the discomforts 



women have testified to the merits of this 

The "Favorite Prescription" quickens the 

of women. It makes a woman strong and 

most needs vigor and vitality- It cures all 

of the distinctly feminine organs. It chmi- 

the way to maternity and makes baby's 



on 



cc 

cm 
cciv 



and nearly painless. Found at all medicme stores- 
i.oult to your intelligence when a druggis. urges upon you 
nostrum as a substitute for tliis proven remedy OF KNOWN 
\ simply that he mav make a little larger profit. Phy- 
i scribe 'Tavorite Prescription" because it's every mgrcdi- 
1- i-rmted upon its outside wrapper making it an ethical 
for them to prescribe. There's no secrecy, no deception 
a good, honest, square-deal medicine, made of native 
ro< ^hoiit alcohol or habit-forming drugs in its make up. Ask 

You I Neighbors. c * », 
Pierce's Pleasant Pellets regulate and strengthen Stomach. 
t r and Bowels. One to three tiny sugar-coated "Pellets' for 
-sc. Easy to take as candy. 
World's Dispensary Medical Association, R. V. Pierce, M. D., 
Prr-;it-!<»nt. Buffalo, N. Y. 



LAW WILL 
BEJESTED 

Senator Cooke Employs 

Counsel to Attack the 

"Pork Barrel'* BIIL 



In sickness or health the best food Is 

SHREDDED 




Try it for breakfast with milk or cream 
—easily digested— strengthening and 



I) 



rem- 
-it'a 
medicinal 



Attempt to Enjoin 
State Auditor From 
Issuing Warrants. 



The 




THIS COVPON 

utltl^s one person, umler ::o years of «ire. to enf 

BORDEN'S PRIZE CONTEST 



Full detallh 



ai.'ptl.<-r page. 



9iAMB 



A %W W^ : 



Fill oul couiKjn, III iti< 



111 ft tftn 



cf 



Borden's Peerless Brand Evaporated Milk 
MaU 10 Contest Editor, Dulutb Evening Hsrald. 



HeraUJ. < — Tt,«' 
th** 1600. OlK) 
tzt*<f by tl.e 

ib to 

L. O. 



:4. — (Si't.. .' 
ci'tik<titJtloiiaiiiy 



t( 
of 
•l.trk hmrt-V bill author- 
latit Mii.iiisi'tu legislature 
be ifsit'fl In tl.t courts. Senator 
Ccokt ot \Valtll^lia county, who 
wttH in h^t. i'Kul Satuiiiay, employed W. 
B, DoupiJi? form-:-! iitlurney genera 
iiiid Ici'iiit 1 srtiitf MiiTunt lourt justice, 
to bring an action to restrain 
Iverson, ftate nudllor, 
wfuTftiils- ■ the 

■■[.(■rk t'lii !. 



rti. 
e r. 



.1 l!. t: 



l.i.:: 



from Issuing 

previsions of the 

Tlic- ca»e will be 

.jiay courts at 





THIS COVPON 

Entitles One Child lo Enlrj' far a Prize In the 

BORDEN'S BABY CONTEST. 

SIZE rut. Ti a 



au:i'-ts ;. l.AIiri, iMt f^i. ti"- ri !.' -■' ■•= '■•'' '■' 

BORDEN'S EAGLE BRAND CONDENSED MILK. 

NO : H OTHKR CONDITIONS 



Name of frua 

Age 

ra rents' Athlrt- 
City or Tow n 

Address "llaby Contest 



Bex. 



Editor/' Duluth Herald. 




The lyifi* 'pork laim bill prepared 
l.v the (food ro&ils Lommlttees of the 
h('U."« and senate appropriaaed f60i>,<.H>K 
cjl of the 4-tate revenue fund and scat- 
tered It over the i'tate for the purpose 
of building brUlgtt and "Improving 
r.,n,iw An analvsJs of the bin showeu 
the measure appropriated state 
fur the Improvt-ment of city and 
viilaiie streets, and the building of 
bridges within corporate llmlt><. The 
"porTk barrel" Is a biennial affair, and 
although It appropriates money to be 
• witliout state supervision 
tended <jn the ground that 
ii fcivr.- lii. larmer liis only "dip' into 
the stale treasury. 

The nt w featur. c- tlK 1909 blh was 
the fact that it riated $200,000 

more than ever l- nd that instead 

of being Confined to the betterment of 
country ro:id«^, 't« prcvifions 

IZ*' 



pr< 
Uni. 



1, ; I ^ t 
will U : 
^Idt: I.. 

The 
trarreK' 

In the 
J' l^ In 
of the 



autlior- 
ghway Ini- 

ufid village 



>,. k. 

I'fiirei uf i 
«M'n. Douglas 
>li. ami th«' 
• dly he tailed 

- I • t"iir !i.i.;,' i*.\ ' 



C(': 

W; - 
flrsf I 

viola I 
Constitution 



saracterlzed 

I 'grab.'" has 

to fight the 

siii'itnie louit 

upon to de- 

f the blJl. 

the "pork 

,vc grounds. 

be urged that 

ion 6 article 9. 

uud in the second 



HIGH SCHOOL, COSTING $25,000. 



place* that It is contrary to the Const!- 
tutJonal amendment of l^SS known as 
the "'good roads 



amendment." 

-• 



West First Street 

is the New Location of 

MERRITT & HECTOR, 



Both PhortM. 



Printer* and Binders. 

"Ra»h Order* a Pleasnre 



VALLEY CITY 
RAISES A KICK 

Over Removal of Depot 

One Mile From the 

City. 



normal training departments. The do 
mestlc science and agricultural work 
wlj; also be extended this year so 
as to Install these lines of effort In en- 
tirety In the school. The total enroll- 
ment of pupils In all the schools of 
city Is 1.150. 

SERIOUS CHARGE 
MADE BY CONVICT 

Says District Attorney 

Offered to Drop Case 

for Money. 

Marinette Wis.. May 24.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— Joseph Glass, a former 
resident of Marinette and now serv- 
ing a live-year term for burglary In 
the Wisconsin state prison, exploded 
bomb before 
testified that 
tritd on a 



Thev are: Mrs. Mary L. Stewart St. 
Cloud: Mrs. H. L Stark. St. Peter; Mrs. 
W. E. Bramhall and .Mrs. W. R. Mac- 
Lean, St. Paul, and Mrs J. L. /^ ash- 
burn Duiuth. The board will have to 
do with the women's Institutions in 
charge of the state board of control. 



DAKOTA BRIEFS 



Watertown, S. D.— The largest oil 
depot between Des Moines and the 
Rocky mountains is to be located in 
Watertown before the end of the sum- 
mer The Manhattan Oil company is 
tack of the move. ^ „ , i 

Wesslngton. S. P.— Rev. F. P. Leach 
<.f Sioux Falls, general secretary of 
the State Sunday School association, 
was one of the principal .-peakt 
the annual convention of the 
School association of Beadle 
which was held In this city. ^ ,, „ 

Aberdeen. 6. !>.— WViile shooting 

phers. Henry Miller, aged 10 



rs at 
Sunday 
county. 



go 



collect the $35,934 due from the fifteen 
life insurance companie.s which w un- 
drew from the state two years ago, 
for the reason that the Issues involved 
are now being tested '"tbe courts 

Kenosha — William \S allace Miller, 
aged 10 son of John W. Miller of Som- 
ers Kenosha county, stumbled as he 
was carrving a revolver owned by 
father and was fatally shot. 

Prairie du Chkn— As a result of 
dispute between Mrs. John Cook 
Mrs William Dupee of the town of 
Clayton, near Prarie du Chlen, the 
furiner has been arrested on the cliarge 
of having attempted to murder the lat- 
ter by shooting. 

Milwaukee— While at the top of a 
with a battered tin can for a 



his 



a 

and 



staircase. 



-old 

389 



toy, John Picolo, a 2-year 
ing with his parents at 
street, tumbled down the long 
8tep.s and alighted on top of 
can in such a manner tliat 



boy liv- 

Jackson 

fiiglit of 

the tin 

his tongue 



a 

the grand Jury when he 

last fall, before he was 

robbery cliarge, A. E. 

SchwJttay. then district attorney 



dropped 
certain 



promised to have the matter 
nrovidlriK G;a.'-9 paid him a 
b'm of money." *^Schwlttay told me 
that a portion of this money would 
eo to the roobed mar., while the rest 
would be ub-ed in 'fixing up' matters, 
testi^'fd Glass. Whether another In- 
dictment will be returned against 
Srhwittay— he was recently tried and 
ecQuitted of a perjury charge—is 
doubtful, as the convict bore a bad 
reputation in Marinette and is known 
t, Vi 1. bitter enemy of Schwltiay. 




LUMBER 
TOTALLY BURNED 

Loss of $3,500 to tlie 

Peshtigo Lumber 

Company. 



I'lM.NEEK LI MKl.KM,t.\ 

(IF Wist ONSIN I'li V 



new 



-(., 



to 



1 , .\::iv .' ! i-'iieclal 
ivlr.g 

f the 

thtrn 

.. V .ift 

Late 

• .ii'phca- 

M '■•?»d, 

^. 

till oi • , ,.t I ti : .iig 



Tht Northern 

rtcd ti.e ton- 

.r.ning about 

ih:s line be- 

: ;,t might b€ 

. ,. \ y grades out 

.w depot is lo- 

of the City, and 

■ g to go 



HAD NARROW ESCAPE. 
Man Overcome 



By 



SHIBERTTHK.ATEKSITE 

IN ST. PAl I SKLEriEll. 



Pa; 



M 1 n n 



M;iv :'4 — Thf new 






th. 



f.AMY IS ALLE(iElL 

Milwjuikfr \\ «n«:iii .^ttiiM'd in IH 
viiiM' ^! it Hv Si'fmif! Husband. 



PLANING MILL 
BADLY DAMAGED 

Loss of $15,000 Caused to 

Cjoquet Lumber 

Company. 



North Dakota 

tJas While Digging Well. 

Milton, N. D., May 24,— While dig- 
ging a well at the creamery, Thomas 
Costello was overcome by gas and ren- 
dered unconscious. In which condition 
he remained for over an hour He Is 
now however, fully recovered from its 
t-ff.c'ts. About 11 o'clock in the fore- 
noe^n Mr. Costello touched off a slick 
ol dviiarnlle in the bottom of the we.l. 
When he went down Into the well after 
dlnnt-r the lantern which he carried 
immediately went out, and \\ llliain 
Soliitt, who was hoisting dirt from the 
top suspecting something wrong, se- 
cured help and found Costello uncon- 
scious in 11i< Ix.t tcrn »if t)ie well. 

BELOIT PEOPLE WANT 

THEIR MONEY RETURNED. 

Beloit, Wis. Mav ^4. — Action is being 
taken by citizens who contributed the 
sum of $4.t'(t* to St. Mary's hospital to 
rv-over the money or part of it. on the 
ground that the hospital has ceased to 
txiet The hospital was founded under 
.iie authority of the Catholic church a 
few vtars ago. but after about two 
years" of life tlie sisters In charge gave 
It up and now the building Is used as a 
lefcidence proptrty. 



was 
accidentally shot In the head by his 
older brother Reuben. The boy is In 
a hospital at Webster, and hie condi- 
tion Is crlticaL 

Pierre, S. D — The team of trained 
butfalo owned by R. K Yokum of this 
city were shipped to Baltimore. Md., 
where they have an engagement of sev- 
eral weeks at an amusement park 
are one of the few trained 
teams In the country, and as they have 
been broken both to harness and sad- 
dle, they will be an attractive feature 
at any place they are put on exhibi- 
tion. 

Devils Lake. N. D,— Ever Wagness. 
one of the best-known citizens of Ivam- 
sey county, and whose acquaintance 
extended all over tlifc f-tate 
Dakota, died at his home 
after an Illness extending 
months. Ever Wagness 
the first settlers of t»i>s„l>'*.'"^,pOf Nor h 
Dakota. He came to Fort Totttn in 
U78. and worked in the post trader s 
store at that place. 

Lisbon, N. D.— Harry S. Oliver, one 
of the earliest settlers In Dakota, Is 
dead from cancer of the stomach. He 
was a member of the house ot repre- 
sentatives for two terms of the legis- 
lature. Including the years li>91-S^-ao. 
/t the time of his death he was post- 
master in Lisbon, and has been a 
tromin^nt figure f<'r many years in 
the politics not only of his county. 
In the state. He was a member of 
first grand commandery of Knig^nts 
Temolar. and otlier Masonic bodies. 

Fargo. N. D.— The new opera house 
Devils Lake will be provided 



They 
buffalo 



of North 
In this city 
over several 
waB one of 



was almost cut off. He was taken to 
the Emergency hospital. 

Wausau — A cow which was to be pa« 
raded and given away by Wausau 
Knights of Pythias at the "Dode Fisk 
circus " tomorrow has been stolen from 
the farm where It was being kept 

Milwaukee — The required fund of 
S75,OO0 for the proposed rescue mission 
has been pledged and work on the in- 
stitution will be Inaugurated shortly. 



and has since 




aged 
after 



goods 
valua- 



teut 
the 



at 



with 
attractions Irom the Red river valley 
circuit according to a letter received 
^n thr t cltv from C P. Walker, who is 
at the head of the circuit 
Grafton, N. D.— Grafton 
old-fashioned glorious 
celebration this year 
make up for the lack 
former years. The 



THE STATE BOARD OF 

WOMEN VISITORS NAMED. 



Ft. 
The 
stale 
been 



pav.l Minn., May 24.— (Special to 
Herald.* — Appointments to the 
board of women visitors have 

announced by Governor Johnson. 



V. ■ 

tl 

c 



1 
1 

V, 

1 



ANOTHER FREE HI H.U. 

MAIL I^ELIVERY R(UTE 



T' 



■rit 1 , 
He7ti 



1 .1.1. 



,. ,1. 







May 24.— 


..Sp 


eCi: 








.f* Commer< 


.a i 


,,■),_ 








that s 












of Ju 1 










lite 


C:» wer» ;.! 




' , * L 






1 ert 


Berg 1 


' r ' 


;, r; 




S.^ 


. L. .<«'pal, T. b. 


Bii I 


K. ' 


r : 


n 


(Jral 


• 1 ieK<„>n, Merwii 


. Wt 


. ky 




t ; '■ 


[ 1 i 


- ' > 


H. 
C 

. J 


H. 
' h 1 1 






1!,..-;- 




<:- T 


E. 








, t 


U-l- 


ad- 








\u 


I t;rts«n 



■ ^ l.i.1 to 

.stable 

u. strict 

u lien he 

I Ii some 

, mat, named 

,!id his two 

itiid when Liv- 

Himpson shot 



1 . , '■ . : 
niix >.i 
t.. .iv; 



li.rv ofc 
it at 1 



the tie I 

Llvin.i 
; the on iv* 1 
,ed his gii! 

{>;. !f^ Livingston is now 
, , , . ■ !li\ .1 awaiting trial. 



UNOSTENTATiOlS CO.MFORT 
AT THE HOTEL ST. REfilS^ 

The One ]»I«KUni New York Hotel That 
Satisfies the IHserJiniiuitiug- 



will hold an 
Fourth of July 
-one that will 
of celebrations in 
celebration will be 
held on July 3, since Hie Fourth falh- 
on Sunday. The committee in charge 
elected H O. Sprague. president and 
M W. Hostelter, secretary. 

1 firlmore N. D. — James H. Magoris, 
^^hff has been m the hospital at North- 
wood tor several days. ^^^.^^P^^l''^ ^f^ 
improving rapidly. Some time ago Mr 
Maaorls ran a nail In his foot and 
bitod poisoning set Ik. U was feared 
that the patient would lose his eg but 
word comes from the hospital that all 

^■-^f'.^^^'^orir^' D.-Horace Pagett 
of the Grand Forks Mercantile com- 
panv left Thursday evening for St 
Paul, where he was called ^V. , the 
deaih of his father. Samuel Pagett. 
who was 64 years of age. 

i'evlls Lake, N. D. --Chief Justice 
Morgan of the supreme court » J*'- 
eovering from a very venous Illness. 
He is at St. Luke s liospital. bt. h'aul. 
On May E he underwent an operation 
and writes that he Is recoverln 
Iv and if all goes well he wil 
better health than he has 
ing the past ten years. 



nice- 
have 
enjoyed dur- 



WISCONSIN BRIEFS 



fc<^>^^^FW^^^^^»^l^^^*^*' 



WORRY OVER EXAMS. 

North Dakotan 




Prompted Former 

(iirl to ( onimit Suicide. 

(Special to 

lust been re- 

.u<. of Mibs Tyr- 

daughter of Mr. 



N 



M.'iv -4,- 



l; 



Lfi 
■Tilt H. )....• •■ 
td here ■' 

< Brown i 
and Mrs S E Brown of Tropico. C 
b It formerly of this city. She was 

-a IP of age and worry 
i-n aching e.\am;nalu'ns 
setiponsiblfc for 
>;a!r at a room in a L 



,1.. 
21 
over the ap- 
at sciiool were 
ct. She inhaled 
a room m a *^os Angeles room- 
house, wliere f-hc had gone from 
the n.oir, i;.t: (-he k-lled her- 



ing 

her home 

self- 

JINIOR SENIOR BANQUET 

Thit 1 River Falls High School 
Largely Attended. 

Klver Falls. Minn., May 24. — 

t, Tl. lUraid.i — The junior- 

Thlef River Falls 

. ; Friday evening at 

<•( \ers were laid 

number including 

[,., ,,,^.,, ... ,,. , ty &8 well as the 

niernbeii- of tl'< ! ■> ' upper classes. The 

,< <al high school Luf advanced in num- 

t,..a so rapidly dunng the last three 

•hat it now ranks fourth in point 

llment am«>rjg the schools of 

n Minnesota. Besides the usual 

found in a high school, it 

utuijiLciins complete commercial and 



A well-known Weetem editor said 
recently (editorially) after a visit to 
New York and the St. Regis hotel: 
"The instant a patron enters the St. 
Regis he Is made to feel at home. 
There Isn't the slightest attempt at 
aristocracy. Indeed, we believe thai 
the multitude of patrons whom the 
St. Regis has had are among the well- 
to-do people of the country, rather 
than from the millionaires." 

This writer has struck the keynote 
of St. Regis service. The great "mid- 
dle class"' are its constant and satis- 
fied patrons. Tliese the St. Regis 
never fails to attract. Situated on 
Fifth avenue at Fifty-fifth street, its 
kcatlon ie ideal for visitors to New 
York who desire to combine busi- 
ness and plea.sure. Far enough re- 
moved from the commercial di.stricts 
to avoid the clatter and roar of busi- 
ness traffic, it it= s^^till within five min- 
utes" ride of the retail shopping and 
theatrical centers. Its every aim is 
to retain "homellkenesp"* in Its at- 
mosphere, and to make every patron 
so satisfied tliat he will be sure to 
come again — and that a.s often as cir- 
cumstances will permit. Its restau- 
rant charges are the same a.«» other 
first-clas.- hotels, and rooms may be 
had as low as ?3 and $4 a day for a 
largo handsomely furnished single 
bedroom: the same with private bath 
for $5 a day (or $6 for two people): 
or $12 a riav and up for an elegant 
suite consisting >>i parlor, bedroom 
and private bath. 



deci- 
but 



Bay- 
Chi- 



.Madlson— The .-supreme f,*^" ^',„f?^r 
decision in the Pabst and Beals inher- 
itance tax cases, fully sustained the 
conslilutionallly of the inheritance tax 
law The decision of the lower court 
in the Beals case is upheld. The 
sion in the Pabst case is reversed, 
on a technicality only. 

Bayfield— The Bayfield Progress is 
the name of a new newspaper started 
here, with L. A. Holmes as editor The 
paper Is owned and controlled b> 
Chairman Henry Wachsmuth of Bay- 

"^Washburn— Work will be started 
thl« week on the buNding of a large 
box" crating and wire reel factory 
twelve miles above this city, near 
field. The plant will be built by 
cago parties. ,^ . . 

Applelon— Twenty schoolboys of Ap- 
pleton, Kaukana, Neenah and Menaslia 
have formed a canoe club that will 
paddle up the Fox river to the ^^ Iscon- 
sin river and then to the iJells 

Madison— At a meeting of the Man- 
dolin Club of the University of VViscon- 
sin. Maurice H. Needham, 10. of Chi- 
cago was elected director for the next 
year, and Edward Fisher, '10. of Madi- 
son was chosen manager. ..... 

Sparta— Word has been received that 
Charles M Ambold, who left that place 
some time ago to take the position of 
assistant manager of the American 
Tobacco company's plant at Petersburg. 
Va has lost both legs in a collision 
between an automobile and a lailroad 

train. ,, , , • - 

Kenoslia — The police are looking for 
two mysterious men. who are believed 
to have made two attempts to kidnap 
Louis Hey den, a boy of 12. , ^ , 

fcitevens Point — The Woman s club of 
Stevens Point has taken up the project 
of establishing a hospital. 

Milwaukee — Gen. Otto H. Falk has 
declined the appointment of public debt 
commissioner tendered by Mayor Rose, 
and William H. Cpmeyer. Jeweler, will 

be named. _, x^ . , ■ 

Madison — State Treasurer Dahl, in a 
tommunication to the state senate ex- 
piaiJiB that he has not attempteii to 



Calumet — Miss Anna Abramson. 
22. died at her home in Wolverine 
a long Illness. The funeral was held 
Sunday with Rev. Ujala officiating. 

Hancock— Hancock, according to the 
finding of the board of review Is about 
$1:50,000 richer in this world's 
than it was last year. The total 
tlon for the city is $2. 85:!. 525. 

Lake Linden— The death of Aurlel, 
15-vear-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Joseph Carriveau of Lake Linden, oc- 
curred after an Illness of two weeks. 
The cause of the death is attributed to 
appendicitis. Besides the parents, 
three sisters and three brothers sur- 

V 1 V <?• 

Ishpemlng — Sunday was the thir- 
tieth anniversary of the destruction by 
fire of the Barnum house, which oc- 
cupied the site of the Nelson house. 
The fire was the hottest that ever oc- 
curred in Ishpemlng. It was worse in 
many respects than the big fire wliicli 
destroyed nearly four block.s of build- 
ings on South Main street in the spring 
of 1873. The Barnum house, which wa.s 
erected and owned by the late Robert 
Nelson, was opened for business on 

Jan. 1, 1873. . . , «. 

Hancock— Patrick O Brlen, who left 
Hancock twenty-five years ago for 
Butte, Mont., where he has since been 
engaged in various mining ventures, is 
home for a visit with relatives and old 
friends for the first time since his de- 
parture. He will spend several months 
In the Copper country as a guest of his 
aunt, Mrs. Kelly, of Ripley, and other 

relatives. , ..!„<. 

Ironwood— Work on the extension of 
the street railway line from Ironwood 
to Bessemer has been started, 
first grading is being done at 
cello. At this point the new line leaves 
the present line and goes near the now 
North Pabst location, thence following 
quite closely the county road and 
entering the city of Bessemer near the 
electric light power house. ^ . , , 

Ontonagon— After being buried at 
Ontonagon, the body of Joseph (jruzlk, 
which was found a week ago. was ex- 
liumed and a coroners inquest held 
over It and it is now decided tliat the 
man did not come to his death acci- 
dentally, but was murdered, and the 
sheriff of Ontonagon county is search- 
ing for the murderers. The lumber- 
man's body was discovered lying beside 
a logging road a few miles from On- 
tonagon. 

Escanaba— Tn the past two weeks. 
Couiiiv Treasurer Mallmann has been 
made "the custodian of $6S,139 direct 
revenue from the saloons of Delta 
county. The records show that at the 
present time there are 133 retail liquor 
places and two wholesale 
breweries add their mite 

^^'ifoughton— F. W. Btoyle. treasurer 
the school board of Portage township, 
has received from Andrew Carnegie a 
draft for $5,000, the first installment 
of the Ironmaster's donation of $15,000 
for a library building for Houghton. In 
accordance with the terms of the dona- 
tion the first Installment was paid 
promptly at the commencement of the 

^Sta'mbaugh— During a mixup a few 
days ago at the Caspian location, near 
Stambaugh, Joe JachlUnski was either 
struck on the head ]Klth a club or other 
weapon, pushed ofT the porch of the 
house where he was boarding and fell 
on his head on some hard substance. 
He was taken to Mercy hospital at 
lion River In a critical condition 



a cracked skull, 
from his injuries. 

Bessemer — The 2-year-old son of 
Rosso Sopliia of Bessemer fell Into » 
pan of boiling water and was badly 
scalded. The child was taken to tho 
hospital at Ashland, where It shortly 
passed away, after suffering muctt 
agony. 

Calumet — A well attended meeting 
of the bakers ol Houghton and Ke- 
weenaw counties was held in the Nel- 
son offices for the purpose of organ- 
izing a U. P. branch of the National 
Bakers' assoclati<n. The' meetinj 
unanimously decided to organize, an< 
Ed Keifu of the Vienna bakery. Rt( 
Jacket, was elected the first president^ 
and Alex Lindsay. the well-knowq; 
Houghton b.-iker, secrttary-treaeurer. 

Torch Lake — Work on a rectory fog 
Holy Rosary church is to be started 
at once. The building will front on 
Lake street, where iliere is ample roona 
on the church lot to make tlie groundq 
not occupied by the building Into an 
ornamental garden. The dimensions o| 
the building will be 24 by 30 feet. 

Ironwood — Old friends have been ad- 
vised of the death of J. P. Moyle, a 
former resident of Ironwood. at Inters 
vale. Me. The deceased was a merabes 
of the Sons of St. George lodge of 
Ironwood. Death was caused by Afrlj 
can fever, Mr. Moyle having leturneq 
onlv a short time ago from South Af-j 
rica, where he had been working in 
the mines. 

Calumet— At a meeting of the Fourtlj , 
of July committee In the Rtd Jacket 
council room, Secretary N. F. Kalsef 
reported that he had closed a contracj 
with Prof. H. S. Martin of St. Johnsi 
and his assistant, R. W. Bottrell, f o* . 
two balloon ascensions heie on thfl 
Fourth of July. 




superintend* 



sune 
;hools. has re« 



The 
Monti- 



i 



houses. Two 
to the grand 

of 



with 



Staples — J. A. Burgei, 
ent of the Staples city ec 
turned from a trip to Mlies City, Mont., 
and while away slg;aed a contract to 
accept a similar position at that place. 
He will have supervision over the two 
jiiade schools, and also the county 
high school, and the salary the first 
year will be $2,500. 

.St. Cloud — TJieodore Sc hledemantel* 
a former resident of St. Cioud, died a,l 
Ramee, N. D., last Thursday night. 
Deatli was caused by stomach troubl^ 
Mankato — A bank caved in, buryin* 
three shovelers. William Hert, John 
Izen and Carl Lundine. Other workn 
juen dug them out. but all three werQ 
tadly liurt. Izens chest was cruslied. 
Hell got a dislocated shoulder and all 
were cut and bruised. 

St. Cloud — The contract for thf 
Northern Pacific depot has been let t<> 
Cameron & Co. of St. Paul by the main- 
tenance of way departnrient. The con*^ 
tract price has not been made publl^ 
but It is understood that it will reacbi 
$30,000. 

liawley — Gui.seppe Legiola, an Ital- 
ian laborer employed on the Norther: 
Pacific, west of Hawley. was arreste 
by Game Warden T. B. C. Evans o 
Hawley for slaughterin,g wild duck 
tind prairie cliickens out of season, an< 
was fined $10 and costs. 

Crookston — Rev. Burton F. Bronson 
and wife arrived Saturday from Ro- 
chester. N. Y.. where Rev. Bronson hafl 
been stationed In charge of a Baptist 
paptorate. r.nd will assume his dutiej 
as pastor of the First Baptist church 
of CrookMon, to whicii putition he wa* 
elected some weeks ago. 

Walker — H. Brumund underwent (I 
serious operation at the Walker hosi 
pltal last week. A small particle 
bone, which was out of place on 
count of frai.tuie. was removed from 
his skull. He ih recovering rapidly. 

Aitkin — Mart Crosby was down froni, 
Dululli last week. He says the pro- 
posed township of Crosby at Serpent 
Lake 1." tiow being drilled for Iron, ano 
that if enough ore is encountered they 
will have to select another place foi 
the new town. 

Crookston — The annual meeting of 
the Gustavus Adolphus college gradu- 
ates in the Northwest was held at 
Grand Forks in the Hotel Frederick, 
followed by a banfjuet and a progranj' 
of musical numbers, addref^ses and 
toasts. Superintendent of Schools N, 
A. Thorson of Crookston was electee 
president, and it was decided to hoi< 
the annual meeting In Crookston 
year. , , . 

Kelllher — Edgar Titus has arrived 
from Bernldjl to take chaige of the 
jewelry department In the City drurf 
store here. „ 

Wahkon— The Mille Lacs Transpor- 
tation company has secured a site neaf 
the Rutherford boathouse and 
build a passenger dock, 
pany warehouse. ,.,..,. 

Crookston — William Munch, deputy 
^tatfgame warden for this district, haa 
received his appointment as ranger for 
this district from C. C. Andrews, th* 
forestry commissioner for Minnesota. 



3Sj 

of 
ac- 



wlll 
com- 



S.S.S. 



NATURE'S 
TONIC 

The very great majority of persons need a tonic in the Spring or early 
Summer. The system undergoes a change at this season and the entire 
phySal machinery is disturbed. The general bodily weakness a tired, 
worn-out feeling. Sckle appetite, poor digestion, a hali sick feehng and » 
general run-do^^ condition of the system, show that the blood ib weak or 
fnaemic. and a blood purifying tonic is needed to build up the deranged 
system and enrich the blood. The use of S. S. S. at this tune may save 
you from a long speU of sickness, and it will certauily prepare you for the 
long hot Summer. Many people have put off u ng a tonic until the syste:^ 
became so weakened and depleted it could not s essfully throw off disease 
geSS id have paid for th? neglect with a sp. f .fever, malaria or soma 
other debilitating sickness. S. S. S. is Nature.* ideal tonic. « is a 
composition of the extracts and juices of roots herbs ^^^ barks which 
BcSnce and exnerience have proven are best fitted for a tonic to the humaa 
Astern It contaf^ no minerals of any kind and is therefore perfectly safe 
?or pSons of any age. S. S. S. tones up the stomach and digestion. rid3 

the^sy7tem o\ tult tiled, worn-out feeling and .i^P^^.V^JSnocfftSTul^es 
to fiverv Dart of the bodv. It purifies and enriches the blood, stimulate* 
tSe s^Se?rng and exc?et^ng members to better action, quiets the over. 

strained nerves, and ^^^^^^i\^%^£Mcc6.. ATLABTA. GA, 



^■^-- 



1 ■■ * «1 J. ^ w*» 



«Maw< 




THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD* MONDAY, MAY 24, 1909 



$1000.00 



Gtveo lot any nilMtance m 



iunous to 



1 <•■•/ w«— 

health found ia food 



tesultiofl from the uie ol 

Calumet 
Baking 
Powder 




ARE YOU SAVING ANYTHING 



H . 

sax : 

Til. 

an 

W! ' 



"1 i '.mlrptl 



t 1 ■ M > ' > ', i i 1 ■ 

lalk It ovtT. 

June lOtli. ' 

,• ..•...,« u[> tlie a. . - - - 

tHEPMERO A CHANDLER, 

2IM» MaiibMHiiii Bldu. 




NEW BOARDING 
AND SALES STABLE 



FIRE TUG IS 
GIVEN TEST 

McGenagle Stands Up 
Well Inder Most Try- 
ing Conditions. 

New Boat Can Throw 

12,000 Gallons Per 

Minute. 



Tl'.'-i fire tug Mc*»nafflo was given 

her first official l,i'v-nt. !n t.i- io'.v-r 

., ,. , ,- •'•,.■ ■■ • •■ ■<( Fill!; avv:ui.> 

■;■' The- boat w.i.'j 

,1.. .ut 1L>::5". 



IS NOW UP 
TO O'CONNOR 

<■ ■ — 

Proposed Strike of Long- 
shoremen Is Entirely 
in His Hands. 

Four Prominent Labor 

Leaders Are Headed 

for Duiuth. 




Fir- 
ail 



! 1 vnii^riO'V*-. «*r«i». 



.\ 




lUltf. 



L- 


' ; I ■.*■■■ ';, 


• In the tnartne atrlke 


^ ! ' ■ M t 


;.„)ti : ' 


.,.,, ",,,«., i,.rahly re- 


v.v,.,l 


>» i !1 f 


nu'iit last 


w tn?k 


1 


eral men ptouunent na- 


t i . 1 n .,> '. 




1,11 labor circles, are to 

onference will 

: 1^.^=, hall ii'* West 

lomorrow tn.l 

• are expeelfil I" be 
^'Connor, president of 
il Longshoremen's 

■ •' - --.r-eti!;^ will 

■ t -V- this 

<Iveii 

L J be 


A! 




icsent time 






1 _i his intet- 

held in Cleveland 

' itlves from fifty- 

;.,-.v. 1 lakes voted 

■1 :i the strike 

Is. It '/ an 

it has tii'js 

.ii..,;. ;...■ ; i ..:.l.-i;' -f the 



Our Annual Sale of All 

Odd Pieces in Dinner Ware 

Starts Tuesday mornins and a big event it is. We never offered sucli wonderful values at any S'-^'f '^^[''r^- 
Fnlni^rrrfrom broken sets French cliina, Englisli china and domestic ware, blue an<l white, plaui white an a 
mi^ti^e of other decoated pieces, all go on sak at way below their original cost. We have been btisy al the 
past week gening out material for this sale. It is truly worth your while to make a special efiort to be here 
early. Odd pieces of china don't last long here at one of these sales. 
just note the prices they are being sold for: 




til VI. 

, . nice w 
:uii. thhs ni' 
till* Mr«joiia!. 



:i*i3 In 
:.. ■ men 

■■Vh'Tl t 

•.• t .1 



I. a of lilt* 

mem her 3 



GOPHER SHOE WORKS 




t, . 1 m a > 



11 

1 1 ■ ■... 
will 
t . , ;, ; : 

t , 
1 . 



• •■d from Mr. < > ' '.uitior and 

.■. will h* otit of employment 

tie-up of lake triirto 

.t Mr. O'f^onnor fully 

^ Cu^ vveiKlit "f res^pon.sihili- 

i.s been thrown upon him l.s 

by hi* reticence In giving 

- bearUiiy; 1" any way upon 

of four natl.mal labor lead- 

> S>o this afternoon for un- 

rt in the meetitig to- 

Thlfl party IncUi lo^ 

- ■ .■'■•!.' -r.sed 

I .h!i 

,„. :)rin 

MoCar- 

, , -, .iremon's 

^ J Do Ian. na- 

i.sii !■»■;■ of tiie 



■. Ui-n'. in 
. ke iiuess- 




'm LI Til — 1« 1"t Ave. \\. 
V£ 4lh Av«f. W. 

«*iiperIor — l-lirt Tuivt-r Ave. |i, 



The Sault Pass;:.,^'>-^. 



ri' 
It 



ighout the 

.animous In 

■ accorduig 

>land moet- 

:ted t.} ar- 

»rnlng, and 

;" a strike n 

..^:=itied from 



JPieces Worth Up 
to 35 Gents for 

5c 

All sizes of plates, sauce 
(iishea. oatmeal dishes, cups and 
saucers. platters, sugar and 
creamers, imported and domestic 
— marvel )u.i value.s. too. Every 
one a big bargain. 



Pieces Worth Up 
to 50 Gents for 

We 

In this lot you'll find meat 
platters, sugar and cream seta, 
bowhs. vegetable dLshos, gravy 
boats, pitchers, spoon trays, 
pickle dishes, etc Any one 
piece ea.sUy worth 50c. 



Pieces Worth Up 
to fl. OO for 

/5c 

Covered dishes, covered but- 
ter dishes, platters, large sizes; 
open vegetable dishes, sugar 
bowls, cream pitchers, gravy 
boats, etc. Big values priced 
up $1.00 each. 



^2.50 Values for 

25c, 50c and 



Wonderful values here In 
large platters, soup tureens, 
china covered dishes, sugar and 
creams, chocolate pots, bowls, 
etc. Pieces here worth up to 
j2.f,0 — at much less than actual 
cost. 



.f 



lat th 
•strike 




Troy, 
w ■ 



ti.i 



1". 



Port nl Duiuth. 



VOLLAND 

Ik»fore huyine tlKit new lli*t. 

>i ■ ■ '.■■ 

n:,l,<» niini." to ■''■■'l-i 
,4" ■■ • :• <r \,\,,K Iv.s and Hangcs j| 



:«sue 13 

■ ii "-:u> . u;«-«i...i -Mnen will 

irine workers' strike on the 

!>■ li* kr'>"'" Miat they 

and r t O'Oon- 

.,it if .1. ■•. • is called 

'ic ground.^. 

■ . ,• . ;..^,-.- '■' ''^ unions af- 

ftliaVed wuh tli^^ni wiil be reprtMent.^d 

at f>-' n-.eotlng. which will be heid be- 




Tbe Bl$ Sale of Hi&i'Grade 

Enamel Ware 



Gon" 
tinues 



As another big inducement we will continue the special 

low prices on first quality, hi£>h grade, guaranteed enamelware 

(no seconds, chiped or damaged pieces in the lot). Just note the 

prices— they are lower than you have been used to paying tor 

seconds" in ordinary stores. It's economy to lay in a good stock of this 

ware, especially at the prices \vc name. 



•Stetson" Stiff Hats. 






■ n-^ belter 
,ia West 



to 



FASmO^iillBLt 



C. VOLLAND, 1.1 



2-1 FIr-t .\ve. I'la-*!, 
Both "Phoort 




Sti'amship >h»veiii*'nts. 



■ ■rl- 



5"' syBT 
MORRISON 

8 Lake Avenue South. 

I Will dress you Better for 
I St7 ^^^stTioncy. $17 



fvlf 



derlaii I, 



mm: MENArEs ( ar 



SUES FOR DEATH 
OF LITTLE GIRL 

Mrs. Lizzie Jetsu of Clils- 

holm Wants $5,000 

From Great Northern. 

Lizzie Je' idmtnlatrator of the 

t , :.. ,1 ,1 i:,jn fcr. S'lste 

■:acK.d 01 mat 

.Tv!!y of last 

de.it h. 

IS" :s .'II tri.'j. ...r:,..MC ....... -ge E,x\- 



SVg-qt. Bailed Kettles. .12^ 
SVa-qt. Bailed Kettles. .18^ 
eVz-qt. Bailed Kettles. .24^ 

8-qt. Bailed Kettles 31^ 

3-qt. Hid. Sauce Pans. .12^ 
4-qt. Hid. Sauce Pans . . 18^ 
5-qt. Hid. Sauce Pans. .24^ 



5-qt. Tea Kettl e s 49^ 

7-qt. Tea Kettles 59^ 

8-qt. Tea Ke ttles.^ .^69^ 

Frying Pans 18^ 

Bread Pans, small . . . 18^ 
Bread Pans, larg e. . .22^ 
10-qt. Dish Pan s.>..29 ^ 



14-qt. Dish Pans 42^ 

17-qt. Dish Pans 59^ 

12-qt. Water Pail 49^ 

Wash Bas in 1 5^ 

2-qt. Milk Pan 7^ 

3-qt. Milk Pans 10^ 

4-qt . Milk Pans 15^ 

5-qt. Milk Pans ...■.''.. 20^ 




Open An 
Account Here 

You can Just as w^ll 
have an account here as 
not. It ig a convenience 
for you In buylng^you pay 
no more — it's not asking a 
favor — we are grlad to 
grant you credit. Ivcarn of 
our way — different from 
.the ordinary. 




FOR THE PUBLIC WELFARE 



WHAT THE PUBLIC SPIRITED MEN AND WOMEN ARE 
DOING AND MIGHT DO FOR DULUTH. 



AiAS. 



sign 



(Note— suggestions from citizens of needed reforms will be welcomed.) 



,,f the district C'ojrt today. 



Mrs 



r'untfan. 



Mnv ::\. - Aftor 



Binders' Hardware. Me- 
chanics' Tools, Fine Cutlery 

QIWYIE-IARSON CO. 

23 Second Avenue West. 



ae 




*"Vi 




tl..- 




tl.. 




«■'' 




T' 




ti ■ 




If: 


•'Ml' 


•\! 


irln 



JetRU claims tn the complaint 

. ,..mr, ..tiv w 18 negUgent in that 

;v.t ff'tli: -d, and 

• ke the proper 

•en 13. 
hlld. Bill) claims, strayed on to 
iinck. waa htt t;y •>•■■• >? 'l^*' '''"''- 
'"a englai'S a- 

■ ;i|j[ was speiii 111 

'iry 



^wN^s^^^^^'^^^rf^^^^^^^i'^^'**'^^'^^^^^^^''^*^^** ^ ! and from the cour'ry 

THE RESCUE HOI^IE >} i'To.^^.^/.J'In'^^ai^sSTa 



and from the country; and to men and 
- - ■ ■ - An Increase of 



Eleventh Infantry, to be a brigadier 
general. 

AMERICANS PRESENTED 

TO BRITISH MONARCH. 

London, May 24— King Edward, as- 
sKsted by the prince of Wales, held a 
levee In St. .Tames palace today. Am- 
bassador Reid and .1. R. Carter, secre- 
tary of the American embassy, were 
among the diplomatic guests present. 
The former presented Charles Carroll 



of Maryland and Walter Karwell of 
Clilcago to Ills m.T.1enty. 



Aged Man To Wed. 

.St. Paul, Minn., May 2 4. — D R. B. 
Joliii.stim, 77 years old, millionaire 
philanthropist, announced last night 
that he wU! marry in the near future, 
the wedding to take nlacu within a 
vear of the marriage of his graiid.son, 
ilarlan G. .7. Johnstone, who wa.s mar- 
ried last snmmer. Mr. Johnson refused 
to give the name of nia finance©. 
"The wedding will be noon, hut I don t 
care to make any further announce- 
ment, " said Mr. Johnson. 



SometKinU New In 

illFB INSURANCE 

ASK 

THE Prudential 

mSIIRAIlCE COMPANY OF AMERICA 

i.,,,.,,*^ .. . ij..» c .r-r..T goBii Of fic*. Newark. N. J. 1 



Promiit and Good! 



tli-c Fr.iniptly, 

. , > 1 1,-1 , 



■We d'-> ■ " 

on-.- ■■ 

Sooiethlng < T'"y ^"'- 

MIKI VIl l'HI>TI'%»i to. 
llulutlt 'I'huue HKH. 



Fatness Reduced 



., .i.'l r>i'.rr.''ct I V *■ sir:ii!f>s3 



re: 

f' 






L>et: 


uil. Mick., 


;. yt,»ur lirag- 
., . la Comyany. 
for J6 cents. 




U TOMOHILE STRK K 

CLRB-.MAN INJURED. 

Menominee. Mich.. May £4.— (Special 
.._ -j,_., |.j,>-f,(<i I — j,»i»eph Lelaen. a Ma- 
in d an officer of 
-1 Brewing com- 
linfully Injured 
'Wer riiad.ster. 
p, struck the 
the outskirts 
.,.,. ' .■-■i were smashed 

• .: Lels- led on all four^. 

y.. -. «'i-.,ui .. ■ .s-'ene of the col- 
\\M.'* al>l'> t'> T.^'«ik h'>me. 



JEWELRY PAiKAi.E IS 

RIFLED IN THE MAILS. 



Minn.-,- ^ Mlr.r... May '.M.— A pack- 

ntaii.lng ' ■- sent by the 

,,i Jewelry '">• "f H"" Cr' 

UMiiia to R. H Knuivig. R^vn^l'^'-^- ^• 

I).. was mysteriously ritied In the 

"^Thl^ -stamps on the package were can- 
-elled m tin- Minneapolis posloflflce, hut 
'.Vf .re it left the building it wa:» no- 
ured that on» end of the package had 
been torn on .m.l tl.ar it w as empty. 

SNAP FOR CHIROPODIST 

SOCIETY IS SCENTED. 

=!pringtleld. III. May 24.— Attorney 
il Stead toilay rendered an optn- 
, Governor r»f'neen that the bill 
wl:i<:u creates a state l»oard of chlr- 
oDody consi.sting of four members, who 
shall be appointed by the governor 
-and recommended by the Chlropodl.sts' 
society of Illinois." vacancies to be 
filled by reoommendatjons of the so- 
'' ■' U is unrimstltutional. The attorne' 
il says llie bill ve.*t3 tlie ap- 
iig power In tlie Chiropodists 
iocietv of Illinois and gives a fran- 
chise to a private asaoclatlon. 



Although every department of the 
Bethel work Is overcrowded and every 
worker will feel unbounded relief when 
new quarters are at last provided, no 
one department will be more greatly 
heneflted than the Rescue home. 

This home i!? the only place In the 
city where rescue work for women Is 
carried on, and although there Is often 
am..ng unthinking I>«"1'1>\^ ,8' ight dis- 
approval In widening out this work, 
reason wir. tell that, with the growth 
of !he ^ty. It IS alKsolutely necessary 
that kind and considerate provision be 
made for the girls and young women 
who are forced to face a severe life 
crisis alone and friendless Much of 
the other work being carried on 13 or 
t e preventive kind- Thought and 
care are extended to the young ^v'>m^n 
before temptation meets them, but no 
one know ng the cm for I and care 
which has been brought to sorrowing 
women can question the value of the 
wo?k being done by the Bethel Rescue 

''The home at the present time Is In- 
adequate to the demands upon it. There 
are twenty-two young women at the 
honie w le^i the luruse and /lu'Pjn^nt 
can 'Mily comfortably care for ft teen 
or .sixteen. Tliere are twenty-flY 
namele-ss babies, when eight or ten is 
ritrnumber that could best be carted 

'''There Is no place In the city where 
the kind attention and help of the 
women of the citv Is more appreciated. 




THE MISSION OF 

THE Y. M. C. A. 



At the conference of the North Ameri- 
can emploved officers of the Young Men's 
Christian association the first week in 
June at Omaha, the general theme will 
be Present Day Objective and Rela- 
tions of the y. M. C. A. Interpreted 
this means "the association's mission 
to the men and boys of the continent," 
says the current Issue of The Survey. 
Important part.i of the program will 
be special reports of commissions 
which have made investigations Into 
The mlssb>n of the association to high 
.school bovs: to the native born of lor- 
eiffn parentage; to men and boya in 



1., VVV...VV ... c.„o....iatlon property the 
pa.= t y»mr and a projt^cted Increase or 
|9 000,0'»i) suggest ther scale on whlcli 
th-'se "missions" may be conducted. 

The most Bigniflcant development In 
recent years has been the Increasing 
emphasis laid on social service. Vk hllc 
no less stress Is placed on personal 
salvation." the Idea of "social salva- 
tion" applied to bettering conditions ot 
life, has taken strong hold. 

Th>» 609 city associations and the 
"25 railroad branches on the continent, 
besides the others, are opening better 
and more commodious buildings and 
extending their work, not only to pro- 
vide for the bodily comfort of men — 
places where thoy can eat and sleep 
and plav and study under the most 
favorable circumstances — but also to 
discover and meet new needs. borne 
of the most effective work Is done at 
isolated railroad stations where the 
need l3 greai but organization for im- 
provement difficult. Special cars are 
run out on different lines to construc- 
tion camps. 

Thus the Y. M. C. A. Is rapidly occu- 
pying a larger place In modern socia' 
life It ha.s been suggested that in 
time a local association, besides its 
other functions, may become a training 
center or -clearing house" for social 
service 

IS INJURED IN 
CROOKSTON FIRE 

Nozzleman Falls Tlirougli 
SRyllgtit— Flame Dam- 
age Is $1,000. 

Crookston, Minn., May 24.— fSl>ecial 
to The Heral.l.)- late last night fire 
broke out In the foundry of the Crook- 
ston Iron works, following a big cast- 
ing job. and about $1,000 damage was 

Harrv Schmidt, a nozzleman, fell 

through a skylight, water having been 

urn^d on before h^ was notified, and 

=,upt.ilned a badly cut hand and severe 

bruises. 

Co!. V«a« oan ITonioted. 

Washington. May :: {.-President Taft 
today sent to th« senate the nomina- 
tion of Col. iUch T. Yeatman of the 



Cash Prizes 



Every Day! 



f 



Young People's and Children's Contest. Name of winner 
published following <lay. 

Young People Under 21 Years— Write a letter about Peer- 
less Brand Evaporated Milk. 

FIRST PRIZE, $3.00 
SECOND PRIZE, $2.00 

Children 12 Years or Under— Draw a picture of a cow. 

FIRST PRIZE, $2.00 
SECOND PRIZE. $ 1 .00 

Condition of Contest— Get a label from a can of Peerless 
Brand Evaporated Milk. Write letter or draw picture of a 
cow — then fill out this coupon. 

PRIZE CONTEST COUPON. 




THIS COVPON 

Entitle.'* •ne permm, under 20 yenrs of Rgc, to enter 

BORDEN'S PRIZE CONTEST 

Full details of contest on another page. 

NAMES • .............V; 

AOB. ........ a... >*•.... 

ADDRESS 

Fill out coupon, attach a label cut from a can of 

Bcrdea's Peerless Brand Evaporated Milk 
Mail to Contest Editor, Dululh Evening Hc-rald. 



Send AU to Contest Editor, Herald. 







THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: MONDAY, MAY 24, 1909. 




I t (»««»«»«««) | l»»»« ««*»*i 



{- »»»»»> H »»»»»»»»»»»* j^ 



WELL KNOWN DULUTHI ANS 
IN CARICATURE 



I 



Dishes have to be washed 1 095 times a year- 
Why not let the Gold Dust Twins do the work? 

It stands to reason tnat if you save a little labor each time you 
wash your dishes, it will amount to a great deal of relief at the end 
of the year. Gold Dust softens hard water, cuts dirt and grease trom 
the dishes and with its use the dishes require litde else than rinsmg and 
wiping. Washing dishes in the old way meant drudgery— with Gold Uust 
it is merely child*s play. 

Gold Dust makes dish water that digs. It goes deep after every 
hidden particle of dirt and germ Ufe and sterilizes as well as cleans. 

Do not use Soap, Naphtha, Borax, Soda, Ammonia or 
Kerosene with Gold Dust. Gold Dust has all desirable 
cleansing qualities in a perfectly harmless and lasting 
form. The Gold Dust Twins need no outside help. 

Made by THE N. K. FAIRBANK COMPANY. CHICAGO 
Makers of Fairy Soap (the oval calce) 

Twins 



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GUY A. EATON. 
Postmaster and Commander of the Naval Reserves. 



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sewer In said Sixth and Vista streets 
from a point 100 feet west of Twenty- 
eiehth avenue east to a point 224 feet 
east of Woodland avenue with outlet 
down Twenty-fourth avenue east to 
Fifth street, according to benefits is 
now payable at the office of the City 
Treasurer. ^ ,,, . 

A penalty of ten HO) per cent will be 
added If payment Is not made on or 
before June 15, 1909. and the said as- 
sessment will then bear interest at the 
rate of six (C> per cent from April 26, 
1909. to date of Payment. 

W. S. McCORMiriC 
City Coniptrol 
Duluth Evening Herald, May 17 a**^*. 

1909 ^ 

OFFICE OF THE COMPT-lfOLLER 

City of Duluth. May 17. 1909. 

Notice is hereby given that qn as- 
sessment levied to defray in. full the 
expense of constructing a sanitary 
sewej in VMsta street. In said city, from 
Fay avenue to Eiglith street, thence 
across Eighth street and tlirough Lot 1, 
Hlock 13. East Lawn Division, to the 
sewer in Woodland avenue, according 
to benefits, is now payable at the office 
of the City Treasurer. 

A penalty of ten (10) per cent will 
be added if payment is not made on or 
before July 15. 1909, and the said as- 
sessment will then bear interest at 
the rate of six (6) per cent from April 
13. 1909, to date of Payment. 

W. S. McCORMICK, 

City Comptroller. 
Duluth Evening Herald — May 17-24, 

1909. 

OFFICE OF THE COMPTROLLER-- 
Clty of Duluth. May 17, 1909. 
Notice Is hereby given that an as- 
sessment levied to defray In full the 
exuf^nse of constructing a sanitary 
sewer In the first alloy north of Ram- 
•jey street. In said city, from a point 
•'0 feet west of Fifty-first avenue west 
to a point 20 feet east of Fifty-second 
avenue west, with outlet, according to 
benefits. Is now payable at the office of 
the City Treasurer 




»»»««»»1 > (»»»»*»»»«*»»«»1 | I««**»***»»******************** 




NOT LOOKING 
FOR TROUBLE 

Food Inspectors Aim to 

Educate Rather Than 

Prosecute. 



fought the decisive battle of Ash Hol- 
low with the Sioux, thence by the 
southern base of the Black Hills to the 
Big Cheyenne river, thence to old F<^rt 
Pierre, which the government had 
bought of Indian traders. Intending it 
for a military post, but Harney found 
It unfit and built Fort Randall, in ISaG. 
Fallas was a civilian employe of the 
army, and settled opposite Randall. 

GRAND JURY RKCOMMENDS 
COLXTY BOARD'S RKMOYAL. 



A penalty of ten (10) per cent will 
be added If payment is not made on or 
before July 15, 1909, and the said as- 
sessment will then bear Intere.st at 
the rate of six (6) per cent from April 
13. 1909, to date of payment. 

• ' W. S. McCORMICK, 

City Comptroller. 
Duluth Evening Herald— May 17-24. 

1909. , 

OFFICE OF THE COMPTROLLER— 
City of Duluth, Mav 17, 1909. 

Notice is hereby given that an as- 
sessment levied to defray In full the ex- 
pense of constructing a sanitary sewer 
in Highland street In said city from Fif- 
ty-sixth avenue west to a connection 
with the sewer in Central avenue with 
a branch In Fifty-sixth avenue west 
in front of Block 15, W^est Duluth. 
Sixth division according to V)euefiis. 
Is now payable at the office of the City 
Treasurer. 

A penalty of ten (10) per cent will 
be added if payment Is not made on 
or before July 15. 1909. and the said 
assessment will then bear Interest at 
the rate of six (6) per cent from April 
13. 1909, to date of payment. 

W. S. McCORMICK. 
City Comptroller. 
Duluth Evening Herald, May 17 and 

24, 1909. 



Mlsmarck, N. D 
jury, which has 



BANQUET TO 
EMPLOYES 

En^neers and Janitors 

of Offict Buildings 

Are Dined. 

Whitney Wall Gives His 

Annuai "Get Togctlicr" 

Dinner. 



T!!r' 



CMUoe* ut firc- 



n Iren of 
--• fully 

n:iv*.-..l only 
•lit work of 



LATEST OIL (RAZE. 

New 



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to th>- 



BisniJirck E\dtt*d Over New Find 
Near That City. 

I; N, r>.. May 2 1. — Last year 

Frank .IasiEkr.w1ak. a local macVilnist 

" -■ ; V, ' ustructed a patent well- 

.rt of his own devico. and 

ral 11 -wing wells last fall 

t, Tlie maclilne Is moved 

\\i'. 1. ^•'^■■^"''"s mo- 

• - t up In work- 

-i.ilui^ engine 

:,,i i> .u.-i Iti Jilvlnfe- the drill. 

,;i.,. 1-4 a v^-i y powerful one 

i . ;.: 'I.,- >'!■ '■- ^ fur 



New Cliief Inspector TaIRs 
of Work of liis De- 
partment 



"Wo do not simply aim to prosecuto 
oftenders against the pure food laws. 
Our aim Is, rather, to educate the deal- 
ers up to the laws," said Andrew French 
of Plalnvllle, the newly appointed chief 
dairy and food Inspector, who was in 
Duluth Saturday, looking over condi- 
tions at the Head of the Lakes. 

"Our Idea Is to Instruct, rather than 
to prosecute. There Is little to be 
gained merely by prosecuting. When- 
ever a dealer shows the Intention of 
doing the right thing and trying to 



I. .. : 1 ,« ; ., ». 



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driniiiar 



: I to 



iiihrtln'! Itiiildiim. 



wells again 

^ two 

<x days 

I .u pth of 

d that he 

1 le news of 

the city at 

being In- 

' ni'W that 

.vereil at 

nils thos<* 

■rn part of 



Hill i-tiiik:. 



|!5 $15 $15. 



■.*i>n, 



win find some of the 
!<pring suits and top- 
ever hiid your eyes on. 
the Clothlor, 219 West 



-I'ciLor. 

■rnl. 



FuU 1> 



ii..4 



THREE (inLDRE\ SLEPT 

DlRlNt^ E\< ITINli FIRE. 



DESPONDENT MAN ENDS 

HIS LIF£B\ DROWNING. 

Sioux Falls. S. D . May 24 —Ed Rig- 

.l..n proved D '"• the tn.!') name of the 

y,.un»r maa w -ed su ride by 

., ,,,MMtu rriiii •»"t'> l-li« Bl*f 

I. l;iK.l>i; s home was at 

. , HI.-; wile and baby are 
■lAid to be residents of Minneapolis. 
;-.,.- s),'>veral days he had been brooding 

•rne trouble, thuught to be of a 

:c nature. 




Mav 24. — The grand 

...^ __ been In session In 

Emmons county, has made a report to 
the court, and among other things 
has recommended the removal of the 
entire 4)oard of county commissioners 
of that county, charging the commls- 
Rloners with being negligent and in- 
competent. Indictments have been re- 
turned agaln.'st the board charprlng 
the members with being implicated in 
manv irregularities pertaining to 
certain bridge-building contracts of 
that county^ 

BODY OF r.EORGE HALL 

FOUND IN THE RIVER. 

Kau Claire. Wis., May 24.— (Special 
to The Herald.) — The body of the late 
Rupert H. Sweet, who. with George 
Hall, was drowned In the Chippewa 
river at Hhawtown two weeks ago. 
when the launch In which they were 
riding struck a pile and tipped over, 
was found Saturday afternoon near the 
west bank of the river on the Martin 
Grosvold farm In the town of Union 
and some four or five miles below this 

city 

Two bovs fishing along the hank of 
the river made the discovery. The body 
was half in the water and half out, 
having apparently caught in a tree, to 
which It was 8u.«pended. while the 
river was high, and hnd remained there 
after the water had gone down. 



OFFICE OF THE COMPTROLLER— 
City of Duluth. May 17, 1909. 

Notice is hereby given that an as- 
sessment levied to defray In full the 
expense of constructing a sanitary 
sewer in Fairmount .street in said city 
from Woodland avenue to the center 
line of Somerset street, according to 
benefits. Is now payable at the oftice 
of tlu City Treasurer 

A penulty of ton tlO) per cent will 
be add. d if payment is not made on or 
before June 15, 1909, and the said as- 
Bes.smpnt will then bear Interest at the 
rate of six (6) per cent from April 26, 
1909. to date of payment. _,,,.,,^ 
W. S. Mc(^(^RMICK, 
City Comptroller. 
Duluth Evening Herald. May 17 and 24. 

1909. 



ANDREW FRENCH. 




observe the laws, there Is no need of 
prosecute him. The laws are rather 
compUcate.l and the dealers have to be 
educated up to them. If, after a warn- 
ing, a dealer persists in trying to evade 
the law, then we try to get after him 
and land him. 

"There are not many serious vioia- 
ti..n.s of the law. Once In a while we 
run across an aggravated case, like 
the one on the border recently, where 
a man sold some decayed meat. As a 
rule we have the lu-arty support of the 
ptail and wholesals groc^-rs. The repu- 
table wholesalers are always ready to 
take back goods whUh do not conform 
with the pure food laws, and the sinall 
retail deabr seldom gets stuck. Our 
aim is to meke It certain that a man 
knows what he is buying, and see that 
the labels tell clearly what the pack- 
ages contain. 

"The milk inspection Is also a big 
feature of the work. We try to co- 
operate with the local inspectors in 
this department of the woik. Duluth, 
the Inspectors tell me. has a very high 
?<tanaing as far as Its dairies are con- 
cerned and you are getting good milk 
here. Of course, there Is always room 
for Improvement." 

Mr PYench succeeded E. K. Slater, 
and this Is hia first official trio to the 
northern part of the state. No suc- 
cessor has yet been appointed to Har- 
ris Bennett, who was deputy for this 
district, for the reason that there are 
no ellglblcs on the list from this part 
of the state. The department Is now 
under the civil service rules. There 
are thirty deputies scattered over the 
state and A. .7. Anderson Is temporarily 
in charge of this district, looking after 
the milk licenses, which are now due. 

Mr. French was the <n)ponent of Con- 
gressman Tawnev In two campaigns, 
and in the last campaign, in 190S. gave 
the congressman a hard fight, losing by 
but 2.S00 votes In the tUrong First Re- 
publican district. 

OLDEST DAKOTAN DEAD. 

f 

First \Yhite Settler. Fellieia FaUas, 
Passes Away. 

Yankton. S. D.. May 24.— Fellieia Fal- 

l;is, who died at St. Mary's hospital at 
Pierre a few days ago. after a long 
illness, was probably the oldest white 
man In length of residence In either of 
The Dakotas. --e came to this country 
in 1S56 with Gen. Harnev's expedition. 
1 which went from Fort Kearney, Neb., 



OFFICE OF THE COMPTROLLEFt— 
City of Duluth. May 17, 1909. 

Notice is" hereby given that an as- 
sessment levied to defray in full the ex- 
pense of constructing a sanitary sewer 
In Vernon street In said city from At- 
lantic avenue to a connection with the 
sewer In Second alley, near Thirtieth 
avenue west, according to benefits, is 
now payable at the office of the City 
Treasurer. ^ ,,, 

A penalty of ten (10) per cent will 
be added If payment is not made on 
or before July 15. 1909. and the said 
assessment will then bear interest at 
the rate of six (6) per cent from April 
13. 1909, to date of payment. 

W. S. McCORMICK. 
City Comptroller. 
Duluth Evening Herald, May 17 and 

24 . 1909. 

OFFICE OF THE COMPTROLLER— 
City of Duluth. May 17. 1909. 

Notice Is hereby given that an as- 
sessment levied to defray in full the 
expense of constructing a sanitary 
sewer In Eighth alley In said city, 
from 250 feet west of Third avenue 
east to the sewer in Third avenue ea.st, 
according to benefits. Is now payable 
at the ofi-ice of the (!lty Treasurer. 

A penalty of ten (10) per cent will 
be ailded if payment is not made on or 
before July 15, 1909, and the said as- 
sessment will then bear interest at the 
rate of six (6> per cent from April 13, 
190J», to date of payment. 

' W. S. McCORMICK. 

City Comptroller. 
Duluth Evening Heraiu. Aaay 17 and 21 

1909. 



OFFICE OF THE COMPTROLLER— 
City of Duluth, May 17, 1909. 

Notice Is hereby given that an as- 
sessment levied to defray In full the 
expense of constructing a sanitary 
sewer In .Sixth alley. In said city, from 
118 former terminus between Eighth 
and Ninth avenues east to Eighth ave- 
nue east, according to benefits. Is now 
payalde at the office of the City 
Treasurer. 

A penalty of ten (10) per cent will 
be addeil If payment Is not made on or 
before July 15. 1009. and the said as- 
sessment will then bear Interest at 
the rate of six (6) per cent from April 
13. 1909, to date of payment. 

W. S. McCORMICK. 

City Comptroller. 
Duluth Evening Herald — May 17-24, 

19t)9\^ 

01«'FiCE OF THE COMPTROLLER— 
City of Duluth. May 17. 1909. 

Notice is hereby given that an as- 
sessment levied to defray In full tne 
expense of constructing a sanitary 
sewer In Third alley. In said city, from 
a point 125 feet east of Twenty-sixth 
avenue east westerly to Twenty-third 
avenue cast, thence south to the sewer 
in Second street, according to benefits, 
is now payable at the office of the City 
Treasurer. 

A penalty of ten (10) per cent will 
be added If payment i.s not made on or 
before May 31. 1909. and the said as- 
sessment will then bear Interest at 
the rale of six (6) per cent from April 
26, 1909, to date of payment. 

W. S. .AfcCORMICK, 

City Comptroller. 
Duluth Evening Herald — May 17-24. 

1909. 

OFFICE «)K THE COMPTROLLER— 
CItv of Duluth. May 17. 1909. 

Notice Is hereby given that an as- 
.ses.Mment levied to defray in full the 
expense of constructing a sanitary 
sewer in Seventh alley, In said city, 
from the sewer In Tenth avenue ea.st to 
a point 200 feet easterly of said avenue, 
accor.ling to benefits, is now payable 
at the office of the City Treasurer. 

A penaltv of ten (10) per cent will 
be added If pavment is not made on or 
before July 15. 1909, and the said as- 
sessment win then bear Interest at 
the rate of six (6) per cent from April 
13. 1909, to date of payment. 

W. S. McCORMICK, 

City Comptroller. 
Duluth Evening Herald — May 17-24, 

1909^ 

offTce of the comptroller — 

City of Duluth. May 17, 1909. 

Notice is hereby given that ait as- 
sessment levied to defray In full the 
expense of constructing a sanitary 
sewer In Seventh street. In said city, 
from Twontv-fourth avenue west to a 
connection with the outlet sewer In 
Twenty-fifth avenue west, according to 
benefits, is now payable at the office of 
the City Treasurer. 

A penalty of ten (10) per cent will 
be acfded If pavment Is not made on or 
before July 15. 1909, and the said as- 
sessment will then bear Interest at 
the rate of six (6) per cent from April 
13, 1909. to date of payment. 

W. S. McCORMICK. 

City Comptroller. 
Duluth Evening Herald — May 17-24, 

1909. 



OFFICIO OF THE COMPTROLLER — 
City Of Duluth, May 17, 1909. 

Notice is hereby given that an as- 
sessment levied to defray in part the 
expense of grading, paving and other- 
wise improving Twenty-ninth avenue 
west In said city from Helm street to 
the southerly side of Railroad .street, 
according to benefits. Is now payablo 
al the office of the City Treasurer. 

A penalty cf ten vlO) per cent wlU 
be added If payment is not made on or 
before June 7th, 1909. and the said 
assessment will then bear Interest at 

■? rate of six (6) per cent from May 
?th. 1909. to date of payment. 

W. S. McCORMICK. 
City Comptroller. 
Duluth Evening Herald, May 17 and 24, 

1909. 

OFFICE OF THE COMPTROLLER— 
City of Duluth, May 17, 1909. 

Notice Is hereby given that an as- 
sessment levied to defray In full the 
expense of grading and paving and 
otherwise improved Third street In 
said city, from the east line of Twenty- 
third avenue east to the North H"'' ^ 
Harrisons Division, according to bene- 
fits, is now payable at the oilice of the 
City Treasurer. 

A penaltv of ten (10) per cent will 
be added If payment is not made on or 
before July 15, 1909, and the said as- 
sessment will then bear Interest at the 
i-ate of six (6) per cent from April 18, 
l'J09. to date of payment. 

W. S. McCORMICK. 
City Comptroller. 
Duluth Evening Herald, May 17 and 24, 

1909. 

OFFICE OF THE COMPTROLLER— 
City of Duluth. May 17, 19)9. 

Notice is hereby given that an as- 
sessment levied to aefray In full the 
expense of paving and otherwise im- 
proving Third street in said city. :iom 
Eighteenth avenue east to Twonty- 
s!e<-ond avenue east, according to -i'lie- 
flts. Is now payable at the office of tne 
City Treasurer. 

A penally of ten (10) per cetit will b; 
added If pavment Is not made on or 
before Julv 15, 1909. and the said as- 
sessment will then bear Interest at the 
rate of six (6> I'er cent from April 13. 
1909, to date of payment, 

W. S. McCORMICK. 
City Comptroller, 
Duluth Evening Herald, May 17 and 24, 

1909. 

OFFICE OF THE COMPTROLLER — 
City of Duluth, May 17. 1909. 
Notice is her.'by given that an as- 
sessment levied to defray In full the 
expense of constructing a sanitary 
.oewer in Fifty-eighth alley west irom 
Elinor street to Fifty-seventh avo- 
nue west; thence In Fifty-seventh 
avenue west to Highland street in 
said city, and extend, d in Huntington 
street from Fifty-seventh avenue west 
to Fiftv-nlnth alley west and extenO- 
ed In Eighth street from Fifty-seventh 
avenue west to east line of Lot 18. 
Block 44. West Duluth. Slxtn Division, 
according to benefits, is now payable 
at the office of the City Treasurer. 

A penalty of ten (10) per cent will 
be added If payment Is not made on or 
before Julv 15, 1909. and the said as- 
sessment will then bear Intere.st at the 
rate of six <6) per cent from April 13. 
1909. to date o'^/^|"X^„nMICK, 

City Comptroller. 
Duluth Evening Herald, May 17 and 24, 

1909. 



CITY OF DrLrTH.^'LERK-S (OFFICE— 
Notice Is hereby glvi-n. that applica- 
tions have been filed in my office for 
license to sell Intoxiciiting Hjl";'" in 
the citv of Iniluth by the following 
named persons at the locations set op- 
Doslt.^ tl:cir respective names, viz: 

Oscar Llndquist. at 1921 West Supe- 
rior street; Martin Nlckelson. at 104 
East Superior street, being a transfer 
from Campbell & Doran (^o,. at No. 206 
West Superior street; (?. Hansen, at No. 
1907 West Superior street, Peter Peter- 
son, at No. ItUO West Superior street; 
Oust Carlson, at No. 15 West Superior 
street; J T. Lanlgan. at No. 41^^ West 
Superior street; M. Monsen, at No 617 
West Superior street; William Heabeck. 
314 Lake avenue south. 

Said applications will b© considered 
by the common council at a regular 
ineetlng thereof to he held on Monday, 
May 31st. 1909, at^7:30 o^c^ock^p. m. 

City Cl.-rk. 
Duluth Evening Herald, May 17 and 
24, 1909. 



OFFICE OF THE OOMPTROLLBR— 
City of Duluth, May 17. 1909. 
Notice Is hereby given that aij as- 
sessment levied to defray m full the 
expense of constructing a sanitary 
«<ewer In West Eighth street, in said 



city, from the west line of U)t 12 to 
the east line of Lot 9. all In Block 59 
West Duluth. Sixth Division; thence 

.south In Fifty-eighth aV"'i?.ft'?^''^Lfh 
Flftv-nlnth alley: thence In Fifty-ninth 
alley to a connection with the present 
sewer In said alley, according to bene- 
lUs Is now payab'.e at the office of the 



will 



City Treasurer. 

A penally of ten (10) per cent 
be added if payment Is not made on or 
before July 15. 1909, and the said as- 
sessment will then ^^ear interest at 
the rate of six (6) per cent from April 
1.,. 1909. to date^of^paymeiit.^^^^ 

City Comptroller. 
Duluth Evening Herald— May 17-24, 
ia09. 



OFFK'E OF THE COMPTROLLER — 

Notice Is hereby given that ati as- 
sessment levied to defray in full the 
expense of a sanitary sewex In 
Woodland avenue In said city from Its 
former termh.ua to the northerly line 
of Lot 10. Blook 4. Woodland Park 
Sixth Division, according to benefits U 
now payable at the office of the City 
Treasurer. ^.., , „,,, 

A penaltv of ten '10) per cent will 
be added If pay'l^'-^'lt Is not made (in 
or before July 15, 190(). and the cald 
assessment will then bear Intere.st at 
the rate of six («) per cent from April 

13 1909 to date of payment. 

li. i.vj». ^ g McCORMICK. 

'jlty Comptroller. 
Duluth Evening Herald. May 17 and 
24, 1909. 



OFFICE OF THE COMPTROLLER-- 
Clty of Duluth, May 17, 1909. 

Notice is hereby given that an as- 
sessment levied to defray In full the 
expense of constructing a .sanitary 
sewer in Eighth street, In said city, 
from Fifth avenue east to the sewar In 
Fourth avenue east, according to bene- 
fits. Is now payable at the office of the 
City Treasurer. . m 

A penaltv of ten (10) per cent will 
be added If payment Is not made on or 
before July 15, 1909, and the said as- 
sessment will then bear Interest at 
the rate of six (C» per cent from April 
13 1909, to date of payment. 
^ • ' W. S. McCORMICK. 

City Comptroller. 
Duluth Evening Herald — May 17-24, 

1909. 



OFFICE OF THE COMPTROLLER— 
City of Duluth. May 17. 1909. 

Notice is hereby given that an as- 
Beesment levied to defray in full the 
expense of constructing a sanitary 
sewer in the right of way for sewer 
adjacent to the southerly end of Lots 
-> 4 6 8 10. 12 14 and 16. Block 80, and 
Lots i« '20, 22. 24 and 26. Block 79, Du- 
luth Proper. Third Division. In said 
rltv from the west line of the east half 
of 'Lot 26, Block 79, Duluth Proper. 
Third Division, to Lake avonu.-, ac- 
cording to benefits. Is now payable at 
the oftice of the City Treasurer. 

A penalty of ten (10) per cent will 
be added If payment Is not made on or 
before June 7th. 1909. and the said as- 
sessment will then bear Interest at the 
rate of six (6) per cent from May 4th, 
1909 to date of payment. 
i3u», lo ^ g McCORMICK, 

City Comptroller. 
Duluth Evening Herald. May 17 and 24, 
1909. 



OFFICE OF THE COMPTROLLER— 
^ City of Duluth. May 17. 1909. 

Notice Is hereby given that an M- 
gessment levied to defray in part th« 
expense of grading, paving and other- 
wise improving Twenty-fifth avenu. 
east m said city from First street to 
S'xth street ana constructing a storm 
water sewer" therein from Fourth street 
to Sixth street, according to benefits Is 
now payable at the office of the City 
Treasurer. ,,„, , ^,.. 

A penaltv of ten dO) per cent will 
be added if pavm-^nt Is not made on or 
before June 24, 1909. and the said aj»- 
sesament will then bear Interest at the 
rate of six (*?) per cent from April 20, 

1,09. to date -'^-^"'^l^i^onyurK, 

(i;itv Comptroller. 
Duluth Evening Herald. May 17 and 

24. 1909. 



OFFICE OF THE COMPTROLLER— 
City of Duluth. May 17, 1909. 
Notice Is hereby given that an as- 
sessment levied to defray In full the 
expense of grading .=!ixth street in said 
city from Wallace avenue on the east 
line of Twenty-eighth avenue east to 
the west line of Twenty-fourth ave- 
nue east and Vista street from the 
north line of Sixth street to Woodland 
avenue, and constructing a sanitary 



OFFICE OF THE COMPTROLLER— 
City of Duluth. May 17. 1909. 
Notice Is hereby given that an as- 
sessment levied to defray in full the ex- 
pense of constructing a sanitary sewer 
In Sixth street In said city from the out- 
let sewer in Second avenue west, to a 
point 225 feet west of Second avenue 
west according to benefits, is now 
payable at tlie office of the City Treas- 

""^A penalty of ten (10) per cent will 
be added If payment Is not made on 
or before July 15. 1909, and the said 
assessment will then bear Interest at 
the rate of six (6) per cent from April 
13 1909. to date of payment. 

• ' W. S. McCORMICK. 

City Comptroller. 
Duluth Evening Herald, May 17 and 

24. 19 09. 

OFFICE OF THE COMPTROLLER— 
City of Duluth, May 17. 1909. 

Notice Is hereby given that an as- 
sessment levied to defray In full the 
expense of constructing a sanit, 
sewer In Eighth alley, In said 
from First avenue east to the sewer In 
I ake avenue, according to benefits, is 
now' payable at the ofilce of the City 
Treasurer. 

A penalty of ten (10) per cent will 
be added If payment Is not made on or 
before July 15. 1909. and the said as- 
sessment will then bear Interest at 
the rate of six (6) per cent from April 
13, 1909, to date^of^pa^me^L^^^^ 

City Comptroller. 
Duluth Evening Herald — May 17-24, 
1009. 



itary 
inty. 



OFFICE OF THE COMPTROLLER-- 
" City of Duluth. May 17, 1909. 

Notice Is hereby given that an aji- 
sessment levied to defray In part tha 
expense of grading, paving and other- 
wise improving Second alley In said 
city from .Lake avenue to Fourth ave- 
nue west, according to benefits. Is now 
payable at the office of the City 
T I* f*fl. surer 

A penalty of ten CIO) per cent will 
be added If pavment is not made on or 
before June 24. 1909. and the said M- 
sessment will then bear Interest at tha 
rate of six (6) per cent from April 20, 
1909, to date of^-^ "'§,%, nUTCK. 

City Comptroller. 
Duluth Evening Herald, May 17 and 

24. 1909. 



OFFICE OF THE COMPTROLLER— 
City of Duluth. May 17. 1909. 
Notice is hereby given that an u- 
sessment levied to defray lii full tha 
expense of paving and other- 
wise Improving .Second street In said 
city from Seventh avenue east to Thir- 
teenth avenue east, according to bene- 
■ '- - ' "-" office of tha 



(10) per cent will 



fits. Is now payable at the 
Cltv Treasurer. 

A penalty of ten 
be added If payment Is not made on or 
before June 24, 1909, and the said as- 
ses.'.ment will then bear Interest at the 
rate of six (6) per cent from April IS, 
9 to date of payment. 
• W. S. McCORMICK. 

City Comptroller. 
Duluth Evening Herald, May 17 
24. 1909. 



seB'j 
rate 
19p 



_^ 



n 




— ■•■^- 



10 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: MONDAY, MAY 24, 1909 



Ikl 



Ik 



MEET WAS A 
BlCaiCCESS 

Washington Team Wins 

First Place and Also 

Herald Cup 

Youthful Athletes 
Struggle for Honor at 
Athletic ParK. 



»»»»»* »*»» »» ' « » « » »» »■ »»* » *** 



WnKhlikStcin, 71. 

AtlaniN. »^- 

Itrynnt. HI "A. 

t'UiMttn, II. 

^♦•ItleUni, 1. 

\<»riiinn « fiU«*r. JelTiTsoii «c"li<»oI. 
cbMiiiiiloii of niiil(i»l«'. It iMilntx. 

'I>iJ I'lin-rj, J«-fl>r>«on i»rll««»l, 
chiiiiiiiiou "* llBlin»eiKhtii, 10 
ptiinlM. 

Alts***" !*«reii'l, Brjnni tn-hoiil, 
«>liaiu|iiMii «l nilddle««?lBht!!», la 
point*. 

M«U Hrt.Mii, W n«hliiipt«m »«<h«oI, 
(•hMiii|»l<'ii oi Ii«-a»>««'lish<>». aO 
poiiittt. 



1 r 

I 



mt l l » » i »„f ^H»H(H^^-^|H|t-»-iMHiH»»»»»»» 



The 1 1 a ^ 

the p:: 

Ath:. 

der 

men 

T!^ 
ond 

Adii :: 

F. 
the 



tram 



,'«lr»K f 



# 




LOSE TWO TO 
LA CROSSE 

White Sox Drop the Last 

Contests of Series 

There. 



Will Meet Wausau For 

Four Games Before 

Coming Home. 



Staiidiug of the Clubs. 

Won. Lost. 

Winona 9 

Eau Caire o 

La Crosse ' 

Dulutb 

Supti ior 



Cbicaffo, 7; New York, 3. 

Chicago, May ;;4.— Chicago yesterday 
won tlie opening game of the seriee 
from New York, 7 to 3. A batting 
rally in the second inning, when the 
hoane team made a three-base hit, a 
single and a double In a row and 
scored three runs, was the feature. 
Score: R. H. E. 

Chicago 3 12 1 x— 7 ll 1 

Now York 1020 000 0—3 6 2 

Uattt^rles — Walsh and Sullivan; Lake. 
Quinn and Blair, rmpires — O'Loughlin 
and Perrlne. 

» 
St. LouiM, 1} BoMton, 0. 

St. Louis. Mo., May 'J-i. — In the 
pame that liaB been seen this 
Boston yesterday lost the first content 
of the series, scoring tci 1. A\ addeU 
was in good form. In the ninth the 
winning run was scored on 
and two sacrifices. Score: 

St. Louis 00 000 

Boston 000 00 

Batteries — Waddell and 
^relanne.s and Carrlgan. 
Kgi.n and Connolly. 




two singries 
R. H. K. 

1 — 1 !? y 

0—0 5 1 

Stephens; 

Umpires — 



AMERICAN ASSOCIATION 



3 

1 



3 
4 

a 

9 



Pet. 
-SOI 
.721 
.636 
271 
.100 



Flr.«t. . 
Walter 1 
Kohstiid, 
100-V»rd 



'■■nf-et 



H ' H ' 1 
h.:-l.l 



at 

,in- 

!-t- 



lil t 

, n tlie liifttiry 



mm?. 




ml, Norman Waltt-r, .Iffft-rs'T, , 
Sl(ln<-v McTnptr;irt \V;isiiiiiKt"ii 
IS«0-ViiriI Rrlny. l.lKhlwelKlit.'., 
First, Hanu.i A riiisrr..'i»K. \V "-^ 
Itat; second. Uchstcr Hakf. Jeffe 
third, Simon 1'. i.r>"i> .\<lnms. 
l(H>-\ur,j l»ii!«h, >Uilill»-"«>iKlit»«, 

i'rvant 
third 
\V a.'-hlji^rioii. 
Oasb, ilc-avywelKtbtn, 

Fii.^t Matt F?r<.nn Washintrton ; set - 
..nd. Herbert Bi : ' " ■• third, 

Waller Lawrenc 

HOO-Vard Helaj Htn'r, -;:i» 4-5. 
ii-si Ccorge Knlsiad. WashinRton; 
,s<-cond, Algerl Strev<'l. Ht-y.-mt: third. 
Lfwis Larn^n. .Ieff»-is' ;i 

llalf-^ille, Heavjweljilitu, 2:1.H. 
Ffrs^t. Miitt Brown. VVashlnKtou; sec- 
ond Witlur Lawrence, WashiiiKton; 
tLir<i, Ciiarle.<? Firovi-d, .IcfTeisun. 
Oiip-K«Mir<h Mile, MliIdiewelKhln. 
first. .WiSi I Sli.-\« 1, tlr\ ;itit '1. 

(.;>:■(>:■»:>• Kolstad. \", ,i> liiii.tM.'i, .1, 

W'altrr Larson, AiLiiii.>^. 

Tbre« »i«audiiiK Hr«»«d Jmudiii, i-lithl- 
weliiElili*. 
Fir-t. Ted Fhiery, :4 feet .i. ff. rson; 
,!, \Veh.«t.'r Hakr, Tcrfcrsuti. third. 
! 'ft ( if-dti .\il.". ins 
ItiiaiilitK lil«b .iHWiii, MlddlewelKblB. 
Flr!=t CJeMi-Kc KolKt.id. Wiisiiiiiglon 
■•1. Jiarsravef--. ,f f'fferson : 
Larson, Jeft\rs<.ii I'.t i 

IS-lNiiinil Shot Put, 32 feet 4 

Pi I- St M ; 1 1 1 H ro \v n. \\ a s i 1 1 1 1 K ' 
ond ) Frankousky. Wa^ 

t FUberfr. Bryant 
MnndiuK Tlroiid Junipa, 
welKlitH. 
;, Larson, Jefferson, 24 
♦ cond, Walter Larson. 
lU-n Sh'an. Bryant. 

HiKb Jump, H«-Hvvwel||bt*i. 
11 Li:iiiit'ii fe- ''^ •-' ' ■ • " - 
'■lid. !(nj;.M' '^'' 

\\ ■ « Muit les -• 

1. Mberi,'. Bryant. 

Tlir,.- Mm..ii..y. Un.ml .lump-. MIdt.-tJi. 
First, Xt.'rinaii W ' ' ' ■ " -■* 

feel ti inrhe.«i. sec^ml, - ■ : " 

.Iclttrson. third, Floyd 



La Crosse, 
Eau Claire 



Sunday's RcMUlt*. 



Duluth. 4. 
Waueuu, 0. 



Saturday'* Iteitulti 

I..aBs Crosse, 6, Duluth, 3. 
Winona, 8; Superior, 3, 
Wausau, 4; Eau Claire, 3. 



Game* Today. 

Duluth at Wausau, 

Superior at La Crosse 

Winona at Eau Claire. 
■ 

La Crosse. Wis.. May 24.— (Special to 
The Herald. 1— La Crosse took both the 
Sattirday and Sunday games w-lth the 
Duluth White Sox. yesterdays 
taking place on a very lieavy 
and resulting in a store ot 
The final score Saturday wae 

Yesterday's game started 
Thorsen in" the I'ox 
showed a libeiality 
hitting one man 
hits, and he was 
box after the first 
Thorsen gave La 
start, netting 



Standing of the Clubs. 



Milwaukee . . 
Louisville . . 
Kansas City 
Minneapolis 
Indianapolis 
Toledo .... 

St. Paul 

Columbus . . 



Won 


21 


20 


15 


ID 


15 


15 


13 


15 



Lost. 
11 
14 
16 
17 
18 
18 
17 
21 



Pet. 

.6f6 

.4i>4 
.40t» 

.4r.5 

.4 55 
.483 
.417 



Satorday'M Ueaulta. 

Milwaukee, 6; St. Paul, 2. 
Minneapolis, 6; Kan-sas City, 
Columbus, 10; Toledo, ^. 
Indianapolis, 6: Louisville, 4. 



4. 



third 
Three 



til in 
Utinoinfr 



third. 
."^ 1 > ' ; I n 

Inehen. 

'ti : f-vc- 



MliUlle- 

feet 7 '.J 
Adams: 



Endicn School Relay Team. Second in the Relay Race. McConF>ighy Rath- 
bun, Smallwood and Cullum. Physical Director Batcheior m tne Rear 



von first ]■ 
r 34 It! 1 
: third Wit!. 
^ ;x-inan team, 



wever. with a 

.ind Shattuck 

i ) ',4. Menonioiii* 

and won five firsts. 



Iti.fiMiiiir llluh 



.III nip. 

til, \V. 

A. A .1 

il. .\ iiiLst roll K. 

ilile It el ay R«ee, 

W;i.-hJiiplon; 
lliiiininK Broad 

'■"'I Ham I--'' ■■' 
,11. 



tiwt-ns. J. 
l,lch<r«rli. 



lIeB%yweiKh<». 

secon«i. l';i'H"ii 
.Jump 

rsr. W.it-r.np- 



1 \\ . 

t a k 

uoi 
li<.ni 



of Ml' 
Twin 
IP 1 



two tliirds, tlie men 

watches, tlie ir.divid- 

tlie relay '"^'''■'■■■P e-up 



ds and 
,r gold 
; and 
them. 

\vln/r of St. I'uul Ct i.ti 
, ilv good. The ollur 
'iriished nine points 
— Centiai 

i.or,.-r,t 1! 



. was 

Twin 

ahead 

l.er nearest 
'.inson made 



a 



.n 



first 
if ll>e 



4v, 



1 ,1 f 



ton : 



. rlhs, 

I a 



Takliii: • 

; and t' 
.. ..• flrst, • 
making V v 

me a, 

third. 



almost 

tee \ era i g<'od 

> mile w«?nt in 

■" . e The 
apin 

., t..(<ii iv....p at 

• . the indivld- 

- I ut Hudson 

lints, as he 

lids. Thor- 

nd and two 

, ; IN La Crosse 

und lie won 6 

gold watch. Al- 

getting a bronze 



y, \\,> 

lingtoii , 
William 

inund. 



Fi as.k 
I'ark, 

Wa-li- 



PLAY WAS BAD BUT 
STILL THEY WON 



Thr FliwellB played at Athletic park 
Sunday with the TurnbuU-Cameron- 
Legler team of Superior. The Fitweils 
won by a score of 10 to 9. 

The whole affair was an en or exhi- 
bition from start to finish, and the 
FitwtUs seemed able to do little else 
The Superior team has It al 
f't evi ry point of the game 
pitcl.tr went up in the last 
ninlli inning. 

There was a fair crowd present. 
they seemed to tiioroughly enjoy 
contest. Hitting was frequent 
grand stanu stops ut times 
spectators to their feet 
applauee. , . , 

The FitwelJs showed a remarkable 
abilitv to boot the ball about the lot. 
while' in every inning but one f he Su- 
perior boys played like a bunch of 
professionals. 

The score: „ „ „ , , 

F'ltwelle 00010 

Tujnbull-Cam-Pegler -1 ' 



contest 
ground 
7 to 4 
5 to 3. 
off with 
for Duluth, but he 
that was amazing, 
and allowing four 
extracted from the 
The favors of Mr. 
Crosse a beautiful 
the locals four runs. 
Murrav rcHeved Thorsen and he did 
well except Jn the third, when La 
Crosse piled up three runs. An 
by O'Brien helped the home 

I»uiuth scored two Ir the second 
ning and got two more runs In 
fifth, but could not tie the 

L»uiuth tried out a 
named Baertachl In 



Kan»a« City, 4, .Mlnaeapolla, 3. 

Kansas City, Mo.. May 24.— ^^ hlle 
Kansas City's' hits were i^ss frequetit 
of the visitors, they wore 
and the locale won from 
4 to 3. Score: K. H- ^. 

3 1 X — 4 E 2 
11 1 — 3 8 i 
-EBBick and Rltter; Young 
Umpire — King. 



than those 
more timely 
Minneapolis, 
Kansas City 
Minneapolis 
Baiteries- 
and Block. 



error 
tetam 



1 over them 
until their 
half of the 



Ti. n. 

X— 5 " 



and 

th< 

and 

brought the 

with shouts of 



MATT BROWN 
Of Washington School, Winner of the 
Individual Championship, and Lead- 
er of the H'-^'"wficTht Cl:=f='^ 

the ^'Vt t,- ' 

n ■ 

of 

th. 

br! 
Tt,. 

tin 

Ih- 

■e* 
evt 
over 1 ■ 

J ! 

m> ■■ 

Is 
mc! 



K 

10 2 C — 10 
(I 4 — S 



and Sliver n,H. i.!.>i 
Wf-ti?tcr Ih'iUe, 



il 



' 1 on' 
tik 



lh'f:i'« I 
Frallkow^^ 



rtl I'l; 



ANNUAL REGATTA 
AT PHILADELPHIA SALARIES TO 

BE DISCUSSED 



I'IuUmI 
ismi :> 



' i .May 11 - Ntvv Y« rk 
,.ff the bulk of the 
at the .«evtnth annual regatta 
American Kowmg association 



■brtrtias,t 





> lltttlllO 

N'ew Vol 

.H'lpl'iia 
and 1 
.in fell t 

ih»wn III- 


. lu ( 't the twelve 

k <_!;tiifS won 

..lU IT.C. 

.■]ic. A 

tilt uay 

.' a lew 


w 1 

! !i 


..; ;,[ 11. V I ;.: 1 

f k \'. ; f t n. 1 1 1 


< strong norlh- 
.- ..; ;lie oarsmen 
tit new jecords 



mt 

W; 
w 

II 

Til. 
se 

thm.:, ; 



-h. 



J 1 ^ ,,; 1 1 > t o i 
Midiceitt, 7 



1 1 > \'.' : 



fierontla. 



Iiii>.h. l,l*tlitweHtbfi», la 2-5 



FAIL TO SCORE 
AT TRACK MEET 



• ■ , ■ - , ■-■[. Paul 

J.,. ' ,1 '■ ., V ' ■ other 

Twin Citv high schools entered in the 

' r.il invitation Intersclolnst ic 

, . t livid on Northrop Ht M .'^.Ht- 

fn-rnoon. i>y ilni siting second 

tal of 26 poiiiis. Menonu«nl« 



events the 

ugles first 

i:m 1...1 oared shell^ 

collegiate eights. 

the feature evt nt. the 

collegiate eiglits. open 

whose members never 

rsity boat at Pough- 

Lotoi.,.1 There were 

the "ornell. Har- 

l■t■nnsyi^^ The crimson 

faVontos and led Cornell 

for the fifst quarter 

on«? -sixteenths mile 

Cornell eight moved 

and soon was a few 

advance of Harvard and won 



ai. 

C'criii. . 
race for 
only to 
rt'wrd il 
keepj--:c 
three i •■ ' 
vard a In 
oarsmen 

and Pennsylvania 
of the one and 
course. Then the 
up on even terms 



>r 



in 



Sun da;, 
hotel, the 
Minnesota 
busijiess. 



wt re 




i_n 
7 


C:26 4 
made 


-0. 
by 


at 


1 *n c 

ilub 


or 
by 
of 



feet i'l 

by six and a fourth lengths 
which beat the record of ti::; 
Yale last year. 

Harvard made some an> 
defeat In ihf junior coiic^ 
WHiinng irom the Malta Ko 
this city the race of the tli st 
eights. The crimson 
though not in as fast 
Juiuor collegiate race wa 

The Central high 
phia won the race 
championslilp 
City college ...... •.--„._„„;- „.^„ The 

race 



afternoon at the Superior 
officials of the Wisconsin- 
league Will meet and discuss 
The most Important topic 
tc be brought up at that time will be 
the over-Veaching of the salary limit 
by a number of the managers. 

There is going to be a howl from the 
managers who feel that they cannot 
afford to pay more than the constitu- 
tion of the Uf.^g.ifc allows. Al Kuehnow 
«ecretarv of the I>uluth team, says that 
three of the teams arc away over the 
llim.t This ht says, does not worry 
I him. If the smauer towns 
sin can afft.rd to pay more 
better players^ 
can stand it, 

ing up »••«■ .-" -;• . > 

sity paying larger salaries, until 
he feels that lie has one of the strong- 
est teams in the league. 

The L>uluth season opens batui<ia>. 
The team will have a great reception 
and if the 



In- 
the 
score. 
new pitcher 
Saturday's game 
Jle performed satisfactorilj- ^»^tll the 
eighth inning, when he issued foui 
passes, v,hich, with two errors b> 
Breen and Vorpagel. netted the home 
team (our runs. La Crosse had prev- 
iously scored one in .^^e second^ 

Duluth scored one In the first in- 
ning and got two men across the plate 
in the second, when Romalne issued 
passes indiscriminately. ,„...,,, 

Catcher Fogel of the locals was put 
off the grounds for disputing a deci- 

■^''trecretary Kuehnow of the Duluth 
team saw .Saturday's game, and Man- 
ager uBrien of the White Sox an- 
nounced before leaving that his squad 
would comprise but fourteen men when 
it reached Wausau. 

Foi. owing are the scores by luu- 

§iin<1nv I^- ^' ^— 

la^Oosse 4 3 x— '' U 2 

Duluth ....... 2 1 1 0—4 12 3 

Batteries — Pfeffer and Schaefcr: 
Thorser Murray and Wertz. 

Saturday — „ , ,^ , , ,, a ,• 

1 a Cros'^e 0100 004 

Duluth 120000000-3 

Batteries — Komalne, „Fogel 
Schaeffer: Baertsclti and Mueller. 

Winona Still Winning. 

Winona, Minn . May 24.— Winona won 
its ninth straight game Saturday by 
defeating Superior in the third of the 
series by a score of fc to 3. 

Despite the fact that Superior played 
Rood ball and made only two en;ors to 
the locaTs four, their errors In the 
third inning were principally respon.sl- 
ble for the four 1 uns. Score: K. tl fc>^ 
«; iVihrior ,0 10000 101 — 3 9 2 

fWim!,io .■.■.•.■.■.■.■.02400002X-S 7 4 

Batteries — Olson and Drill; Bjers and 

Moore. 

» - 

Wausau Takes Long Game. 

Wausau Wis.. May 24.— Wausau won 
a fifteen-inning game here Saturday, 
after having been tied, by Eau Claire 
In the third inning. 

A hit bv Bourheois brotight in the 
winning score. After the third Inning 
11 wai a pitchers' battle, one of the 
most stt.bborn seen on the local aia- 

wrut./'°'':2 10 000 000 000 1-S- 
Eau Cialre .. S 0--3 
Batteries — Dunbar and Johnson; Jus- 
tus, Wormans and Nieman. 



Six Pltcbem r«ed. 

Toledo, Ohio. May 24— >Six pitchers, 
three for each teatn, were used in yes- 
terday's game between Columbus and 
Toledo, which was won by the home 
team by a score of 8 to 6. ^'^'^^^'^- ^ ^ 

Columbus 221010000— 614' 2 

Toledo 10 12 13 x— 8 11 ^ 

Batteries — Goodwin, Nflson, Oey«^r 
and Schreck; Plnkney, Robinson, West 
and Fisher. Umpire— Kcrin. 



<ny nruce.) 

"Believe me, John, a9 
the country couslrt 
sometimes exclaims, lit 
a fit of entiiuslasm, 
there was some race al 
the Duluth Boat club 
.Saturday afternoon. 

In a race over the fu}i 
mile and a-half coursSi 
the seniors defeated the juniors by a 
trifle over a boat length. The more 
experienced seniois jumped the JuniorS 
at the start of the race. They gained 
a full lialf lengtii in the first twentjf 
strokes. Tliis was Increased to 0, 
length, before the first half-mile. Then 
the juniors began to gain. 

They puHtd up to the middle of th« 
seniors' shell. Then the seniors raised 
their stroke to about thlrty-slx and 
crossed the line ahead of the green 
crew. 

It was a race all the way. It waf 
not decided until the line was crossed. 
Two hundred yards from home th0 
juniors had an opportunity to win th» 
race through the collapsing of one oC 
the members of the senior boat. Tlila 
man keeled over near the finisli of th« 
race, simplv holding his oar and let- 
ting the other men pull the boat, 
the juniors known this fact and . 
twenty drives into the boat, they migh* 
liave defeated the seniors. ^ ^ , 

But even the defeat will stand for 9 
virtual Vict. 11 v for Dr. Lynams charge; 
It was confidently expected upoii 
sides that the seniors would 
runaway race out of it. It 
heved that the seniors had 
game on the ice before the 
the race. 

But the seniors failed 
marked superiority over 
oarsmen. In fact, rowing .-- - , 

number of strokes to the minute, th^ 
™ors outrowed the Peyton PupHs, 
and came so near passing ^''^-^V^^^J 
the coxswain yelleu for « highet 
stroke. With the raising of thelf 
stroke the seniors were able to rt-tam 
their lead gamed at the start ot ine 
race and cross the line a winner. 

Looking over what ll>e. race dis- 
closed, it must be said that If thf 
Minlors had been rowmg a 
length of time so that 
tneir stroke 
have given the 



Had 

put 



. 4 

make ^ 
was ba»- 
put Ui* 
start ot 

to show any 
the greenefr 
the e&mp 



Milwaukee, 4} St. Paul, 2. 

Milwaukee. Wis., May 1^4.— The lead- 
ers won their third straight game of 
the series today, beating St. Paul by a 
"score of 4 to 2. Schneiberg pitched fine 
hall with the exception ot one inning, 
when three safeties and a base on 
gave the visitors their two 
(.'larks batting and a;i r> unu work 
the field and a wonderful 



balls 
runs, 
in 
one-handed 



catch by Dougherty 
tures. Score: 

Milwaukee 2000 1 

St. Paul 0000: 

Batteries — Schneiberg 
Hall and Cariech. 
and Owens. 



furnished the fea- 

R. H. E. 

1 X — 4 8 1 

(1 C — 2 6 2 
and Hostetter; 



Umpires — Eckman 



LoniMvllle. 

Indianapolhs 
ville defeated 
2 to 1. In a ten- 
of the largest 
cd a gatne in 



s 1 

C 4 
and 



2; IndiannpollN. 1. 

liid., May 24. — Louis- 
IndianapoMs yesterday. 
Inning game before one 
crowds that ever attend 
this citv. Both pitchers 
worked well, but Slagle received the 
poorer sui-i'ort. Louisville scoreu the 
winning run in the tenth on a double 
steal, Williams muffing a short tlirow 
from the catcher. Score: R. H- E. 

Indianapolis ..100000000 0—1 6 4 

Louisville 1 (.0 1—2 6 2. 

Batteries — Slagle and Howley; Thiel- 
man and Hughes. Umpires — Hayes and 
Conalian. 

GOPHERS TROUNCE HIBBING. 

St. Paul Team I*iles Up Seventeen 
Runs on the Range. 

Hlbbing, Minn., May 24.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — The Colored Gophers of 
St. Paul carried the local team off Us 
f^et in the game Saturday, the final 
score being 17 to 2. 

Hlbbing used two pitchers, but the 
Gophers did not mind, seemingly being 
able to hit them at will. A total oi 
six errors on the part of tiie locals 
materially helped the "dusky gelmon.' 

For the Gophers. Tate allowed but 
six hits, wliicli gave the locals two 
rune. The Gophers did not err once. 
The two teams are scheduled for an- 
otlier game today. Score: 
GOPHERS. 

AB. R. H. PO. A. E. 
6 2 3 3 4 



in Wlscon- 

money for 

he says that Duluth 

He has been strengthen- 

the team lately and of neces- 



Wausau Shut Out. 

Wausau, Wis. May 24.— Eau Claire 
shut out Wausau here yesterday, roil- 
ing up five scores The result was 
brought about bv a combination of er- 
rors and hits. Score: R. H. E 

Wausau C 0-0 3 6 

Eau Cialre 4 1 0—5 6 2 

Batteries — Saukoff and Johnson: Mc>r- 
row and Nieman. 



Wallace, 2b .. 
Johnson, c - . . 
McMurray, If 
Barton, cf . . . 

Mllner, rf 

Binga, 3b . . . . 
Marshall, lb . . 
McDougall, S8 
Tate, p 



4 
4 
6 
6 
6 
4 
B 
4 



2 
2 
4 


8 
1 
2 
2 
1 



2 
4 

2 
1 
2 
1 
1 



PO. 

8 

8 

1 

5 



1 
12 

1 

1 



A. 
4 

1 


1 


2 

5 
2 



weathei is fine there will be 
an enormous crowd at Athletic park 
when Duluth faces Superior 
opening gome of the season, 
mings will pitch on 




Totals 



Geiselman, cf 

Brookins, 3b 
Booth, lb . . . - 
Williams, If . 
Simons If, p. 
Burrows, ss . 
Calligan, 2b . 
Chaffee, c . 
Geo. Sage, p 



44 17 17 27 15 



HIBBING. 



rf. 



AB. 

. 3 
. 4 
. 4 
. 3 
. 4 
. 4 
. 3 
. 3 
. 3 



R. 
1 

1 











H. 



1 

1 



1 


2 
1 





PO. 

1 



11 

2 
8 
5 
3 
2 




A. 

1 
1 


1 
8 
1 
1 



t 

( 


C 



c 
c 





E. 




1 




s 
(• 

2 




the 
the 



of 
apd 
I 
will be a 

iVf. 

be 



"hold 
will 

■ Into the 
Saturday, 
the catch 



Sam 



spot 

the 

citizen 

Ian as a 



the 



in the 
Al Cum- 
occasion. 



par 

Phi 



w 



won easi.y, 

time as the 

i rowed. 

school of Philadel- 

for the scholastic 

defeating the Baltimore 

and the Georgetown pre 

laratory school of Washington. 

lladeliphia youngsters had the 

.]] in hand from the start and the 

. 1 iv light was that t.etween Baltimore 

ai.d Georgetown for second place. 

The University of Pennsylvania and 
Georgetown freshmen crews furnished 
the struggle for second eights. Th.: 
Pennsvlvania freshmen showed excep- 
Ilonally g.'od form in this event and 
led from 
their lead 

, J. A. 

both 



the start. They Increased 

In the last half mile from a 

length to nearly three. 

Durando Miller and his brother 

f New York Athletic dub. 



elder 
real 



- ;',",v'T.;Si';";!ic,';jrv.!'c "7<'^i..«" 

%i ;.r made better time than 1 
ii.Vther. though the latter had rn 
, , mpetition In his race 

The closest struggle of th* da> was 
«Vi«t furnished by the Harlem Row- 
S cS' ami the' New Vork Athletic 
,'iil. in the first double sculls. The 
iiiiKin double had a lead of nearly a 
^ngtii. a Muarter of a mile from the 
finicb but the New York Athletic club 
almost caught them in the last 
kes, losing by a couple 



AMATEURS OPEN 
THEIR SEASON 



Cascades. 31; Duluth Heights. 1. 

Hummers, 20; Duluth Reds. 8. 

Adams, 7; Union Match company, 5 

The City Amateur Baseball league 
its season Sunday. Two of the 
were walkaways. The other 
was a fair exhibition. 

n was the first game ol 
for all tlie teams and many 
were shown up. 
make an effort 



Standing of the Clubs. 



Won. Lost. Pet. 

Pittsburg 16 11 -621 

Chicago 19 13 .694 

Philadelphia 14 12 .638 

Brooklvn 13 U 481 

Cincinnati 15 17 .4€& 

New York 18 16 464 

St. Louis 14 18 438 

Boston 12 17 .414 



Totals . 

Score by 
Gophers . . . 
Hlbbing . . . 

Summary: 
Gophers, 9 



31 2 

Innings: 

40 

10 

Earned rufi 
Two-base 



6 27 13 



4 13 2 2 1—17 

000000 1— 2 

a — Hlbbing, 1; 

hits — Booth. 

t Wallace, Barton, Mllner and Marshall. 

Home runs — McMurrav and Brookins. 

Hit bv pltchcl ball— McMurray. Bases 

on balls— Off Tate, 2; off Simons, 1- 

Struck out— By Simons. 1. 



There were no g^ames 
National league Saturday 
account of wet grounds. 



played in the 
or Sunday, on 



«-■ 1 1 
w 
1 111 



str< 



of 



opened 
games 

fa\r Plk ni III ll..iji. 

the season 
weak spots 
Each manager will 
to strengthen his team 
next games. It is expected 
will then settle down 
I. orr« Bpnson's plav and a liarc. fight 
the*^ champkfnshlp. Each week here- 
affer. three games wli: be piayed 

At each game there was 
crowd and in each instance 
was a feature. 

Thirteen Inning Tie. 

Fosston and Ada played a l3-inriing 
f. r, Kame at Fos^on yesterday. Ada 
hacl to caKh I trainband could not play 
it out 



AMERICAN LEAGUE 



Standing of the Clubs. 



a large 
rooting 



Detroit .... 
Philadelphia 

Boston 

New Y'ork . 
St. Louis . . . 
Cleveland .. 
Clilcago . . . . 
Washington 



Won. 


Lost. 


Pet. 


..19 


IC 


655 


. .17 


9 


.654 


..17 


11 


.607 


..16 


12 


671 


. .13 


15 


.46* 


..12 


16 


.429 


. .13 


18 


.419 


. . 7 


20 


.26I> 



GREAT CROWD 
WILL ATTEND 



Satorday't* Remilta. 

Philadelphia, 7; Detroit, 1. 
Chicago. 2; Boston. 1. 
Washington. 4- Cleveland. 
New York. 2: St. Louis. 1. 



1. 



To Get Loving Cup. 



R 



Waabington School 



Relay Team, Winners of the Relay 
Whiteside, Brown and Lawrence. 



Race. Lundberg, 



■ ger 
hall 
Polo 



New York. May , r4--,jy'^Vou,« 
Bresnahan leads lus St. 1-ou s 
t.iivor^ on the diamond at tne 
^rt ,nc?s til.-, afternoon, his old friends 
will tender him a loving cup John M. 
Ward manager of the Giants in 189.:.. 
.and now a V^dfer. will ni*ke the pifcs- 
«fitatlo& s£»«<kcb. 



R."tteries— Cadreau and Roy- 
ton: Sumrners -"1 Betcher Ada. 



Foss- 



and Betcher 

> 



Moose Lake Wins. 



Moose Lake. Minn.. May 24.— (Spe- 
i»i fn TlTe Herald. 1— Moose Lake de- 
flated tJe Spa mfng basebai: team here 
' 1 .lo,,. 11 tr, 4 The Spalding boys 
^courd'^ ct . 'noJhing lith ^Nevers, the 
1 ,li T.itrher who struck out fou. 
rn'm'en'' TheVaterles we.e Nevers 

ata Newton; Daoi^isftt »»<i 



Joiijisoa. 



Detroit. 4! « aBhlaprtoa, 2. 

Detroit. Mich.. May £4— Only five 
Detroit plavers readied first liase. but 
four scored" and one died stealing, not 
a home plaver being left on the bases. 
Tw-o^lts were bunched with a pass in 
the first, and two more 
throw in the seventh, 
counted all the runs. 
had oeveral chances to 
not hit with men waiting. Cobb was 
llenched for criticising a decision. 

^^p^roit • 2 2 x— 4" 4 j 

W-irh r p* on .... 2 0—2 P 1 
^Ueries—WUleU aiid Staaage, Orftjr 



with a wild 

Cobb's hits 

Washington 

score, but could 



London. May 24.— Every seat in the 
National Sporting club has been sold 
for this evening, when Sam Langford, 
Boston negro, will attempt to win the 
title cf heavyweight champion of Eng- 
land from Ian Hague, who recently 
took it from "Gunner" Molr and 
"Jimmy" Walsh, the American fighter 
and "Digger" Stanley will battle 
the bantamweight championship 

^'^ie"b'lg fellows will fight twenty 
rovinds for a purse of «9.00'), and the 
bantatns fifteen rounds for 51,1 fio. 

Langford and Walsh have been train 
ine together at .Stonebrldge 
with the small colony of 
who have taken up their residence 
the?e, believe they have excellent 
chances of winning ,^^^^«{%^^-^X' 
will enter the ring at about 165 j.ounds 
is giving much weight to Hague, but 
expects to overcome this disadvantage 
bv his quickness, in which he excels the 
Yorkshire man. Langford Is a strong 
favorite In the betting, some wagers 
having been made at 5 to 2 on him tc 
win Not much money has been 
wagered at these figures, however, and 
it is likely that Hague's stocK 
prove when the Yorkshire 
»ad back tli«lr man. 



for 
of 



Paik, and. 
Americans 



sufficient 
they could raise 
a trifle higher, they would 
;enlor8 tlie hght of 
their lives. They do not shoot Qi^JC'Kly 
enough at the present time and when 
U comes to raising the stroke, they are 
acking. While there was aii improve- 
ment In the torm shown f^^turday af- 
ternoon there were times when about 
™y^an in the junior b..at was row- 
ing Individually, wasting hla el'-^E^^ 
and impeding the progress of the boat. 
The Lynam stroke ^showed to good 
advantage. After the first half mile 
of the race the seniors attem^ned to 
row stroke for stroke with the 5u"»^>J'- 
It was at this point that the junlura 
leg^n to creep up on the i'eylou 
crowd. 

The race showed that t'«i»"t'l,/»'^^" Jf 
have two crews that tun go to ^t 1 aul 
and Klve a very good account of thein- 
selvef The season is young yet. Many 
Tccidents and other things may hap- 
nen before the time arrives foi the re- 
gatta, but if the Junior crew show* 
same progress up to the t^ie of 
holding of the regatta at St. fajf' »» 
it has In the past week. Dr. Lyn*"! 
should have a very good chance 
turning out a winning crew. 

The junior crew has promised 
it is up to both the coach and the 
members of the crew to make the most 
of a grand opportunity. 

There is a rumor that there 
shift in the makeup of the senior crew. 
Just how true this '•""?«-^>" '«,„^ 'i]^^._ 
shown the present \n eek. , l*oth crewB 
have a lot of hard work ahead oj 
them especially the Jumors. The spee4 
of the shoot and the catch of the 
Junic s inust be quickened If thev are 
tc have any hope of being able 
raise their stroke sufficiently to 
their own with t'.ie crews that 
compete at St. Paul. 

The juniors got their legs 
stroke In very good form 
though in getting together in 
they are very poor al times. 
• • • 
Tonight at dear old London. 
Langtord the Boston colored middle- 
weight will be pitted against Ian 
Hague of Yorkshire, Eng. It looks ae 
if all black Sammy will have to do will 
be to walk around Mr. Hague once or 
twice, select some nice vulnerable 
upon his body, and send home 
punch that will net the Boston 
the greater part of the purse. 

Thev have touted English 
star upon 'he other side of the water 
But thev also touted poor old C^unneV 
Sm th as a star. Little -Tommy Burns 
plaved with this Gunner 'j,'^ th. and at 
hie end of a showing up ^f^'t, put the 
ivnnotic delivery to the pride of Eng- 
land Tl'ey have a bunch of overrated 
migilists upon the other side of he 
briny deep. when it comes to the 
heavvwe ight class, and un ess 
Haaue pFoves to be something 
En I'm nd hasn't turned out for many e 
vear he will prove nothing more than 
a little ererds^e^for^stocky .Sammy. 

name Fortune pla.yed a scurvy trick 
up^n the members ot the Duluth Cen- 
tral high school traok team. 
^iTnT^r'^L SnS?;ate-- nattire that 
can happen to athletes happened to the 
membeVs of the Duluth te^m. 
fell, were Injured and 
things occurred to 
from breaking into 

'°HeTmer was almost sure of w;lnnln8f 
r^olntfi In the two dashes for Dulutln 
He easiry cuallfied for the 220 dash 
"ut in't'l^e Anal w.hen the Du u^h boy 
had a chance to win, his leg. that was 
injured a week ago, gave out and he 
finlslied fifth. 

QuInn was beaten in ----, « - w m 
being nipped at the tape. He finished 
l^oirfh ^Taylor also met with an ao- 
cident In the 440. which the 
his team believe kept 
nii'g the race. 

Thorburn finished fifth in , 

which was run In the inter.schola>Mo 
lime of 4 minutes ^6 seconds 
jumped 19 feet 2 Inches in the 
broad Jump, which would 

ciir« n hiKh school , 

sure a nmn » However, an fortune 

they were jumping fur- 

and thf- Duluth man wae 

the scoring. Johnson 

had not sufficiently recovered from his 

njur"es to compete In the weight*., and 

here you have the story of 

of the Zenith City athletes 

fairlv Kood showing. 

All of the members of the team, with 
the exception of Quinn. will be In 
school next year. That should Insure 
for Duluth a very strnnp team in 1910. 

After Joe Jeannette's victory in Paris 
over hie black brother. Sam McVey. 
the excited p'lenchmen leaped blithely 
through the ropes and kissed black Joe 
nat upon his rather swarthy 
Eleanor Glyn. who complains 
coldness of the American men, should 
to this Paris place. 



Ian 
that 



Down at 
about every- 



They 
a few other 
prevent Duluth 
the high score 



m the event, 
would have it, 
ther this year, 
not counted in 



the 440. Just 

He finished 

K\th an ao- 

members of 

him from wln- 

tlie mile. 

hola^Mo 

McCrea 

running 

ordinarily in- 

Rthlete of a place 



the failure 
to make a 



cheeks, 
of the 



go 



Cjele Records Broken. 

Angeles, 



will Im- 
men arrive 



LoB Angeles, Cab, May .24.— Three 
world's motor-cycle records were 
broken here yesterday. E Lingenfelder 
of Chicago broke the eight-mile record 
in V minutes 28 seconds, by 11 seo- 

*^"The ^S-mlle race for professionals 
was taken by Lingenfelder in 24 mln- 
ute« 10 seconds. The former record 
WHS •'BOS The lO-rnJle amateur event 
was Taken by A. Ward of this dty in. 
8;04. Previous record, b:Ob 4-6. 



f 

f 



rf^ .aa,. 




THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD; MONDAY, MAY 24, 1909. 



u 



POT HUNTERS FROM MINING 
CAMPS KILLING OFF GAME 




tilt* 



— , M f Ini.'S >t tin- V'Mr. 
lur ex a uu j^aint- 

t. It' i.i s*trtimy. 

Urt Ilttl.' tliur iMiiitunit. But 

- l.)t>k alike to thesie i*-»t 

'•' ■■■ -.. -I'.i •..-,! as S'>'>ri 

;.-k (n th- 

-ven if 

! • aft.>r. 

Mituitv-tota 

. kl'il.-l by 

; 1 .S W 1 1 ' > 



s*'<niuil to forget entirely the art o;' 
running: Ijases, while Crook«twn playt-il 
A «'>)d game tliroughout. 

foiHiolly. a mt-MTiber of the Plckett.s 
team, had his nose broken during tlie 
[iractice. The score: H. H. K. 

<:. F. Plcketts. .00 I) i: 1 I — 4 9 i 
<'ro.)ksion 4 10 0:^—7 8 5 

KatUTlea — Grand Kork.s rickelt!*. 
Shannon and Millraith; Crookaton. 
Stev'TM Htiii Martin 




m n 




BASEBALL SKAHON IS 

OPKNED AT CROOKSTON. 

<r<.kston. Minn.. May 24. — (Sperial 
to Tlu- H.M-ild > — Thp l>cVStfl)aU season 
wa.-i formally opened in Crookston yes- 
ttMday wlu-n tlie Commercial leaj^ue 
silii'd'ule for th^ sumnier was started 
Willi a tfanie between the Iledlands and 
MiliUii teams. the Company 1 boy-* 
v^;t ninff hi a clouting contest by a 
>. li) to 6. There was a crowd 

[I wliich taxed the capacity of 

and -Htand and bleachers, 
leajjue was reorganized by the 
■ i I J. H. Zealand as president 
''hestern»an as .-lecreiary- 
illd will incl'! '■■ I ■■'!'■ t.. .i,m; 
I. Hedlaiids. !" 

...!ri Sealri. 



th.' Si 
The 



SPORTS FOR 
THEWEEK 

Many Important Events 

Are To Take Place 

This Week. 



.ffi- 

-. A' 1 1 1 



Racing. Golf, Bowling. 

Boxing, Track Meets 

and Other Sports. 



RECORDS BROKEN 
AT GRAND FORKS 

Dakota School Boys Make 

Good Showing in 

Field Meet. 



NKCi.tl NEK KKKK.VTS THE 

tUA(KMi;.MSlN(iTEAM. 



Mich . May 24 - :al to 

t-^(Jn Sund'i. !ioon. 

lie most hotlv t. niteeted 

played at I'nlon p. irk, tho 

iity nine defeated the crack 

tf-am. the score being 3 to 2. 

' '- ' K .i.n up from 

.uii; l:iti m of the 

, .... ! -.,H> en- 



,\ . ' : 1 . 1 -s 1 1 ; 

Muni 

t •■' 

t; 



. \ r> 



, ,. . ad the 

Mi:;- •• SC U'e l>».'ltu? 14 to 

", ' : acU lislipeniins high 

s tm -Hufti-red a severe dffeat at 

is of thf MartiU'Hte highs, the 

Biaiiiei'd Dettats Aitkin. 

Aitkin. Minn.. May :i I. — (.Special to 
The H'rald >--Hralnerd defeated Alt- 
Kin i;; ! ' '>aj*eball thi.s 

,,. I., .,; a .score of 
ij f'.aun'- ' game were 
' ling of T of Brainerd. 
ui.j -suu^k out sixir-M men and al- 
lowed but foul hits, and tlie playing 
of Hu.th of Brainerd U short; mI.so the 
catclilng of i'arker :'or Hi iiin.-fd 
• 

Xeu ^i^^'Us HecoiHi. 

■ >rk. May 24.— Martin .1. .Sherl- 

Irish-.\n!eri<an Atliblic Cub 

!.•* thrower, sent 

irt from a seven- 

•t ':!ii.- .\thletic 

!;---v u-ijrld'.s 

. ., ; ; 'i-he 

' 1.:!:; r. ■■-■a:* 

..,■ i . .1 -ri. 



DULUTH BOY 
KIDNAPED 

Escapes From Captor Af- 
ter Spending Night 
in Box Car. 

Man Described By Boy 

Arrested By Ashland 

Police. 



WAIVKS i:X.\MlN.\TION. 



b 
m 
B 
I" 



t> 
(1 
ti 
Cli 

\K 
T> 
V- 
II 
I' 

P 

»■■■■ 

A 
1; 



SAFE BLOWN 
AT P^CTOR 

Robbers Make Good Haul 

in T. R. Hancock's 

Saloon. 



.VshluiKl. Wi.^.. May 21. — (Spe- * 

♦• t-ail to The IlLTHhl.) — .John Kyun. * 

^ thr nlk*!;v(l khIiiuiKT t»f (ionloii * 

■♦ Clayltni. whfii araii>iuxi In i;ourl * 

^it tills iiKiriiiiii;, wuivtMl exainination ^ 

* and was iMtuiul over to the grand * 

* Jury. It «uft brouj?tit «»ut at the * 

* hearing that llyan was prepar- * 

* in^ to lake olV tho boy's j?ood * 

* clothes and dlsjjui.se hlni when # 
^i^ tlie latter esi.a|>«"*i. Kyan will ^^^ 
^ prohal>ly plead i^uilty and be sent ^ 
^ to state pri.-ioii. * 

* * 

^k *f* 'T' ^ ^ ^ ^ "^ " 



• rk-i. 
1 '-y 



I, 113 



Believed That There Were 

Three Men in the 

Gang. 



MANY BETS ARE 
MADE ORALLY 

Brooklyn Prosecutor Will 

Test Law in Court 

of Appeals. 



Tlie 
It I'l 

1,,,,,, 

I. 

v. . . . . 
^•al u--' 
' • ! I , • -« t . 

l.ol.-t. 

!,.•■ : 

> 1 W i. 

It:.; 



«aff In T. II. Hancock's saloon 

wan blown open at an early 

rday morning. and the 

, ,i • Ml .-d $r',i) in catili. a gold 

.,i:;i.-.i ,it $r,'>. I silv.T watch 

ii |:"., Iff! I Mil*; ■.\'.tt;i 111). 

r ^■ii.Hi.k. cook J I ifie L'roctor 

I. It 1 til" "Kflosion and wlsen 

aysi he 
., .-.■ i,,.-i, I ,,i,i.,,.^ - '■■'■ N'lild- 

■ ..!.. ,■>.,,■ ,,f the htii; 'i! A was 
II y by the c\ plosion 
!i WHM lieard all cwer 
mirrors an 
. ■ 1) r-ik 



Kidnaped from his mother while on 
a vhslt with frlenda at Ashland, and 
forced to spend the night In a box car 
with his abductor. Ciordon, the 10-year- 
old son of Mr. and Mr.s. Fred O. Clay- 
ton of 2011 We.st Fi>sl street, slii>ped 
away from the kidnaper while the lat- 
ter slept, and was found by a search- 
ing party late yesterday morning. 

Jolm llyan, alias Jameji Thoma.s. who 
is under arrest and la being held by 
the Ashland authorities for the offense, 
v.-as described by the Clayton boy as 
the man who had spirited him away 
on Saturday night. The case against 
Jtyan will be taken up today, and It 
is understood that charges of a serious 
nature wHl be preferred by tiie district 
attorney at Ashland 

F. C. Clayton, the father of the boy, 
Is a railroad englnneer on the 
Nortliern Pacltic road, and makes 
a run between Duluth and A.shland. 
The boy and his mother were planning 
on spending most jt the summer with 
the W. L>. Kuhn family of 322 Front 
street. They went to Ashland about a 
week ago. 

The mile lad left the hou.se before 
dusk .Saturday night to meet his father, 
i.s was his usual custotn. Before ho 
had gone far, Ills story goes, he was 
slopped by a stranger, who. after talk- 
ln« with him for a little while, took 
his watch away from him. sold It and 
bought some liquor. 

The llijuor was lucked under the 
man's coat, according to the story told 
by the Clayton lad, and he was forced 
to go with the ftitranger down to tho 
(jmaha railroad yards. Most of the 
whisky the man drank himself, but he 
said Kyan had made him drink some 

The little boy spent the night, shiv- 
ering and cold, in iho box car. Ryan 
wa-s loo siuperte.l by the llftuor to be 
much concerned with his little prl.s- 
(uier. li:arly In the morning when his 
ciptor .slept (jord(»n escaped. He was 
at loss to know where to go, and wan- 
dered aimlessly abouU 

The senrchlng party ran across him 
on the Washburn road that passe.i 



good form «>;seti, shortstop lor the 
Adams team got a home run. 

West Eiid'cjiri Dies. 

Violet Cecilia Olson, the 7-year old 
.laughter of Mr. and Mrs. Emil Olsen 
of 2720 West Michigan street, died 
early yesterday morning at the home 
of h?r parents. Death was due to 
typhoid fever. 

The funeral of the child will be held 
tomorrow afternoon from the resi- 
dence, at 2 o'clock. Interment will be 
at Park Hill cemetery. Kev. C. G. Ol- 
sen. pastor of the Bethany Swedish 
Lutheran church, will officiate. 
■ 

Ready lor FestivaL 

A final dross rehearsal for the 
"Sater Fesl," the annual entertainment 
to be presented by the young people 
of the First Norwegian-E)anisli M. E. 
church, will be lield tonight. The af- 
fair will be held at the church to- 
row evening. 

A special feature of the entertain- 
ment will be the costumes. The decor- 
ations, the stage settings, and the 
linguage will .suggest. Norway. 

The progrnm will be varied and will 
consist tor the most part in dialogues 
and recitations in Norwegian. Old Norsk 
songs will be sung and a number of 
inslriitnental nutnbers are also on the 
program. 

West End Shortrails. 

William Anderson is In Minneapolis 
for a few days' visit. 

Miss Augusta Anderson of San Fran- 
cisco, Cal., is a guest at the home of 
Alderman Peter Olsen of 32:J3 West 
Tenth street. She is returning to her 
home, after a year in Europe. 

The Altar Oulhl of St. Luke's Episco- 
pal church will meet tomorrow even- 
ing at the vestry. 

Mr. and Mrs. Olaf Pearson have re- 
turned from Rochester, Mum., where 
Mrs. Pearson underwent a succcsstu. 
operation for appendicitis. Tiicy live 
at 2109 West First street. 

The Young Ladies' Society of the 
First Swedish Baptist church will 
meet next Fr:Jay evening at the home 
uf Mr.s. Charles F. Peterson, 610 
Fifty-ninth avenue west. The meet- 
ing is tlie regular monthlv se.ssion. 

The Ladies' Guild of St. Luke's Epis- 
copal church will meet Friday after- 
noon at the home of Mrs. H.)lloway. 
2731 West Fourth street. 

The cadets of St. Lukes i:i)is< opa ; 
church will nvet at the church 
Wednesday evening. 

Rev. C. G. Olsen, pastor of the Beth- 
any Swedisli Lutheran church returned 
today from Eau Claire, where he con- 
ducted servl.-es Sunday 



Can You 
Draw a Cow? 



Little Boys' taps 



In all the pretty shades and sliapes. 
at 25 cents and SO cents. C. W Krlo- 
son. the Clothier, 219 West Superior 
street. 




This Picture Won ist Prize. 

CASH PRIZES DAILY 

Children Under 12 Years of Age. 

1st Daily Prize $2.00 

2nd Daily Prize $1.00 

Grand Prize $10.00 

For Best Picture of all Receivctd During Contest. 



See particulars of contest and entry cou- 
pon elsewtiere in tliis paper. 



WAS A CASE 
OFJUICIDE 

Believed the Unidentified 

Dead Man Met Death 

By Own Hand. 



Note on Body 
Was Tired 
Life. 



Said He 
of 



WAS SHOT BY 
BARTENDER 

Row In St. Croix Avenue 

Saloon Has Serious 

Results. 



thrown by one of the men. Enraged at 
this, and to save himself from further 
injury, he says, Johnson reached behind 
the bar, seized his revolver and fired 
two shots, one of the bullets taking ef- 
fect In Hill's side. 

Frank Hill, one of the men who 
started the disturbance, was taken to 
the police station with Jolmson. 

Johnson will have a h^^aring in police 
court May 31. Ball lias been fixed at 
tl.OOO. Frank Hill, charged with dis- 
orderly conduct, pleaded not guilty in 
court this morning, and his hearing 
was set for this afternoon. 



John Johnson Fires His 

Revolver at John 

HilL 



"I am tired of life." 

This is the substance of a note found 
in the clothing of the unidentified 
man, who was found dead, last .Satur- 
day at Thirty-first avenue east, about 



morning. The boy was tlied, he satd, 
I lieard all over j , _J ,j.,j ^j^p^ ^„y during the night, 
ind windows of ^ ^^j, ^^^ police what his strange 
^m Ihe ■■'»■•*'» L.ntr.panion looked like and the desorlp- 

the all-y. •'»• ,i,„/i;ivi-n l-d to the .irrr-st of Ryan 
th the nitro- •''",..?.: ,.o.. Ha «'na found loafing 



IM,' 'l).,\ 



lis.) 



In lil«jv\ 
rountl. 



' ' w u 1 

they 



know the 



■:. I •;.• -afr> 

I v.- li.-t-ll s*^\ - 

s s»"oi hang- 
and they be- 
nii'ii who are 



I'T if r.f '■>k:vri, 

"■ ■■■■■■ ■ 'Y 

>f 

' ' ■ I -:i >i itie r':i- 

n found 
ill who 

I t 1 f 

I bay 

■ ied 

il 



fill K-. I.I 



BIG TOURNAMENT 
OPENS IN GOTHAM 

Bowlers Gather for An- 
nual Meet in Old 
New York- 



ir 

■itr 



-, ; : 1 ■ 1 • I 



i 1 1 fin i " • 

■ <e scale, 
• kmaker.i». 

- VA'Ith •■1- 



■lU 

>r 



f Saiurdiv nights robbery. 

SAYS HE CANNOT 
SUPPORT WIFE 

John Johnson Financial- 
ly Unable To Comply 
With Court's Order. 

i,,i;-. filed afridavlts In 

li.,; ; . , ' .show that he la 

M.-iill>- 'ill ii.|.' I 1 ..imply with any 

•r of the court directing liini to pay 

•.e!!'-'-i ! ' ' iriu'V's fees uid [»ro% ide 

i ir'tiTi; '..•■ pending of 

• has C'lmmenced. 

h H wife left htm In 

, ed with another 

I me back once or 

I ; ' t that since No- 

hntiii' I ' I 

.• dis'-'uraged 

.:k He was 

; ■. hut says It 

, iport him and 

. ,, ,i ., , i, . .IS' now to pay his 

i.>rney's fee.s. 

,.,. defendant claims that his wife 

is well able to take care of herself. 

T'e riitildnt charges habitual drunk- 

lel treatment on the part 
The case has Iwen con- 

,11 '1.-, J I'i'l I wo W«'>I\ ^. 

IKHKL AM) MKAT MARKET 
i AT BAinKTTK BIRNKD. 



rimeaton's mill about a .mile and a ^\^'^ | .joo feet south of .Superior street. The 
,ut of town about i.) '> clo..k,yesterda> | ^^^^^^^,^^_ ^ ^,^^ ^^^ committed sul- 

cide. 

The words were written in German, 
probably Indicating the nationality of 
the dead man. The remains are being 
held at Flood & Horgan's undert